2013, 5, 455-467; doi: 10. 3390/nu5020455 nutrients issn 2072-6643



Yüklə 112.12 Kb.
PDF просмотр
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü112.12 Kb.

Nutrients 20135, 455-467; doi:10.3390/nu5020455 

 

nutrients 



ISSN 2072-6643 

www.mdpi.com/journal/nutrients 



Article 

An Extract from Wax Apple (Syzygium samarangense (Blume) 

Merrill and Perry) Effects Glycogenesis and Glycolysis 

Pathways in Tumor Necrosis Factor-α-Treated FL83B   

Mouse Hepatocytes 

Szu-Chuan Shen 

1,†,

*, Wen-Chang Chang 

2,†

 and Chiao-Li Chang 

2

 

1

  Department of Human Development and Family Studies, National Taiwan Normal University,   



No. 162, Sec. 1, Heping East Road, Taipei 10610, Taiwan 

2

  Graduate Institute of Food Science and Technology, National Taiwan University, P.O. Box 23-14, 



Taipei 10672, Taiwan; E-Mails: d99641001@ntu.edu.tw (W.-C.C.);   

carrieli700@hotmail.com (C.-L.C.) 



 

These two authors contributed equally to this work. 



*  Author to whom correspondence should be addressed; E-Mail: scs@ntnu.edu.tw;   

Tel.: +886-2-7734-1437; Fax: +886-2-2363-09635. 



Received: 29 November 2012; in revised form: 21 January 2013 / Accepted: 4 February 2013 / 

Published: 6 February 2013 

 

Abstract: FL83B mouse hepatocytes were treated with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) to 

induce insulin resistance to investigate the effect of a wax apple aqueous extract (WAE) in 

insulin-resistant  mouse  hepatocytes.  The  uptake  of  2-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1, 

3-diazol-4-yl)amino]-2-deoxyglucose  (2  NBDG),

 

a  fluorescent 



D

-glucose  derivative,  was 

performed,  and  the  metabolism  of  carbohydrates  was  evaluated  by  examining  the 

expression  of  glycogenesis  or  glycolysis-related  proteins  in  insulin-resistant  hepatocytes. 

The  results  show  that  WAE  significantly  improves  the  uptake  of  glucose  and  enhances 

glycogen content in insulin-resistant FL83B mouse hepatocytes. The results from Western 

blot  analysis  also  reveal  that  WAE  increases  the  expression  of  glycogen  synthase  (GS), 

hexokinase  (HXK),  glucose-6-phosphate  dehydrogenase  (G6PD),  phosphofructokinase 

(PFK) and aldolase in  TNF-α treated cells, indicating that WAE may ameliorate  glucose 

metabolism  by  promoting  glycogen  synthesis  and  the  glycolysis  pathways  in 

insulin-resistant FL83B mouse hepatocytes. 

 

 

OPEN ACCESS

 


Nutrients 2013

456 

 

Keywords: wax  apple;  insulin  resistance;  glucose  metabolism;  glycogenesis;  glycolysis; 

FL83B mouse hepatocytes 

 

Abbreviations 

TNF-α,  tumor  necrosis  factor-α;  WAE,  wax  apple  aqueous  extract;  2-NBDG, 

2-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino]-2-deoxyglucose; 

KRB 


buffer, 

Krebs-Ringer 

Bicarbonate  buffer;  GS,  glycogen  synthase;  HXK,  hexokinase;  G6PD,  glucose-6-phosphate 

dehydrogenase;  PFK,  phosphofructokinase;  DM,  diabetes  mellitus;  F12K,  F12  Ham  Kaighn’s;  FBS, 

Fetal  bovine  serum;  PBS,  phosphate  buffered  saline;  SDS,  sodium  dodecyl  sulfate;  EDTA, 

ethylenediamine  tetraacetic  acid;  PMSF,  phenylmethanesulfonyl  fluoride;  SDS-PAGE,  sodium 

dodecyl  sulfate  polyacrylamide  gel  electrophoresis;  PBST,  phosphate  buffer  saline  and  Tween  20; 

HRP,  horseradish  peroxidase;  ECL,  enhanced  chemiluminescence;  G6P,  glucose-6-phosphate;   

PP  pathway,  pentose  phosphate  pathway;  NADPH,  nicotinamide  adenine  dinucleotide  phosphate 

reduced;  ROS,  reactive  oxygen  species;  PI3K,  phosphatidylinositol-3  kinase;  DHAP,   

dihydroxyacetone phosphate. 

1. Introduction 

Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disorder whose incidence is rapidly increasing. This chronic 

disease  is  characterized  by  hyperglycemia  resulting  from  deficiencies  in  insulin  secretion  and/or 

insulin action [1]. Type 2 DM is the most common form of diabetes, accounting for more than 90% of 

cases. Insulin resistance is a characteristic feature of Type 2 DM [2]. 

The hyperglycemia characterizing the disease is a result of altered glucose metabolism and results in 

numerous  complications,  such  as  nerve  and  microvascular  disease.

 

The  liver  is  an  insulin-sensitive 



organ that regulates energy homeostasis. Liver cells have been used in an in vitro model to evaluate 

and screen antihyperglycemic agents from food ingredients [2]. In addition, in vitro hepatocytes retain 

the  enzyme  activities  characteristic  of  the  intact  in  vivo  liver  [3];  thus,  they  may  provide  a  suitable 

model for examining liver function. 

Currently,  several  drugs  that  increase  insulin  sensitivity  are  being  administered  clinically  to 

ameliorate  Type  2  DM.  In  recent  years,  the  search  for  appropriate  hypoglycemic  agents  has  been 

focused on plants or herbs used in traditional medicine [4]. Myrtaceae plants are traditionally used to 

cure bronchitis, asthma, DM and inflammation by Europeans [5]. They demonstrate potent free radical 

scavenging,  anti-oxidant,  anti-mutagen  and  anticancer  activities  [6].  Wax  apple  (Syzygium 

samarangense (Blume) Merrill and Perry) belongs to the Myrtaceae plant family and is of economic 

importance  in  Asia  and  Taiwan.  Wax  apple  fruits  have  reportedly  demonstrated  antihyperglycemic 

activity  in  alloxan-induced  (Type  1  DM)  diabetic  mice  [7].  However,  studies  investigating  the 

association  between  wax  apples  and  insulin  resistance  (Type  2  DM)  are  lacking.  Moreover,  the 

mechanism by which wax apples alter glucose metabolism in Type 2 DM is not clearly elucidated. 

The present study aimed to investigate the effect of wax apple fruit extract (WAE) on carbohydrate 

metabolism  in  TNF-α-treated  insulin-resistant  FL83B  mouse  hepatocytes.  Glucose uptake, glycogen 


Nutrients 2013

457 

 

accumulation and the expression of proteins involved in glucose metabolism were evaluated in FL83B 

cells.  Additionally,  the  expressions  of  glycogenic  and  glycolytic  enzymes  were  analyzed  using 

Western blotting to identify the mechanisms underlying glucose metabolism in FL83B cells. 



2. Materials and Methods 

2.1. Chemicals and Reagents   

Insulin,  recombinant  mouse  TNF-α  and  F12  Ham  Kaighn’s  modification  (F12K)  medium  were 

purchased  from  Sigma-Aldrich  Co.  (St.  Louis,  MO,  USA).  Fetal  bovine  serum  (FBS)  was  obtained 

from  Gemini  Bio-Products  (Woodland,  CA,  USA).  The  fluorescent  dye  2-(N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1, 

3-diazol-4-yl)amino)-2-deoxyglucose (2-NBDG) was purchased from Invitrogen (Eugene, OR, USA). 

All of the chemicals used in this study were of analytical grade. 



2.2. Plant Material and the Extraction, Isolation and Purification of WAE 

The fruit of the wax apple (Syzygium samarangense (Blume) Merrill and Perry) was collected after 

the  third  week  of  blooming  in  2010,  July  from  Shuang-Hsi  Township,  Taipei  County,  Taiwan.  The 

method of Shen et al. [8] was used to obtain WAE from unripe wax apple fruit water extract into a 

freeze-dried  powder  for  further  study  (Figure  1).  An  aliquot  of  20  g  reconstituted  wax  apple  fruit 

extract was run through a Sephadex LH-20 (St. Louis, MO, USA) column with 0% to 100% MeOH 

(500  mL)  as  the  eluent.  The  fractionated  eluates  in  the  collector  from  single  experiments  were  then 

pooled  into  S1,  S2,  S3  and  S4  fractions  according  to  the  order  of  elution  and  the  thin  layer 

chromatography  (TLC)  profile.  A  silica  gel  precoated  plate  (Kieselgel  60  F254,  0.20  mm,  Merck, 

Darmstadt, Germany) with a mobile phase of benzene:ethyl-formate:formic acid = 1:5:2 was used for 

TLC  analysis.  Fraction  S3  was  run  through  the  MCI-gel  CHP  20P  (2  cm  ×  30  cm)  (Mitsubishi 

Chemical Industries, Tokyo, Japan) using gradient elution with MeOH-H2O (0:100, 10:90, 20:80 and 

30:70; 300 mL in  each  stage) to  obtain  fractions S-31 and S-32.  Fraction S-32 was run through  the 

Sephadex LH-20 column (2 cm × 30 cm) using gradient elution with H2O-MeOH to obtain fractions 

S-321  and  S-322.  Fraction  S-322  was  further  chromatographed  over  an  MCI-gel  CHP  20P  column 

using gradient elution with H2O-MeOH to obtain fraction A. Every 3 mL of fraction A was collected. 

Adjacent  fractions  were  pooled  based  on  the  TLC  profile  and  then  freeze-dried  as  a  powder   

(WAE, 7 mg).   



2.3. Cell Culture   

The experiments were performed on mouse liver FL83B cells; a hepatocyte cell line derived from a 

fetal mouse (15 day to 17 day). The cells were incubated in F12K containing 10% FBS and 1% penicillin 

and streptomycin  (Invitrogen Corporation, Camarillo, CA, USA) in 10 cm Petri dishes at 37 °C and 

5% CO

2

. Experiments were performed on cells that were 80% to 90% confluent. 



Nutrients 2013

458 

 

Figure 1. The flow chart for fractionation of wax apple fruit water extract. 

 

2.4. Induction of Insulin Resistance Using TNF-α and Cell Preparation 

The  methods  were  adopted  from  Huang  et  al.  [9],  with  minor  modifications.  Briefly,  the  FL83B 

cells were seeded in 10 cm dishes and then incubated at 37 °C for 48 h to achieve 80% confluence. 

Serum-free  F12K  medium  containing  20  ng/mL  recombinant  mouse  TNF-α  was  then  added  before 

incubating  for  5  h  to  induce  insulin  resistance.  The  cells  were  then  transferred  to  another  F12K 

medium containing 5 mM glucose, without (basal) or with 1000 nM insulin and 6.25 ng/mL WAE and 

incubated for 3 h at 37 °C. An assay of glucose uptake was then performed. 



2.5. Determination of Glycogen   

The  accumulation  of  glycogen  in  FL83B  cells  was  determined  after the 3 h incubation noted in   

2.4 using a glycogen assay kit (Biovision  Corp., Mountain  View, CA, USA). Briefly, the cells were 

collected,  washed  twice  with  ice-cold  PBS  and  homogenized  in  200  μL  deionized  water.  The 

homogenates were boiled for 5 min to inactivate enzymes and centrifuged at 13,000× g for 5 min to 

remove the pellet. Fifty microliters of supernatant of each sample were mixed with 2 μL of Hydrolysis 

Enzyme Mix in a 96-well plate, and the plate was incubated at room temperature for 10 min. A 50-μL 

aliquot of the reaction mix (46 μL Development Buffer, 2 μL Development Enzyme Mix, 2 μL OxiRed 

Probe)  was  added  to  each  well,  and  the  plate  was  incubated  at  room  temperature  for  30  min  in  the 

dark.  Absorbance  at  570  nm  was  measured  using  a  microplate  reader  (Sunrise,  TECAN,  Salzburg, 

Austria).  A  standard  glycogen  curve  (0,  0.4,  0.8,  1.2,  1.6  and  2.0  μg/well)  was  calculated  by  the   

above method. 

 

 


Nutrients 2013

459 

 

2.6. Protein Extraction from Cells 

After pre-incubation in serum-free F12K medium with or without TNF-α at 37 °C for 5 h, FL83B 

cells were transferred to another serum-free F12K medium with/without insulin or WAE for 3 h. The 

medium was removed. The cells were washed twice with ice cold PBS and then lysed in ice cold lysis 

buffer containing 20 mM Tris-HCl (pH 7.4), 1% Triton X-100, 0.1% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS),   

2 mM  ethylenediamine tetraactic acid  (EDTA), 10 mM  NaF, 1 mM  phenylmethanesulfonyl  fluoride 

(PMSF), 500 μM sodium orthovanadate and 10 μg/mL antipain. Cell lysates were sonicated 4 times 

every 5 s with ice cooling and then centrifuged (13,000× g, 20 min) to recover the supernatant. The 

supernatant  was  removed  as  the  cell  extract  and  stored  at  −80  °C  for  further  use.  The  protein 

concentration in the cell extract was determined using Bio-Rad protein assay dye reagent (Richmond, 

VA, USA). 

2.7. Western Blot Analysis 

Aliquots of the supernatant, each containing 50 μg protein, were used to evaluate the expression of 

glycogen  synthase  (GS),  hexokinase  (HXK),  glucose-6-phosphate  dehydrogenase  (G6PD), 

phosphofructokinase (PFK) and aldolase. The samples were subjected to 10% sodium dodecyl sulfate 

polyacrylamide  gel  electrophoresis  (SDS-PAGE).  The  proteins  were  electrotransferred  to  a 

polyvinylidene difluoride membrane. The membrane was incubated with block buffer (PBS containing 

0.05% Tween-20 and 5% w/v nonfat dry milk) for 1 h, washed with PBS containing 0.05% Tween-20 

(PBST) 3 times and then probed with 1:2000 diluted solutions of anti-GS (Cell Signaling Technology, 

Beverly, MA, USA), 1:1000 diluted solution of anti-HXK, anti-G6PD and anti-PFK antibody (Gene 

Tex,  Irvine,  CA,  USA)  overnight  at  4  °C.  The  intensity  of  the  blots  probed  with  1:4000  diluted 

solution of mouse monoclonal antibody to bind  actin (Gene Tex, Irvine, CA, USA) was used as the 

control to ensure that a constant amount of protein was loaded into each lane of the gel. The membrane 

was  washed  3  times  for  5  min  each  time  in  phosphate  buffer  saline  and  0.05%  Tween  20  (PBST), 

shaken  in  a  solution  of  horseradish  peroxidase  (HRP)-linked  anti-mouse  IgG  or  anti-rabbit  IgG 

secondary antibody, washed a further 3 times for 5 min each time in PBST and then exposed to the 

enhanced chemiluminescence (ECL) reagent (Millipore) according to the manufacturer’s instructions. 

The  films  were  scanned  and  analyzed  by  using  UVP  Biospectrum  image  system  (Level,   

Cambridge, UK). 



2.8. Statistical Analysis 

The  data  were  analyzed  using  one-way  ANOVA  and  Duncan’s  new  multiple  range  tests.   

p-value < 0.05 was considered significant. 

 

 



Nutrients 2013

460 

 

3. Results 

3.1. Effect of WAE on Glycogen Content in Insulin Resistant FL83B Mouse Hepatocytes 

In mouse liver FL83B cells, exposure to insulin (1000 nM) for 3 h significantly increased glycogen 

content  about  5.69-fold,  from  0.26  ±  0.02 μg/mg  protein  in  the  normal  group  to  1.74  ±  0.28 μg/mg 

protein in the positive control (Figure 2). There was a 133.3% increment in glycogen in TNF-α-treated 

insulin-resistant cells that were treated with WAE, as well as insulin (0.63 ± 0.55 μg/mg protein), as 

compared with the cells treated with TNF-α, as well as insulin (0.27 ± 0.01 μg/mg protein) (Figure 2). 



Figure  2.  Effect  of  wax  apple  aqueous  extract  (WAE)  on  glycogen  content  in 

TNF-α-treated  FL83B  mouse  hepatocytes.  FL83B  cells  were  incubated  in  serum-free   

F12 Ham Kaighn’s (F12K) medium, with or without added TNF-α (20 ng/mL), incubated 

at 37 °C for 5 h, transferred to another serum-free F12K medium without (basal) or with 

insulin (1000 nM), WAE (6.25 μg/mL) and then incubated for an additional 3 h. Data of 

glycogen content are expressed as the mean ± SD, n = 4. Letters a~c indicate significant 

differences  at  the  5%  level.  N:  Normal  group,  cells  incubated  with  F-12K  medium.   

C:  Control  group,  cells  incubated  with  F-12K  medium  containing  1000  nM  insulin.   

T: TNF-α treated insulin-resistant group. 

N

C

T

WAE

Glycoge



conten

t (

g)



0.0

0.5

1.0

1.5

2.0

2.5

a

b



c

c

 



TNF-α 

− 

− 



Insulin 



− 



WAE (6.25 ng/mL) 

− 

− 

− 





3.2. Glycogen Synthase Expression 

The addition of insulin alone increased the GS expression level by 20.8% in normal FL83B cells 

(Figure  3).  The  GS  expression  level  of  TNF-α-induced  insulin-resistant  FL83B  cells  decreased  by 

28.6%  compared  to  that  of  the  control  group.  However,  WAE  at  a  concentration  of  6.25  μg/mL 

increased GS expression by 51.7% in insulin-resistant FL83B mouse hepatocytes (< 0.05) (Figure 3). 

 

 


Nutrients 2013

461 

 

Figure 3. Effect of WAE on glycogen synthase expression in TNF-α-treated FL83B mouse 

hepatocytes.  FL83B  cells  were  incubated  in  serum-free  F12K  medium,  with  or  without 

added  TNF-α  (20  ng/mL),  incubated  at  37  °C  for  5  h,  transferred  to  another  serum-free 

F12K medium with or without insulin (1000 nM), WAE (6.25 μg/mL) and then incubated 

for an additional 30 min. The relative expressions of glycogen synthase in each treatment 

group  were  calculated  using  actin  as  the  standard.  Letters  a~d  indicate  significant 

differences at the 5% level. 

 

3.3. Glycolysis-Related Enzyme Expression 

Figure 4 shows the effect of WAE on glucose metabolite-related enzyme expression in TNF-α-treated 

FL83B  cells.  The  results  show  that  the  expression  of  HXK,  G6PD,  PFK  and  aldolase  in  insulin 

alone-treated FL83B cells increased by 9.4%, 8.7%, 5.3% and 45.1%, respectively, compared to that of 

the  normal  group.  By  contrast,  the  HXK,  G6PD  and  PFK  expression  levels  of  the  TNF-α-treated 

FL83B cells decreased by 9.8%, 29.0% and 21.4%, respectively, compared to that of the normal group 

(Figure 4). However, treatment with FWFE increased expression of HXK, G6PD, PFK and aldolase by 

39.2%,  101.4%,  69.5%  and  40.7%,  respectively,  compared  to  the  TNF-α-treated  group.  In  addition, 

treatment with WAE increased expression of HXK, G6PD, PFK and aldolase by 15.7%, 31.6%, 26.7% 

and 4.1%, respectively, compared to the insulin alone-treated control group (Figure 4). 

 

 


Nutrients 2013

462 

 

Figure  4.  Effect  of  WAE  on  glucose  metabolite-related  enzymes  expression  in 

TNF-α-treated FL83B mouse hepatocytes. FL83B cells were incubated in serum-free F12K 

medium, with or without added TNF-α (20 ng/mL), incubated at 37 °C for 5 h, transferred 

to  another  serum-free  F12K  medium  with  or  without  insulin  (1000  nM),  WAE   

(6.25  μg/mL)  and  then  incubated  for  an  additional  30  min.  The  relative  expressions  of 

hexokinase,  glucose-6-phosphate  dehydrogenase,  phosphofructokinase  and  aldolase  in 

each  treatment  group  were  calculated  using  actin  as  the  standard.  Letters  a~d  indicate 

significant differences at the 5% level. 

 

4. Discussion 

The proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance 

by  the  impairment  of  insulin  signal  transduction  in  cells  and  animals.  The  possible  mechanisms  for 

TNF-α to  impair insulin  signal  transduction involve the downregulation  of insulin  receptor (IR)  and 

insulin  receptor  substrate-1  (IRS-1)  expressions,  the  inhibition  of  tyrosyl  phosphorylation  of  IR  and 

IRS-1,  the  increase  in  serine/threonine  phosphorylation  of  IRS-1,  the  decrease  in  the  activities  of 

insulin  receptor  kinase  and  protein  tyrosine  phosphatases  (PTPs)  and  the  inhibition  of  insulin 

stimulated  glucose  transporter  [9].  In  our  previous  study,  the  uptake  of  fluorescent  dye  2-NBDG  in 

TNF-α-induced insulin-resistant FL83B cells decreased by 1.4% and 12.9%, respectively, compared to 

those  of  the  normal  and  insulin  alone-treated  group.  However,  WAE  at  the  concentration  of   



Nutrients 2013

463 

 

6.25  ng/mL,  increased  glucose  uptake  in  TNF-α-treated  FL83B  mouse  hepatocytes  [8]. WAE  might 

alleviate insulin resistance in TNF-α-treated FL83B cells by activating PI3K-Akt/PKB signaling and 

inhibiting  inflammatory  response  via  suppression  of  JNK,  rather  than  ERK,  activation  [8]. 

Resurreccion-Magno et al. [7] investigated the hypoglycemic bioactivity of wax apple fruit in Type 1 

DM  mice  and  suggested  that  chalcones,  an  intermediate  product  of  isoflavone  biosynthesis,  and 

polyphenol derivatives in plants and their derivates are the main anti-diabetic components.   

The liver releases glucose by hydrolyzing glycogen and uptakes glucose from the blood to maintain 

blood glucose homeostasis [10]. The modulation of glucose metabolism involves the performance of 

numerous  glucose  regulating  enzymes  in  the  liver  [11,12].  Panneerselvam  and  Govindaswamy  [13] 

found the activity of enzymes involved in glucose metabolism, including HXK, G6PD, PFK and GS, 

were declined in diabetic rats. GS is the primary enzyme for catalyzing glycogen synthesis in the liver. 

Insulin induces a series of signal transduction pathways and dephosphorylates GS, which activates this 

enzyme  and,  consequently,  increases  glycogen  content  and  reduces  the  blood  glucose  level  under 

normal conditions [14]. The metabolism of glucose can be mediated by insulin through insulin signal 

transduction,  which  stimulates  the  subsequent  utilization  of  glucose  and  synthesis  of  glycogen  in   

cells  [15].  TNF-α  may  interfere  with  insulin  signal  transduction  via  phosphorylation  of  insulin 

receptors, tyrosyl phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 and activation of phosphatidylinositol-3 

kinase (PI3K), therefore influencing glucose metabolism [16,17]. Recently, TNF-α has been reported 

to inhibit the glucose uptake ability and decrease the expression of PI3K in FL83B cells [9]. Inhibition 

of PI3K results in interference of gene modulation, glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis in HepG2 

hepatoma  cells [18].  The results from  this study show that TNF-α may interfere  with  and cause  the 

reduction of GS expression in the FL83B cells. WAE may increase the glycogen levels (Figure 2) and 

expression of GS in insulin-resistant FL83B mouse hepatocytes (Figure 3), indicating that WAE may 

improve  insulin  sensitivity,  thus  promoting  the  synthesis  of  glycogen  in  insulin-resistant  FL83B   

mouse hepatocytes. 

Most cells in the body are dependent upon a continuous supply of glucose to supply energy in the 

form of ATP [19]. Glycolysis is triggered when glucose is transported into cells. In a Type 2 DM rats 

model, the activity of HXK is significantly decreased [20]. HXK is a key enzyme for the first step of 

glycolysis that catalyzes phosphorylation of glucose into glucose-6-phosphate (G6P). Insulin has been 

reported  to  increase  the  activity  of  HXK  and  enhance  glucose  utilization  in  muscle  cells  [21]. 

Treatment with TNF-α decreased the HXK expression level in normal FL83B cells. However, WAE 

increased  the  HXK  expression  level  in  insulin-resistant  FL83B  mouse  hepatocytes  (Figure  4A), 

indicating that WAE may enhance the glycolysis pathway in insulin-resistant FL83B mouse hepatocytes. 

G6PD is the rate determining step key enzyme in the pentose phosphate pathway (PP pathway) that 

catalyzes glucose-6-phosphate to produce 6-phosphogluconolactone, as well as nicotinamide adenine 

dinucleotide phosphate reduced (NADPH) [22]. Environmental stresses, such as drugs, inflammatory 

reactions,  UV  exposure,  ion  radiation  and  oxidative  chemicals,  may  lead  to  the  production  of 

substantial  amounts  of  reactive  oxygen  species  (ROS)  and  high  oxidative  stress  and,  subsequently, 

inhibit G6PD activity in the PP pathway [23]. TNF-α triggers the production of ROS and depresses the 

activity of  G6PD in  cells [24]. Insulin  promotes the production of NADPH catalyzed by G6PD  and 

increases  the  anti-oxidative  capacity  in  hepatocytes  and  adipocytes.  The  activity  of  G6PD  is  also 

modulated by the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) pathway in insulin signaling cascades, which 


Nutrients 2013

464 

 

simultaneously  regulates  glucose  metabolism  [25].  In  this  study,  WAE  significantly  increased  the 

expression of G6PD in insulin-resistant FL83B hepatocytes compared to results in the control group 

(Figure 4B), indicating that WAE may promote cells to go through the pentose phosphate pathway for 

glucose metabolism. 

In  contrast  to  glucose,  fructose  is  entirely  metabolized  in  the  liver.  PFK  is  the  rate  determining 

enzyme  in  the  first  step  of  fructose  metabolism.  PFK  catalyzes  the  phosphorylation  of  C-1  in 

fructose-6-phosphate,  causing  the  irreversible  formation  of  fructose-1,6-bisphosphate  and  promoting 

glycolysis. Strack [26] reported that the activity  of PFK  significantly decreased in  tissues, including 

liver, muscles and adipose of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. However, treatment with metformin 

normalized  the  PFK  activity  in  muscles  and  adipocytes,  but  partially  restored  PFK  activity  in 

hepatocytes of those diabetic rats. It may be that the long-term exposure to low glucose concentrations 

irreversibly inactivates glucose metabolic enzymes in liver and decreases the efficiency of glycolysis 

and glycogenesis as a consequence [26]. The activity of PFK may be regulated through cytokines or 

insulin secreted from cells [27]. Insulin increases the production of fructose-2,6-bisphosphate, a PFK 

activating  factor,  and activates PFK [28]. Aspirin has been recognized to  effectively  restore  glucose 

metabolism  by  repairing  the  quaternary  structure  of  PFK  in  diabetic  rats  [29].  The  results  from  this 

study  show  that  WAE  increased  the  expression  of  PFK  in  insulin-resistant  FL83B  (Figure  4C), 

suggesting that WAE may provide a similar effect to aspirin in DM patients. 

Aldolase  is  an  essential  enzyme  in  glycolysis,  which  catalyzes  hexose  bisphosphates  (i.e.

fructose-1,6-bisphosphate) decomposition into triose phosphates, including glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate 

and  dihydroxyacetone  phosphate  (DHAP)  via  a  reversible  aldol  condensation  reaction  [30].  The 

activity  of  aldolase  has  been  reported  to  be  affected  by  cytokines  and  various  environmental   

stresses [31]. The results from this study show that TNF-α suppresses aldolase expression; however, 

WAE increases the aldolase expression of TNF-α treated cells (Figure 4D), indicating that WAE may 

alleviate  the  damage  from  free  radicals,  such  as  oxidative  stress  or  ROS,  of  hepatocytes  caused  by 

TNF-α, thereby improving the metabolism of hepatic glucose. 

5. Conclusions 

The  present  study  investigated  the  effects  of  WAE  on  the  metabolism  of  carbohydrates  in 

TNF-α-induced  insulin-resistant  FL83B  mouse  hepatocytes.  The  results  show  that  WAE  improves 

glucose  uptake  in  TNF-α-treated  FL83B  cells.  Furthermore, WAE increases expression of GS, HXK, 

G6PD, PFK and  aldolase, suggesting increased  glycolysis and  gluconeogenesis, and WAE increases 

glycogen storage.  These  findings  suggest  that  wax  apple  fruit  may  mitigate  the  hyperglycemia  in   

Type 2 DM patients; therefore, it has the potential to be developed into a functional  food or dietary 

supplement  that  prevents  and/or  alleviates  DM.  Further  investigation  on  the  purification  and 

identification of active compounds in WAE is currently underway in our laboratory. 

Acknowledgements 

Financial  support  (NSC  97-2313-B-214-003-MY3)  from  the  National  Science  Council,  the 

Republic of China (Taiwan) is gratefully acknowledged. Special thanks are due to James S. B. Wu of 


Nutrients 2013

465 

 

the  Institute  of  Food  Science  and  Technology  at  National  Taiwan  University  for  his  critical 

suggestions in experiments. Our gratitude also goes to the Academic Paper Editing Clinic, NTNU. 

Conflict of Interest 

The authors declare no conflict of interest. 



References 

1.  Roa, B.K.; Sudarshan, P.R.; Rajasekhar, M.D.; Nagaraju, N.; Roa, C.A. Antidiabetic activity of 



Terminalia pallida fruit in alloxan induced diabetic rats. J. Ethnopharmacol. 2003, 85, 169–172. 

2.  Cheng, H.L.; Huang, H.K.; Chang, C.I.; Tsai, C.P.; Chou, C.H. A cell-based screening identifies 

compounds from the stem of Momordica charantia that overcome insulin resistance and activate 

AMP activated protein kinase. J. Agric. Food Chem. 200856, 6835–6843. 

3.  Hengstler, J.G.; Utesch, D.; Steinberg, P.; Platt, K.L.; Diener, B.; Ringel, M.; Swales, N.; Fischer, 

T.;  Biefang,  K.;  Gerl,  M.;  Böttger,  T.;  Oesch,  F.  Cryopreserved  primary  hepatocytes  as  a 

constantly available in vitro model for the evaluation of human and animal drug metabolism and 

enzyme induction. Drug Metab. Rev. 200032, 81–118. 

4.  Rates, S.M. Plants as source of drugs. Toxicon 200139, 603–613. 

5.  Gurib-Fakim, A. Phytochemical screening of 38 Mauritian medicinal plants. Rev. Agric. Sucr. Ile 



Maurice 1996, 69, 42–50. 

6.  Neergheen,  V.;  Soobrattee,  M.;  Bahorun,  T.;  Aruoma,  O.  Characterization  of  the  phenolic 

constituents  in  Mauritian  endemic  plants  as  determinants  of  their  antioxidant  activities  in  vitro.   

J. Plant Physiol. 2006163, 787–799. 

7.  Resurreccion-Magno, M.; Villasenor,  I.; Harada,  N.; Monde, K. Antihyperglycaemic flavonoids 

from Syzygium samarangense (Blume) Merr. and Perry. Phytother. Res. 200519, 246–251. 

8.  Shen,  S.C.;  Chang,  W.C.;  Chang,  C.L.  Fraction  from  wax  apple  [Syzygium  samarangense 

(Blume)  Merrill  and  Perry]  fruit  extract  ameliorates  insulin  resistance  via  modulating  insulin 

signaling and inflammation pathway in tumor necrosis factor α-treated FL83B mouse hepatocytes. 



Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2012, 13, 8562–8577. 

9.  Huang, D.W.; Shen, S.C.; Wu, J.S.B. Effects of caffeic acid and cinnamic acid on glucose uptake 

in insulin-resistant mouse hepatocytes. J. Agric. Food Chem. 200957, 7687–7692. 

10.  Kim, H.P.; Son, K.H.; Chang, H.W.; Kang, S.S. Anti-inflammatory plant flavonoids and cellular 

action mechanism. J. Pharmacol. Sci. 200496, 229–245. 

11.  Ferrer, J.C.; Favre, C.; Gomis, R.R.; Fernandez-Novell, J.M.; Garica-Rocha, M.; de la Iglesia, N.; 

Cid, E.; Guinovart, J.J. Control of glycogen deposition. FEBS Lett. 2003546, 127–132. 

12.  Iynedjian, P.B. Molecular physiology of mammalian glucokinase.  Cell. Mol. Life Sci. 200966

27–42. 

13.  Panneerselvam,  R.S.;  Govindaswamy,  S.  Effect  of  sodium  molybdate  on  carbohydrate 



metabolizing enzymes in alloxan-induced diabetic rat. J. Nutr. Biochem. 2002, 13, 21–26. 

14.  Saltiel,  A.R.;  Kahn,  C.R.  Insulin  signaling  and  the  regulation  of  glucose  and  lipid  metabolism. 



Nature 2001, 414, 799–806. 

Nutrients 2013

466 

 

15.  Zick, Y. Insulin resistance: A phosphorylation-based uncoupling of insulin signaling. Trends Cell 



Biol. 200111, 437–441. 

16.  Cheng, J.T.; Liu, I.M. Stimulatory effect of caffeic acid on α1A-adrenoceptors to increase glucose 

uptake into cultured C2C12 cells. Naunyn-Schmiedeberg’s Arch. Pharmacol. 2000362, 122–127.   

17.  Cichy,  S.B.;  Uddin,  S.;  Danilkovich,  A.;  Guo,  S.;  Klippel,  A.;  Unterman,  T.G.  Protein  kinase 

B/Akt  mediates  effect  of  insulin  on  hepatic  insulin-like  growth  factor-binding  protein-1  gene 

expression through a conserved insulin response sequence. J. Biol. Chem. 1998273, 6482–6487.   

18.  González-Espinosa,  C.;  Romero-Ávila,  M.T.;  Mora-Rodríguez,  D.M.;  González-Espinosa,  D.; 

García-Sáinz,  J.A.  Molecular  cloning  and  functional  expression  of  the  guinea  pig 

α1A-adrenoceptor. Eur. J. Pharmacol. 2001426, 147–155. 

19.  Gropper,  S.S.;  Smith,  J.L.;  Groff,  J.L.  Advanced  Nutrition  and  Human  Metabolism,  5th  ed.; 

Wadsworth Publishing: Belmont, CA, USA, 2009; p. 72. 

20.  Clore, J.N.; Stillman, J.; Sugerman, H. Glucose-6-phosphate flux in  vitro is  increased in  type 2 

diabetes. Diabetes 200049, 969–974. 

21.  Ivy,  J.L.;  Sherman,  W.M.;  Cuyler,  C.L.;  Katz,  A.L.  Exercise  and  diet  reduce  muscle  insulin 

resistance in obese Zucker rat. Am. J. Physiol. 1986251, E299–E305. 

22.  Abdel-Rahim,  E.A.;  El-Saadany,  S.S.;  Abo-Eytta,  A.M.;  Wasif,  M.M.  The  effect  of  sammo 

administration  on  some  fundamental  enzymes  of  pentose  phosphate  pathway  and  energy 

metabolities of alloxanized rats. Nahrung 199236, 8–14. 

23.  Nikolaidis,  M.G.;  Jamurtas,  A.Z.;  Paschalis,  V.;  Kostaropoulos,  I.A.;  Kladi-Skandali,  A.; 

Balamitsi, V.; Koutedakis, Y.; Kouretas, D. Exercise-induced oxidative stress in G6PD-deficient 

individuals. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc. 200638, 1443–1450. 

24.  Ho, H.Y.; Cheng, M.L.; Chiu, D.T. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-from oxidative stress to 

cellular functions and degenerative diseases. Redox. Rep. 2007, 12, 109–118. 

25.  Wagle,  A.;  Jivraj,  S.;  Garlock,  G.L.;  Stapleton,  S.R.  Insulin  regulation  of  glucose-6-phosphate 

dehydrogenase gene expression is rapamycin-sensitive and requires phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. 

J. Biol. Chem. 1998, 273, 14968–14974. 

26.  Strack, T. Genetics  and  molecular biology  protein  kinase C-[zeta] as an  AMP-activated protein 

kinase kinase kinase: The protein kinase C-[zeta]-LKB1-AMP-activated protein kinase pathway. 

Drugs Today (Barc.) 200844, 303–314. 

27.  Silva,  D.D.;  Zancan,  P.;  Coelho,  W.S.;  Gomez,  L.S.;  Sola-Penna,  M.  Metformin  reverses 

hexokinase  and  6-phosphofructo-1-kinase  inhibition  in  skeletal  muscle,  liver  and  adipose  tissue 

from streptozotocin-induced diabetic mouse. Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 2010496, 53–60. 

28.  Deprez, J.; Vertommen, D.; Alessi, D.R.; Hue, L.; Rider, M.H. Phosphorylation and activation of 

heart  6-phosphofructo-2-kinase  by  protein  kinase  B  and  other  protein  kinases  of  the  insulin 

signaling cascades. J. Biol. Chem. 1997, 272, 17269–17275. 

29.  Spitz,  G.A.;  Furtado,  C.M.;  Sola-Penna,  M.;  Zancan,  P.  Acetylsalicylic  acid  and  salicylic  acid 

decrease  tumor  cell  viability  and  glucose  metabolism  modulating  6-phosphofructo-1-kinase 

structure and activity. Biochem. Pharmacol. 200977, 46–53. 

30.  Yamakoshi,  Y.;  Nagano,  T.;  Hu,  J.C.;  Yamakoshi,  F.;  Simmer,  J.P.  Porcine  dentin  sialoprotein 

glycosylation and glycosaminoglycan attachments. BMC Biochem. 20113, 1–13. 



Nutrients 2013

467 

 

31.  Huang,  Y.;  Shinzawa,  H.;  Togashi,  H.;  Takahashi,  T.;  Kuzumaki,  T.;  Otsu,  K.;  Ishikawa,  K. 

Interleukin-6 down regulates expression of the aldolase B and albumin genes through a pathway 

involving the activation of tyrosine kinase. Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 1995320, 203–209. 

©  2013  by  the  authors;  licensee  MDPI,  Basel,  Switzerland.  This  article  is  an  open  access  article 

distributed  under  the  terms  and  conditions  of  the  Creative  Commons  Attribution  license 



(http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/). 


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə