Academic Research International Vol. 5(4) July 2014



Yüklə 129.85 Kb.
PDF просмотр
tarix19.08.2017
ölçüsü129.85 Kb.

Academic Research International   Vol. 5(4)  July 2014

 

  



 

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

_______________________________

_______________________________

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

___________________

___________________

___________________

 

  

 



    

Copyright © 2014 SAVAP International                                                                            



ISSN: 

2223-9944

 e 


ISSN: 

2223-9553

 

www.savap.org.pk

                                                        

23

                                    



www.journals.savap.org.pk

                                                                               



Bud Fall Induction in Clove (Syzygium Aromaticum

Manuela Baietto 

1

Department of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences-  



Production, Landscape, Agroenergy, University of Milan, ITALY. 

1

Manuela.baietto@unimi.it



 

ABSTRACT 

The abstract is to be in fully-justified italicized text, at the top of column as it is here, 

Cloves - the dry unopened flower buds of 

Syzygium aromaticum - represent the main 



source  of  income  for  many  farmers  in  Indonesia,  Tanzania,  India,  and  Sri  Lanka.  

The main issues associated with this crop are the pronounced biennial, triennial and 

quadriennial  bearing,  which  lead  to  irregular  pattern  of  production,  and  the  very 

high  costs  of  production.  The  objective  of  this  experimental  work  was  to  induce  the 

bud fall by applying hormone-like chemicals, precursors of the abscisic acid, which is 

the hormone responsible for the separation of leaves, flowers, fruits and other parts 

of the shoots at maturity or senescence. From a business perspective, the goal was to 

decrease  the  costs  of  harvesting,  which  represent  more  than  40%  of  the  total 

production costs. In fact, the chemical induction of the buds would have allowed for 

the  synchronization  of  bud  harvest  and  eliminated  the  need  for  hand-picking  buds 

from tall trees. Two different chemical compounds were tested (ACC and Ethephon) 

at  varying  concentrations.  The  experiment  did  not  produce  the  expected  results,  as 

the flower buds fall was not induced. Several technical, ecological and physiological 

reasons can be taken into account to explain such results.  

Keywords: 

Chemical  absission,  eugenia  caryophillata,  harvesting,  sustainable 

agriculture, thinning.  

INTRODUCTION 

Syzygium  aromaticum

  (L.)  Merr.  et  Perry  is  an  evergreen  tree  belonging  to  the  Myrtaceae 

family.  It  is  cultivated  for  the  production  of  cloves,  dried  unopened  flower  buds  which  are 

used  as  spices  in  gastronomy  and  as  the  essential  part  for  kretek  cigarettes  (Polzinet  al., 

2007). Clove tree is cultivated in the islands of Tanzania (Pemba and Zanzibar), Madagascar, 

Indonesia, Comoros Islands, and Sri Lanka, but the major producer is Indonesia, with 50.000 

– 60.000t per annum (Leela and Sapna, 2008). Tobacco industry in Indonesia employs about 

11  million  workers  and  is  the  second  largest  employer  after  the  government  (Nichteret  al., 

2009);  cigarettes  represent  an  important  source  of  national  revenue  for  Indonesian 

Government,  whose  tobacco  takes  was  approximately  38  trillion  rupiah  ($4.2  billion  US 

dollars)  in  2006  (Graham,  2006).  The  tobacco  market  in  Indonesia  in  unique  because  over 

90%  of  all  smokers  smoke  kretek  cigarettes,  and  only  a  10%  smoke  “white”  cigarettes. 

Modern-day  kreteks  consists  of  Indonesian-grown  tobacco  (60-85%  by  wt.),  chopped  clove 

buds (15-40% by wt.) and a brand-specific flavoring spices mix (Hanusz, 2000).  



S.  aromaticum

  is  a  tropical  plant  that  requires  warm  and  humid  climate,  with  an  annual 

rainfall  of 2500-3000  mm. It  has  no  altitude requirements,  as it can  grow  from  sea level to 

1000 meters. Clove is cultivated as 7 x 7 m) or consociated crop with coconut palm, areca nut 

palm, pepper, coffee and banana. It is a perennial plant, reaching 30 m in height, starting to 

bear  flowers after  5  years  and  reaching  the full  production  after  15-20  years  (Martin et  al., 

1987).  Harvesting  is  manual:  flower  buds  are  hand  picked  using  step  ladders  without 

damaging the branches, as this would adversely affect the succeeding growth. The buds are 

hand  separated  from  the  cluster  after  segregation    from  the  stalks,  and  evenly  spread  to 


Academic Research International   Vol. 5(4)  July 2014

 

  



 

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

______

______


__________________________________________________

____________________________________________

____________________________________________

____________________________________________ 

  

 

    



Copyright © 2014 SAVAP International                                                                            

ISSN: 

2223-9944

 e 


ISSN: 

2223-9553

 

www.savap.org.pk

                                                     

24

                                       



www.journals.savap.org.pk

 

facilitate sun drying, on mats or cement floors. At night, buds should be stored undercover, to 



avoid moisture re-absorbing. The period of drying depends on the climatic conditions and is 

typically accomplished  four or five days under direct sun while it takes about four hours in 

artificial drying conditions (desiccator).  

The  total  production  of  clove  witnessed  a  decrease  in  the  last  10  years  due  to  some 

agronomic,  economic  and  social  issues  which  are  harshly  affecting  the  farmers,  inducing 

many of them to shift to other less problematic crops (cocoa, banana, palm, cassava). From a 

merely agronomic point of view, the main issues regard, in particular, the irregular temporal 

pattern of production, with biennial, as well as triennial and quadriennial bearing (De Waard, 

1974).  This  problem  is  particularly  important  in  Indonesia,  with  remarkable  triennial  and 

quadriennial  fluctuation  depending  on  the  total  year  rainfall,  the  exposure  to  low  and  high 

temperatures, the length of the dry season and other ecological and physiological parameters.  

However, the main problem is associated with the harvest of the intact flower buttons which 

requires  a  very  skilled  and  time  consuming  manual  picking  followed  by  their  segregation 

from the stalks and from the cluster. Even though the juvenile phase of clove trees lasts for 

about 5 years (a relatively short time in fruit trees), the full production is reached only when 

the plants are very high (20 m) and very vigorous, leading to a difficult, slow, and dangerous 

harvesting processes. Moreover, the determination of the precise picking time is a crucial to 

optimize  the  yield,  the  concentration  of  essential  oils  in  the  dried  product  [according  to 

several recent literature references (Ayoolaet al., 2008, Alma et al., 2007, Polzinet al., 2007, 

Jirovetzet  al.,  2006,  Raina  et  al.,  2001),  18  compounds  represent  more  than  99%  of  the 

essential  oil  from  clove.  The  major  components  are  as  follows:  eugenol,  87%,  eugenyl 

acetate, 8%, β-caryophyllene, 3,5%] and the following year flowering time and bearing of the 

tree (Martin et al., 1988); in fact, all the cloves on a tree seldom mature at the same time and, 

to  harvest  the  entire  crop,  trees  must  be  picked  several  times  during  the  harvesting  season. 

From an economic point of view, harvesting represents, in Indonesia, up to 40% of the total 

production costs, depending on labor availability and location. 

For these reasons, the main goal of the experiment was to evaluate the application of some 

hormone-like chemicals as a tool to induce in a controlled way the flower buds fall.  

The chemical thinning of flower buds is difficult to achieve, and little bibliographic records 

are  available,  also  because  only  few  plant  species  are  cultivated  for  the  production  of  the 

unopened  flower  buttons  (buds).  One  of  them,  for  instance,  is  Capparis  spp.,  which  is 

cultivated  for  the  production  of  capers,  the  brined  unopened  flower  buds.  Capers  are 

manually harvested as well, but efforts to obtain a more mechanized harvesting of Capparis 

spp. have all failed (Tuttolomondoet al., 2006).  

Several  publications  describe  the  application  of  growth  regulators  to  fruit  trees  of  the 

Rosaceae

  family  and  to  grape,  whose  flower  buds  are  sometimes  too  many  to  provide  a 

sufficient  development  of  each  single  fruit.  In  this  cases,  chemical  thinning  is  usually 

obtained  by  means  of  molecules  that  induce  the  drop  of  flower  buds  of  fruitlet,  such  as 

hydrogen  cyanamide,  dinitro-orthocresol,  ammonium  thiosulphate,  naphtaleneacetic  acid, 

BA,  Carbaryl,  and  2-chloroethylphosphonic  acid.  Unfortunately,  all  these  treatments  are 

aimed at reducing the liveability of the fruit buds, not their abscission. Sometimes they fall, 

but  only  after  a  deep  physiological  modification which,  in  most  cases,  totally  compromises 

the characteristics of the flower bud itself.  

The most interesting results on buds fall were obtained when using the endogenous ethylene 

naturally produced by the plant, or by applying natural or chemical precursors of the ethylene 

The application of this plant hormone is a known effective tool since the 70’s, and gave good 



Academic Research International   Vol. 5(4)  July 2014

 

  



 

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

_______________________________

_______________________________

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

___________________

___________________

___________________

 

  

 



    

Copyright © 2014 SAVAP International                                                                            



ISSN: 

2223-9944

 e 


ISSN: 

2223-9553

 

www.savap.org.pk

                                                        

25

                                    



www.journals.savap.org.pk

                                                                               

results on flowers and floral buds abscission: Veliath and Ferguson (1973) applied ethephon 

(which  is  converted  in ethylene  by  the  plant  metabolism)  at  1000  ppm  and  caused  the  first 

appreciable  bud  drop  in  tomato  plants.  More  recently,  YanChanget  al.  (2003)  obtained 

comparable  positive  results    on  the  abscission  of the  distal  areal  of  the  pedicel  of  the  same 

species  by  applying  very  small  quantities  of  ethylene  to  the  plants.  Another  early  and 

interesting study was done on Phaseolus vulgaris L. (Webster et al., 1975): the application of 

250 ppm ethephon promoted bud and flower abscission, while leaf abscission was unaffected 

as well as the total number of fruit and seed of the following season.  

Nakamura and Wakasugi (1978) studied the effects of the timing of ethephon application on 

persimmon  tree:  when  sprayed  at  the  flower  bud  stage,  flowers  abscised  at  the  juncture 

between calyx and peduncle, whereas when sprayed at the young fruit stage, they abscised at 

the juncture between calyx and fruit.  

Ethylene  has  a  great  effect  on  the  abscission  of  ornamental  cut-flowers,  in  particular  when 

administered  during  transportation:  in  1987,  Woltering  investigated  the  sensitivity  of  more 

than  50 ornamental  plants  species  to  the  exposure  of exogenous  ethylene, finding  that  1-15 

μ

l/l  ethylene  caused  the  abscission  of  flower  buds  and  flowers  (at  various  stages  of 



development) after 24 hours.  

In 1991, Ethrel (ethephon) was applied at various concentration to sweet peas plants (Ohwaka 

et  al.):  the  100  ppm  Ethrel  treatment  resulted  in  the  abscission  of  a  large  number  of 

developing  flower  buds,  which  showed  a  rapid  rate  of  endogenous  ethylene  production 

immediately after spraying.  

The  effects  of  ethylene  exposure  of  members  of  the  Myrtaceae  family  was  recently 

investigated  (Macnish  et  al.,  2005):  the  separation  at  a  morphological  and  anatomically 

distinct abscission zone between the pedicel and floral tube of an opened flower was already 

obtained  when  using  only  1  μl/l  ethylene  for  6  h  induced  ,  whereas  10  μl/l  for  24  h  were 

necessary to completely abscise the flower buds enclosed in shiny bracteoles. It is even true 

that  there  is  no  bibliographic  evidence  on  the  same  effects  on  clovetree  or  on  the 

morphological  and  physiological  characteristics  of  the  fallen  buds.  It  would  be  thus 

interesting to investigate the abscission power of ethylene and ethephon on clove tree, and the 

possibility to spray those chemicals to support the flower buds fall. 

Though  the  application  of  ethephon-based  chemicals  was  deeply  investigated  and  easily 

obtained via canopy spraying , treatments with ethylene are much more difficult to obtain, as 

they  require  a  controlled  environment  and/or  time-prolonged  applications  (24  to  48  hours). 

For this reason, we envisioned the possibility of using different ethylene-releasing substances 

or  ethylene-precursors  such  as  1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic  acid  (ACC).  Direct 

applications of ACC solutions to various parts of the flower of some species (Citrus limon



Pelargonium

 spp.) led to an increased ethylene production in the specific flower part (Hilioti 

et al., 2000). 

MATERIAL AND METHODS  

The  experiment  was  conducted  on  a  private  clove  plantation  (PT.  PerkebunanCengkeh 

Zanzibar) in Curug Semarang (7°01’42’’S 110°42’28’’E), Central Java, Indonesia.  

Bud  fall  induction  was  studied  on  56 adult clove  trees  (Syzygium  aromaticum  (L.)  Merr.  et 

Perry.  Individuals  were  chosen  throughout  the  selected  plantation  during  the  first  survey  in 

the field (January 2009); the trees were all in very good shape, free from any visible disease 

of biotic or non-biotic origin. The trees were similar in height (about 15 m), LAI index and 

plantation year (1974). As the chemicals application timing is crucial for the evaluation of the 



Academic Research International   Vol. 

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Copyright © 2014 SAVAP International                                                                            

buds  fall, a  second  survey  was  conducted in  April 2009    and allowed   to  check  proper and 

similar maturation stage of the buds of the selected trees (Figure 1). 

Figure 1. Flower buds of clove tree at proper stage of maturation

Each  treatment  was  applied  on  8  individuals  following  a  randomized  blocks  design  of 

experiment. Ethephon (CAS 16672

effects  on  cloves  (buds)  abscission.  Following  a  literature  survey,  the  following 

concentrations were tested: Ethephon 100, 250, 500 and 1000 ppm; ACC 10

M (table 1).  



Table 1. Treatments applied in the study

Chemical 



No. of samples

Ethephon 

Ethephon 



Ethephon 

Ethephon 





RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

After the applications, plants were strictly observed for five days in order to evaluate: 1. the 

date  (or  hours  after  chemicals  application)  of  the  first  bud  fall;  2.  the  percentage  of  fallen 

buds after three, six, twelve and twenty



Academic Research International   Vol. 5(4)  July 2014

 

  



 

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

______

______


__________________________________________________

____________________________________________

____________________________________________

____________________________________________

Copyright © 2014 SAVAP International                                                                            

ISSN: 

2223-9944

 

buds  fall, a  second survey was  conducted in  April  2009   and allowed   to  check proper and 



similar maturation stage of the buds of the selected trees (Figure 1).  

Figure 1. Flower buds of clove tree at proper stage of maturation 

Each  treatment  was  applied  on  8  individuals  following  a  randomized  blocks  design  of 

experiment. Ethephon (CAS 16672-87-0) and ACC (CAS 22059-21-8) were tested for their 

effects  on  cloves  (buds)  abscission.  Following  a  literature  survey,  the  following 

ntrations were tested: Ethephon 100, 250, 500 and 1000 ppm; ACC 10

-6

, 10


Table 1. Treatments applied in the study 

No. of samples 

Concentration 

Application 

Water per plant (l)

100 ppm 


1 mg/l 

250 ppm 


2,5 mg/l 

500 ppm 


5 mg/l 

1000 ppm 

10 mg/l 

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION 

After the applications, plants were strictly observed for five days in order to evaluate: 1. the 

date  (or  hours  after  chemicals  application)  of  the  first  bud  fall;  2.  the  percentage  of  fallen 

buds after three, six, twelve and twenty-four hours after the treatment; 3. the total percentage 

____________________________________________

____________________________________________

____________________________________________

____________________________________________ 

  

 

    



 e 

ISSN: 

2223-9553

 

buds  fall, a second  survey was  conducted in  April  2009    and allowed    to  check  proper and 

 

Each  treatment  was  applied  on  8  individuals  following  a  randomized  blocks  design  of 



8) were tested for their 

effects  on  cloves  (buds)  abscission.  Following  a  literature  survey,  the  following 

, 10

-5

 and 10



-4

 

Water per plant (l) 

20 

20 


20 

20 


After the applications, plants were strictly observed for five days in order to evaluate: 1. the 

date  (or  hours  after  chemicals  application)  of  the  first  bud  fall;  2.  the  percentage  of  fallen 

eatment; 3. the total percentage 


Academic Research International   Vol. 5(4)  July 2014

 

  



 

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

_______________________________

_______________________________

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

___________________

___________________

___________________

 

  

 



    

Copyright © 2014 SAVAP International                                                                            



ISSN: 

2223-9944

 e 


ISSN: 

2223-9553

 

www.savap.org.pk

                                                        

27

                                    



www.journals.savap.org.pk

                                                                               

of  fallen  buds;  4.  the  initial  and  the  total  percentage  of  fallen  leaves;  5.  the  presence  of 

necrosis (black or brown spots or burns) or chlorosis on fallen/not fallen leaves, their initial 

and total percentage, their evolution throughout the five days of observation.  

After a negligible initial bud fall, probably due to the mechanic impact of the sprayed liquid, 

we did not appreciate any buds fall during the day one nor during the following days.  

The chemical analysis on the fallen buds, in order to evaluate the presence of potentially toxic 

chemical residuals, and the presence of essential oils in sufficient concentrations wasn’t done 

on the fallen buds,  nor on the buds still on the trees due to the lack of expected bud fall. 

The in-depth bibliographic research performed on the agronomic techniques applied on clove 

tree  has  revealed  a  very  lacunose  global  knowledge  of  this  tropical  crop.  Few  studies  are 

available, namely concerning the essential oils of the flower buds and the genetic breeding on 

some cultivars. Very few experiments have been performed in the field in order to address the 

problems related to  bearing fluctuation and labor effort, as well as economic issues related to 

the manual harvesting of the flower buds. The clove harvestable part is the unopened flower 

buttons, and this peculiarity is shared only with Capparis spp. (in southern Italy and in some 

other arid zones as Turkey)  

The  manual  harvest  of  any  plant  part  (leaves,  shoots  but,  in  particular,  flowers  and  fruits) 

represent  an  obstacle  to  the  extensive  cultivation  of  lots  of  species  (Pyruscommunis, 



Prunusmalus

P. persicaP. armeniacaP. aviumRubus spp., Oleaaeuropea etc. ), and in all 

cases  the  labor  effort  increases  the  production  costs  and  decreases  the  income  per  hectare. 

Published studies demonstrate that the scientific community has worked hard to address this 

aspect, usually suggesting agronomic techniques or the application of chemicals to obtain the 

natural  fall  of  fruits  in  cherry  (Kollar  and  Scortichini,  1986),  and  apple  (Schumacher  and 

Stadler, 1993), two fruit trees where the harvest is mechanically assisted. 

The negative results reported here can be explained by one or more of the following reasons: 

1. the concentration of the sprayed solutions was not optimized; 2. the sprayed precursors of 

absisic acid did not reach the right tissues and the synthesis of a sufficient concentration of 

absisic acid in the abscission zones was not triggered; 3. the fall of the buds should have been 

followed by a mechanical shaking of the trunk; 4. the wind drift prevented the solutions from 

reaching the target tissues. These are only some of the ecological, physiological and practical 

speculations that could explain the failure of the experiment, and which thus deserve further 

investigations.  Some other useful tests to perform in the future (next flowering season or in 

the  next  two  or  three  years)  should  be  the  following:  (1)Increase  of  the  concentrations  of 

ACC and Ethephon in solution; (2) Selection of younger or shorter (dwarf) samples in order 

to obtain a very good application of the chemicals;  (3) Selection of some other chemicals to 

test that could be effective in the flower buds fall. 

From  a  technical  point  of  view,  in  order  to  facilitate  the  experiment  and  to  test  as  many 

concentrations and chemicals as possible, it should also be feasible to select only some parts 

of the tree, to address the applications to the lowest branches. These samples would require 

smaller volumes of solutions, which would be applicable without using high-pressure spray 

pumps but small hand spray tools. The possible wind drift would also be prevented. In case 

one or more applications induced the desired buds fall, the selected chemical at the effective 

concentration would then be applied (the same year or the following year) at a tree scale in 

order to evaluate the feasibility of the treatment. 

 

CONCLUSIONS 


Academic Research International   Vol. 5(4)  July 2014

 

  



 

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

______

______


__________________________________________________

____________________________________________

____________________________________________

____________________________________________ 

  

 

    



Copyright © 2014 SAVAP International                                                                            

ISSN: 

2223-9944

 e 


ISSN: 

2223-9553

 

www.savap.org.pk

                                                     

28

                                       



www.journals.savap.org.pk

 

On order to solve the problem of manual harvesting of clove flower buds, and to lower the 



cost production of the spice, this research was focused on obtaining the chemical abscission 

of flower buds applying two hormone precursors of absisic acid (ACC and Ethephon). As no 

bibliographic reports were found on chemical thinning on clove trees,  the concentrations and 

application  methods  of  chemicals  were  chosen  basing  on  the  studies  developed  on  other 

species, in particular in order to obtain the chemical thinning of fruit lets. As no results were 

obtained, further studies are necessary to achieve the economic results.  

These new studies could be focused on: 

-  testing  new  hormone  precursors  or  other  chemicals  on  selected  parts  of  the  same 

samples, or different (higher) concentrations of the same hormones already used 

-  testing  several  chemical  thinning  agents  on  another  species,  a  small  tree  or  a  shrub, 

whose  harvest  is  the  flower  button,  reducing  the  experimental  economic  and  labour 

costs 


-  applying  growth  regulators  and  bending  the  shoots  of  young  clove  tree  samples  in 

order  to  obtain  shorter  stems  and  internodes,  juvenility  reduction,  higher  flower 

bearings and to limit the biennial, triennial or quadrennial production fluctuation.  

REFERENCES 

[1]


 

Feldman, R. S. (1996). Understanding Psychology. Newyork: McGraw-Hill,Inc. 

[2]

 

Alma  et  al.,  (2007).  Research  on  essential  oil  content  and  chemical  composition  of 



Turkish clove (Syzygium aromaticum L.). Bio Resources2(2): 265-269. 

[3]


 

Ayoola et al., (2008). Chemical analysis and antimicrobial activity of the essential oil 

of  Syzygium  aromaticum  (clove).  African  Journal  of  Microbiology  Research,  7(2): 

162-166. 

[4]

 

Biswas, B. (1994). Effect of growth substances on growth, flowering and fruiting of 



papaya. Annals of Agricultural Research15(3): 301-305. 

[5]


 

Dalal et al., (2005). Effect of chemical on flowering and fruit yeld of mango cv. Pairy. 



International Journal of Agricultural Sciences

1(1): 24-25. 

[6]

 

De  Waard,  P.W.F.  (1974).  The  development  of  clove  loads  and  causes  of  irregular 



bearing  of  cloves  [Eugenia  caryophyllus  (Sprengel)  Bullok  et  Harrison].  Journal  of 

Plantation Crops

2(2): 23-31. 

[7]

 

Dutta  et  al.,  (2008).  Effect  of  plant  bio-regulators  on  fruit  quality  and  mineral 



composition of ripe mango cv. Himsagar. Indian Agriculturist52(3/4): 107-111. 

[8]


 

Hanusz,  M.  (2000).  Kretek,  The  Culture  and  Heritage  of  Indonesia’s  Clove 



Cigarettes.

 Equinox Publishing, Tortola, British Virgin Islands. 

[9]

 

Hilioti et al., (2000). Regulation of pollination-induced ethylene and its role in petal 



abscission of Pelargonium * hortorumPhysiologia Plantarum109: 322-332. 

[10]


  Jirovets et al., (2006). Chemical composition and antioxidant properties of clove leaf 

essential oil. Journal of Agrictultural Food Chemistry54: 6303-6307. 

[11]

  Kollar,  G.,  &  Scortichini,  M.  (1986).  Effetti  di  trattamenti  chimici  facilitanti 



l’abscissione  del  frutto  della  cultivar  di  ciliegio  dolce  “Germesdorf”.  Rivista  di 

Ortoflorofrutticultura italiana

70: 85-95. 



Academic Research International   Vol. 5(4)  July 2014

 

  



 

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

_______________________________

_______________________________

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

___________________

___________________

___________________

 

  

 



    

Copyright © 2014 SAVAP International                                                                            



ISSN: 

2223-9944

 e 


ISSN: 

2223-9553

 

www.savap.org.pk

                                                        

29

                                    



www.journals.savap.org.pk

                                                                               

[12]

  Leela, N. K., &Sapna, V. P. (2008). Clove. In: Parthasarathy, V.A., Chempakam, B., 



Zachariah, T.J. (Eds). Chemistry of spices. CAB International, Cambridge, USA, pp. 

146-164 


[13]

  Macnish  et  al.,  (2005).  Anatomy  of  ethylene-induced  floral-organ  abscission  in 



Chamelauciumuncinatum

 (Myrtaceae). Australian Journal of Botany53: 119-131. 

[14]

  Martin et al., (1988). Causes of irregular clove production in the islands of Zanzibar 



and Pemba. Experimental Agriculture24: 105-114. 

[15]


  Martin  et  al.,  (1987).  Clove  tree  yields  in  the  islands  of  Zanzibar  and  Pemba. 

Experimental Agriculture

23(3): 293-303. 

[16]

  Menon, P. S. (2000). IISR scientists develop new clove varieties. Journal of Herbs, 



Spices & Medicinal Plants

7(1): 103-105. 

[17]

  Mukhopadhyay,  A.  K.  (1976).  A  note  on  the  effect  of  growth  retardants  and  L-



methionine  on  flowering  of  mango  (Mangiferaindica  L.).  Haryana  Journal  of 

Horticultural Sciences

5(3/4): 169-171. 

[18]

  Nakamura,  M.,  &  Wakasugi  S.  (1978).  Chemical  thinning  of  Japanese  persimmon 



trees using Ethrel sprays. I. The influence of Ethrel on the formation of the abscission 

layer of the flower or fruit and its developmentJournal of the Japanese Society for 



Horticultural Science,47(

3): 308-316

[19]

  Nichter  et  al.,  (2009).  Reading  culture  from  tobacco  advertisements  in  Indonesia. 



Tobacco control

18: 98-107. 

[20]

  Polzin  et  al.,  (2007).  Determination  of  eugenol,  anethole,  and  coumarin  in  the 



mainstream  cigarette  smoke  of  Indonesian  clove  cigarettes.  Food  and  Chemical 

Toxicology

45(10): 1948-1953. 

[21]

  Raina  et  al.,  (2001).  Essential  oil  composition  of  Syzygium  aromaticum  leaf  from 



Little Andaman, India. Flavour and Fragrance Journal16(5), 334-336. 

[22]


  Sarkar  et  al.,  (1998).  Regulation  of  tree  vigour  in  mango.  Indian  Journal  of 

Horticulture

55(1): 37-41. 

[23]

  Schumacher  R.  &Stadler  W.  (1993).  Fruit  set  regulation  and  quality.  Acta 



Horticulturae

326: 49-57. 

[24]

  Singh  S.  P.,  &Borase  S.  S.  (2003).  Extending  shelf-life  of  tropical  fruits  through 



ripening retardants. Advances in Horticulture and Forestry9: 79-100. 

[25]


  Tuttolomondo  et  al.,  (2006).  Origano,  rosmarino,  timo,  mirto  e  cappero: 

caratterizzazione,  propagazione  e  tecniche  colturali.  Informatore  Agrario 



Supplemento

62(50): 21-25.  

[26]

  Veliath J.A. &Ferguson A.C. (1973). A comparison of ethephon, DCIB, SADH, and 



DPA  for  abscission  of  fruits,  flowers,  and  floral  buds  in  determinate  tomatoes. 

Journal of the American Society for Horticultural Science

98(1): 124-126. 

[27]

  Webster  et  al.,  (1975).  Effects  of  ethephon  on  abscission  of  vegetative  and 



reproductive structures of Phaseulus vulgaris L. Hort Science10(2): 154-156. 

[28]


  Woltering E. J. (1987). Effects of ethylene on ornamental pot plants: a classification. 

Scientia Horticulturae

31(3/4): 283-294. 

[29]

  YanChang et al.,  (2003). Effect of ethylene on abscission of tomato pedicel in vitro. 



ActaHorticulturae Sinica

30(5): 554-558. 




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə