Active compounds and medicinal properties of Myrciaria genus Leonardo Luiz Borges



Yüklə 225.44 Kb.

tarix04.08.2017
ölçüsü225.44 Kb.

Active compounds and medicinal properties of Myrciaria genus

Leonardo Luiz Borges

a

,

b



,

, Edemilson Cardoso Conceição



b

, Dâmaris Silveira

a

a

Faculdade de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade de Brasília, Campus Universitário Darcy Ribeiro, Asa Norte, 70910-900 Brasília, DF, Brazil



b

Faculdade de Farmácia, Universidade Federal de Goiás, CP 131, 74001-970 Goiânia, GO, Brazil

a r t i c l e

i n f o


Article history:

Received 2 July 2013

Received in revised form 16 November 2013

Accepted 17 December 2013

Available online 27 December 2013

Keywords:

Anti-oxidant

Myrciaria

Polyphenols

a b s t r a c t

The genus Myrciaria occurs in various Brazilian biomes. Its species contains several active components,

including phenolic compounds, such as tannins, flavonoids, ellagic acid and anthocyanins. Biological

activities reported for Myrciaria fruits and leaf and bark extracts include antioxidant, antibacterial

and antifungal effects. This work aims to provide an overview of the active compounds of Myrciaria,

highlighting its secondary metabolites and medicinal properties for stimulating new studies regarding

this genus.

Ó 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

1. Introduction

The Myrciaria genus belongs to the Myrtaceae family. Accord-

ing to


Camlofski (2008)

the members of this family are well

known due to the great technological potential of its native spe-

cies and its fruits, with possibilities for industrialisation. The

fruits of this family provide a high yield of pulp, which has a

pleasant flavour and contains several substances with antioxidant

properties. The species of the Myrciaria genus is spread across

various Brazilian biomes such as the Amazon Forest, Caatinga,

Cerrado, Atlantic Forest and Pampa. This genus contains approx-

imately 99 known species (

Table 1

), 21 of which are native to



Brazil (

IPNI, 2012

). Some Myrciaria species grow in domestic

gardens, such as ‘‘jabuticabeira’’ [Myrciaria cauliflora (Mart.) Berg

and Myrciaria jaboticaba (Vell.), with Berg being the most widely

found], which produce fruits highly appreciated by the popula-

tion and are consumed in the form of juices, jams, wines and

liqueurs; thus, it has a great potential in the food industry. In

addition, the fruit contains substances with medicinal character-

istics (


Fig. 1

).

There are few studies reported that address this genus in partic-



ular. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to review the Myrciaria

genus, primarily focusing on their appearance, phytochemical

characteristics and the biological activities which have been

reported.

2. Distribution of the Myrciaria genus

The geographical distribution of Myrciaria species occurs in di-

verse regions, such as Brazil, Bolivia, Paraguay, Argentina, Central

America, and South Florida (

Table 1

). In Brazil, these plants are



cultivated mainly in the states of São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, Minas

Gerais and Espírito Santo (

Oliveira et al., 2008

).

Taxonomic classification for several species of the Myrtaceae



family and Myrciaria genus is controversial, which leads to difficul-

ties in intensifying research and taxonomic studies. In order to

address this issue, authors identify Myrciaria species through

comparisons with herbarium specimens, literature reviews and

analyse using molecular markers. On the basis of this methodol-

ogy, four different groups of ‘‘jabuticabeira’’ have been defined:

Myrciaria phytrantha (kiaersk) Mattos, M. jaboticaba (Vell) O. Berg.,

Myrciaria coronata Mattos, and M. cauliflora (Mart.). O. Berg

(

Citadin, Danner, & Sasso, 2010



). M. cauliflora is the most

widespread species in Brazil.

3. Active compounds detected in the Myrciaria genus

Dark-coloured fruits and their products are commonly con-

sumed in many cultures. Several reports have revealed that these

fruits are beneficial for human health, and currently there has been

a growing research interest with regard to the products of this fruit

used for consumption. Several studies have demonstrated that

fruits of Myrciaria species present antioxidant activity and a

significant anthocyanin content. Anthocyanins are a type of func-

tional pigment found in vegetables, flowers and fruits, which are

responsible for their red, blue or violet colour appearance. The

anthocyanin structure consists of a C

15

heterocyclic nucleus



0308-8146/$ - see front matter Ó 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodchem.2013.12.064

Corresponding author at: Faculdade de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade de



Brasília, Campus Universitário Darcy Ribeiro, Asa Norte, 70910-900 Brasília, DF,

Brazil. Tel.: +55 62 3209 6182; fax: +55 62 3209 6037.

E-mail address:

leonardoquimica@gmail.com

(L.L. Borges).

Food Chemistry 153 (2014) 224–233

Contents lists available at

ScienceDirect

Food Chemistry

j o u r n a l h o m e p a g e : w w w . e l s e v i e r . c o m / l o c a t e / f o o d c h e m



Table 1

Myrciaria species.

Species

Synonym


Distribution

Myrciaria alagoana Sobral

*



Brazil



Myrciaria angustifolia

(O.Berg) Mattos

Myrciaria brevipedunculata (O.Berg) Mattos; M. deserti (Cambess.) O.Berg; M.

dichotoma D.Legrand; M. piedadensis (Kiaersk.) Mattos & D.Legrand; Eugenia

cisplatensis Cambess. var. angustifolia (O.Berg) Lillo; E. adamantium Cambess.; E.

decumbens Cambess.; E. depauperata Cambess.; E. ipehuensis Barb.Rodr. ex Chodat &

Hassl.; E. mugiensis O.Berg; E. piedadensis Kiaersk.; E. suaveolens Cambess.; E.

tweediei Hook. & Arn.; B. acuminatissimus (Miq.) O.Berg; B. acuminatus O.Berg; B.

affinis O.Berg; B. amarus O.Berg; B. angustifolius O.Berg; B. angustissimus O.Berg; B.

apiculatus O.Berg; B. brunneus O.Berg; B. canescens O.Berg; B. cisplatensis Griseb.;

Blepharocalyx salicifolius (Kunth) O.Berg

*

; Myrcia mugiensis Cambess.; Myrcianthes



cisplatensis O.Berg var. angustifolia O.Berg; Myrcianthes cisplatensis O.Berg var.

brevipedunculata

Brazil

Myrciaria apiculata



Barb.Rodr.

Myrciaria cuspidata O.Berg

*

; M. cuspidata O.Berg var. humilis O.Berg; M. cuspidata



O.Berg var. stricta O.Berg; M. herbacea O.Berg; M. minensis O.Berg; M. recurvipetala

Barb.Rodr.; M. tenella O.Berg; M. tenella var. elliptica O.Berg; M. tenella (DC.) O.Berg

var. minor (Cambess.) O.Berg; M. undulata O.Berg; Eugenia alegrensis Kiaersk.; E.

minensis Kiaersk.; E. tenella DC.; E. tenella var. elliptica Kiaersk.; E. tenella var. minor

Cambess.; Myrtus tenella Mart. ex DC.

Brazil, Paraguay

Myrciaria apiculata

Barb.Rodr. ex Chodat &

Hassl.



Paraguay



Myrciaria arborea D.Legrand

var. rostata Mattos

Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Caribbean, Colombia, Costa



rica, Ecuador, French Guyana, Guatemala,

Guyana


Myrciaria aspera Mattos

Brazil



Myrciaria atiraensis

Barb.Rodr.

Eugenia bimarginata DC.

*

; E. dicrossa O.Berg; E. pardensis O.Berg; E. subcordata



O.Berg; E. umbellaris O.Berg; E. umbellata DC.

Brazil (native)

Myrciaria atiraensis

Barb.Rodr. ex Chodat &

Hassl.

Eugenia camporum Morong; E. pitanga (O. Berg) Kiaersk



*

; E. pluriflora DC.; Luma

pitanga (O. Berg) Herter; Stenocalyx pitanga O. Berg

*

; Myrtus pitanga (O. Berg)



Kuntze

Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay

Myrciaria aureana Mattos

Myrciaria phytrantha (Kiaersk.) Mattos; Eugenia phytrantha Kiaersk.; Plinia aureana

(Mattos) Mattos; P. phitrantha (Kiaersk.) Sobral

*

;



Brazil

Myrciaria baporeti D.Legrand

Myrciaria hagendorffii O.Berg; M. rivularis O.Berg; Eugenia hagendorffii Kiaersk.; E.

rivularis Cambess.; Myrcia granulata R.O.Williams; Plinia baporeti (D.Legrand)

Rotman; P. rivularis (Cambess.) Rotman

*

; Siphoneugena baporeti (D.Legrand) Kausel



Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, Uruguay

Myrciaria baporetii D.Legrand

Myrciaria rivularis var. baporetii (D.Legrand) D.Legrand

*

; Myrciariopsis baporetii



(D.Legrand) Kausel

*

; Plinia baporeti (D. Legrand) Rotman; Siphoneugena baporetii



(D.Legrand) Kausel

Paraguay


Myrciaria bipennis O.Berg

Marlierea bipennis (O.Berg) McVaugh; Myrcia bipennis (O. Berg) McVaugh;

Brazil

Myrciaria borinquena Alain



Puerto Rico

Myrciaria cauliflora (Mart.)

O.Berg


Myrciaria jaboticaba (Vell.) O.Berg; Eugenia cauliflora (Mart.) DC.; E. edulis Vell; E.

jaboticaba Kiaersk.; Guapurium peruvianum Poir.

*

; Myrtus cauliflora Mart.; M.



jaboticaba Vell.; Plinia cauliflora (Mart.) Kausel

*

; P. jaboticaba (Vell.) Kausel



Bolivia, Brazil, El Salvador, Honduras, Paraguay

Myrciaria ciliolata O.Berg var.

warmingiana (Kiaersk.)

Mattos


Myrciaria leucophloea O.Berg var. warmingiana (Kiaersk.) Mattos; Eugenia

leucophloea Kiaersk. var. warmingiana

Brazil

Myrciaria cordata O.Berg



*

Brazil; Guyana; Venezuela



Myrciaria cordifolia D.Legrand

Plinia cordifolia (D.Legrand) Sobral

*

Brazil


Myrciaria coronata Mattos

Plinia coronata (Mattos) Mattos

Brazil

Myrciaria cuspidata O.Berg



var. acuminatissima

O.Berg


Brazil


Myrciaria cuspidata O.Berg

var. diffusa O.Berg

Brazil


Myrciaria cuspidata O.Berg

var. difusa O.Berg

Brazil


Myrciaria cuspidata O.Berg

var. latifolia O.Berg

Brazil


Myrciaria delicatula (DC.)

O.Berg


*

Myrciaria delicatula var. delicatula; M. linearifolia O.Berg; M. macrocarpa A.Usteri; M.

maschalantha (Kiaersk.) Mattos & D.Legrand; Eugenia delicatula DC.; E. maschalantha

Kiaersk.; Paramyrciaria delicatula (DC.) Kausel; P. delicatula (DC.) Kausel var.

linearifolia (O.Berg)

Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay

Myrciaria delicatula (DC.)

O.Berg var. acutifolia

O.Berg



Brazil



Myrciaria delicatula (DC.)

O.Berg var. angustifolia

O.Berg



Brazil



Myrciaria delicatula (DC.)

O.Berg var. conferta O.Berg

Eugenia delicatula DC. var. conferta Kiaersk.

Brazil


Myrciaria delicatula (DC.)

O.Berg var. latifolia O.Berg

Brazil


Myrciaria disticha O.Berg

*

Eugenia biseriata Kiaersk.



Brazil

Myrciaria disticha O.Berg var.

Brazil


(continued on next page)

L.L. Borges et al. / Food Chemistry 153 (2014) 224–233

225


Table 1 (continued)

Species


Synonym

Distribution

bahiensis O.Berg

Myrciaria disticha O.Berg var.

fluminensis O.Berg

Brazil



Myrciaria dubia (Kunth)

McVaugh


*

Myrciaria caurensis; M. divaricata O.Berg; M. lanceolata O.Berg; M. lanceolata var.

angustifolia O.Berg; M. lanceolata var. glomerata O.Berg; M. lanceolata var. laxa

O.Berg; M. obscura O.Berg; M. paraensis O.Berg; M. phillyreoides O.Berg; M. riedeliana

O.Berg; M. spruceana O.Berg; Eugenia grandiglandulosa Kiaersk.; Marlierea edulis

Nied.; Psidium dubium Kunth

Brazil, Venezuela

Myrciaria dumicola Chodat &

Hassl.

Eugenia dumicola Barb.Rodr.; E. pyriformis var. argentea Mattos & D. Legrand



*

; E.


pyriformis fo. ponhi D. Legrand; E. turbinata O. Berg; E. uvalha Cambess;

Pseudomyrcianthes pyriformis (Cambess.) Kausel

Paraguay

Myrciaria edulis Skeels

Myrciaria plicatocostata O.Berg; Eugenia edulis Vell.; E. plicatocostata Glaz.;

Hexachlamys edulis (O. Berg) Kausel & D. Legrand; Marlierea edulis Nied.; Plinia

anonyma Sobral

*

; P. edulis (Vell.) Sobral



*

; P. plicatocostata (O.Berg) Amshoff

Brazil

Myrciaria egensis O.Berg



Myrcia egensis (O.Berg) McVaugh; M. egensis (O.Berg) Burret

Brazil, Peru

Myrciaria ehrenbergiana

O.Berg


Aulomyrcia ehrenbergiana (O.Berg) Amshoff; Myrcia ehrenbergiana (O.Berg)

McVaugh


*

;

Brazil, Guyana



Myrciaria ferruginea O.Berg;

*



Brazil

Myrciaria floribunda O.Berg

*

Myrciaria amazonica O.Berg; M. arborea D.Legrand; M. axillaris O.Berg; M. chartacea



O.Berg; M. ciliolata (Cambess.) O.Berg; M. leucophloea O.Berg; M. longipes O.Berg; M.

maragnanensis O.Berg; M. maranhensis O.Berg; M. maximiliana O.Berg; M. prasina

O.Berg; M. mexicana Lundell; M. oneillii (Lundell) I.M.Johnst.; M. protracta (Steud)

O.Berg; M. salzmannii O.Berg; M. schuechiana O.Berg; M. sellowiana O.Berg; M.

splendens O.Berg; M. tenuiramis O.Berg; M. tolypantha O.Berg; M. tolypantha var.

latifolia O.Berg; M. uliginosa O.Berg; M. verticillata O.Berg; Calyptranthes floribunda

(H.West ex Willd.) Blume; Eugenia floribunda H.West ex Willd.; E. ciliolata Cambess.;

E. leucophloea (O.Berg) Kiaersk.; E. leucophloea Kiaersk.; E. maranhensis Kiaersk.; E.

oneillii Lundell; E. salzmannii Benth.; Paramyrciaria ciliolata (Cambess.) Rotman

Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Caribbean, Colombia, Costa

rica, Ecuador, French Guyana, Guatemala,

Guyana


Myrciaria glanduliflora

(Kiaersk.) Mattos &

D.Legrand

*

Eugenia glanduliflora Kiaersk.



Brazil

Myrciaria glazioviana

(Kiaersk.) G.M.Barroso ex

Sobral


*

Eugenia cabelludo var. glazioviana Kiaersk.; Paramyrciaria glazioviana (Kiaersk.)

Sobral

Brazil


Myrciaria glomerata O.Berg

Eugenia cabelludo Kiaersk.; Marlierea antrocola Kiaersk.; Paramyrciaria glomerata

(O.Berg) Sobral; Plinia glomerata (O.Berg) Amshoff;

Brazil


Myrciaria grandifolia Mattos

Plinia grandifolia (Mattos) Sobral; Plinia grandifolia Mattos

Brazil

Myrciaria guapurium O.Berg



Eugenia guapurium DC.; Guapurium peruvianum Poir.

*

Peru



Myrciaria guaquica (Kiaersk.)

Mattos & D.Legrand

Eugenia guaquica Kiaersk.;

Brazil


Myrciaria guaquiea Kiaersk.

Eugenia guaquiea Kiaersk.; Paramyrciaria guaquiea (Kiaersk.) Sobral

*

Brazil


Myrciaria hatschbachii Mattos

Plinia hatschbachii (Mattos) Sobral

*

Brazil


Myrciaria ibarrae Lundell

Myrciaria longicaudata Lundell

Guatemala, Mexico

Myrciaria involucrata O.Berg

Myrciaria trinitatis O.Berg; Plinia involucrata (O.Berg) McVaugh

*

; P. pinnata L.



*

Brazil


Myrciaria itacurubiensis

Barb.Rodr.

Paraguay


Myrciaria itacurubiensis

Barb.Rodr. ex Chodat &

Hassl.



Paraguay



Myrciaria leptophylla

(Barb.Rodrig) Chodat &

Hassl.

Eugenia herbaceae O.Berg



*

; E. leptophylla Barb.Rodr.

Brazil, Paraguay

Myrciaria leucadendron

O.Berg

*



Brazil

Myrciaria leucophloea O.Berg

var. conferta O.Berg

Brazil



Myrciaria leucophloea var.

laxa O.Berg

Brazil


Myrciaria lituatinervia O.Berg

Marlierea lituatinervia (O.Berg) McVaugh

*

Guyana


Myrciaria longipes var. opaca

O.Berg


Brazil


Myrciaria longipes var.

pellucida O.Berg

Brazil


Myrciaria marowynensis

O.Berg


Eugenia marowynensis Miq.

Brazil, Ecuador, French Guyana, Suriname

Myrciaria micrantha O.Berg

Paramyrciaria delicatula (DC.) Kausel

Paraguay

Myrciaria micrantha

Barb.Rodr. ex Chodat &

Hassl.


Paraguay


Myrciaria myriophylla O.Berg

Myrciaria myriophylla (Casar.) O.Berg; Blepharocalyx myriophyllus (Casar.) Morais &

Sobral

*

; Eugenia myriophylla Casar.; Myrcia pinaster Mart. ex O.Berg



Brazil

Myrciaria myrtifolia Alain

Puerto Rico



Myrciaria nettiana (Kiaersk.)

Mattos & D.Legrand

Eugenia nettiana Kiaersk.

Brazil


226

L.L. Borges et al. / Food Chemistry 153 (2014) 224–233



Table 1 (continued)

Species


Synonym

Distribution

Myrciaria nitida O.Berg

Myrciaria polyantha (Miq.) O.Berg; Eugenia inaequiloba DC.; E. nitida Benth.; E.

polyantha Miq.; Myrcia inaequiloba (DC.) Lemée

*

Brazil



Myrciaria nitida var.

chartacea O.Berg

Guyana


Myrciaria nitida var. coriacea

O.Berg


Guyana


Myrciaria nitida var. dives

O.Berg


Guyana


Myrciaria oblongata Mattos

Plinia oblongata (Mattos) Mattos

Brazil

Myrciaria pallida O.Berg



*

Myrciaria sulcata Mattos

Brazil

Myrciaria perforata O.Berg



Calyptranthes axillaris O.Berg; C. maschalantha O.Berg; C. obscura DC.; C. tuberculata

O.Berg; Neomitranthes nitida Mattos; N. obscura (DC.) N.Silveira

*

; N. wilsoniana



Mattos

Brazil


Myrciaria peruviana (Poir.)

Mattos


Guapurium peruvianum Poir.

*

; Plinia peruviana (Poir.) Govaerts



Bolivia

Myrciaria peruviana var.

trunciflora Mattos

*

Eugenia rabeniana Kiaersk.; Plinia trunciflora (O. Berg) Kausel



Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay

Myrciaria pilosa Sobral &

Couto

*



Brazil

Myrciaria plicato-costata

O.Berg

Plinia plicato-costata (O.Berg) Amshoff; Eugenia plicato-costata (O.Berg) Glaz.; Plinia



anonyma Sobral

Brazil


Myrciaria plinioides

D.Legrand

Brazil


Myrciaria polyantha O.Berg

Aulomyrcia inaequiloba (DC.) Amshoff; Eugenia polyantha Miq.; Myrcia inaequiloba

(DC.) D. Legrand

Brazil, French Guyana, Suriname, Venezuela

Myrciaria pseudodichasiantha

(Kiaersk.) Mattos &

D.Legrand

*

Eugenia pseudodichasianth Kiaersk.



Brazil

Myrciaria puberulenta B.Holst

Venezuela



Myrciaria pumila O.Berg

*

Myrciaria adenodes (Kiaersk.) Mattos & D.Legrand; Eugenia adenodes Kiaersk.; E.



adenodes Kiaersk

Brazil


Myrciaria quitarensis O.Berg

Eugenia quitarensis Benth.; Myrcia quitarensis (Benth.) Sagot

*

Guyana, Venezuela



Myrciaria racemosa

M.L.Kawas.

Ecuador


Myrciaria ramiflora O.Berg

Eugenia coffeifolia DC

*

; E. melinonis Sagot; E. sinemariensis Aubl.



Brazil

Myrciaria rojasii D.Legrand

*

Myrciaria tapiraguayensis Barb.Rodr.; Paramyrciaria tapiraguayensis (Barb.Rodr.)



Sobral

Brazil, Paraguay

Myrciaria rubiginosa

(Cambess.) O.Berg

Eugenia rubiginosa Cambess.; Eugeniopsis rubiginosa (Cambess.) O.Berg; Marlierea

rubiginosa (Cambess.) D.Legrand

*

;

Brazil



Myrciaria schaueriana O.Berg

Aulomyrcia schaueriana (Miq.) Amshoff

French guyana, Suriname

Myrciaria schuechiana var.

deflexa O.Berg

Brazil



Myrciaria schuechiana var.

latifolia O.Berg

Brazil


Myrciaria sericea O.Berg

Eugenia neosericea P.O.Morais & Sobral

*

Brazil


Myrciaria silveirana

D.Legrand

Aulomyrcia alagoensis O.Berg; A. crenulata O.Berg; Calyptromyrcia cymosa O.Berg;

Myrcia adpressepilosa Kiaersk.; M. alternifolia Miq.; M. amethystina (O.Berg) Kiaersk.;

M. andaiaensis Mattos; M. angustifolia (O.Berg) Nied.; M. androsaemoides (O.Berg)

Krug & Urb.; M. arimensis Britton; M. bicudoensis (O.Berg) Mattos; M. botrys (O.Berg)

N.Silveira; M. camapuana Mattos; M. campestris DC.; M. cassinioides DC.; M. collina

S.Moore; M. corumbensis Glaz.; M. crassicaulis Cambess.; M. crenulata (O.Berg)

Mattos; M. cuneata (O.Berg) Nied.; M. cymosa (O.Berg) Nied.; M. cymosopaniculata

Kiaersk.; M. daphnoides DC.; M. decrescens (O.Berg) Mattos; M. dermatophylla

Kiaersk.; M. diaphanosticta Kiaersk.; M. guianensis (Aubl.) DC

*

; M. heringeriana



Mattos; Myrcianthes cymosa (O.Berg) Mattos

Brazil


Myrciaria spirito-sanctensis

Mattos


Brazil


Myrciaria stirpiflora O.Berg

Eugenia stirpiflora Krug & Urb.

Caribbean, United States

Myrciaria strigipes O.Berg

*

Paramyrciaria strigipes (O.Berg) Sobral; Plinia strigipes O.Berg



Brazil

Myrciaria strigipes var.

longifolia O.Berg

Brazil



Myrciaria tenella var.

spathulata O.Berg

Eugenia tenella DC. var. spathulata (O.Berg ex Mart.) Kiaersk.

Brazil


Myrciaria tolypantha var.

angustifolia O.Berg

Brazil


Myrciaria tolypantha var.

pubescens O.Berg

Brazil


Myrciaria trunciflora O.Berg

Myrciaria peruviana (Poir.) Mattos var. trunciflora (O.Berg) Mattos; Eugenia

rabeniana Kiaersk.; Plinia trunciflora (O.Berg) Kausel

Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay

Myrciaria vexator McVaugh

Costa Rica, Panama, Venezuela



Myrciaria vismeifolia (Benth.)

O.Berg


Eugenia vismeifolia Benth.

Bolivia, Brazil, French Guyana, Guyana, Panama,

Suriname, Venezuela

Myrciaria vismiifolia O.Berg

Eugenia vismiifolia Benth

Brazil


*

Accepted synonm.

L.L. Borges et al. / Food Chemistry 153 (2014) 224–233

227


(2-phenylbenzopyrilium cation or anthocyanidin), usually at-

tached to at least one sugar residue (

Reynertson, Yang, Jiang, Basile,

& Kennelly, 2008

). Its fruits are known as Brazilian berry because of

the high quantity of anthocyanins found in the epicarp, primarily

cyanidin-3-O-glucoside (1a) and delphinidin-3-O-glucoside (1b)

(

Wu, Dastmalchi, Long, & Kennelly, 2012



).

There are few studies concerning the chemical composition of

M. cauliflora (Mart.) O. Berg., although the presence of ascorbic acid

(2), tannins, cyanidins and peonidin glycosides have been reported

(

Reynertson et al., 2008



). Phytochemical constituents of the meth-

anolic extract of jaboticaba were characterised by LC-MS-TOF

method and several polyphenols (cyanidin-3-O-glucoside (1a), del-

phinidin-3-O-glucoside (1b), jaboticabin (3a), 2-O-(3,4-dihydroxy-

benzoyl)-2,4,6-trihydroxyphenylacetic acid (3b), isoquercitrin (5),

quercimeritrin (6), quercitrin (7), myricitrin (9), ellagic acid (16),

and syringin (24)) were identified in the fruit extracts. In addition,

seven gallotannins and two ellagic acid derivatives were identified.

The hydro-ethanolic extract from the leaves of M. cauliflora contain

several compounds, primarily including polyoxygenated deriva-

tives, such as gossypetin-3,8-dimethyl ether-5-O-b-glucoside

(25a), gossypetin-3,5-dimethyl ether (25b) and myricetin-3,5,3

0

-

trimethyl ether (25c). In addition, some organic acids, such as



O

HO

OH



O

O

OH



CH

2

OH



OH

OH

OH



R

1a H cyanidin 3-O-glucoside

1b OH delphinidin 3-O-glucoside

R

HO

O



O

OH

HO



HO

HO

ascorbic acid

O

O

OH



OH

O

O



R

OH

HO



3a Me methyl 2-[(3,4-dihydroxybenzoyloxy)-4,6-dihydroxyphenyl]acetate

3b H 2-O-(3,4-dihydroxybenzoyl)-2,4,6-trihydroxyphenylacetic acid

R

OH

O



OH

HO

O



OH

OH

quercetin

O

HO

OH



O

O

OH



CH

2

OH



OH

OH

OH



O

isoquercitrin

HO

OH



O

OH

O



O

OH

OH



O

OH

OH



OH

OH

quercimeritrin

O

O

OH



HO

O

OH



OH

O

OH



OH OH

OH

CH



3

quercitrin

O

O



OH

HO

O



OH

OH

O



OH

OH

OH



O

O

OH



OH

OH

CH



3

rutin

O

O



OH

HO

O



OH

OH

myricitrin

OH

O

CH



3

OH

HO



OH

O

O



OH

HO

OH



CH

3

OH



R

10 pyranocyanin (general strucuture)

O

HO



11 cinnamic acid

CO

2



H

OH

12 O-cumaric acid

COOH

HO

OH



OH

13 gallic acid

COOH


OH

OH

14 protocatechuic acid

OH

OH

15 methyl protocatechuate



O

OMe


O

O

O



O

OH

HO



OH

OH

16 ellagic acid

Fig. 1. Molecular structures (1–49) of the compounds found in Myrciaria genus.

228


L.L. Borges et al. / Food Chemistry 153 (2014) 224–233

oxalic (26), citric (27), tartaric (28), malic (29), fumaric (30), quinic

(31) and succinic acid (32) were detected in the aqueous extract of

M. cauliflora epicarp by GC and HPLC methods (

Wu et al., 2012

).

Other polyphenolic compounds isolated from the methanolic



extract of M. cauliflora are gallic acid (13), protocatechuic acid

(14), epi-gallocatechin-3-O-gallate (35), quercetin-3-O-b-galacto-

side (36), kaempferol (37), quercetin (4), kaempferol-3-O-

a

-arabi-



nofuranoside (38), quercetin-3-O-

a

-arabinofuranoside (39) and



myricetin-3-O-rhamnoside (40) (

Hussein, Hashem, Seliem, Linde-

quist, & Nawwar, 2003

).

The content of ellagic acid (16) and total phenols decreases with



ripening, and a similar tendency was observed for the total tannin

content. This decrease could be associated with the loss of astrin-

gency during the jaboticaba ripening. This phenomenon is similar

to that observed in other fruits such as strawberries (

Abe, Lajolo,

& Genovese, 2011

).

CH

3



CH

3

CH



3

CH

3



CH

3

H



3

C

CH



3

CH

3



CH

3

CH



3

17 beta-carotene

O

O



OCH

3

OH



OH

HO

O



O

18 O-methylellagic acid

O

O



O

O

OH



OCH

3

OH



O

O

H



3

C

HO



HO

HO

19 (4-alpha-rhamnopyranosyl) ellagic acid

OH

HO

20 all-trans-lutein



O

O

OH



HO

21 violaxanthin

O

O



H

HO

O



22 luteoxanthin

O

+



Cl

-

O



HO

OH

O



HO

O

H OH



OH

OH

OH



23 cyanidin galactoside

O

OH



HO

HO

OH



O

H

3



CO

OCH


3

OH

24 syringin

O

OH

OH



R

3

HO



OR

2

OR



1

O

OCH



3

25a R

1

=Glc, R



2

=OCH


3

, R


3

=H

25b R

1

=CH


3

, R


2

=OH, R


3

=H

25c R

1

=CH


3

, R


2

=H, R


3

=OCH


3

O

OH



HO

O

OH



OH

O

O



26 gossypetin-3,5-dimethyl ether

HO

O



OH

O

OH



O

HO

27 citric acid

OH

OH

O



HO

O

OH



28 tartaric acid

OH

O



HO

O

OH



29 malic acid

O

OH



O

HO

30 fumaric acid

HO

OH

OH



O

OH

HO



31 quinic acid

O

OH



O

HO

32 succinic acid

O

O

33 (2E,6E)-farnesyl acetate



O

34 1,8-cineole

Fig. 1 (continued)

L.L. Borges et al. / Food Chemistry 153 (2014) 224–233

229


When fruit extracts from M. cauliflora were subjected to bioac-

tivity-guided fractionation using the DPPH assay, a depside, methyl

2-[(3,4-dihydroxybenzoyloxy)-4,6-dihydroxyphenyl]acetate (jabu-

ticabin), was isolated (3a). In addition, other substances have been

identified, such as depside 2-O-(3,4-dihydroxybenzoyl)-2,4,6-tri-

hydroxyphenylacetic acid (3b), quercetin (4), isoquercitrin (5),

quercimeritrin (6), quercitrin (7), rutin (8), myricitrin (9), pyrano-

cyanins (10), cinnamic acid (11), O-coumaric acid (12), gallic acid

(13), protocatechuic acid (14), methyl protocatechuate (15) and el-

lagic acid (16) (

Einbond, Reynertson, Luo, Basile, & Kennelly, 2004

).

Myrciaria dubia (Kunth) McVaugh, popularly known as ‘‘camu-



camu,’’ is noted for being an important source of antioxidants such

as vitamin C (2), b-carotene (17) and phenolic compounds (

Vidigal,

Minim, Carvalho, Milagres, & Goncalves, 2011

). Despite the great

commercial potential of camu-camu, few works have been pub-

lished regarding its phytochemical content. Screening of the phe-

nolic content of Myrciaria fruits revealed that the hydroethanolic

extract from M. dubia fruits presented higher levels of total phenols

than Myrciaria vexator McVaugh and M. cauliflora.

Reynertson et al.

(2008


) found that the total phenolic content in camu-camu fruits

was higher than in Malpighia emarginata fruits (acerola). Among

the phenolic compounds present in M. dubia fruits include flava-

nols, flavanones, anthocyanins, catechin (4), flavan-3-ol, and rutin

(8). Cyanidin-3-glucoside (1a) was identified as the major anthocy-

anin in fruits, followed by delphinidin 3-glucoside (1b).

In addition, the fruits are rich in carotenoids, such as b-carotene

(17), violaxanthin (21) and luteoxanthin (22). All-trans-lutein (20)

is the major carotenoid, ranging from 45% to 55% of the total carot-

enoid content. In addition to the colourant properties, carotenoids

possess several others functions, such as vitamin A activity, cancer-

preventing effects, cardiovascular protective effects and can reduce

the risk of cataracts. Camu-camu fruits at different stages of matu-

rity exhibit different DPPH antioxidant capacities, which increase

during ripening (

Chirinos, Galarza, Betalleluz-Pallardel, Pedreschi,

& Campos, 2010

).

The methanolic extract of leaves from M. dubia have been found



to contain ellagic acid (16), 4-O-methylellagic acid (18) and 4-(

a

-



rhamnopyranosyl) ellagic acid (19) (

Akter, Oh, Eun, & Ahmed, 2011

).

M. vexator, found in Mesoamerica and northern areas of South



America, produces edible fruits, known as blue grape or false jabo-

ticaba, which are consumed in some localities as fresh fruits or as

processed jellies and drinks. From the hydromethanolic extract of

M. vexator fruits, the following compounds were isolated: cyani-

din-3-O-glucoside (1a), delphinidin-3-O-glucoside (1b), jabotica-

bin (3a), 2-O-(3,4-dihydroxybenzoyl)-2,4,6-trihydroxyphenylace

tic acid (3b), ellagic acid (16), quercitrin (7), rutin (8), myricitrin

(9), protocatechuic acid (14), methyl protocatechuate (15) and

cyanidin galactoside (23) (

Dastmalchi et al., 2012

).

Several species of the Myrtaceae family are rich in essential oils,



many of which have antimicrobial activity. Essential oil from the

O

HO



OH

O

OH



OH

OH

O



OH

OH

OH



35 epi-gallocatechin-3-O-gallate

O

O



OH

HO

O



OH

OH

Gal



36 quercetin-3-O-beta-galactoside

OH

O



OH

HO

O



OH

37 kaempferol

O

O



OH

HO

O



OH

O

HO



OH

OH

38 kaempferol-3-O-alpha-arabinofuranoside

O

O

OH



HO

O

OH



OH

O

OH



OH

HO

39 quercetin-3-O-alpha-arabinofuranoside

O

O

OH



HO

O

OH



OH

OH

40 myricetin-3-O-rhamnoside

O

OH

OH



H

3

C



OH

H

H



E

41 beta-caryophyllene

E

E



42 bicyclogermacrene

H

OH



CH

3

H



3

C

H



H

3

C



CH

3

H



43 globulol

H

H

44 gama-muurolene

H

O

H

45 beta-caryophyllene oxide

H

2



C

HO

CH



3

H

3



C

CH

3



46 Spathulenol

47 alpha-bisabolol oxide A

O

OH



48 Alpha-pinene

49 d-limonene

Fig. 1 (continued)

230

L.L. Borges et al. / Food Chemistry 153 (2014) 224–233



stems of Myrciaria floribunda (H. West ex Willd.) O. Berg, popularly

known as ‘‘camboin amarelo,’’ contains sesquiterpenes (72.2%) and

the major compound was found to be (2E, 6E)-farnesyl acetate (33)

(19.9%). Monoterpenes are the primary group present in the essen-

tial oils from leaves (53.9%) and flowers (55.4%), and the compound

1,8-cineole (34) is the major constituent of essential oil from both

the sources (38.4% and 22.8%, respectively) (

Tietbohl et al., 2012

).

The constituents of essential oils from the leaves of Myrciaria



trunciflora Mart. (O. Berg) [syn. Plinia trunciflora (O. Berg.) Kausel],

popularly known as ‘‘jaboticaba-de-cabinho,’’ were analysed by

GC-FID-MS and 21 compounds were identified. Although hydrocar-

bon sesquiterpenes (24.79%) were identified, oxygenated sesqui-

terpenes were found to be the major constituents (48.09%). The

main constituents identified were b-caryophyllene (8.2%) (41),

bicyclogermacrene (10.6%) (42), globulol (10.8%) (43), and

c

-



muurolene (44). Essential oils from other Myrciaria species have

been analysed and the major compounds identified were as fol-

lows: b-caryophyllene (41) and its oxide (45) and caryophyllene

oxide (39.3%) for Myrciaria edulis oil; b-caryophyllene (9.2%) (41)

for Myrciaria peruviana var. trunciflora Mattos (syn. P. trunciflora)

oil; spathulenol (27.2%) (46) for M. cauliflora oil; and

a

-bisabolol



oxide A (47) for M. cordifolia oil (

Apel, Sobral, Zuanazzi, & Henri-

ques, 2006

).

Volatile components in camu-camu fruits have been identified



by GC–MS (gas chromatography–mass spectrometry) and twenty-

one compounds were detected; majority of the compounds were

terpenes (98%), predominated with

a

-pinene (66%) (48) and



d-limonene (24%) (49), and b-caryophyllene (41) among the

sesquiterpenes, was found to be the major compound (

Franco &

Shibamoto, 2000

).

4. Biological properties of the Myrciaria genus



In addition to the colourant properties, anthocyanins can be

associated with flavouring properties that enhance the palatability

of food leading to healthy food habits. There are several articles

regarding these pigments, reporting anti-carcinogenic, antioxidant,

antiviral and anti-inflammatory activities, which are in agreement

with the properties exhibited by foods that have considerable

anthocyanin content. Furthermore, anthocyanins are antimuta-

genic and cancer chemopreventive and have an effect on type 2

diabetes and Alzheimers disease. The consumption of foods rich

in anthocyanins has been linked to a reduction in weight gain, reg-

ulation of hormones involved in obesity, and improvement of insu-

lin resistance in mice (

Prior et al., 2010

). Therefore, plant extracts

rich in such compounds are potentially useful as therapeutics.

4.1. Antioxidant effects

Leite et al. (2011

) observed that rats fed with a diet mixed with

lyophilised epicarp from M. cauliflora exhibited an increased anti-

oxidant potential in the plasma of rats, which can be attributed

to the anthocyanin content of the epicarp. However, it was ob-

served that excessive consumption of anthocyanins present in

jaboticaba peel caused a reduction in antioxidant activity, empha-

sising the need to establish a recommended daily intake for these

substances (

Leite et al., 2011

).

M. vexator fruits exhibit an antiradical activity, as determined



by the ABTS method, which was found to be much higher than that

of the so-called ‘‘superfruits’’, such as blueberries (

Akter et al.,

2011; Leite et al., 2011

).

Camu-camu (M. dubia) fruits were found to have powerful



antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties in vivo in humans

and this activity could be attributed to the presence of vitamin C,

anthocyanins and b-carotene (

Inoue, Komoda, Uchida, & Node,

2008

). As well known, plants rich in carotenoids are known to have



several biological functions, such as cancer-preventing effects and

are protective against cardiovascular diseases. In addition, they re-

duce the risk of cataracts (

Van den Berg et al., 2000

).

Camu-camu juice presented similar properties to ascorbic acid,



which can be attributed to the presence of unknown substances,

besides vitamin C or other compounds, which are capable of mod-

ulating the kinetics of vitamin C in vivo. A daily consumption of

70 mL of camu-camu juice for a week was capable of reducing uri-

nary 8-hydroxydesoxyguanosine, a biomarker of DNA damage; this

did not occur with equivalent amounts of isolated ascorbic acid

(

Inoue et al., 2008



).

4.2. Anti-inflammatory activity

The leaves and peel of the fruits of M. cauliflora are astringent

and are popularly used as a remedy for diarrhea and skin irritation.

Other indications include asthma, intestinal inflammation and

hemoptysis. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that depsides

and anthocyanins of jaboticaba fruits can reduce inflammation

caused by exposure to cigarette smoke (

Dastmalchi et al., 2012

).

These compounds present strong antioxidant and anti-inflamma-



tory properties, and some of these are of interest because of their

potential to treat chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

The anti-inflammatory activity of jaboticaba against COPD renders

this fruit an emerging functional food for smokers, to reduce the

lung damage in these patients. Fruits of M. vexator exhibit activity

against COPD, primarily because of their antioxidant capacity and

polyphenol content (

Dastmalchi et al., 2012

).

4.3. Hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic activities



The consumption of freeze–dried jaboticaba peel increased

HDL-cholesterol (41.7% in animals fed with 2% freeze–dried peel

jaboticaba, when compared with the control group) and reduced

insulin resistance in obese rats (hyperinsulinemia was lower in

animals that received freeze–dried jaboticaba peel) (

Lenquiste,

Batista, Marineli, Dragano, & Maróstica, 2012

). The compound

4-(

a

-rhamnopyranosyl) ellagic acid, obtained from the methanolic



extract of M. dubia leaves, exhibited strong inhibition against

human recombinant aldose reductase, which was 60-fold higher

than that of quercetin. Aldose reductase inhibitors are important

in preventing the reduction of glucose to sorbitol and reducing

diabetic complications (

Akter et al., 2011

).

4.4. Antifungal and antiproliferative activities



The hydroethanolic extracts (80%) of M. cauliflora leaves exhib-

ited antifungal activity in vitro against strains of Candida albicans

(dilution to 1:2) and Candida krusei (crude extract), whereas the

hydroethanolic extract from stem barks exhibited antifungal activ-

ity against the strains tested: C. albicans (dilution to 1:2), Candida

guilliermondii (dilution to 1:8) and C. krusei (dilution to 1:8) (

Diniz,

Macêdo-Costa, Pereira, Pereira, & Higino, 2010



).

The polar fraction of jaboticaba peel presented antiproliferative

effects against leukemia cells (K-562) and the non-polar extract

exhibited activity against prostate cancer cells (PC-3). The micro-

nucleus test in mice using the polar extract of jaboticaba (M. cau-

liflora) peel induced no DNA damage and mutagenic effects

(

Leite-Legatti et al., 2012



).

4.5. Antibacterial activity

Myoda et al. (2010

) recently studied the effects of several con-

centrations of methanolic extract of camu-camu juice residue from

the seed and peel on the following microorganisms: Staphylococcus

aureus, Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The extract

L.L. Borges et al. / Food Chemistry 153 (2014) 224–233

231


exhibited antimicrobial activity against S. aureus, which was prob-

ably because of the lipophilic compounds present in the extract.

Hydromethanolic extracts from the leaves of M. cauliflora pre-

sented effective antibacterial activity against Streptococcus mitis,

S. mutans, S. sanguinis, S. oralis, S. salivarius and Lactobacillus casei,

when compared with chlorhexidine 0.12%, revealing a strong

potential for finding new agents active against bacteria that cause

tooth decay (

Macedo-Costa et al., 2009

).

4.6. Anticholinesterase activity



Essential oils obtained from the flowers and leaves of M. flori-

bunda had an IC

50

value of 1583 and 681



l

g/ml (both low mild

values), respectively, in an acetylcholinesterase inhibitory bioassay

(

Tietbohl et al., 2012



). Leaf essential oils of M. trunciflora presented

activity against Candida dubliniensi and C. albicans. It was suggested

that this activity may be associated with the sesquiterpene content

in the oil and that the essential oils from these species could be

exploited as medicinal sources (

Lago et al., 2011

).

4.7. Anti-plasmodium activity



When evaluated against Plasmodium falciparum, the dichloro-

methanic and ethanolic extracts from the cortex of M. dubia exhib-

ited CI

50

value of 3 and 6



l

g/ml, respectively. These values are

close to those of others species that have known activity against

P. falciparum, such as Remijia peruviana (CI

50

= 7.4


l

g/mL), Cinchona

officinalis (CI

50

= 4.2



l

g/mL), and Cinchona pubescens (CI

50

= 1


l

g/

ml) (



Ruiz, Maco, Cobos, Gutierrez-Choquevilca, & Roumy, 2011

).

4.8. Gastroprotective activity



The aqueous ethanolic extract from leaves of M. peruviana var.

trunciflora Mattos (syn. P. edulis) did not reveal acute toxicity in

mice treated with 5 g/kg p.o. and also showed promising antiulcer

activity in rats with HCl/ethanol-induced ulcers (100, 200, and

400 mg/kg p.o.); thus, revealing to be more potent than lanzopraz-

ole. The triterpenoids present in leaves of M. peruviana var. truncifl-

ora probably play the gastroprotective role in the ulcer induced

models used in this study (

Ishikawa et al., 2008

).

4.9. Toxicity, genoxic, and antigenotoxic effects



The genotoxic and antigenotoxic potential of M. dubia juice was

evaluated in blood cells of mice after acute, subacute and chronic

treatment. After treatment, no signs of toxicity were observed

and no cell death occurred, indicating that camu-camu fruits

should be safe for human consumption; however, studies at a

greater depth are necessary. In addition, camu-camu presented

antigenotoxic activity in an ex vivo test (comet assay) (

Silva


et al., 2012

).

5. Conclusions



In spite of the evidence regarding the potential of Myrciaria spe-

cies as a source for obtaining useful compounds, few studies about

the chemical composition and biological activity of the species

belonging to this genus have been reported. Furthermore, most

of the existing studies have concentrated on M. cauliflora, M. dubia,

and M. vexator, other species possess a vast diversity of active com-

pounds. Therefore, more investigations in others species of the

Myrciaria genus may be promising because the quimiotaxonomic

similarity within the species that have been studied reveals great

potential in discovering new molecules with biological importance.

The data described in this paper reveal several species with

great potential for food and pharmaceutical applications due to

the high molecular diversity found in this genus, with several

properties that could be explored. Biological activities such as

antioxidant,

anti-inflammatory, hypoglycemic, hypolipidemic,

antifungal,

antiproliferative,

antibacterial,

anticholinesterase,

anti-Plasmodium and gastroprotective effects have been reported

and the main chemical compounds correlated with these proper-

ties have been isolated. The knowledge obtained from this review

should be useful for further exploitation of the several resources of

the Myrciaria genus.

References

Abe, L. T., Lajolo, F. M., & Genovese, M. I. (2011). Potential dietary sources of ellagic

acid and other antioxidants among fruits consumed in Brazil: Jabuticaba

(Myrciaria jaboticaba (Vell.) Berg). Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture,

92(8), 1679–1687

.

Akter, M. S., Oh, S., Eun, J.-B., & Ahmed, M. (2011). Nutritional compositions and



health promoting phytochemicals of camu-camu (Myrciaria dubia) fruit: A

review. Food Research International, 44(7), 1728–1732

.

Apel, M. A., Sobral, M., Zuanazzi, J. å., & Henriques, A. T. (2006). Essential oil



composition of four Plinia species (Myrtaceae). Flavour and Fragrance Journal,

21(3), 565–567

.

Camlofski, A. M. (2008). Caracterização do fruto de Cerejeira ‘Eugenia involucrata DC’



visando seu aproveitamento tecnológico. Programa de Pós-Graduação em

Ciências e Tecnologia de Alimentos, vol. MSc. Ponta Grossa: Universidade

Estadual de Ponta Grossa.

Chirinos, R., Galarza, J., Betalleluz-Pallardel, I., Pedreschi, R., & Campos, D. (2010).

Antioxidant compounds and antioxidant capacity of Peruvian camu camu

(Myrciaria dubia (H.B.K.) McVaugh) fruit at different maturity stages. Food

Chemistry, 120(4), 1019–1024

.

Citadin, I., Danner, M. A., & Sasso, S. A. Z. (2010). Jabuticabeiras. Revista Brasileira de



Fruticultura, 32, 1

.

Dastmalchi, K., Flores, G., Wu, S. B., Ma, C., Dabo, A. J., Whalen, K., et al. (2012).



Edible Myrciaria vexator fruits: Bioactive phenolics for potential COPD therapy.

Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry, 20(14), 4549–4555

.

Diniz, D. N., Macêdo-Costa, M. R., Pereira, M. S. V., Pereira, J. V., & Higino, J. S. (2010).



Efeito antifúngico in vitro do extrato da folha e do caule de Myrciaria cauliflora

Berg. sobre microrganismos orais. Revista de Odontologia da UNESP, 39, 151–156

.

Einbond, L. S., Reynertson, K. A., Luo, X.-D., Basile, M. J., & Kennelly, E. J. (2004).



Anthocyanin antioxidants from edible fruits. Food Chemistry, 84(1), 23–28

.

Franco, M. R. B., & Shibamoto, T. (2000). Volatile composition of some Brazilian



fruits: Umbu-caja (Spondias citherea), Camu-camu (Myrciaria dubia), Aracü a-boi

(Eugenia stipitata), and Cupuacüu (Theobroma grandiflorum). Journal of

Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 48, 1263–1265

.

Hussein, S. A. M., Hashem, A. N. M., Seliem, M. A., Lindequist, U., & Nawwar, M. A. M.



(2003). Polyoxygenated flavonoids from Eugenia edulis. Phytochemistry, 64(4),

883–889


.

Inoue, T., Komoda, H., Uchida, T., & Node, K. (2008). Tropical fruit camu-camu

(Myrciaria dubia) has anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties. Journal

of Cardiology, 52(2), 127–132

.

IPNI. (2012). The international plant name index (<



http://www.ipni.org/

>). The


Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew: The Harvard University Herbaria; Australian

National Herbarium.

Ishikawa, T., Donatini Rdos, S., Diaz, I. E., Yoshida, M., Bacchi, E. M., & Kato, E. T.

(2008). Evaluation of gastroprotective activity of Plinia edulis (Vell.) Sobral

(Myrtaceae) leaves in rats. Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 118(3), 527–529

.

Lago, J. H., Souza, E. D., Mariane, B., Pascon, R., Vallim, M. A., Martins, R. C., et al.



(2011). Chemical and biological evaluation of essential oils from two species of

Myrtaceae – Eugenia uniflora L. and Plinia trunciflora (O. Berg) Kausel. Molecules,

16(12), 9827–9837

.

Leite-Legatti, A. V., Batista, Â. G., Dragano, N. R. V., Marques, A. C., Malta, L. G., Riccio,



M. F., et al. (2012). Jaboticaba peel: Antioxidant compounds, antiproliferative

and antimutagenic activities. Food Research International, 49(1), 596–603

.

Leite, A. V., Malta, L. G., Riccio, M. F., Eberlin, M. N., Pastore, G. M., & Marostica, M. R.



(2011). Antioxidant potential of rat plasma by administration of freeze-dried

jaboticaba peel (Myrciaria jaboticaba Vell Berg). Journal of Agricultural and Food

Chemistry, 59(6), 2277–2283

.

Lenquiste, S. A., Batista, Â. G., Marineli, R. d. S., Dragano, N. R. V., & Maróstica, M. R.



(2012). Freeze-dried jaboticaba peel added to high-fat diet increases HDL-

cholesterol and improves insulin resistance in obese rats. Food Research

International, 49(1), 153–160

.

Macedo-Costa, M. R., Diniz, D. N., Carvalho, C. N., Pereira, M. S. V., Pereira, J. V., &



Higino, J. S. (2009). Eficácia do extrato de Myrciaria cauliflora (Mart.) O. Berg.

(jabuticabeira) sobre bactérias orais. Rev Bras Farmacogn, 19(2B), 565–571

.

Myoda, T., Fujimura, S., Park, B., Nagashima, T., Nakagawa, J., & Nishizawa, M.



(2010). Antioxidative and antimicrobial potential of residues of camu-camu

juice production. Journal of Food Agriculture & Environment, 8(2), 304–307

.

Oliveira, A. L., Neto, E. A. B., Fenerich, E. J., Alonso, C. O., Azevedo, J. S. A., & Neto, P. O.



(2008). Efeito da aplicação pré-colheita de cálcio na qualidade dos frutos de

jabuticaba. Vitória: XX Congresso Brasileiro de Fruticultura

.

232


L.L. Borges et al. / Food Chemistry 153 (2014) 224–233

Prior, R. L., Wilkes, S., Rogers, T., Khanal, R. C., Wu, X., Hager, T. J., et al. (2010).

Dietary black raspberry anthocyanins do not alter development of obesity in

mice fed an obesogenic high-fat diet. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry,

58(7), 3977–3983

.

Reynertson, K. A., Yang, H., Jiang, B., Basile, M. J., & Kennelly, E. J. (2008).



Quantitative analysis of antiradical phenolic constituents from fourteen edible

Myrtaceae fruits. Food Chemistry, 109(4), 883–890

.

Ruiz, L., Maco, M., Cobos, M., Gutierrez-Choquevilca, A. L., & Roumy, V. (2011).



Plants used by native Amazonian groups from the Nanay River (Peru)

for the treatment of malaria. Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 133(2),

917–921

.

Silva, F. C., Arruda, A., Ledel, A., Dauth, C., Romao, N. F., Viana, R. N., et al. (2012).



Antigenotoxic effect of acute, subacute and chronic treatments with Amazonian

camu-camu (Myrciaria dubia) juice on mice blood cells. Food and Chemical

Toxicology, 50(7), 2275–2281

.

Tietbohl, L. A. C., Lima, B. G., Fernandes, C. P., Santos, M. G., Silva, F. E. B., Denardin, E.



L. G., et al. (2012). Comparative study and anticholinesterasic evaluation of

essential oils from leaves, stems and flowers of Myrciaria floribunda (H.West ex

Willd.) O. Berg. Latin American Journal of Pharmacy, 31(4), 637–641

.

Van den Berg, H., Faulks, R., Granado, F. H., Hirschberg, J., Olmedilla, B., Sandmann,



G., et al. (2000). The potential for the improvement of carotenoid in foods.

Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, 80, 880–912

.

Vidigal, M. C. T. R., Minim, V. P. R., Carvalho, N. B., Milagres, M. P., & Goncalves, A. C.



A. (2011). Effect of a health claim on consumer acceptance of exotic Brazilian

fruit juices: Acai (Euterpe oleracea Mart.), Camu-camu (Myrciaria dubia), Caja

(Spondias lutea L.) and Umbu (Spondias tuberosa Arruda). Food Research

International, 44(7), 1988–1996

.

Wu, S. B. A., Dastmalchi, K., Long, C. L., & Kennelly, E. J. (2012). Metabolite profiling



of jaboticaba (Myrciaria cauliflora) and other dark-colored fruit juices. Journal of

Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 60(30), 7513–7525



.

L.L. Borges et al. / Food Chemistry 153 (2014) 224–233



233

Document Outline






Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə