Abstract—



Yüklə 79.82 Kb.
PDF просмотр
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü79.82 Kb.

 

 



 

Abstract

 The present study aimed to evaluate Anti-inflamatory 

activity  of  different  fruits  viz  Phyllanthus  emblica,  Limonia 



acidissima, Syzygium cumini, Artocarpus hirsutus, Carissa congesta, 

Anacardium  occidentale.  Anti-inflammatory  activity  was  evaluated 

using  Albumin  denaturation  assay  and  Proteinase  inhibitory  activity 

at  different  concentrations.    Diclofenac  sodium  was  used  as  a 

reference  drugs for the study of Anti- inflammatory activity. Among 

six  fruits,  Phyllanthus  emblica  showed  highest  inhibition  in  both 

Albumin  denaturation  assay  and  Proteinase  inhibitory  activity  with 

IC

50

 values 85.93µg/ml and 97.24µg/ml respectively. Fruit extract of 



Artocarpus  hirsutus  was  showed  lowest  inhibition  with  IC

50

  values 



284.48µg/ml  and  297.60µg/ml  for  Albumin  denaturation  and 

Proteinase  inhibitory  activity  respectively.  In  Albumin  denaturation 

assay,  Diclofenac  sodium  showed  highest  inhibition  at  200µg/ml 

(92.64±2.30%) 

and 

percentage 



inhibition 

at 


200µg/ml 

(90.08±2.56%) for Proteinase inhibition activity. 

 

Keywords

  Albumin  denaturation,  Anti-inflammatory  activity, 

Diclofenac sodium, Proteinase inhibition. 

 

I.



 

I

NTRODUCTION



 

 NFLAMMATION 

is  a  process  by  which  the  body's  white 

blood  cells  and  substances  they  produce  protect  us  from 

infection  with  foreign  organisms,  such  as  bacteria  and 

viruses.  When  cells  in  the  body  are  damaged  by  microbes, 

physical agents or chemical agents, the injury is in the form of 

stress.  Symptoms  of  inflammation  include  redness,  swelling, 

and  pain,  joint  stiffness,  loss  of  joint  function  as  a  result  of 

infection, irritation, or injury. Inflammation can be external or 

internal.  

Plants  may  become  the  base  for  the  development  of  a  new 

medicine  or  they  may  be  used  as  phytomedicine  for  the 

treatment  of  disease [1]. In this growing interest, many of the 

phytochemical  bioactive  compounds  from  medicinal  plants 

have shown many pharmacological activities [2], [3]. Most of 

the Anti-inflammatory drugs available in the market, having a 

wide range of problems such as efficacy and undesired effects 

including  gastrointestinal  tract  disorders  and  other  unwanted 

effects, 

gastrointestinal 

disturbances, 

renal 

damages, 



respiratory  depression  [4],  [5].  This  situation  highlights  the 

need for advent of safe, novel and effective analgesic and anti-

inflammatory compounds [6], [7]. 

 

1



  Srividya,    Department  of  Biotechnology,    Manipal  Institute  of 

Technology,  Manipal  University,  Manipal,    Karnataka,  India  .( 

Phone:9986125116,  E-mail: vidya221@gmail.com 

2

Department  of  Post  graduate  studies  and  Research  in  Biosciences, 

Mangalore University, Mangalagangothri, Karnataka, India. 

Phyllanthus  emblica  has  been  used  to  reduce  pain  [8]  and 

fever  treatments by rural populations in its growing areas [9]. 



Limonia  acidissima,  considered  to  be  a  hepatoprotectant, 

possess  different  biological  activities  namely  adaptogenic 

activity  against  blood  impurities,  leucorrhoea,  dyspepsia  and 

jaundice.  Traditionally,  all  parts  of  the  plants  are  given  as 

natural medicine as a cure for various ailments [10]. Although 

Phyllanthus  emblica,  Limonia  acidissima,  Syzygium  cumini, 

Artocarpus 

hirsutus, 

Carissa 

congesta, 

Anacardium 

occidentale  were  widely  used  in  ethnomedicine  for  the 

treatment  of  inflammatory  and  related  disorders,  their  anti- 

inflammatory  properties  have  not  yet  been  pharmacologically 

evaluated. Hence, the present study was undertaken to evaluate 

anti-inflammatory activity of methanol fruit extracts by in-vitro 

methods. 

II.

 

M



ATERIALS 

A

ND 



M

ETHODS


 

A.

 

Plant Materials 

Samples  of  fresh  ripe  fruits  were  collected  from  the  local 

forest  of  Udupi,  and  Kanakapura  town  of  Ramanagar district, 

Karnataka.  The  fruits  comprised  of  Phyllanthus  emblica, 



Limonia  acidissima,  Syzygium  cumini,  Artocarpus  hirsutus, 

Carissa congesta, Anacardium occidentale. The fruit samples 

were  authenticated  by  the  taxonomist,  Dept.  of  Botany, 

Poornaprajna College, Udupi, Karnataka. 

 

B.



 

Extraction Procedure 

Each  Sample  of  fresh  fruit  was  washed  under  running  tap 

water  followed  by  washing  with  distilled  water to remove the 

surface  debris.    100g  of  edible  portions  of  the  fruit  were 

weighed  and  minced  using  a  kitchen  blender.  After 

homogenization,  it  was  extracted  in  methanol  for  72  hours  in 

dark at 37

o

C incubator shaker. After 3 days, the whole extracts 



are  filtered  and  then  centrifuged  to  obtain  clear  extract.  The 

filtrate  was  concentrated  under  Rotary  vacuum  evaporator. 

The  resultant  extract  was  lyophilized  to  obtain  dry  powder. 

The yield of crude extracts were noted and later preserved in a 

deep freezer (-20° C) for further use. 

C.

 



Evaluation of In-vitro Anti-inflammatory  Activity

 

1.



 

Inhibition of Albumin Denaturation 

 Inhibition  of  albumin  denaturation  was  determined  by  the 

method  described  by  Mizushima  et  al  [11]  with  slight 

modifications.  The  reaction  mixture  (2ml)  was  consisting  of 

test extract at different concentrations and aqueous solution of 

bovine  serum  albumin  fraction.  pH  of  the  reaction  mixture 

In Vitro Anti-inflammatory Activity of Some 

Wild Fruits of Karnataka. 

Srividya *

and Chandra M



International Conference on Biological, Environment and Food Engineering (BEFE-2015) May 15-16, 2015 Singapore



http://dx.doi.org/10.15242/IICBE.C0515017

48


 

 

(6.3) was adjusted using 1N HCl. The samples were incubated 



at 37

o

C for 20 min and then heated at 57



o

C for 30 min. After 

cooling  the  samples,  1ml  of  Phosphate  buffer  saline  (P

H

  6.3) 



was  added  to  each  sample  tubes.  The  turbidity  was  measured 

spectrophotometrically  at  660  nm  against  blank.  The 

experiment  was  performed  in  triplicate.  Percent  inhibition  of 

protein denaturation was calculated as follows: 

 

Percentage  inhibition  (%)  =  (O.D  control  –  O.D  sample)  X 

100/ O.D control 

 

2.

 



Proteinase Inhibitory Activity 

 

Proteinase inhibitory activity was determined by the method 



described by Oyedepo et al [12] with slight modifications. The 

reaction  mixture  (2ml)  was  consisting  of  test  extract  at 

different  concentrations,  80µg  trypsin  and  20  mM  Tris  HCl 

buffer (pH 7.4). The mixture was incubated at 37

o

C for 5 min 



and  then  0.5  ml  of  1%  casein  was  added.  The  mixture  was 

incubated  for  an  additional  15  min.  1  ml  of  70%  perchloric 

acid was added to terminate the reaction. The reaction mixture 

was  centrifuged  and  the  absorbance  of  the  supernatant  was 

read  at  210  nm  against  buffer  as  blank.  The  experiment  was 

performed in triplicate. The percentage inhibition of proteinase 

inhibitory activity was calculated. 

Percentage  inhibition  (%)  =  (O.D  control  –  O.D  sample)  X 

100/ O.D control 

 

D.

 



Statistical Analysis

 

The results are expressed as the mean±SD for three replicates. 



Linear regression analysis was used to calculate IC

50

 value. 



III.

 

R



ESULTS 

A

ND 



D

ISCUSSION

 

The results of albumin denaturation of the six fruit extracts 



were  displayed  in  Fig.1.  Albumin  denaturations  of  six  fruit 

extracts  were  analyzed.  All  fruit  extracts  exhibited  albumin 

denaturation with percentage inhibition values between 79% to 

28%  at  concentration  of  200µg/ml.  Inhibition  of  albumin 

denaturation  at  200µg/ml  was  found  to  be  highest  in 

Phyllanthus  emblica  followed  by  Limonia  acidissima, 

Syzygium  cumini,  Anacardium occidentale, Carissa congesta, 

Artocarpus  hirsutus  and  the  values  were  79.01±3.07%, 

65.75±2.53%,  51.57±2.83%, 33.71±1.10%, 28.73±2.53% and 

28.00±1.94% respectively.  Percentage inhibition value for the 

standard  diclofenac  sodium  was  found  to  be  92.64±2.30%.

 

Denaturation  of  bovine  serum  albumin  is  a  well 



documented 

cause  of  inflammation.  Anti

‐inflammatory drugs like salicylic 

acid,  flufenamic  acid,  Phenylbutazone  etc,  have  shown  dose 

dependent  ability  to  thermally  induced  protein  denaturation 

[13]. It is previously reported that many flavonoids and related 

polyphenols  contribute  significantly  to  the  antioxidant  and 

anti


‐inflammatory activity of many plants [14], [15]. 

 

Fig. 1 Inhibition of Albumin denaturation of six fruit extracts 



 

In 


Inhibition of albumin denaturation

, the IC


50

 values for six 

fruit extracts were found to be highest in

 Phyllanthus emblica 



followed 

by 

Limonia 

acidissima, 

Syzygium 

cumini, 

Anacardium  occidentale,  Carissa  congesta,  Artocarpus 

hirsutus  and  values  were  85.93µg/ml,  108.56  µg/ml,  133.92 

µg/ml,  233.89  µg/ml,  269.07  µg/ml  and  284.48  µg/ml 

respectively.  IC

50

  value  for  the  standard  diclofenac  sodium 



was  found  to  be  67.44ug/ml.  The  results  were  displayed  in 

(Table.1). 

The Proteinase inhibitory activity at 200µg/ml was found to 

be  highest  in  Phyllanthus  emblica  followed  by  Limonia 



acidissima,  Syzygium  cumini,  Artocarpus  hirsutus,  Carissa 

congesta,  Anacardium  occidentale  and  the  values  were 

70.49±1.59%,  61.11±1.82%,  48.09±1.59%,  27.08±1.56%, 

25.35±0.79%  and  23.96±1.56%  respectively.  The  results  are 

displayed  in  the  Fig.2.  Percentage  inhibition  value  for  the 

standard diclofenac sodium was found to be 90.08±2.56%. 

 

Fig. 2  Proteinase inhibitory activity of six fruit extracts 



 

In

 Proteinase inhibitory activity

, the IC

50

 values were found 



to  be  highest  in 

Phyllanthus  emblica  followed  by  Limonia 

International Conference on Biological, Environment and Food Engineering (BEFE-2015) May 15-16, 2015 Singapore

http://dx.doi.org/10.15242/IICBE.C0515017

49


 

 

acidissima,  Syzygium  cumini,  Carissa  congesta,  Anacardium 



occidentale, Artocarpus hirsutus and values were 97.24 µg/ml, 

119.01 µg/ml, 146.65µg/ml, 278.24 µg/ml, 289.60 µg/ml, and 

297.60  µg/ml  respectively.  IC

50

  value  for  the  standard 



diclofenac  sodium  was  found  to  be  70.95  µg/ml.  The  results 

were  displayed  in  (Table.1).  It  is  previously  proved  that 

proteinases  of  leukocytes  play  an  important  role  in  the 

development  of  tissue  damage  during  inflammatory  reactions 

and significant level of protection was provided by proteinase 

inhibitors [16]. 

T

ABLE 


I

C



50

 

V



ALUES 

O



S

IX 


M

ETHANOL 


F

RUIT 


E

XTRACTS


 

Fruit extrats               Albumin  

                               Denaturation                                           

                        (IC

50

 µg/ml) 


Proteinase 

Inhibition 

(IC

50

 µg/ml) 



P.emblica 

85.93 


        97.24 

L.acidissima 

108.56 


119.01 

S.cumini 

133.91 


146.65 

A.occidentale 

233.89 


289.60 

C.congesta 

269.07 


278.24  

A.hirsutus 

284.48 


297.60 

Diclofenac sodium 

67.44 

70.95 


    

Linear regression analysis was used to calculate IC

50

 value. 


IV.

 

C



ONCLUSION

 

In 



Inhibition  of  albumin  denaturation  activity,  the  IC

50 


values  were  found  to  be  highest  in  Phyllanthus  emblica 

followed 

by 

Limonia 

acidissima, 

Syzygium 

cumini, 

Anacardium  occidentale,  Carissa  congesta  and  Artocarpus 

hirsutus.  The  same  trend  was  seen  in  proteinase  inhibitory 

activity  of  three  methanolic  fruit extracts except, Anacardium 



occidentale, and Carissa congesta. The results obtained in the 

present  investigation  indicate  that  Phyllanthus  emblica, 



Limonia  acidissima  and  Syzygium  cumini  fruits  were  a 

potential  source Anti- inflammatory agents compared to other 

fruits of the study. 

A

CKNOWLEDGMENT



 

The  authors  gratefully  acknowledge  the  Department  of 

Biotechnology,  MIT,  Manipal  University,  for  providing  the 

facilities to carry out the research work.   

R

EFERENCES  



 

[1]


 

  Iwu  M.W.,  A.R.  Duncan,  C.O.  Okunji.,  “New  antimalarials  of  plant 

origin.  In:  Janick  J,  Editor.  Perspective  on  new  crops  and  new  uses”, 

Alexandria: VA ASHS Press, 1999, pp. 457-462. 

[2]

 

  Chen I.N, Chang C.C, Wang C.Y, Shyu Y.T, Chang T.L, “ Antioxidant 



and  antimicrobial  activity  of  Zingiberaceae  plants  in  Taiwan”,  Plant 

Foods Hum. Nutr., 2008, vol.63, pp.15-20 

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11130-007-0063-7

 

[3]



 

  Turker  AU,  Usta  C  (2008).  Biological  screening  of  some  Turkish 

medicinal plants for antimicrobial and toxicity studies. Nat. Prod., 2008, 

Vol.22, pp .136-146. 

[4]

 

  Heidari  M.R,  Mehrabani  M,  Pardakhty  A,  Khazaeli  P,  Zahedi  M.J, 



Yakhchali  M,  Vahedian  M  (2007).  “  The  analgesic  effect  of  Tribulus 

terrestris extract and comparison of gastric ulcerogenicity of the extract 

with  indomethacine  in  animal  experiments”,  Annals  of  the  New  York 

Academy of Sciences, 2007, vol.1095, pp. 418-27 

http://dx.doi.org/10.1196/annals.1397.045

 

[5]


 

  Girard  P,  Verniers  D,  Coppé  M.C,  Pansart  Y,  Gillardin  J.M,  2008. 

“Nefopam and ketoprofen synergy in rodent models of antinociception”, 

European J. Pharm., 2008, vol.584 (2-3), pp. 263-271 

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejphar.2008.02.012

 

[6]



 

    Tao Y.M, Li Q.L, Zhang C.F, Xu X.J, Chen J, Ju Y.W, Chi Z.Q, Long 

Y.Q,  Liu  J.G.,  “LPK-26.  a  novel  κ-opioid  receptor  agonist  with  potent 

anti-nociceptive  effects  and  low  dependence  potential”,  European  J. 

Pharm., 2008,vol .584, pp .306-311.  

[7]


 

  Kolesnikov  Y,  Sõritsa  D  (2008).  “Analgesic  synergy  between  topical 

opioids and topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in the mouse 

model of thermal pain”, European J. Pharm., vol.579 (2-3), pp. 126-133. 

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejphar.2007.10.014

 

[8]



 

  Nicolis  E,  Lampronti  I,  Dechecchi  M.C,  et  al.,  “Pyrogallol,  an  active 

compound  from  the  medicinal  plant  Emblica  officinalis,  regulates 

expression  of  pro-inflammatory  genes  in  bronchial  epithelial  cells”,  Int 

Immunopharmacol, 2008, vol. 8(12), pp.1672-1680 

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.intimp.2008.08.001

 

[9]


 

  Burkill,  I.  H.,  A  Dictionary  of  the  Economic  Products  of  the  Malay 

Peninsula,  Vol.  1,  Ministry  of  Agriculture  and  Co-operatives,  Kuala 

Lump ,1966. 

[10]

 

Morton  J.F.,  Wood-Apple.  In:  Fuits  of  warm  climates,  Flare  Books, 



Miami, Florida, 1987, pp.190-191. 

[11]


 

Mizushima  Y  and  Kobayashi  M.,”  Interaction  of  anti

‐inflammatory 

drugs  with  serum  preoteins,  especially  with  some  biologically  active 

proteins”, J of Pharma Pharmacol., 1968, vol. 20, pp.169

‐173 


http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.2042-7158.1968.tb09718.x

 

[12]



 

Oyedepo  O.O  and  Femurewa  A.J.,”  Anti

‐protease  and  membrane 

stabilizing  activities  of  extracts  of  Fagra  zanthoxiloides,  Olax 



subscorpioides  and  Tetrapleura  tetraptera”,  Int  J  of  Pharmacong., 

1995, vol.33, pp. 65

‐69 

http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/13880209509088150



 

[13]


 

Mizushima  Y  and  Kobayashi  M.,”  Interaction  of  anti

‐inflammatory 

drugs  with  serum  preoteins,  especially  with  some  biologically  active 

proteins”, J of Pharma Pharmacol., 1968, vol. 20, pp.169

‐173 


http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.2042-7158.1968.tb09718.x

 

[14]



 

Yu L, Haley S, Perret J, Harris M, Wilson J and Qian M., “Free radical 

scavenging  properties  of  wheat  extracts”,  J.  Agri.  Food  Chem., 

2002,vol. 50, pp. 1619–1624 

http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf010964p

 

[15]



 

Okoli  C.O  and  Akah  P.A.,  “Mechanism  of  the  anti-inflammatory 

activity  of  the  leaf  extracts  of  Culcasia  scandens  P.  beauv  (Araceae)”, 

Pharmacology, Biochemistry and Behavior, 2004, vol.79, pp. 473

‐481 

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pbb.2004.08.012



 

[16]


 

Das S.N and Chatterjee S., Long term toxicity study of ART

‐400. Indian 

Indg Med., 1995, vol. 16 (2), pp.117



‐123. 

 

International Conference on Biological, Environment and Food Engineering (BEFE-2015) May 15-16, 2015 Singapore



http://dx.doi.org/10.15242/IICBE.C0515017

50


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə