14 th August 2013 For Extension Hill Pty Ltd: Extension Hill Magnetite Project



Yüklə 153.8 Kb.
PDF просмотр
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü153.8 Kb.

Survey of Proposed Drill Lines in Tenement M59/339 at Extension 

Hill 

 

14

th

 August 2013 

 

For Extension Hill Pty Ltd: Extension Hill Magnetite Project 

 

Surveyed by Jennifer Borger



, assisted by Ian Nicholls

2

 

1. Botanical Consultant  



13 Pipers Place, Kalamunda WA 6076  

Ph: 0427998403  

ABN:  

 

2. Ian Nicholls 



Site Field Assistant 

Extension Hill Pty Ltd. Extension Hill Magnetite Project 

PO Box 82, West Perth, WA 6872 

   


 

 

 



 

 

 



10-800-EN-REP-1120

 

Contents 



 

Page  


1. Background 

2. Climate 



3. Regional Vegetation  

4. Threatened and Priority Species 



5. Survey methodology 

6. Results 



6.1 Flora of Conservation Significance 

6.2 Vegetation Communities  



10 

7. Relevant Legislation and Compliance with Recognised Standards 

14 

8. References 



15 

Appendix 1: Flora recorded from the survey area 

16 

Appendix 2: GPS coordinates of Conservation Significant Flora  



19 

Appendix 3: Conservation codes  

20 

Table 1: Flora of Conservation Significance recorded from within 20km  



Table 2: GPS coordinates for the proposed drill lines 

Figure 1: Location of Proposed Drill Lines  



Figure 2: Location of flora of conservation significance  

Figure 3: Persoonia pentasticha  



Figure 4: Regrowth  on sandplain  

10 

Figure 5: Vegetation communities on the rocky ridge landform  



12 

Figure 6: York gum open woodland  

13 

 

 



 

1. Background 

Extension Hill Pty Ltd proposes to drill exploration holes in Tenement M59/339 in the North 

Extension Hill area in the Midwest region of Western Australia, approximately 85 km east of 

Perenjori, and immediately east of the Great Northern Highway.  Previous surveys in the 

area recorded four threatened flora (T) including Darwinia masonii, Eucalyptus synandra, 



Acacia imitans and Lepidosperma gibsonii. (Bennett Environmental Consulting 2000; ATA 

Environmental 2004; Meissner and Caruso 2008)  The Mount Gibson Range Vegetation 

Complexes Priority Ecological Community is also recorded in the area.  

2. Climate 

Extension Hill is located in the transition zone from the wetter south west to the semi-arid 

Yalgoo region. The climate is Mediterranean with predominantly dry hot summers with 

occasional thunderstorms with mild wet winters with average rainfall recorded at Mt. Gibson 

Station (1983 – 2012) as 350.8 mm; Perenjori 329.2 mm and Paynes Find (north) 291.4 mm.  

Average monthly statistics at Mt. Gibson show a fairly even spread of rainfall with a slight 

increase 36.5 – 42.4 mm per month recorded in May to August; with 17.3 – 30.3 mm per 

month recorded from September to April. 2013 records (BOM 2013) show an above average 

rainfall in May at most centres in the area, except at Paynes Find, with below to well below 

average rainfall received in June and July.   



3. Regional Vegetation  

The survey area is located within the Southwest Province, Wheatbelt IBRA region in the 

Wheatbelt P1 sub-IBRA region.  It is very close to the boundary with the Tallering IBRA sub-

region, and this is reflected in the diversity of species found in the area, with representation 

from both regions.  

Payne et al (1998) has the area mapped as Land Systems of Mt. Gibson – hill with mixed 

shrublands 12 – Tallering – prominent ridges and hills of banded ironstone, dolerite and 

sedimentary rocks.  Vegetation: Scattered to moderately dense tall shrubland of Acacia 



ramulosa and other Acacias with undershrubs such as Thryptomene and Eriostemon 

(Philotheca) species on ridges and hills and understorey of Eremophila species and Ptilotus 

obovatus on the slopes. Broadscale mapping by Beard (1976) has much of the Mt. Gibson 

Range mapped as shrublands of Acacia acuminata and Allocasuarina acutivalvis on 

ironstone; medium woodland of York Gum (Eucalyptus loxophleba) on colluvial slopes and – 

surrounding Mt. Gibson – shrublands of bowgada (Acacia ramulosa) and A. quadrimarginea 

on stony ridges and shrublands of bowgada and jam scrub.   

The Department of Environment and Conservation (DEC) carried out several surveys in the 

region on BIF and Greenstone landforms over the past 8 years.  Results of these surveys 

have improved the description of plant assemblages occurring near the survey area and are 

presented in Flora and vegetation of banded ironstone formations of the Yilgarn Craton: 

Mount Gibson and surrounding area (Meissner & Caruso 2008).  These communities have 

been used to describe the Mount Gibson Range Vegetation Complexes (banded ironstone 

formation) Priority Ecological Community (PEC).  

 


 

4. Threatened and Priority Species 

Several rare species have been recorded in the area, with some discovered recently through 

increased survey effort in the region. Threatened flora (T) recorded in the vicinity include 



Eucalyptus synandra, Darwinia masonii, Acacia imitans and Lepidosperma gibsonii.  A list of 

all priority and threatened flora within 20 km are presented in Table 1. (DEC/ DPaW)  

Conservation codes are described in Appendix 3.  

Table 1: Flora of Conservation Significance recorded from within 20km  

Family 

Scientific Name 



Conservation code 

<10km 

Cyperaceae 



Lepidosperma gibsonii 

T  


Fabaceae 



Acacia unguicula 

 



Fabaceae 

Acacia imitans 



Myrtaceae 

Eucalyptus synandra 



Myrtaceae 

Darwinia masonii 



Violaceae 

Hybanthus cymulosus 



Asteraceae 

Gnephosis setifera 

P1 


 

Casuarinaceae 



Allocasuarina tessellata 

P1 


Cyperaceae 



Lepidosperma sp. Blue Hills 

P1 


 

Fabaceae 



Acacia cerastes 

P1 


Myrtaceae 



Chamelaucium sp. Yalgoo 

P1 


Rutaceae 



Philotheca nutans 

P1 


Asteraceae 



Podotheca uniseta 

P3 


Celastraceae 



Psammomoya implexa 

P3 


 

Goodeniaceae 



Goodenia perryi 

P3 


 

Lamiaceae 



Microcorys tenuifolia 

P3 


Myrtaceae 



Euryomyrtus recurva 

P3 


Myrtaceae 



Thryptomene sp. Wandana 

P3 


 

Myrtaceae 



Verticordia venusta 

P3 


Poaceae 


Austrostipa blackii 

P3 


Proteaceae 



Persoonia pentasticha 

P3 


Proteaceae 



Grevillea scabrida 

P3 


Proteaceae 



Grevillea subtiliflora 

P3 


 

Colchicaceae 



Wurmbea murchisoniana 

P4 


 

Sapindaceae 



Dodonaea amplisemina 

P4 


 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

5. Survey methodology 

Predetermined survey lines were marked out and an area of 25 m either side of the line was 

surveyed for the presence of flora of conservation status.  The GPS coordinates for the start 

and finish of the lines are presented in Table 2.   

 

Table 2: GPS coordinates for the proposed drill lines 



Line 

No 


Length 

Start 


End 

  

  





1  293.615  514680  6729541  514941  6729675 

2  289.479  514640  6729632  514896  6729768 

3  289.412  514580  6729380  514830  6729960 

4  286.521  514610  6729730  514870  6729870 

5  275.197  514556  6279929  514802  6730052 

6  202.675  514558  6730064  514737  6730160 

 

The layout of the drill lines is shown in Figure 1.  Line 1 is furthest south.   



 

A description of the vegetation community was recorded based on the NVIS system using 

strata (dominant species, height and cover) rather than height classes, and coordinates 

where there was a vegetation change. The vegetation community descriptions are used to 

compare against communities forming the Mount Gibson Range Vegetation Complexes 

PEC.   


 

A list of flora of conservation significance recorded from the local area (20 km radius) was 

determined from a literature search.  Flora of conservation significance present in the survey 

area were recorded and flagged.  Other significant flora which occur on similar landforms 

from a wider area (Blue Hills/ Warriedar area) were also searched for.   

 

 



 

 

 

                Figure 1: Location of Proposed Drill Lines in relation to PER boundary and previously known Lepidosperma gibsonii (DRF) locations 



  

 

     (Figure drawn by B. McLernon, Extension Hill Pty Ltd)

6. Results 

One threatened species and one priority species were recorded within the survey area – 



Lepidosperma gibsonii (T) and Persoonia pentasticha (P3).  Lepidosperma gibsonii was 

recorded around the south eastern area of Drill Line 1.  Persoonia pentasticha was recorded 

near Drill line 5. (Figure 2)  A total of 91 tussocks of Lepidosperma gibsonii were recorded, 

and one Persoonia pentasticha.  

 

Three vegetation communities were recorded within the area, with two – (1) sandplain 



(recently burnt) dominant in the south western area, and (2) laterite/ rocky ridge through the 

north, central and south eastern area (partly burnt).  A small area of (3) Eucalyptus open 

woodland on colluvial plain occurred at the northern end.   

 

Some disturbance had occurred within the area – mainly old access tracks, gravel removal 



and fire.   

 

6.1 Flora of Conservation Significance 



 

1. Lepidosperma gibsonii (T) 

 

Family: Cyperaceae 

 

Lepidosperma gibsonii was recorded in the area of Line 1, with a total of 91 tussocks within 

the potential impact area. Most were grazed and individual tussocks were small (generally 

less than 3cm in diameter, and up to 30cm height).  Less than 10% had flowering stems. 

The area in which they occurred had been burnt within the last few years and occurred in 

open to mid-dense regrowth to an average height of about 1.2m on a rocky south facing 

slope in shallow soil.  

 

Description: Tufted perennial with short rhizomes; terete culm; leaves and culms 



spirodistichous.  It is recognised as being in the L. costale group based on genetics.  It is 

only known from the Mt. Gibson Range, on BIF ranges, and recorded from gullies and on 

slopes in shallow soil.  (Barrett 2007).  


 

 

 



Figure 2: Location of flora of conservation significance (Figure drawn by B. McLernon, EHPL)

2. Persoonia pentasticha (P3) 

Family: Proteaceae 



Figure 3: Persoonia pentasticha 

 

Persoonia pentasticha is a low to 

medium shrub (Figure 3) with a range 

of approximately 380km occurring in 

the northern wheatbelt and in the 

Yalgoo Bioregion. It is often found 

growing in Eucalyptus woodlands 

often having a sporadic occurrence, 

rather than forming a dominant part 

of the stratum (personal observation).  

It is placed within the Chapmaniana 

group – bark smooth, leaves alternate 

with 5 prominent veins.  Inflorescence axillary to terminal, anauxotelic – growth does not 

continue beyond the flowering region; flowers actinomorphic, mostly subtended by scale 

leaves.   

 

Persoonia pentasticha is a shrub to 0.4 – 1.8 m high. The flowers are actinomorphic, tepals 

yellow, mostly subtended by scale leaves.  Leaves are linear 3.5 – 12cm long; more or less 

terete, alternate with 5 prominent veins. Fruit is a drupe.  It has been recorded as flowering 

from August to November.  

 

Two species are included in the Chapmaniana group – Persoonia chapmaniana and P. 



pentasticha.  The ovary is densely hairy in chapmaniana, and glabrous in pentasticha. Both 

have linear leaves, sub-terete in chapmaniana, more or less terete in pentasticha; 5 – 30 

flowered in chapmaniana, 1 – 15 flowered in pentasticha.  P. Chapmaniana has been 

recorded west of Persoonia pentasticha.   

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



Figure 3: Persoonia pentasticha 

10 

 

 



6.2 Vegetation Communities  

 

Vegetation structure was described based on the NVIS system based on strata rather than 



height classes.  Ground cover (forbs, grasses, ferns) was found to be very sparse in most 

sites most likely due to below average rainfall in June and July.  Some shrubs were sterile 

due to stage of growth (immature) or dry conditions.  These are indicated with a question 

mark.  Vegetative characteristics were used to rule out similar species of conservation 

significance.  

 

1. Sandplain community 

Much of this community had been burnt and was dominated by dense low shrubland (Figure 

4).  


 

Drill Lines: Western half of Lines 1 and 2  

GPS: 514694 E/ 6729655 N (Line 2); 514678 E/ 6729542 N (Line 1) 

Two descriptions of the shrublands are listed below.  The composition varied with different 

shrubs being dominant in various areas.   

 

1a. Eucalyptus oldfieldii, E. leptopoda subsp. arctata and Codonocarpus cotinifolius isolated 

low mallee/ tall shrub over Grevillea paradoxa, Melaleuca nematophylla, M. 

conothamnoides, Acacia acuaria, Acacia coolgardiensis, Persoonia hexagona, ?Persoonia 

manotricha (sterile), Dodonaea adenophora, Hibbertia glomerosa var. glomerosa, H. 

stenophylla, Hybanthus floribundus subsp. floribundus, Keraudrenia velutina subsp. velutina 

mixed low shrubland with isolated forbs (Waitzia acuminata) with varying dominance of 

shrub species.    

 

1b. Isolated Codonocarpus cotinifolius and Acacia murrayana tall shrubs (> 2m)  over mixed 



shrubland of Calycopeplus paucifolius, Acacia acuaria, Hakea minyma, Hibbertia glomerosa 

var. glomerosa, Persoonia ?manotricha, Philotheca sericea, Grevillea paradoxa over 

isolated forbs.  

 

 



Figure 4: Regrowth on sandplain 

11 

 

 



2. Rocky ridge communities 

There was some variation in the community structure along the ridge depending on position 

on the slope and substrate. (Figure 5) 

 

2a. Line 2 East end GPS 514889 E/ 6729769 (also eastern end of Lines 3, 4 and 5) 



Landform: rocky ridge with laterite; north east aspect; moderate slope to small areas of 

steep slope 

 

Isolated Eucalyptus loxophleba subsp. supralaevis and Callitris columellaris trees over 



Melaleuca nematophylla, Acacia ramulosa var. ramulosa, Allocasuarina acutivalvis subsp. 

prinsepiana, Calycopeplus paucifolius open tall shrubland (20 – 30 %) over Aluta aspera 

subsp. hesperia, Eremophila clarkei, Philotheca deserti and P. brucei subsp. brucei sparse 

low shrubland (2 – 3 %) over isolated Cheilanthes adiantoides, Waitzia acuminata, Stylidium 

confluens ferns and forbs  

 

2b. Line 6 West end GPS: 514558 E/ 6730059 N (also Lines 5, 4 and 3 central area) 



Landform: broad ridge; gravel/ laterite/ rock – sedimentary – ironstone, siltstone; gentle 

slope 


 

Isolated Eucalyptus loxophleba subsp. supralaevisE. oldfieldii, E. kochii subsp. amaryissia 

and Callitris columellaris (< 2%) in Allocasuarina acutivalvis subsp. prinsepiana, Acacia  



nigripilosa subsp. nigripilosa, A. anthochaera, A. assimilis subsp. assimilis, A. ramulosa var. 

ramulosa, Melaleuca leiocarpa tall shrubland (>50% cover) over isolated low shrubs (Senna 

artemisioides, Philotheca sericea, Aluta aspera subsp. hesperia, Leucopogon sp. Clyde Hill, 

Eremophila latrobei subsp. latrobei, Micromyrtus racemosa var. racemosa, Solanum 

lasiophyllum (<1 %) with isolated forbs/ seedlings/ grass tussock (Eremophila clarkei, E. 

latrobei, Waitzia acuminata, Drosera macrantha, Amphipogon caricinus, Cheilanthes 

adiantoides)  

 

Other shrubs occurring (not common): Persoonia pentasticha P3, Senna sp. Austin, 



Scaevola spinescens, Hibbertia stenophylla, Olearia pimeleoides 

 

2c. Line 1 East end (514903 E/ 6729669 N) 



Landform: rocky outcrop; small valley sloping into drainage line; slope mainly south 

 

Regrowth following fire – dense Acacia shrubland with several Lepidosperma gibsonii (T) 



tussocks  

 

Isolated Allocasuarina acutivalvis subsp. prinsepiana low trees over Acacia andrewsii, 



Grevillea paradoxa, Mirbelia depressa, Philotheca brucei subsp. brucei, P. deserti subsp. 

deserti, Melaleuca nematophylla, M. radula low shrubland to closed shrubland over sparse 

Lepidosperma gibsonii, Lomandra ?effusa (sterile), Cheilanthes sieberi subsp. sieberi

Waitzia acuminata 

 

2d. Line 3 & 4 Western end (Fire regrowth - recent; historic disturbance from gravel 

removal; old access tracks) 

Landform: broad ridge, gently sloping to the south west; gravel 

 

Acacia ramulosa var. ramulosa and Allocasuarina acutivalvis subsp. prinsepiana shrubland 

with Micromyrtus racemosa var. racemosa, Melaleuca nematophylla, Glischrocaryon 

aureum, Eremophila latrobei subsp. latrobei over isolated forbs (Stylidium confluens 

dominant) 

 

 


12 

 

 



Figure 5: Vegetation communities on the rocky ridge landform  

 

 



1. 

 

 



2. 

 

3. 



 

4. 


 

5. 


 

 

Various communities occurring in the rocky 



ridge area.  Part of the area had been burnt 

(Photo 1 – Eucalytpus leptopoda mallee and 



Codonocarpus cotinifolius in low shrubland); 

regrowth on gravel pit (Photo 4); mature 

shrubland (Photos 2 & 3); Eucalytpus kochii 

in tall shrubland (Photo 5)  

 


13 

 

  



3. Eucalyptus supralaevis subsp. loxophleba low open woodland over Acacia 

anthochaera, A. ramulosa and Melaleuca leiocarpa tall shrubland community  

 

Drill Line: 6 

GPS: 514675 E/ 6730136 N 

Landform: change of slope: lower slope to plain  

Land surface: red brown clay loam; surface rock <2 % - gravel; litter 30 – 40%; fallen timber 

< 5% 

Disturbance: old access track with some regrowth; minor erosion 

 

Stratum & 



height (m) 

cover 



Habit 

Dominant Species  

U1  8 – 11  

10 – 15   T 



Eucalyptus loxophleba subsp. supralaevis, 

Allocasuarina acutivalvis subsp. prinsepiana  

M1  2 – 6 

30 – 50   S 

Acacia anthochaera, A. ramulosa var. ramulosa, 

Melaleuca leiocarpa, Dodonaea inaequifolia, Acacia 

nigripilosa subsp. nigripilosa 

M2  <2 


2 – 10  



Alyxia buxifolia, Eremophila clarkei, Scaevola 



spinescens, Senna artemisioides subsp. filifolia, 

Comesperma integerrimum, Dianella revoluta var

divaricata  

G <0.1 


<1  



Amphipogon caricinus, Erodium cygnorum, Waitzia 



acuminata 

 

 



Figure 6: York gum open woodland 

 

 



 

 

 



 

14 

 

 



7. Relevant Legislation and Compliance with Recognised Standards 

 

7.1 Commonwealth Legislation 

 

Commonwealth Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 



 

  The survey area does not have national environmental significance under the 



EPBC Act 1999 

 

7.2 State Legislation 



 

Clearing of Native Vegetation  

The Environmental Protection (Clearing of Native Vegetation) Regulations WA 2004 

establishes that any clearing of native vegetation requires a permit from DPaW.  Under 

section 51A of the Environmental Protection Act, 1986  

 

Regulation 6 of the Regulations defines Environmentally Sensitive Areas (ESA) as “the area 



covered by vegetation within 50 m of Rare Flora, to the extent to which the vegetation is 

continuous with the vegetation in which the Rare Flora is located”.  The area covered by a 

TEC is also considered an ESA wherein clearing cannot occur unless a clearing permit is 

granted. 

 



  Part of the survey area is located within an ESA – Line 1 eastern area – several 



occurrences of Lepidosperma gibsonii.   

 

  The survey area does not contain any TEC listed under the EPBC Act 1999 or 



by DPaW.   

 

Priority Ecological Communities  

 

Part of the survey area (rocky ridge; York gum woodland) is located within the Mt. Gibson 



Range Vegetation Complexes (banded ironstone formation) PEC.  Community vegetation 

structure/ composition are close to the Mt. Gibson Community 3 (open Eucalyptus 

woodlands over Acacia spp. on colluvial plains: Line 6) and Community 4 (mallee woodland 

and woodlands of Eucalyptus spp. over Acacia acuminata – lower slopes Mt. Gibson and 

colluvial sites: Lines 3 – 5; part Lines 1 & 2)) as described by Meissner and Caruso (2008).  

The yellow sandplain community is not representative of the PEC (part Lines 1 & 2 - west).    

 

Community 3 is fairly widely represented in the area (Mt. Gibson, Extension Hill, Yandhanoo 



Hills and other hills near the Great Northern Highway) , whereas Community 4 is more 

restricted to the Mt. Gibson range area.    

 



  Part of the area is potentially representative of Mt. Gibson PEC.  



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



15 

 

 



 

8. References 

 

ATA Environmental (2004) Targeted search at Mount Gibson for the declared rare flora 



Darwinia masonii.   

 

Barrett R L (2007) New species of Lepidosperma (Cyperaceae) associated with banded 



ironstone in southern Western Australia in Nuytsia 17: 37 – 60. Western Australian 

Herbarium, Department of Environment and Conservation, WA Perth  

 

Beard, JS, 1976, Vegetation Survey of Western AustraliaSheet 6, Murchison 1:1,000,000 



Vegetation Series, Map and Explanatory Notes, University of Western Australia, Perth 

 

Bennett Environmental Consulting Pty Ltd (2000) Flora and vegetation of Mt Gibson.  21 



Currawong Drive, Gooseberry Hill WA 6076 

 

Bureau of Meteorology (2013) Climate and past weather.  Available: http://www.bom.gov.au  



 

Centre for Plant Biodiversity Research (2006) Euclid – Eucalypts of Australia 3

rd

 Edition. 



Interactive CD. CSIRO Publishing 

 

Department of Environment and Conservation (2013) NatureMap.  Available: 



http://naturemap.dpaw.wa.gov.au/default.aspx  

EPA (2004) Guidance for the Assessment of Environmental Factors (in accordance with the 

Environmental Protection Act 1986), Terrestrial flora and vegetation surveys for 

Environmental Impact Assessment in Western Australia, Environmental Protection Authority  

 

Grieve B J (1998) How to know Western Australian wildflowers: a key to the flora of the 



extratropical regions of Western Australia. Part II. University of Western Australia Press, 

Nedlands WA 6907 

 

Maslin, B R (Coordinator) (2001): Wattle: Acacias of Australia; Published by Australian 



Biological Resources Study, Canberra & Department of Conservation and Land 

Management, Perth. (Interactive CD) 

 

Meissner R and Caruso Y (2008) Flora and vegetation of the Yilgarn Craton: Mount Gibson 



and surrounding area.  Conservation Science W. Aust. 7 (1): 105 – 120. Department of 

Environment and Conservation, Wanneroo, WA  

 

Payne A L, Van Vreeswyk A M E, Pringle H J R, Leighton K A, Hennig P (1998) Technical 



Bulletin No. 90 – An inventory and condition survey of the Sandstone – Yalgoo – Paynes 

Find area, Western Australia.  Agriculture Western Australia, Perth WA 

 

Western Australian Herbarium (2013) FloraBase – the Western Australian Flora, viewed 



August & September 2013, 

http://florabase.dec.wa.gov.au

 

 

Weston P H (1995) Proteaceae: Subfam. 1. Persoonioideae in Flora of Australia Volume 16, 



Elaeaganaceae, Proteaceae 1. Melbourne CSIRO  

 

 



 

16 

 

 



Appendix 1: Flora recorded from the survey area 

 

Family 



Scientific Name  

Cons 

code  

Amaranthaceae 



Ptilotus obovatus var. obovatus  

  

Apiaceae 



Xanthosia bungei  

  

Apocynaceae 



Alyxia buxifolia 

  

Asparagaceae 



Lomandra ?effusa 

  

Asteraceae 



Gilberta tenuifolia  

  

Asteraceae 



Olearia dampieri subsp. eremicola  

  

Asteraceae 



Olearia muelleri 

  

Asteraceae 



Olearia pimeleoides 

  

Asteraceae 



Waitzia acuminata var. acuminata 

  

Casuarinaceae 



Allocasuarina acutivalvis subsp. prinsepiana     

Chenopodiaceae 



Enchylaena lanata  

  

Chenopodiaceae 



Sclerolaena diacantha  

  

Crassulaceae 



Crassula colorata var. colorata 

  

Cupressaceae 



Callitris columellaris  

  

Cyperaceae 



Lepidosperma gibsonii 

Dilleniaceae 



Hibbertia arcuata  

  

Dilleniaceae 



Hibbertia glomerosa var. glomerosa  

  

Dilleniaceae 



Hibbertia stenophylla  

  

Droseraceae 



Drosera macrantha subsp. macrantha  

  

Ericaceae 



Leucopogon sp. Clyde Hill 

  

Euphorbiaceae 



Calycopeplus paucifolius 

  

Fabaceae 



Acacia acuaria  

  

Fabaceae 



Acacia acuminata 

  

Fabaceae 



Acacia andrewsii  

  

Fabaceae 



Acacia anthochaera  

  

Fabaceae 



Acacia assimilis subsp. assimilis  

  

Fabaceae 



Acacia coolgardiensis  

  

Fabaceae 



Acacia murrayana 

  

Fabaceae 



Acacia nigripilosa subsp. nigripilosa 

  

Fabaceae 



Acacia obtecta  

  

Fabaceae 



Acacia prainii 

  

Fabaceae 



Acacia ramulosa var. ramulosa  

  

Fabaceae 



Acacia stereophylla var. stereophylla  

  

Fabaceae 



Acacia tetragonophylla  

  

Fabaceae 



Leptosema aphyllum 

  

Fabaceae 



Mirbelia depressa  

  

Fabaceae 



Senna artemisioides subsp. filifolia  

  

Fabaceae 



Senna sp. Austin  

  

Geraniaceae 



Erodium cygnorum  

  

 



17 

 

Family 



Scientific Name  

Cons 

code  

Goodeniaceae 



Scaevola spinescens  

  

Goodeniaceae 



Velleia rosea  

  

Gyrostemonaceae 



Codonocarpus cotinifolius  

  

Haloragaceae 



Glischrocaryon aureum  

  

Hemerocallidaceae 



Dianella revoluta var. divaricata 

  

Lamiaceae 



Hemigenia sp. Yuna  

  

Lamiaceae 



Lachnostachys coolgardiensis  

  

Lamiaceae 



Microcorys sp. Mt Gibson  

  

Malvaceae 



Keraudrenia velutina subsp. velutina  

  

Myrtaceae 



Aluta aspera subsp. hesperia  

  

Myrtaceae 



Chamelaucium pauciflorum subsp. Perenjori  

  

Myrtaceae 



Eucalyptus kochii subsp. amaryissia  

  

Myrtaceae 



Eucalyptus leptopoda subsp. arctata 

  

Myrtaceae 



Eucalyptus loxophleba subsp. supralaevis 

  

Myrtaceae 



Eucalyptus oldfieldii 

  

Myrtaceae 



Malleostemon tuberculatus  

  

Myrtaceae 



Melaleuca conothamnoides  

  

Myrtaceae 



Melaleuca leiocarpa 

  

Myrtaceae 



Melaleuca nematophylla 

  

Myrtaceae 



Micromyrtus racemosa var racemosa 

  

Poaceae 



Amphipogon caricinus 

  

Poaceae 



Austrostipa elegantissima  

  

Poaceae 



Austrostipa nitida  

  

Poaceae 



Monachather paradoxus  

  

Polygalaceae 



Comesperma integerrimum  

  

Proteaceae 



Grevillea ?obliquistigma subsp. obliquistigma  

  

Proteaceae 



Grevillea paradoxa  

  

Proteaceae 



Hakea minyma  

  

Proteaceae 



Hakea recurva subsp. recurva 

  

Proteaceae 



Persoonia ?manotricha  

  

Proteaceae 



Persoonia hexagona  

  

Proteaceae 



Persoonia pentasticha  

P3 


Pteridaceae 

Cheilanthes adiantoides  

  

Pteridaceae 



Cheilanthes sieberi subsp. sieberi  

  

Rutaceae 



Philotheca brucei subsp. brucei 

  

Rutaceae 



Philotheca deserti subsp. deserti 

  

Rutaceae 



Philotheca sericea  

  

Sapindaceae 



Dodonaea adenophora  

  

Sapindaceae 



Dodonaea inaequifolia  

  

Sapindaceae 



Dodonaea viscosa subsp. angustissima  

  

Scrophulariaceae 



Eremophila clarkei 

  

Scrophulariaceae 



Eremophila latrobei subsp. latrobei 

  

Solanaceae 



Solanum lasiophyllum 

  


18 

 

Family 



Scientific Name  

Cons 

code  

Stylidiaceae 



Stylidium confluens  

  

Violaceae 



Hybanthus floribundas subsp. floribundas  

  

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

19 

 

Appendix 2: GPS coordinates of Conservation Significant Flora  

 

Scientific Name 



Cons Cd  Easting   Northing   Date 

No. 


tussocks 

Lepidosperma gibsonii 

514857  6792620  14/08/2013 





Lepidosperma gibsonii 

514862  6729625  14/08/2013 





Lepidosperma gibsonii 

514865  6729613  14/08/2013 





Lepidosperma gibsonii 

514866  6729623  14/08/2013 





Lepidosperma gibsonii 

514871  6729630  14/08/2013 



15 

Lepidosperma gibsonii 

514871  6729644  14/08/2013 





Lepidosperma gibsonii 

514873  6729638  14/08/2013 





Lepidosperma gibsonii 

514873  6729618  14/08/2013 





Lepidosperma gibsonii 

514879  6729633  14/08/2013 





Lepidosperma gibsonii 

514882  6729635  14/08/2013 





Lepidosperma gibsonii 

514887  6729647  14/08/2013 





Lepidosperma gibsonii 

514903  6729669  14/08/2013 





Lepidosperma gibsonii 

514904  6729645  14/08/2013 





Lepidosperma gibsonii 

514904  6729662  14/08/2013 



22 

Lepidosperma gibsonii 

514915  6729672  14/08/2013 





Lepidosperma gibsonii 

514916  6729649  14/08/2013 





Lepidosperma gibsonii 

514917  6729632  14/08/2013 





 

 

 



 

Total 


91 

Persoonia pentasticha  

P3 


514766  6730043  14/08/2013 

 



 

 


20 

 

Appendix 3: Conservation codes  



 

T: Threatened Flora (Declared Rare Flora — Extant) 

Taxa


1

 which have been adequately searched for and are deemed to be in the wild either 

rare, in danger of extinction, or otherwise in need of special protection, and have been 

gazetted as such (Schedule 1 under the Wildlife Conservation Act 1950). 

 

1: Priority One: Poorly-known taxa 

Taxa that are known from one or a few collections or sight records (generally less than five), 

all on lands not managed for conservation, e.g. agricultural or pastoral lands, urban areas, 

Shire, Westrail and Main Roads WA road, gravel and soil reserves, and active mineral 

leases and under threat of habitat destruction or degradation. Taxa may be included if they 

are comparatively well known from one or more localities but do not meet adequacy of 

survey requirements and appear to be under immediate threat from known threatening 

processes. 

 

2: Priority Two: Poorly-known taxa 

Taxa that are known from one or a few collections or sight records, some of which are on 

lands not under imminent threat of habitat destruction or degradation, e.g. national parks, 

conservation parks, nature reserves, State forest, vacant Crown land, water reserves, etc. 

Taxa may be included if they are comparatively well known from one or more localities but 

do not meet adequacy of survey requirements and appear to be under threat from known 

threatening processes. 

 

3: Priority Three: Poorly-known taxa 

Taxa that are known from collections or sight records from several localities not under 

imminent threat, or from few but widespread localities with either large population size or 

significant remaining areas of apparently suitable habitat, much of it not under imminent 

threat. Taxa may be included if they are comparatively well known from several localities but 

do not meet adequacy of survey requirements and known threatening processes exist that 

could affect them. 

 

4: Priority Four: Rare, Near Threatened and other taxa in need of monitoring 

1.  Rare. Taxa that are considered to have been adequately surveyed, or for which sufficient 

knowledge is available, and that are considered not currently threatened or in need of 

special protection, but could be if present circumstances change. These taxa are usually 

represented on conservation lands.  

2.  Near Threatened. Taxa that are considered to have been adequately surveyed and that 

do not qualify for Conservation Dependent, but that are close to qualifying for Vulnerable.  

3.  Taxa that have been removed from the list of threatened species during the past five 

years for reasons other than taxonomy.  

 

5: Priority Five: Conservation Dependent taxa 

Taxa that are not threatened but are subject to a specific conservation program, the 

cessation of which would result in the taxon becoming threatened within five years 



Document Outline

  • T: Threatened Flora (Declared Rare Flora — Extant)
  • 1: Priority One: Poorly-known taxa
  • 2: Priority Two: Poorly-known taxa
  • 3: Priority Three: Poorly-known taxa
  • 4: Priority Four: Rare, Near Threatened and other taxa in need of monitoring
  • 5: Priority Five: Conservation Dependent taxa


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə