1, Lázaro Gomes do Nascimento 1, Cícero Francisco Bezerra Felipe



Yüklə 0.52 Mb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə2/4
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü0.52 Mb.
1   2   3   4
2016, 21, 20

6 of 29


essential oil is active on the opioid receptors. However, the variable response seen at different doses

could also be due to the effect of other constituents present in the oil apart from eugenol [

29

].

3.6. Heracleum persicum Essential Oil



The genus Heracleum belongs to the Apiaceae (Umbelliferae) family and includes more than

70 species from all around the world [

73

]. For Heracleum persicum the essential oil is one of the most



important constituents for the fruits [

74

], leaves [



75

], flowers [

76

] and roots [



77

]. According to the

GC/MS analysis carried out by [

30

], hexyl butyrate (56.5%) is the major constituent of the essential oil



of the fruits of Heracleum persicum. In this study, Hajhashemi et al. [

30

] tested the essential oil (50 and



100 mg/Kg, p.o.) in the formalin and acetic acid-induced writhing tests. The antinociceptive effect

of the essential oil was observed in both tests. However in the formalin test, the material was devoid

of effect in the first phase of the model. In the acetic acid test, (although the pain in the abdominal

writhes is not model specific), the involuntary muscle twitches of the abdomen may be of interest

because of their similarity those known in visceral disorders [

3

,



78

]. In the formalin pain model, oral

administration of the oil reduced the late phase behavioral response to s.c. formalin injection in mice

and since the late phase is inflammatory in origin, it indicates the peripheral antinociceptive effect of

the plant material [

30

].



3.7. Hofmeisteria schaffneri Essential Oil

Hofmeisteria schaffneri (A. Gray) R.M.King & H.Robinson belongs to the Asteraceae family [

31

].

Previous chemical work with the plant allowed isolation of several thymol and northymol



derivatives [

79

,



80

], including Hofmeisterin III, thymol itself and 8,9-epoxy-10-acetoxythymyl

angelate. Angeles-López et al. [

31

] tested the essential oil (1–100 mg/Kg, p.o.) obtained from



the dried aerial parts of Hofmeisteria schaffneri, along with the major component [thymol

(10–100 mg/Kg, p.o.)], using the hot plate test. Two other thymol derived compounds were

synthesized and tested as well: thymyl isovalerate (0.1–17.7 mg/Kg, p.o.) and thymyl isobutyrate

(0.1–17.7 mg/Kg, p.o.). Hofmeisterin III significantly increased latency to thermal stimuli. The

antinociceptive effect of the compound was not reversed by pre-treatments with either glibenclamide

(10 mg/Kg, i.p.), a K

+

channel blocking, or l-NAME (30 mg/Kg, i.p.), an inhibitor of nitric oxide



synthase. However, pre-treatment with naloxone (1 mg/Kg, i.p.), a non-selective opiate receptor

antagonist partially reversed the effect of Hofmeisterin III in the hot plate test. All of the other

compounds showed similar effects, except 8,9-epoxy-10-acetoxythymyl angelate. The authors suggest

that esterification of thymol’s free phenolic group may reduce the activity of the compound.

However, thymol was only active at the highest dose. It has been previously shown that thymol

partially blocks voltage-operated Na

+

[

81



] and K

+

[



82

] channels and directly activates aminobutyric

acid GABA

A

receptors [



83

]. Thymol also reversibly inhibited prostaglandin synthesis; probably

related to the analgesic effect of thymol in endodontic therapy [

84

]. Furthermore, it was speculated



that thymol could have an analgesic effect due to its agonistic effect on adrenergic receptors [

85

].



3.8. Hyptis fruticosa and Hyptis pectinata (L.) Poit Essential Oils

The genus Hyptis (Lamiaceae) consists of approximately 400 species distributed from the

southern United States to Argentina and exhibits a major morphological diversity in the Brazilian

Cerrado [

86

]. In Brazil, such plants are frequently found on the northeastern coast [



87

].

Franco et al. [



32

] studied the antinociceptive effect of the essential oil (25, 50 and 100 mg/Kg, i.p.)

extracted from Hyptis fruticosa leaves and flowers in the acetic acid-induced writhing and formalin

tests. Both oil samples presented the same major constituents, however, in different proportions:

1,8-cineole (18.70% and 12.46%, respectively), α-pinene (12.29% and 20.51%, respectively) and

β

-pinene (8.56% and 13.54%, respectively). In a dose-dependent manner, both oils reduced the



number of acetic acid i.p. administration induced writhing movements. The effects were not reversed

by naloxone. In addition, the essential oils significantly reduced the licking time in the first and



Molecules 2016, 21, 20

7 of 29


second phases of the formalin test. The acetic acid induced abdominal contraction test reveals

peripheral activity, while the formalin method reveals both central and peripheral activities [

88

].

Drugs that act primarily on the central nervous system inhibit both phases of the formalin test, while



peripherally acting drugs inhibit the late phase [

3

]. The neurogenic phase (early phase) is probably



a direct result of stimulation in the paw and reflects centrally mediated pain with the release of

substance P, while the inflammatory phase (late phase) is due to the release of histamine, serotonin,

bradykinin and prostaglandins [

88

]. In addition, studies performed with 1,8-cineole and β-pinene



showed the centralized antinociceptive properties of these monoterpenes on hot plate and tail-flick

tests. It was also demonstrated that β-pinene may well be considered a partial agonist of opioid µ

receptors, while 1,8-cineole seems not to participate in this family of receptors [

89

]. Franco et al. [



32

]

suggested, therefore, that the essential oils have both peripheral and central analgesic actions without



opioid system influence, although the central activity was more discrete. In a study, the analgesic

effect of the essential oil (10, 30 and 100 mg/Kg, p.o.) obtained from the leaves of Hyptis pectinata

was tested using acetic acid-induced writhing, formalin, and hot plate tests [

33

]. GC-MS analysis



showed that β-caryophyllene (40.90%) and caryophyllene oxides (30.05%) were the main compounds

present in the oil. In pharmacological tests, we observed that treatment with increased doses of Hyptis

pectinata essential oil resulted in similar degrees of inhibition in contortions. Naloxone (1 mg/Kg, i.p.),

an opioid antagonist, did not reverse the anti-hyperalgesic effect of the Hyptis pectinata essential oil at

30 mg/kg; however, l-NAME (3 mg/Kg, i.p.), an inhibitor of the NO system, and atropine (1 mg/Kg,

i.p.), a cholinergic antagonist, showed significant effects in reducing the antinociceptive activity of

the Hyptis pectinata essential oil using the acetic acid-induced writhing model. The essential oil also

presented antinociceptive effect in the hot-plate model. In this test, naloxone, l-NAME, and atropine

antagonists were able to inhibit the anti-hyperalgesic effect of the the Hyptis pectinata essential oil.

When these same antagonists were screened for their ability to reverse the analgesic effect of essential

oil in the formalin model, only atropine was able to maintain its effect. Naloxone and l-NAME

did not reverse the antinociceptive effect of Hyptis pectinata essential oil. The mechanism of action

of Hyptis pectinata essential oil was investigated by pre-treating animals with several drugs which

interfere in different systems. The results demonstrate the involvement of the

L

-arginine-nitric oxide



pathway in the antinociceptive effect of the essential oil, which is in accordance with others who

have shown the system’s participation in antinociceptive effects during peripheral inflammation [

90

].

The involvement of the opioid system in the antinociceptive activity of Hyptis pectinata essential oil



was evaluated by pre-treating mice with an opioid antagonist, naloxone. The results suggest that the

anti-hyperalgesic effect observed in the hot plate model is due, in part, to the involvement of opioid

system because naloxone reversed the antinociceptive activity of the essential oil.

3.9. Illicum lanceolatum Essential Oil

Illicium lanceolatum A.C. Smith (Illiciaceae family) is a popular Chinese aromatic plant.

The leaves and roots of Illicium lanceolatum have often been used as traditional Chinese medicines to

treat bruises, internal injuries and back pain. GC/MS analysis carried out [

34

] indicated the presence



of the following phenylpropenes in the essential oil of the roots of Illicium lanceolatum: myristicin

(17.63%), α-asarone (17.23%), methyl isoeugenol (11.19%), apiol (8.82%), isolongifolol (5.94%) and

τ

-cadinol (4.32%). The antinociceptive action of the essential oil was tested in animals subjected to the



acetic acid-induced writhing test. According to Liang et al. [

34

], the essential oil produced inhibition



of the writhing responses in inhibitory ratios of 26.60%, 31.73% and 35.90%, respectively. The results

indicated that the essential oil from the roots of Illicium lanceolatum possesses significant analgesic

activity. However, more investigations are needed in order to elucidate its mechanism of action.

3.10. Lippia gracilis Essential Oil

The genus Lippia (Verbenaceae) is widely distributed in tropical and subtropical America and

Africa and consists of approximately 250 species of herbs, shrubs and small trees [

91

,

92



]. In Brazil, the

Molecules 2016, 21, 20

8 of 29


genus Lippia is represented by nearly 120 species, conspicuous for their flash appearance during the

blooming period and by their fragrance, in general, strong and pleasant [

93

]. Lippia gracilis Schauer



(Verbenaceae), known in Brazil by the name “alecrim-da-chapada”, is an herb commonly found in

Northeastern Brazil, it is highlighted because it presents high monoterpene contents [

94

], such as



carvacrol, o-cymene, γ-terpinene and β-caryophyllene [

95

]. Several communities in northeastern



Brazil use Lippia gracilis to treat cough, bronchitis, nasal congestion and headache [

96

]. It was



investigated the analgesic effect of the essential oil from Lippia gracilis leaves obtained under water

stress condition (50–200 mg/Kg) in mice subjected to the acetic acid writhing test [

35

]. A chemical



analysis performed by the group indicated as the main constituents the presence of thymol (32.68%),

p-cymene (17.82%), methyl thymol (10.83%), carvacrol (7.53%), γ-terpinene (7.13%), β-caryophyllene

(6.47%), 1,8-cineole (3.45%), and myrcene (3.35%). Oral administration of the essential oil caused

inhibition of acetic acid-induced writhes at the doses of 50, 100 and 200 mg/Kg. Mendes et al. [

35

]

affirm that essential oil from the leaves of Lippia gracilis displays antinociceptive action, possibly



by inhibiting the release of endogenous mediators that stimulate the nociceptive neurons [

57

].



Further studies accomplished by [

36

] confirmed the antinociceptive effect of Lippia gracilis (leaf)



essential oil, as previously described by Mendes and collaborators. In this work, the essential oil

(10, 30 and 100 mg/kg, p.o.) was tested in mice subjected to the acetic acid-induced contortion,

formalin-induced licking and hot plate tests.

The chemical analysis indicated the presence of

carvacrol (44.43%), o-cymene (9.42%), γ-terpinene (9.16%) and β-caryophyllene (8.83%) as the major

constituents of the essential oil. In the acetic acid-induced contortion test, the mice treated with

increasing doses of Lippia gracilis essential oil showed inhibition of contortions with doses of 10, 30,

or 100 mg/kg. The ability to reduce acetic acid-induced writhings and formalin-induced licking

responses are indicative of antiinflammatory effect. The acetic acid-induced writhings model has

been used as a screening tool for the assessment of analgesic or antiinflammatory agents [

57

].

Guilhon et al. [



36

] postulated that acetic acid acts by inducing the release of mediators that stimulate

nociceptive neurons sensitive to non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs and narcotics. The mediators

(i.e., histamine, serotonin, bradykinin and others) released into the peritoneal fluid cause an increase

in vascular permeability, reducing the threshold of nociception and stimulating nociceptive fibres’

nervous terminals [

64

,

97



,

98

]. To confirm the peripheral anti-hyperalgesic effect, Guilhon et al. [



36

]

used the formalin model. In this model, at the doses tested (10, 30, or 100 mg/Kg) Lippia gracilis



essential oil did not reduce the time that the animal spent licking the formalin-injected paw (first

phase). All doses of the essential oil however significantly reduced the licking time in the second

phase after the formalin injection. Centrally acting drugs such as narcotics inhibit both phases of the

nociceptive response equally [

60

]. Drugs with peripheral action, such as aspirin and dexamethasone



inhibit only the second phase [

6

,



24

]. The antinociceptive effect of the essential oil was also tested

in the hot plate model, where pre-treatment with the oil (10–100 mg/kg) resulted in significant

anti-hyperalgesic activity (all doses tested only in the late phase). In order to evaluate a possible

mechanism underlying the antinociceptive effect of Lippia gracilis, it was assessed the involvement of

the opioid, cholinergic and nitric oxide (NO) systems in the essential oil effects observed following

administration. The opioid antagonist naloxone (1 mg/Kg, i.p.) did not reverse the anti-hyperalgesic

effect of Lippia gracilis (at 30 mg/Kg), for either acetic acid-induced writhings or formalin induced

licking. Atropine (1 mg/Kg, i.p.), the cholinergic antagonist significantly reduced the antinociceptive

activity of the essential oil in both models. Similarly, the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, l-NAME

(3 mg/Kg, i.p.), slightly reduced the Lippia gracilis induced anti-hyperalgesia. The three antagonists

were able to inhibit the anti-hyperalgesic effect of Lippia gracilis in the hot plate model. These results

suggest that constituents from essential oil may be acting through different pathways to produce the

observed antinociceptive activity. As such, it is likely that the mechanisms underlying this activity

are multi-fold and require more investigation [

36

].



Molecules 2016, 21, 20

9 of 29


3.11. Matricaria recutita L. Essential Oil

Matricaria recutita L. is an herbaceous, annual, aromatic plant, native in Southern and Eastern

Europe [

99

]. Matricaria is widely distributed and cultivated has been used in traditional medicine



since the time of ancient Egypt, Greece and Rome [

100


]. The matricaria flower is a well-known remedy

for various gastrointestinal problems: spasms, inflammatory diseases, disorders such as indigestion,

flatulence, excess gas production and bloating. Matricaria preparations are used externally in

medicine and cosmetics, owing to its antiinflammatory properties [

99

]. Most of the pharmacological



properties of the matricaria flower are related to its essential oil containing (α-bisabolol and its

oxides; chamazulene and spiroether) and flavonoids such as apigenin and apigenin 7-O-glucoside

and sesquiterpene lactones such as matricin and coumarins [

99

,



101

]. Tomi´c et al. [

37

] investigated



the antinociceptive effect of bisabolol-oxides of matricaria oil (25, 50 and 100 mg/kg, p.o.) in

mice subjected to the carrageenan-induced inflammation test, which was measured in a modified

“paw-pressure” test as previously described by [

102


]. GC/MS analysis indicated the presence of

α

-bisabolol oxide A (21.5%), α-bisabolol oxide B (25.5%) and (Z)-spiroether (cis-en-yn-spiroether)



(10.3%) as the main components. Matricaria oil produced a significant dose-dependent reduction

of hyperalgesia induced by carrageenan in both prophylactic and therapeutic treatment schemes.

In post carrageenan injection, it is known that various inflammatory mediators are involved in

nociception and hyperalgesia: histamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), prostaglandins (PGs) and

others [

103


]. In this work, Tomi´c et al. [

37

] suggest that the antihyperalgesic effect of matricaria oil



is most likely related to its two main components-α-bisabolol oxides A and B. This affirmation is

based on Rocha [

104

] who demonstrated in mice that (´)-α-bisabolol (p.o.) diminished mechanical



hyperalgesia of the carrageenan paw injected and reduced nociceptive behavior in a second,

inflammatory phase of the formalin test. However, [

105

] demonstrated in vitro that α-bisabolol oxides



A and B do not inhibit cyclooxygenase (COX), an enzyme responsible for prostaglandin synthesis.

It was shown that cis-en-yn-spiroether and (´)-α-bisabolol both act as COX inhibitors [

106

] and


that (´)-α-bisabolol reduces neuronal excitability in mice sciatic nerves, probably by an irreversible

blockade of voltage-dependent sodium channels [

107

]. Tomi´c et al. [



37

] conclude, therefore, that

bisabolol oxides could decrease neuronal excitability similarly to (´)-α-bisabolol; and seeing that

cis-en-yn-spiroether and (´)-α-bisabolol can inhibit COX, the reduction of hyperalgesia exerted by

matricaria oil may be explained by the reduced neuronal excitability and, in part, by inhibition of

prostaglandin synthesis.

3.12. Mentha x villosa Huds Essential Oil

Various mentha species are used all over the world as choleretic, spasmolytic and analgesic

agents [

108


]. In Northeastern Brazil, Mentha x villosa Huds (Labiatae), an aromatic herb, is widely

used in folk medicine as a stomachic medicine, an anxiolytic agent, for the treatment of menstrual

cramps and for diarrhea with cholic and blood in the stools [

109


]. Sousa et al. [

38

] investigated the



antinociceptive effect of Mentha x villosa Huds leaves essential oil (at 10, 100 and 200 mg/Kg, p.o.) and

its major constituent piperitenone oxide (also at 10, 100 and 200 mg/Kg, p.o.) and as determined by

GC-MS analysis. Both substances were tested in mice subjected to the acetic acid-induced writhing,

formalin, hot plate and tail-flick tests. In the first test, both substances reduced the number of

writhings. At the lower doses (10 and 100 mg/kg body weight), neither agent induced significant

changes in the number of writhings. The association with naloxone (2 mg/Kg, s.c.) did not alter

the number of writhings as compared to either group treated with essential oil or piperitenone

oxide alone. The antinociceptive effect of Mentha x villosa Huds leaves essential oil (and its major

constituent) was assessed in the formalin test. In this model, both agents reduced significantly the

paw licking time for the second phase of the formalin test only. The effect was not reversed by

naloxone (2 mg/kg, s.c.). At dosages lower than 50 mg/kg body weight, neither agent induced

significant changes in the second phase of testing. In the hot plate and tail flick tests, neither agent

presented antinociceptive effect. The hot-plate and tail immersion tests are reported to be useful


Molecules 2016, 21, 20

10 of 29


tests for discriminating analgesic agents acting at the spinal medulla level (primarily) and at the

higher central nervous system levels, from those acting by peripheral mechanisms, with positive

results indicating central activity [

3

]. Sousa et al. [



38

] affirm that according to the acetic acid-induced

writhing, both the essential oil from Mentha x villosa Huds leaves and piperitenone oxide act by

peripheral mechanisms. Also, based on the results of the hot-plate and tail immersion tests, the

authors assumed that the antinociceptive effects of both agents were not related to central processing.

3.13. Nepeta crispa Willd. Essential Oil

Nepeta crispa Willd. is a plant of the Lamiaceae family and one of the aromatic and medicinal

plants of Iran [

110

]. In Iranian folk medicine, especially in the Hamadan province, distillates and



infusions are prepared from its aerial parts and are traditionally used as a sedative, relaxant and

carminative and also as a restorative tonic for nervous and respiratory disorders [

111

]. Ali et al. [



39

]

evaluated the antinociceptive activity of the essential oil of Nepeta crispa (30, 100 and 200 mg/Kg, i.p.)



in rats subjected to the tail-flick and formalin test pain models. The administration of the essential

oil of Nepeta crispa presented antinociceptive effect in the tail-flick and formalin (in both phases) tests.

Such effect, however, needs more investigation in order to elucidate the possible mechanism of the

antinociceptive action of the essential oil.

3.14. Ocimum basilicum, Ocimum gratissimum and Ocimum micranthum Essential Oils

Ocimum (Lamiaceae) is a genus that comprises more than 150 species; these are distributed in

tropical and subtropical regions [

112


114


]. The essential oil of many Ocimum species is used to

treat headaches, diarrhea, helminth infestations, inflammations and pain [

115



117



]. It is also used

in the pharmacy, perfumery and cosmetics industries because of its odorant, bactericide, fungicide

and insect repellent properties. Chromatographic essential oil analyses have shown that plants from

this genus are rich in volatile constituents such as linalool, geraniol, citral, alcanfor, eugenol, thymol,

1,8-cineole and neryl acetate [

112


,

116


]. The antinociceptive effect of the essential oil from the leaves

of Ocimum basilicum was evaluated [

40

]. In this work [



40

], the essential oil (50, 100 and 200 mg/Kg,

s.c.) in mice subjected to acetic acid-induced writhing, hot plate and formalin tests was tested.

GC-MS analysis indicated the presence of the following major constituents: linalool (69.54%) and

geraniol (12.55%). In the acetic acid-induced writhing test, the essential oil reduced the writhings

in a dose-dependent manner. The intraperitoneal administration of acetic acid irritates the gastric

serous membrane and produces abdominal writhings due to inflammation, which is the peripheral

component of pain. The action of anti-inflammatory substances such as indomethacin results in

inhibition of the enzyme cyclooxygenase in the arachidonic acid pathway, preventing the biosynthesis

of prostaglandins and prostacyclins and reducing pain [

3

,

118



]. In the hot plate test, the essential

oil at 50 mg/kg significantly increased the mice response times to thermal stimulus. This effect

was reversed in the presence of naloxone (5 mg/Kg, i.p.), which suggests that opioid receptors are

involved in the essential oil antinociceptive action [

118



120



]. Finally, the essential oil’s effects on the

first and second phases of pain during the formalin test could be characterized by the reduction of

the paw licking time after stimulus. The results suggested that action on the central and peripheral

components of pain might be involved. It is known that the first phase of pain is neurogenic and

occurs through nociceptive neuronal activity by direct action. The second phase occurs through

ventral horn neuronal activity at the spinal cord level, which is characterized by inflammation and

sensitivity to NSAIDs [

118


,

120


]. Drugs that present central action, such as narcotics (morphine),

inhibit both phases of pain, while peripheral drugs only inhibit the second phase [

60

]. Venâncio



et al. [

40

] suggest that the antinociceptive activity of the essential oil of Ocimum basilicum seems to be



associated with linalool (the main constituent), acting on K

+

-ATP channels, which has an important



role in pain modulation [

121


]. In a later work, the antinociceptive effect of Ocimum gratissimum

essential oil (30, 100 and 300 mg/Kg, p.o.) and its major components (at 5 and 10 mg/Kg, p.o.) were

evaluated [

41

]. Phytochemical analysis confirmed the presence of eugenol (67.17%) and myrcene



Molecules 

1   2   3   4


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə