1. Application details Permit application No



Yüklə 142.82 Kb.
PDF просмотр
tarix30.08.2017
ölçüsü142.82 Kb.

Page 1  

  

 

Clearing Permit Decision Report  

 

1.  Application details  



 

1.1.  Permit application details 

Permit application No.: 

4330/1 


Permit type: 

Purpose Permit 



1.2.  Proponent details 

Proponent’s name: 

Western Areas NL 

1.3.  Property details 

Property: 

Mining Lease 77/582 



 

Mining Lease 77/911 



Local Government Area: 

Kondinin 



Colloquial name: 

Forrestania Nickel Project 



1.4.  Application 

Clearing Area (ha) 

No. Trees 

Method of Clearing 

For the purpose of: 

9.01 


 

Mechanical Removal 

Mineral Production and Mineral Exploration 

1.5.  Decision on application 

Decision on Permit Application: 

Grant 


Decision Date: 

16 June 2011 



2.  Site Information 

2.1.  Existing environment and information 

2.1.1. Description of the native vegetation under application 

Vegetation Description 

Beard vegetation associations have been mapped at a 1:250,000 scale for the whole of Western 

Australia. Two Beard vegetation associations have been mapped within the application area (GIS 

Database; Shepherd 2009): 

 

511: Medium woodland; salmon gum & morel; and 



2048: Shrublands; scrub-heath in the Mallee Region. 

 

The application area was surveyed by staff from Botanica Consulting (2007) on 29 and 30 October 



2006. The following vegetation types were identified within the application area: 

 

1b: Tall Open Allocasuarina corniculata Scrub developed on sandy flats; 



 

1c: Drainage Line Community- Closed heath of Melaleuca uncinata and sparse Allocasuarina 



corniculata over a Low Open Shrubland dominated by Myrtaceous and Protaceous species in broad 

sandy drainage channels; 

 

2a: Low Open Woodland of Eucalyptus pileata and Eucalyptus eremophila subsp. eremophila over 



Shrub Mallees including Eucalyptus pileata, Eucalyptus ereomphila subsp. eremophila, Eucalyptus 

olivine and intermittently Eucalyptus sporadic, Eucalyptus incrassate and Eucalyptus scyphocalyx

 

2b: Very Open Shrub Mallees of Eucalyptus olivine and Eucalyptus sporadicai and tall iGrevillea 



baxteri and Grevillea eriostachya shrubs over a Closed Low Myrtaceous and Proteaceous Heath 

and sedges developed on sandy flats with ironstone nodules; 

 

2c: Very Open Shrub Mallees of Eucalyptus olivine and Eucalyptus pileata and Open Shrubland of 



Allocasuarina corniculata, Callitris tuberculata, Melaleuca uncinata and Leptospermum spp. over an 

Open Myrtaceous and Proteaceous Heath over sedges developed on sandy flats with ironstone 

nodules; 

 

3a: Catchment Community. Low Open Woodland and Mallee mosaic of Eucalyptus flocktoniae, 



Eucalyptus transcontinentalis, Eucalyptus pileata and Eucalyptus eremophila subsp. eremophila 

over a Closed Heath of Melaleuca pentagona, Melaleuca adnata, Melaleuca teuthidoides, Melaleuca 



sparsiflora and Melaleuca lateriflora developed on clays flanking drainage line; 

 

3b: Catchment Community. Open Woodland and Mallee mosaic of Eucalyptus transcontinentalis 



over Open Shrub Mallees of Eucalyptus transcontinentalis and Eucalyptus eremophila subsp. 

eremophila over Tall Open Scrub of Melaleuca johnsoniiMelaleuca adnata and Melaleuca laterifolia 

Page 2  

developed on clays flanking the drainage line; 

 

3c: Drainage Line Community. Woodland of Eucalytputs transcontinentalis Eucalyptus incerata over 



Eucalyptus pileata Open Shrub Mallees over Tall Open Melaleuca johnsonii, Melaleuca adnata and 

Melaleuca teuthidoides Scrub developed on seasonally inundated clay along a poorly defined 

drainage line; 

 

3d: Drainage Line Community. Low Open Woodland of Eucalyptus flocktoniae over Eucalyptus 



eremophila subsp. eremophila over a Closed Tall Melaleuca acuminata, Melaleuca adnata and 

Callistemon phoeniceus developed on hard brown cracking clays along drainage channel; and 

 

4a: Low Woodland of Melaleuca strobophylla developed on seasonally inundated clay in 



depressions. 

 

Clearing Description 

Western Areas NL has applied to clear up to 9.01 hectares of native vegetation within a boundary of 

87.3 hectares for the purpose of mineral exploration and mineral production. 

 

Where possible, progressive rehabilitation will be undertaken around the site on recently disturbed 



areas using topsoil and vegetative material where possible. 

 

Vegetation Condition 

Excellent: Vegetation structure intact; disturbance affecting individual species, weeds non-

aggressive (Keighery, 1994). 

 

Comment 

The application area is located in the Mallee and Coolgardie regions of Western Australia and is 

situated approximately 78 kilometres east of Hyden (GIS Database). 

 

Clearing permit CPS 691/2 was previously granted over the application area for the purpose of 



clearing 23 hectares of native vegetation for mineral production. CPS 691/2 expired on 9 March 

2011 and clearing permit application CPS 4330/1 was lodged to clear the remaining 9.01 hectares of 

native vegetation that wasn’t cleared under CPS 691/2 (Western Areas NL, 2011). 

 

3.  Assessment of application against clearing principles 



(a)  Native vegetation should not be cleared if it comprises a high level of biological diversity. 

Comments 

Proposal is not likely to be at variance to this Principle 

 

 

The application area occurs within the Western Mallee (MAL2) subregion of the Mallee Interim Biogeographic 

Regionalisation for Australia (IBRA) bioregion and the Southern Cross (COO2) subregion of the Coolgardie 

IBRA bioregion (GIS Database). The Southern Cross subregion is characterised by subdued relief, comprised 

of gently undulating uplands dissected by broad valleys with bands of low greenstone hills (CALM, 2002). The 

drainage of the Southern Cross subregion is occluded (CALM, 2002). The Western Mallee subregion is 

characterised by clays and silts underlain by Kankar, exposed granite, sandplains and laterite pavements. Salt 

lake systems occur on a granite basement, with occluded drainage systems (CALM, 2002). Mallee 

communities can be found on a variety of surfaces while Eucalyptus woodlands occur mainly on fine-textured 

soils, with scrub heath on sands and laterite (CALM, 2002). 

 

The application area occurs within an Environmentally Sensitive Area (Register of National Estate), which is 



the Lake Cronin Area (GIS Database). The Lake Cronin Area is listed on the Register of National Estate for its 

high level of floral and faunal diversity and endemism. According to the Australian Heritage Database (2011), 

16 fauna species that are endemic to either the south-west region or to Western Australia occur within the Lake 

Cronin area. The Lake Cronin area is also described as being an important refuge for rare species due to 

widespread clearing in the wheatbelt to the west. Rare species include fauna such as the Malleefowl (Leipoa 

ocellata) and flora such as Eucalyptus steedmanii

 

A flora and vegetation survey was initially conducted over the application area in February and March 2004 by 



staff from Frost O’Connor and Associates (2004) and further surveys were conducted in June 2007 by Botanica 

Consulting (2007). The survey by Frost O’Connor and Associates (2004) identified 219 plant taxa from 91 

genera and 39 families within the application area and the immediately adjacent areas. According to the 

biodiversity study of Western Australia by CALM (2002), eucalypt woodlands in the Western Mallee  subregion 

are known for having high biodiversity. Over 685 species of acacias and eucalypts alone are known to occur in 

these woodlands (CALM, 2002). It is therefore considered unlikely that the application area contains greater 

biodiversity than other eucalypt woodlands within the Western Mallee subregion. 

 

A total of seven Priority Flora species were recorded within the application area during the two flora and 



vegetation surveys (Botanica Consulting, 2007; Frost O’Connor and Associates, 2004): 

 

Boronia westringioides (P2): Approximately 2-20 individuals within application area. Restricted to Forrestania; 



Comesperma calcicola (P3): Approximately 1-10 individuals within application area; 

Cryptandra polyclada subsp. polyclada (P3): Approximately 5-50 individuals within application area. Species 

is abundant in areas adjacent to the application area; 

Daviesia elongate subsp. implexa (P3): Approximately 1-10 individuals within application area; 

Pityrodia sp. Yilgarn (P3): 1 individual recorded within the application area; 


Page 3  

Pultenaea adunca (P3): According to Florabase this species is known from a wide distribution (Western 

Australian Herbarium, 2011). It is therefore considered unlikely that the proposed clearing will significantly 

impact the conservation of this species; 

Grevillea baxteri (P4): Approximately 6-60 individuals within application area. This population is an extension 

of the previously known range for this species. However, there are numerous populations east south east of 

the application area (Frost O’Connor and Associates, 2004). 

 

Western Areas NL have committed to avoiding all Priority Flora species within the application area, however, if 



the clearing of Priority Flora is unavoidable, Western Areas NL will liaise with the Department of Environment 

and Conservation prior to the removal of these species. 

 

According to available GIS Databases the application area is within the buffer zone for one Priority 3 Ecological 



Community (PEC), Ironcap Hills Vegetation Complexes (GIS Database). Mining is listed as a main threat to this 

PEC (EPA, 2009). The vegetation within the application area does not comprise the landforms or the 

vegetation associated with this PEC and given the previous disturbance within the application area, the 

proposed clearing is considered unlikely to impact on its values. 

 

Biota Environmental Sciences (2006) conducted an initial fauna survey of the application area in February, 



March and November 2005. A further survey of the application area was conducted in May and November 

2006 (Biota Environmental Sciences, 2007). As a result of these fauna surveys, a total of 126 vertebrate 

species comprised of 71 bird species, 16 native mammal species, four introduced mammal species and 35 

herpetofauna species. It is likely that there will be loss of individuals due to the proposed clearing, however, it is 

considered unlikely that this will affect the conservation status of any of the species recorded within the 

application area (Biota Environmental Sciences, 2006) 

 

Based on the above, the proposed clearing is not likely to be at variance to this Principle. 



 

Methodology 

Australian Heritage Database (2011) 

Biota Environmental Sciences (2006) 

Biota Environmental Sciences (2007) 

Botanica Consulting (2007) 

CALM (2002) 

EPA (2009) 

Frost O’Connor and Associates (2004) 

Western Australian Herbarium (2011) 

GIS Database: 

- IBRA WA (regions – subregions) 

- Register of National Estate 

 

(b)  Native vegetation should not be cleared if it comprises the whole or a part of, or is necessary for the 

maintenance of, a significant habitat for fauna indigenous to Western Australia. 

Comments 

Proposal may be at variance to this Principle 

 

 

A two phase fauna survey of the application area was undertaken by Biota Environmental Sciences (2006) with 

Phase I conducted in February/March 2005 and Phase II conducted in November 2005. Additional Phase III 

and Phase IV surveys were undertaken by Biota Environmental Sciences (2007) in May and November 2006 

respectively. From these field surveys, the following five Scheduled fauna species have been identified within 

the application area and its adjacent surrounds: 

 

Calyptorhynchus lastirostris (Short-billed (Carnaby’s) Black-Cockatoo) – Endangered and Schedule 1. This 

species was observed within the application area, however, suitable breeding habitat of large Eucalyptus 



solmonophloia is not present within the application area; 

Dasyurus geoffroii (Western Quoll (Chuditch)) – Vulnerable and Schedule 1. Three individuals recorded within 

the application area. The full extent of the Chuditch population cannot be quantified. However, given this 

population’s isolation from other populations in the states south west, the vegetation within the application area 

may be significant habitat for this species. Given that this species utilises a large range of habitats including 

woodland associations and dry sclerophyll forests, it is probable that this species would utilise all habitats 

within the application area (DEC, 2006; Biota Environmental Sciences, 2007). The implementation of a fauna 

management condition to salvage Chuditch hollows from the application area prior to clearing, and relocate to 

nearby habitat may reduce any potential impact to the conservation of this species; 



Leipoa ocellata (Malleefowl) – Vulnerable and Schedule 1. Not recorded during survey. A recently active 

mound near Flying Fox water disposal pipeline was recorded in 2006 (Biota Environmental Sciences, 2007). 

Biota Environmental Sciences (2006) suggest that Malleefowl is probably present in most habitats within the 

application area. The implementation of a condition to avoid Malleefowl mounds may avoid potential impacts to 

the conservation of this species; 

Platycercus icterotis xanthogenys (Western Rosella) – Schedule 1. Nine individuals have been recorded within 

the application area. It is considered likely that this locality supports a large population of this species and given 

the small scale of the clearing it is considered unlikely that conservation of this species will be impacted (Biota 

Environmental Sciences, 2007); 



Falco peregrines (Peregrine Falcon) – Schedule 4. Recorded once within the application area. There is 

potential for some loss of nesting and foraging habitat however, given the mobility of the species the 

conservation status is unlikely to be affected; 


Page 4  

 

An additional six Priority 4 fauna species (Carpet Python, Shy Groundwren, Rufous Fieldwren, Crested 



Bellbird, White-browed Babbler and the Western Brush Wallaby) were recorded within the application area 

during these four surveys (Biota Environmental Sciences, 2006; Biota Environmental Sciences, 2007). A 

further three Priority 4 species were identified in a desktop survey as being likely to occur within the application 

area (Biota Environmental Sciences, 2006; Biota Environmental Sciences, 2007). According to Biota 

Environmental Sciences (2006; 2007), given that these species are either widespread, highly mobile or 

occurring in low numbers within the application area, it is unlikely that the proposed clearing will impact on the 

conservation of any of these Priority 4 fauna species. 

 

Based on the above, the proposed clearing may be at variance to this Principle. 



 

Methodology 

Biota Environmental Sciences (2006) 

Biota Environmental Sciences (2007) 

DEC (2006) 

DEC (2011) 

 

(c)  Native vegetation should not be cleared if it includes, or is necessary for the continued existence of, 



rare flora. 

Comments 

Proposal is not likely to be at variance to this Principle 

 

 

According to available GIS Databases, there are no known records of Declared Rare Flora (DRF) within the 

application area (GIS Database). 

 

No DRF taxa were recorded during vegetation surveys conducted in June 2007 by Botanica Consulting (2007) 



or in November 2003 by Frost O’Connor & Associates (2004). 

 

Based on the above, the proposed clearing is not likely to be at variance to this Principle. 



 

Methodology 

Botanica Consulting (2007) 

Frost O’Connor & Associates (2004) 

GIS Database: 

- Declared Rare and Priority Flora List 

 

(d)  Native vegetation should not be cleared if it comprises the whole or a part of, or is necessary for the 



maintenance of a threatened ecological community. 

Comments 

Proposal is not likely to be at variance to this Principle 

 

 

According to available GIS Databases, there are no known records of Threatened Ecological Communities 

(TECs) within the application area (GIS Database). The nearest known TEC is located approximately 125 

kilometres south-west of the application area (GIS Database). At this distance, there is little likelihood of any 

impact to the TEC as a result of the proposed clearing. 

 

Based on the above, the proposed clearing is not likely to be at variance to this Principle. 



 

Methodology 

GIS Database: 

- Threatened Ecological Sites Buffered 

 

(e)  Native vegetation should not be cleared if it is significant as a remnant of native vegetation in an area 



that has been extensively cleared. 

Comments 

Proposal is not at variance to this Principle 

 

 

The application area falls within the Coolgardie and the Mallee Interim Boigeographic Regionalisation for 

Australia (IBRA) bioregions (GIS Database). Shepherd (2009) reports that approximately 98.42% and 55.65% 

of the pre-European vegetation is still present within these bioregions respectively. In addition, there is 

approximately 35.48% of the vegetation remaining within the Western Mallee IBRA subregion, of which 24.08% 

remains in conservation estates. There is approximately 52.53% of vegetation remaining within the Shire of 

Kondinin (Shepherd, 2009). 

 

The vegetation in the application area is broadly mapped as Beard vegetation associations: 



 

511: Medium woodland; salmon gum & morel; and 

2048: Shrublands; scrub-heath in the Mallee Region. 

 

According to Shepherd (2009) approximately 48.62% of Beard vegetation association 2048 remains within the 



Mallee bioregion and approximately 48.62% of Beard vegetation association remains within the Western 

Mallee subregion (see table on next page). 

 


Page 5  

 

* Shepherd (2009)  



** Department of Natural Resources and Environment (2002) 

 

Based on the above, the proposed clearing is not at variance to this Principle. 



 

 

Pre-European 



area (ha)* 

Current extent 

(ha)* 

Remaining 



%* 

Conservation 

Status** 

Pre-European 

% in IUCN 

Class I-IV 

Reserves (and 

post clearing %) 

IBRA Bioregion 

- Coolgardie 

12,912,204 

12,707,873 

~98.42 

Least 


Concern 

~10.87 


(~11.04) 

IBRA Subregion 

 - Southern Cross 

6,010,833 

5,808,059 

~96.63 


Least 

Concern 


~16.25 

(~16.81) 

IBRA Bioregion 

- Mallee 

7,395,897 

4,115,655 

~55.65 

Least 


Concern 

~17.98 


(~30.70) 

IBRA Subregion 

- Western Mallee 

3,981,718 

1,412,907 

~35.48 


Depleted 

~9.96 


(~24.08) 

Local Government 

- Kondinin 

741,930 


389,733 

~52.53 


Least 

Concern 


~3.81 

(~6.14) 


Beard vegetation associations 

- State 


511 

700,410 


499,600 

~71.33 


Least 

Concern 


~14.13 (~18.73) 

2048 


322,220 

158,540 


~49.2 

Depleted 

~7.61 (~15.00) 

Beard vegetation associations 

- Bioregion (Mallee) 

2048 


313,728 

152,545 


~48.62 

Depleted 

~7.75 (~15.48) 

Beard vegetation associations 

- Bioregion (Coolgardie) 

511 


464,424 

435,794 


~93.84 

Least 


Concern 

~17.48 (~18.62) 

2048 

4,379 


4,379 

~100 


Least 

Concern 


~3.52 (~3.52) 

Beard vegetation associations 

- subregion (Western Mallee) 

2048 


313,693 

152,510 


~48.62 

Depleted 

~7.75 (~15.48) 

Methodology 

Department of Natural Resources and Environment (2002) 

Shepherd (2009) 

GIS Database 

- Pre-European Vegetation 

- IBRA WA (regions - subregions) 

 

 

(f)  Native vegetation should not be cleared if it is growing in, or in association with, an environment 



associated with a watercourse or wetland. 

Comments 

Proposal is not at variance to this Principle 

 

 

There are no watercourses or wetlands within the application area (GIS Database). A vegetation survey 

conducted by staff from Botanica Consulting (2007) did not identify any vegetation growing in or in association 

with a watercourse. 

 

Based on the above, the proposed clearing is not at variance to this Principle. 



 

Methodology 

GIS Database: 

- Hydrography, linear 

 

(g)  Native vegetation should not be cleared if the clearing of the vegetation is likely to cause appreciable 



land degradation. 

Comments 

Proposal is not likely to be at variance to this Principle 

 

 

There is one soil type, Ms8, mapped within the application area containing two sub-types (GIS Database): 

 

   i.  on rolling to undulating terrain, brown and grey cracking clays 



  ii.  on rolling areas, similar shallow soils, with a complex association of soils often containing some 

Page 6  

 

ironstone gravels. 



 

According to Western Areas NL (2011), the western and southern sections of the project area are located on 

high ground developed on cream to light yellow sands of variable depths over lateritic soils; and broad shallow 

valley in the north east section is developed over brown clay loams. 

 

The application area is located adjacent to existing mining operations. It is unlikely that the proposed clearing 



of 9.01 hectares will cause further land degradation to the local area. 

 

Based on the above, the proposed clearing is not likely to be at variance to this Principle. 



 

Methodology 

Western Areas NL (2011) 

GIS Database: 

- Soils, Statewide 

 

(h)  Native vegetation should not be cleared if the clearing of the vegetation is likely to have an impact on 

the environmental values of any adjacent or nearby conservation area. 

Comments 

Proposal may be at variance to this Principle 

 

 

The application area occurs within an Environmentally Sensitive Area (Register of National Estate), which is 

the Lake Cronin Area (GIS Database). At its closest point, the application area is approximately 6.7 kilometres 

west, south-west from Lake Cronin and 3.6 kilometres west of the Lake Cronin Nature Reserve boundary (GIS 

Database).   

 

According to the Australian Heritage Database (2011) the Lake Cronin Area is one of a number of areas in the 



south-west which has provided excellent conditions for the persistence of a range of primitive and relict 

species. At over 31,000 hectares, the Lake Cronin Area is a significant area in maintaining existing processes 

at a regional scale and therefore is potentially important contemporary refugia for many species (Australian 

Heritage Database, 2011). 

 

The Lake Cronin Area is dominated by mallee and woodland associations (Australian Heritage Database, 



2011). According to vegetation mapping conducted by Frost O’Connor and Associates (2004), the application 

area is dominated by mallee and woodland associations. As this vegetation type is well represented within the 

Lake Cronin Area it is unlikely that the proposed clearing of up to 9.01 hectares of native vegetation within a 

broader area of 87.3 hectares, approximately 3.6 kilometres from the nature reserve at the closest point will not 

significantly affect ecological linkages to the reserve. 

 

Based on the above the proposed clearing may be at variance to this Principle. 



 

Methodology 

Ausrtalian Heritage Database (2011) 

Frost O’Connor and Associates (2004) 

GIS Database: 

- DEC Tenure 

- Register of National Estate 

 

(i)  Native vegetation should not be cleared if the clearing of the vegetation is likely to cause deterioration 

in the quality of surface or underground water. 

Comments 

Proposal is not likely to be at variance to this Principle 

 

 

According to available databases, the application area is not located within a Public Drinking Water Source 

Area (PDWSA) (GIS Database).  

 

The groundwater salinity within the application area is approximately 14,000 - 35,000 milligrams/Litre Total 



Dissolved Solids (TDS) (GIS Database). This is considered to be hyper saline. Given the size of the area to be 

cleared (9.01 hectares) compared to the size of the Yilgarn-Southwest Groundwater Province (24,601,260 

hectares) (GIS Database), the proposed clearing is not likely to cause salinity levels within the application area 

to alter significantly. 

 

The application area is located within a semi arid, warm Mediterranean environment with an average annual 



rainfall of 338.6 millimetres recorded from the nearest weather station at Hyden approximately 78 kilometres 

west of the application area (BoM, 2011; CALM, 2002). The small size of the proposed clearing area within the 

above climate is unlikely to result in significant changes to surface water flows. 

 

There are no known groundwater dependent ecosystems within the application area (GIS Database).  



 

Based on the above, the proposed clearing is not likely to be at variance to this Principle. 

 

Methodology 

BoM (2011) 

CALM (2002) 

GIS Database 

- Groundwater Provinces 

- Groundwater Salinity, Statewide 



Page 7  

- Potential Groundwater Dependent Ecosystems 

- Public Drinking Water Source Areas (PDWSA’s) 

 

(j)  Native vegetation should not be cleared if clearing the vegetation is likely to cause, or exacerbate, the 



incidence or intensity of flooding. 

Comments 

Proposal is not likely to be at variance to this Principle. 

 

 

The application area is located within a semi arid, warm Mediterranean environment with an average annual 

rainfall of 338.6 millimetres recorded from the nearest weather station at Hyden approximately 78 kilometres 

west of the application area (BoM, 2011; CALM, 2002). Rainfall is usually experienced in during winter months 

and it is likely that during these times of intense rainfall there may be some localised flooding in adjacent areas 

(CALM, 2002). However, annual evaporation rates are approximately 2,200 millimetres, therefore there is little 

surface water flow during normal seasonal rains (GIS Database; Western Areas NL, 2011). 

 

Based on the above, the proposed clearing is not likely to be at variance to this Principle. 



 

Methodology 

BoM (2011) 

CALM (2002) 

Western Areas NL (2011) 

GIS Database: 

- Evaporation Isopleths 

 

Planning instrument, Native Title, Previous EPA decision or other matter. 

Comments 

              



 

There are two Native Title Claims (WC 03/6 and WC 00/7) over the area under application (GIS Database).  

These claims have been registered with the National Native Title Tribunal on behalf of the claimant group. 

However, the mining tenure has been granted in accordance with the future act regime of the Native Title Act 



1993 and the nature of the act (i.e. the proposed clearing activity) has been provided for in that process, 

therefore the granting of a clearing permit is not a future act under the Native Title Act 1993

 

There are no registered Aboriginal Sites of Significance within the application area (GIS Database). It is the 



proponent’s responsibility to comply with the Aboriginal Heritage Act 1972 and ensure that no Aboriginal Sites 

of Significance are damaged through the clearing process. 

 

It is the proponent's responsibility to liaise with the Department of Environment and Conservation and the 



Department of Water, to determine whether a Works Approval, Water Licence, Bed and Banks Permit, or any 

other licences or approvals are required for the proposed works. 

 

The clearing permit application was advertised on 9 May 2011 by the Department of Mines and Petroleum 



inviting submissions from the public. No submissions were received in relation to the proposed clearing. 

 

 

Methodology 

GIS Database: 

- Aboriginal Sites of Significance 

- Native Title Claims – Filed at the Federal Court 

- Native Title Claims – Registered with the NNTT 



 

4.  References 

Australian Heritage Database (2011) Register of National Estate: Lake Cronin Area.  http://www.environment.gov.au 

(Accessed 30 May 2011) 

Biota Environmental Sciences (2006) Fauna and Faunal Assemblages Report. Prepared for Western Areas NL. North Perth, 

Western Australia. 

Biota Environmental Sciences (2007) Forrestania Fauna monitoring Survey - Flying Fox Phases III and IV. Prepared for 

Western Areas NL. North Perth, Western Australia. 

BoM (2011) Bureau of Meteorology Website - Climate Averages by Number, Averages for HYDEN. 

http://www.bom.gov.au/climate/averages/tables/cw_010568.shtml (Accessed 19 May 2011) 

Botanica Consulting (2007) Vegetation Survey of a Proposed Extension to the current Clearing Permit Number 691/1 within the 

Tenements M77/582 and M77/911. Prepared by Jim's Seeds, Weeds & Trees Pty Ltd for Western Areas NL. 

Boulder, Western Australia. 

DEC (2007 - ) NatureMap: Mapping Western Australia's Biodiversity. Department of Environment and Conservation. URL: 

http://naturemap.dec.wa.gov.au/. Accessed xx/xx/xxxx 

Department of Conservation and Land Management (2002) A Biodiversity Audit of Western Australia's 53 Biogeographical 

Subregions. 

Department of Natural Resources and Environment (2002) Biodiversity Action Planning. Action planning for native biodiversity 

at multiple scales; catchment bioregional, landscape, local. Department of Natural Resources and Environment, 

Victoria. 

EPA (2009) Advice on Conservation Values and Review of Nature Reserve Proposals in the Lake Cronin Region. Advice of the 

Environmental Protection Authority to the Minister for Environment under Section 16(e) of the Environmental 


Page 8  

Protection Act 1986. 

Frost O'Connor & Associates (2004) Flora and Vegetation Studies Flying Fox Forrestania Nickel Project. Prepared for Western 

Areas NL, Western Australia. 

Keighery, B.J. (1994) Bushland Plant Survey: A Guide to Plant Community Survey for the Community. Wildflower Society of 

WA (Inc). Nedlands, Western Australia.  

Shepherd, D.P. (2009) Adapted from: Shepherd, D.P., Beeston, G.R., and Hopkins, A.J.M. (2001), Native Vegetation in 

Western Australia. Technical Report 249.  Department of Agriculture Western Australia, South Perth.  

Western Areas NL (2011) Supporting Document for Clearing Permit (Purpose) Application, Mining Tenements M77/582 & 

M77/911. West Perth, Western Australia. 

 

5.  Glossary 

 

  Acronyms: 



 

BoM

 

Bureau of Meteorology, Australian Government



 

CALM

 

Department of Conservation and Land Management (now DEC), Western Australia



 

DAFWA

 

Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia



 

DEC 

Department of Environment and Conservation, Western Australia 



DEH 

Department of Environment and Heritage (federal based in Canberra) previously Environment Australia 



DEP

 

Department of Environment Protection (now DEC), Western Australia



 

DIA 

Department of Indigenous Affairs 



DLI

 

Department of Land Information, Western Australia 



DMP 

Department of Mines and Petroleum, Western Australia 



DoE

 

Department of Environment (now DEC), Western Australia



 

DoIR

 

Department of Industry and Resources (now DMP), Western Australia



 

DOLA

 

Department of Land Administration, Western Australia



 

DoW 

Department of Water 



EP Act

 

Environmental Protection Act 1986, Western Australia



 

EPBC Act 

Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (Federal Act) 



GIS

 

Geographical Information System 



ha 

Hectare (10,000 square metres) 



IBRA

 

Interim Biogeographic Regionalisation for Australia



 

IUCN 

International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources – commonly known as the World 

Conservation Union 

RIWI Act

 

Rights in Water and Irrigation Act 1914, Western Australia



 

s.17 

Section 17 of the Environment Protection Act 1986, Western Australia 



TEC

 

Threatened Ecological Community



 

 

   



Definitions: 

 

{Atkins, K (2005). Declared rare and priority flora list for Western Australia, 22 February 2005. Department of Conservation and 

Land Management, Como, Western Australia} :-

 

 



P1 

Priority  One  -  Poorly  Known  taxa:  taxa  which  are  known  from  one  or  a  few  (generally  <5)  populations 

which are under threat, either due to small population size, or being on lands under immediate threat, e.g. 

road  verges,  urban  areas,  farmland,  active  mineral  leases,  etc.,  or  the  plants  are  under  threat,  e.g.  from 

disease,  grazing  by  feral  animals,  etc.  May  include  taxa  with  threatened  populations  on  protected  lands. 

Such taxa are under consideration for declaration as ‘rare flora’, but are in urgent need of further survey. 

 

P2 

Priority Two - Poorly Known taxa: taxa which are known from one or a few (generally <5) populations, at 

least some of which are not believed to be under immediate threat (i.e. not currently endangered). Such taxa 

are under consideration for declaration as ‘rare flora’, but are in urgent need of further survey. 

 

P3 

Priority Three - Poorly Known taxa: taxa which are known from several populations, at least some of which 

are  not  believed  to  be  under  immediate  threat  (i.e.  not  currently  endangered).  Such  taxa  are  under 

consideration for declaration as ‘rare flora’, but are in need of further survey. 

 

P4 

Priority Four – Rare taxa: taxa which are considered to have been adequately surveyed and which, whilst 

being  rare  (in  Australia),  are  not  currently  threatened  by  any  identifiable  factors.  These  taxa  require 

monitoring every 5–10 years. 

 



Declared Rare Flora – Extant taxa (= Threatened Flora = Endangered + Vulnerable): taxa which have been 

adequately searched for, and are deemed to be in the wild either rare, in danger of extinction, or otherwise in 

need  of  special  protection,  and  have  been  gazetted  as  such,  following  approval  by  the  Minister  for  the 

Environment, after recommendation by the State’s Endangered Flora Consultative Committee. 



 



Declared Rare Flora - Presumed Extinct taxa: taxa which have not been collected, or otherwise verified, 

over  the  past  50  years  despite  thorough  searching,  or  of  which  all  known  wild  populations  have  been 

destroyed  more  recently,  and  have  been  gazetted  as  such,  following  approval  by  the  Minister  for  the 

Environment, after recommendation by the State’s Endangered Flora Consultative Committee.  



 

          

 


Page 9  

{Wildlife Conservation (Specially Protected Fauna) Notice 2005} [Wildlife Conservation Act 1950] :- 

 

Schedule 1 



 

Schedule 1 – Fauna that is rare or likely to become extinct: being fauna that is rare or likely to become 

extinct, are declared to be fauna that is need of special protection. 



 

Schedule 2      Schedule  2  –  Fauna  that  is  presumed  to  be  extinct:  being  fauna  that  is  presumed  to  be  extinct,  are 

declared to be fauna that is need of special protection. 



 

Schedule 3   

 

Schedule  3  –  Birds  protected  under  an  international  agreement:  being  birds  that  are  subject  to  an 

agreement between the governments of Australia and Japan relating to the protection of migratory birds and 

birds in danger of extinction, are declared to be fauna that is need of special protection. 

 

 

 

Schedule 4   

 

Schedule 4 – Other specially protected fauna: being fauna that is declared to be fauna that is in need of 

special protection, otherwise than for the reasons mentioned in Schedules 1, 2 or 3. 



 

 

{CALM (2005). Priority Codes for Fauna. Department of Conservation and Land Management, Como, Western Australia} :-

 

 

P1 

Priority  One:  Taxa  with  few,  poorly  known  populations  on  threatened  lands:  Taxa  which  are  known 

from few specimens or sight records from one or a few localities on lands not managed for conservation, e.g. 

agricultural  or  pastoral  lands,  urban  areas,  active  mineral  leases.    The  taxon  needs  urgent  survey  and 

evaluation of conservation status before consideration can be given to declaration as threatened fauna. 



 

P2 

Priority Two: Taxa with few, poorly known populations on conservation lands: Taxa which are known 

from  few  specimens  or  sight  records  from  one  or  a  few  localities  on  lands  not  under  immediate  threat  of 

habitat  destruction  or  degradation,  e.g.  national  parks,  conservation  parks,  nature  reserves,  State  forest, 

vacant  Crown  land,  water  reserves,  etc.    The  taxon  needs  urgent  survey  and  evaluation  of  conservation 

status before consideration can be given to declaration as threatened fauna. 

 

P3 

Priority Three: Taxa with several, poorly known populations, some on conservation lands: Taxa which 

are known from few specimens or sight records from several localities, some of which are on lands not under 

immediate  threat  of  habitat  destruction  or  degradation.    The  taxon  needs  urgent  survey  and  evaluation  of 

conservation status before consideration can be given to declaration as threatened fauna. 



 

P4 

Priority Four: Taxa in need of monitoring: Taxa which are considered to have been adequately surveyed, 

or for which sufficient knowledge is available, and which are considered not currently threatened or in need 

of special protection, but could be if present circumstances change.  These taxa are usually represented on 

conservation lands. 



 

P5 

Priority Five: Taxa in need of monitoring: Taxa which are not considered threatened but are subject to a 

specific conservation program, the cessation of which would result in the species becoming threatened within 

five years. 

 

 

Categories of threatened species (Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999)  



EX 

Extinct:  A native species for which there is no reasonable doubt that the last member of the species has 

died. 


 

EX(W) 

Extinct in the wild:  A native species which: 

(a)  is  known  only  to  survive  in  cultivation,  in  captivity  or  as  a  naturalised  population  well  outside  its  past 

range;  or  

(b)  has  not  been  recorded  in  its  known  and/or  expected  habitat,  at  appropriate  seasons,  anywhere  in  its 

past range,  despite exhaustive surveys over a time frame appropriate to its life cycle and form. 

 

CR 

Critically Endangered:  A native species which is facing an extremely high risk of extinction in the wild in 

the immediate future, as determined in accordance with the prescribed criteria. 



 

EN 

Endangered:  A native species which:   

(a)  is not critically endangered;  and 

(b)  is facing a very high risk of extinction in the wild in the near future, as determined in accordance with the 

prescribed criteria. 

 

VU 

Vulnerable:  A native species which: 

(a)  is not critically endangered or endangered;  and 

(b)  is facing a high risk of extinction in the wild in the medium-term future, as determined in accordance with 

the prescribed criteria. 

 

CD 

Conservation  Dependent:    A  native  species  which  is  the  focus  of  a  specific  conservation  program,  the 

cessation  of  which  would  result  in  the  species  becoming  vulnerable,  endangered  or  critically  endangered 

within a period of 5 years. 

 

 



 


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə