7 20 December, 2016 Featuring the plants of the Australian



Yüklə 27.47 Kb.
PDF просмотр
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü27.47 Kb.

7 - 20 December, 2016 

Featuring the plants of the Australian 

National Botanic Gardens, Canberra, ACT 

written and illustrated by Friends Rosalind 

and Benjamin Walcott

Today  we  will  visit  the  Rock  Garden, 

starting at the top and working our way 

down the hill.

1. On your left as you enter the Rock Garden 

from the top is Scaevola albida, a 

prostrate 

shrub  native  to  a  range  of  habitats  in 

Queensland,  NSW,  Victoria

,  Tasmania  and 

South  Australia  (photo  above).  It

  is  a 


groundcover  with  mauve  fan  flowers  on 

light green foliage.



2. 

Also  on  your  left  is  Anigozanthos 



flavidus, or Tall Kangaroo Paw, with rusty 

orange  paw  flowers  on  thin  stems  above 

tall clumps of strappy green foliage (photo 

next page top left). All kangaroo paws are 

native to Western Australia and the flowers 

are bird pollinated.



14.  On  your  right  in  front  of  the  waterfall  is 

Eremophila  christopheri    with  mauve  bells 

on a small bush with bright green leaves (photo 

below).  It  is  found  in  the  wild  in  southern 

Northern  Territory.  It  is  named  after 

Christopher  Giles  who  first  collected  this 

species.


12.  On  your  right  is  Hibbertia  pedunculata 

with  bright  yellow  flowers  and  fine  creeping 

foliage (photo below left)  The species name 

‘pedunculata’  refers  to  the  flower  having  a 

peduncle or long stalk. This plant grows in the 

wild in coastal NSW and eastern Victoria.



13. On your left is Dianella caerulea with short 

grass-like  foliage  and  pale  blue  sheaths  of 

flowers (photo above right). This plant is native 

to  the  eastern  states  of  Australia  including 

Tasmania.

15.  Also  on  your  right  is  the  striking 

Doryanthes  excelsa  or  Gymea  Lily  (photo 

below). This plant is 

indigenous to the coastal 

areas of New South Wales near Sydney. It has 

sword-like leaves more than a metre long and 

flower spikes 2-4 metres high.

A publication of the Friends 

of  the  Australian  National 

Botanic Gardens

1,2

3

4

5

6,7

8,9,10


11

12

13

14

15

4. Bear left to see on your right Xanthorrhoea 

johnsonii  or  Grass  Tree  which  has  been 

burned to stimulate new growth (photo below 

left).  The  spikes  are  covered  with  many  tiny 

white flowers whose nectar is attractive to birds 

and insects. The trunk of this Grass Tree can 

grow up to 5 metres tall and the  plant is found 

in Queensland and New South Wales. 

5.  On  your  left  is  Prostanthera  cuneata    or 

Alpine Mint Bush, a small shrub with wedge-

shaped, dark green aromatic foliage and white 

trumpet flowers (photo above right). This plant 

occurs  in  southeastern  Australia,  including 

Tasmania.



6. 

On your right is Verticordia galeata, 

showy plant with small, bright yellow, honey 

scented flowers in profusion (photo below). 

IIt  is  found  naturally  near  Geraldton, 

Western Australia.



8. Bear left across the plank bridge to see on 

your  right  Grevillea  plurijuga  in  a  pot  with 

fresh  green  upright  foliage  and  long  stems 

ending in purplish pink flowers (photo below). 

It  grows  naturally  near  Esperance,  Western 

Australia.



9. Turn right down the steps to see on your left 

in a pot Hakea victoria or Royal Hakea with 

stem-clasping,  green  veined  foliage  with 

prickly edges (photo below). This remarkable 

foliage  develops  different  colours  of  cream, 

yellow, orange and red .This plant is found in 

a restricted area on the south coast of Western 

Australia.



10.  Further  on  your  left  is  Verticordia 

pennigera  in  a  pot  showing    bright  pink 

terminal  clusters  of  fringed  flowers  on  tiny 

grey-green 

foliage 


(photo 

below 


left). 

Verticordia  in  Latin  means  ‘turner  of  hearts’. 

This  beautiful  genus  comes  mostly  from 

southwestern Western Australia.



11.  Also  on  your  left  is  Alyogyne  huegelii 

‘Misty’,  a  very  attractive  selection  of    A. 

huegelii with pale mauve flowers with maroon 

centres and coarse green foliage (photo above 

right)

.

7.  Also  on  your  right  is  Pileanthus 



vernicosus,  or  Copper-cups,  an  erect  small 

shrub with tiny light-green foliage and salmon 

flowers (photo above ). It can be found naturally 

in Western Australian coastal heathlands, sand 

dunes  and  plains  between  Geraldton  and 

Carnarvon.



3.  Still  on  your  left  is  Grevillea  ‘Mason’s 

Hybrid’,  a  spreading  bush  with  large  spider 

blooms of pink, red and orange (photo above 

right).  This  hybrid  arose  from  seed  collected 

from  an  upright  glaucous  form  of  Grevillea 



bipinnatifida. The other parent is presumed to 

be G. banksii.




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə