African Journal of Agricultural Research Vol. 6(15), pp. 3623-3630, 4 August, 2011



Yüklə 147.43 Kb.
PDF просмотр
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü147.43 Kb.

 

 

African Journal of Agricultural Research Vol. 6(15), pp. 3623-3630, 4 August, 2011 



Available online at http://www.academicjournals.org/AJAR 

DOI: 10.5897/AJAR10.1097 

ISSN 1991-637X ©2011 Academic Journals

 

 



 

Full Length Research Paper 

 

Photosynthetic yield, fruit ripening and quality 



characteristics of cultivars of Syzygium samarangense 

 

Adel. M. Al-Saif



1,2

*, A. B. M. Sharif Hossain

1

, Rosna Mat Taha

1

 and K. M. Moneruzzaman

1

   

 

           



1

Biotechnology Division, Institute of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala 

Lumpur, Malaysia. 

          

2

Department of Plant Production, College of Food and Agricultural Sciences, King Saud University, P. O. Box 



2460, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia. 

 

Accepted 15 June, 2011 



 

This  study  was  carried  out  to  evaluate  the  photosynthetic  yield,  color  development  and  quality 

characteristics  of three  cultivars of  Syzygium  samarangense  at  commercial  farm of  Banting, Selangor 

and  functional  food  laboratories,  University  of  Malaya,  Kuala  Lumpur.  Various  physiological  and 

biochemical parameters were studied during two seasons of fruit growth from October, 2009 to August, 

2010 with the ‘Giant Green’, ‘Masam manis Pink’ and ‘Jambu madu Red’ cultivars of S. samarangense

Results showed that the highest chlorophyll content, maximal and variable fluorescence (Fm and Fv) in 

mature leaves and photosynthetic yield (Fv/Fm) were found in ‘Jambu madu Red’ cultivar. Furthermore, 

this cultivar that had the medium time for fruit development also produced the highest amount of Juice 

content  (ml/100  g). The  highest,  lower  fluorescence  (F0)  in  mature  leaves,  maximal  fluorescence  (Fm) 

and variable fluorescence (Fv) in new flush, the earliest peel color and the fruit maturity were observed 

in  ‘Masam  manis  pink’  cultivar.  The  highest,  lower  fluorescence  F0  in  new  flush  and  chlorophyll  a, 

chlorophyll  b  and  total  chlorophyll  were  recorded  in  fruit  of  ‘Giant  Green’  cultivar.  Also,  some  other 

quality parameter like peel, pulp, biomass and juice color, aromatic flavor, texture and taste were taken 

into  account to  compare  the  quality  in  the  cultivars  of  S.  samarangense.  This  study  also  showed  that 

the  photosynthetic  yield  had  a  strong  correlation  with  the  fruit  biomass  among  the  three  cultivars.  In 

conclusion,  Jambu  madu  Red’  and  ‘Masam  manis  pink’  ‘cultivars  are  comparatively better  than  ‘Giant 

Green’ cultivar if cultivated under South Asian conditions. 

 

Key words: Syzygium samarangense

, photosynthetic yield, ripening, quality, cultivars.  

 

 

INTRODUCTION 



 

The  wax  jambu  (Syzygium  samarangense)  is  a  non-

climacteric  tropical  fruit,  others  names  are  wax  apple, 

rose apple and java apple. The color of the fruit is usually 

pink,  light-red,  red,  green,  sometimes  greenish-white,  or 

cream-colored  (Morton,  1987).  The  species  presumably 

originated  in  Malaysia  and  other  South-East  Asian 

countries. It  is  widely  cultivated  and  grown  throughout  

 

 

 



*Corresponding author. E-mail: adel7saif@yahoo.com. Tel: 03-

79674372. Fax: 03-79674178. 

 

Abbreviations:

  F0,  Fluorescence;  Fm,  maximal  fluorescence; 



Fv, 

variable  fluorescence;  FDP,  fruit  developmental  period; 



CRD, 

completely  randomized  design;  LSD,  least  significant 

difference. 

Malaysia  and  in  neighboring  countries  such  Thailand, 

Indonesia  and  Taiwan.  Currently  in  Malaysia  it  is 

cultivated  mainly  as  smallholdings  areas  ranging  from  1 

to 5 ha  with its hectarage estimated at about 2000 ha in 

2005 (Shu et al., 2006). Syzygium is a genus of flowering 

plants  that  belongs  to  the  family,  Myrtaceae.  The  genus 

comprises  about  1100  species  (Little  et  al.,  1989).  High 

levels  of  diversity  occur  from  Malaysia  to  northeastern 

Australia,  where  many  species  are  very  poorly  known 

and  many  more  have  not  been  described  taxonomically 

(Morton, 1987). Some of the edible species of Syzygium 



spp 

are  planted  throughout  the  tropics  worldwide.  In 

Malaysia,  there  are  about  three  species  which  bear 

edible fruits,  namely the  water  apple (Syzygium aquem)

Malay  apple  (Syzygium  malaccense)  and  wax  jambu (S. 

samarangense

). The pink, red and green cultivars of wax 

jambu are  popular  in  Malaysia  and  others  South  East  


 

 

3624         Afr. J. Agric. Res. 



 

 

 



Asian  countries.  The fruit is  rounder  and  more  oblong  in 

shape, also having a drier flesh than the wax jambu. Wax 

jambu  commonly  flower  early  or  late  in  the  dry  season; 

the  flowers  appear  to  be  self-compatible  and  the  fruit 

ripens 40 to 50 days after anthesis.  

Fruit is a berry, pear shaped, broadly pyriform, crowned 

by the fleshy calyx with incurved lobes, 3.5-5.5 × 4.5-5.5 

cm,  light  red  to  white;  fruit  flesh  is  white  spongy,  juicy, 

aromatic,  sweet-sour  in  taste.  Seeds  0  to  2,  mostly 

suppressed  globose  up  to  8  mm  in  diameter  (Morton, 

1987). The waxy fruit is pear shaped and the color of the 

fruit  is  usually  pink,  light-red,  red,  sometimes  green  or 

cream-colored (Morton, 1987). The size, shape and color 

of  fruit  are  usually  distinct  characteristics  for  different 

cultivars  in  the  same  species  (Galan,  1989).  Only  few 

cultivars of wax apple are available, which are exotic and 

perpetuated  through  vegetative  methods  of  propagation 

(Morton,  1987).  Measurement  of  the  chlorophyll  a 

fluorescence  is  a  quick,  precise  and  non-destructive 

technique,  widely  used  in  investigating  damage/repair 

caused  in  the  photosynthesis  plant  system  by  various 

types of stresses (Govindjee, 1995). The different cultivar 

produces fruits varying from pink to deep red, depending 

on  environmental  and  cultural  conditions.  Fruit  color  is 

influenced  by  many  factors,  such  as  light,  temperature, 

position  on  the  tree,  growing  stage,  and  leaf:  fruit  ratio 

(Shu  et  al.,  2001).  It  has  been  reported  that  different 

cultivars of wax jambu are different in their morphological 

and  physiological  characteristics  depending  on  the 

genetic behavior, location and climatic conditions, yet this 

has to be documented. Currently very little information is 

available  in  the  literature  on  photosynthetic  yield,  color 

development and quality characteristics of three cultivars 

of  S.samarangense.  Hence,  this  study  is  aimed  to 

evaluate the photosynthetic character, color development 

and  quality  as  well  as  the  physiological  and  biochemical 

characteristics of the three cultivars of S. samarangense. 

It is also useful to assess the quality and the relationship 

between the photosynthetic yield and the fruit biomass of 

the three cultivars under South East Asian region. 

 

 

MATERIALS AND METHODS  



 

The present study was carried out during the year of 2009 to 2010 

to  point  out  the  photosynthetic  characteristics,  color  development 

and  quality  compare  of  three  cultivars  of  wax  jambu 

(S.samarangense)  namely  ‘Giant  Green’,  ‘Masam  manis  Pink’  and 

‘Jambu  madu  Red’  available  at  commercial  farm  of  Banting, 

Selangor, Malaysia. Five trees of each cultivar (about 13 years old),  

were selected from a commercial farm in Banting, 2°

 

30 N, 112° 30 



E  and  1°28  N,  111°  20  E  at  an  elevation  of  about  45  m  from  sea 

level.  The  area  under  study  has  a  hot  and  humid  tropical  climate. 

The soil in orchard is peat with a mean pH of around 4.6 (Ismail et 

al.,  1995).  The  experimental  trees  received  similar  horticultural 

management, 

and 


observations 

were 


recorded 

on 


the 

photosynthetic  characteristics,  fruit  development  and  pigmentation 

characteristics  of  each  cultivar  as  mentioned  below.  Chlorophyll 

content  in  leaves  was  determined  using  a  Minolta  SPAD  meter. 

SPAD meter were calibrated before  taking  the  readings.  A  single  

 

 



 

 

leaf  was  attached  with  the  SPAD  meter  for  chlorophyll  readings. 



The  SPAD  value  of the  leaves was  determined  at the  immediately 

after anthesis. Ten readings were taking per treatment. Chlorophyll 

fluorescence  was  measured  by  Hansatech  Plant  Efficiency 

Analyzer.  It  was  represented  by  lower  F0,  Fm  and  Fv.  

Photosynthetic yield (Fv/Fm) also evaluated at 28°C and time rage 

was  10  µs

-3

.  Fruit  development  of  each  cultivar  was  monitored 



weekly.  Flowers  from  each  cultivar  were  tagged  when  available 

from  15  February  to  17  May  2000.  In  total,  150  randomly  chosen, 

open  flowers  were  tagged  (50  ‘Giant  Green,  50  ‘Masam  manis 

Pink’,  and  50  ‘Jambu  madu  Red’).  The  number  of  flowers  tagged 

ranged between 1 and 10 for each cultivar on a particular date. On 

each  tag,  the  date  and  flower  position  (1,  2,  or  3°)  was  recorded. 

Then, as fruit approached horticultural maturity, they were observed 

every day and the dates on which they reached full maturity (that is, 

full color) were recorded.  

This data was used to calculate fruit developmental period (FDP). 

Fruit  were  harvested  after reaching full  maturity.  The surface color 

of  each tagged fruit was  determined  at three different points  of  the 

fruit  using  a  standard  color  chart  (Minolta,  Osaka,  Japan)  and 

expressed as percentage of color cover. The chlorophyll content of 

both leaf and fruit was determined by methods described in Hendry 

and  Price  (1993).  The  peel,  pulp,  juice  and  biomass  color  was 

determined  using  a  standard  color  chart  (Minolta,  Osaka,  Japan). 

The  K


+

  content  of  the  fruit  juice  was  determined  by  using  a  Cardy 

Potassium  meter. After  extraction  of fruit juice, 3 to 5  drops  of fruit 

juice  were  placed  on  to  the  calibration  sensor  pad  of  Cardy 

Potassium Meter, Model-2400, USA. The reading in ppm was taken 

from  the  display  pad  after  it  stabilized  of  20  s.  Firmness  was 

measured  by  deformation,  under  constant  load  of  400  g,  with  a 

penetrometer  (Durapat  et  al.,  1986).  A  sensorial  analysis  of  taste 

and  aromatic  flavor  was  carried  out  at  the  laboratory  among  the 

ripen fruits of the three cultivars. We have employed a triangle test 

in  which  the  tasters  were  asked  to  state  whether  one  of  the 

samples  differs  from  the  other  two  presented.  The  experimental 

design  was  Completely  Randomized  Design  (CRD)  comprised  of 

three cultivars with ten independent observations. Only quantitative 

data  were  analyzed statistically using Fisher’s  analysis  of  variance 

techniques.  One  way  ANOVA  was  applied  to  evaluate  the 

significant  difference  in  the  parameters  studied  within  the  different 

cultivars.  Least  significant  difference  (Fisher’s  protected  LSD)  was 

calculated, following significant F-test (p=0.05). 

 

 



RESULTS AND DISCUSSION  

 

Leaf chlorophyll content  

 

Plant  structure  and  chlorophyll  content  strongly  affect 



rates  of  photosynthesis  (Eitel  et  al.,  2009).  The 

Chlorophyll a and b content of the new flush and mature 

leaves was determined using a Minolta SPAD meter. The 

results  showed  that  the  chlorophyll  content  in  mature 

leaves  were  not  statistically  significant  among  the 

cultivars  (Figure  1).  In  new  leaves  chlorophyll  content 

(SPAD value) also did not varied significantly among the 

three  cultivars  of  S.  samarangense.  The  range  of  Chl

ab

 

values  was  comparable  to  those  shown  in  other  studies 



that  examined  the  Chl

ab

  of  broadleaf  specie  (Richardson 



et al., 2002).  

 

 



Potassium content in leaf 

 

Potassium (K) increases the photosynthetic rates of  crop 



 

 

Al-Saif et al.         3625 



 

 

 



 

 

Figure 1.

 Chlorophyll content in new and mature leaves of three cultivars of S. samarangense. 

 

 



 

 

K

+

 c

o

n

te

n



(p

p

m

 

 



Figure 2. 

Potassium content in new flush of different cultivars of Syzygium 



samarangense.

 

 



 

 

leaves,  CO



2

  assimilation  rate  and  facilitating  carbon 

movement  (Sangakkara  et  al.,  2000).  The  high 

concentration  of  K

+

 is  thought  to  be  essential for  normal 



protein  synthesis.  The  physiological  role  of  K  during  the 

fruit  formation,  fruit  setting  and  maturation  periods  is 

mainly  expressed  in  carbohydrate  metabolism  and 

translocation  of  metabolites  from  leaves  and  other 

vegetative  organs  to  developing  bolls.  Pettigrew  (1999) 

stated  that  the  elevated  carbohydrate  concentrations 

remaining in source tissue, such as leaves, appear to be 

part  of  the  overall  effect  of  K  deficiency  in  reducing  the 

amount of photosynthate available for reproductive sinks 

and thereby producing changes in yield and quality seen 

in  cotton.  Notable improvements in fruit  yield  and  quality 

resulting  from  K  input  were  reported  by  Gormus  (2002), 

Aneela et al. (2003), Pervez et al. (2004) and Pettigrew et 

al. (2005). These may be reflected in distinct changes in 

seed  weight  and  quality.  Cultivars  of  S.  samarangense 

produced significant differences in the case of K

+

 content 



in  leaves  (Figure  2).  Results  showed  that  the  highest  K

+

 



content  of  leaves  (495  ppm)  was  recorded  in  ‘Jambu 

madu Red’ cultivar followed by ‘Giant Green’ and ‘Masam 

manis Pink’ cultivars with a potassium content of 477 and 

463  ppm.  The  potassium  content  in  the  leaves  of  Wax 

jambu  cultivars  might  be  genetically  regulated.  Level  of 

potassium  was  considered  higher,  when  most  plants  on 

potassium  levels  were  in  the  range  of  100  to +400  ppm. 

In  agriculture,  some  cultivars  are  more  efficient  at  K 

uptake  due  to  genetic  variations,  and  often  these  plants 

have  increased  disease  resistance  (Datnoff,  2007). 

Potassium has also been implicated to have a role in the 

thickening of cell walls (Datnoff, 2007).  

 

 

Chlorophyll fluorescence of new and mature leaf 



 

The  chlorophyll  fluorescence  has  become  one  of  the 

most  powerful  and  widely  used  techniques  available  to 

plant  physiologist  and  ecophysiologist.  Chlorophyll 

fluorescence  gives  information  about  the  state  of  photo 

system  II.  Chlorophyll  fluorescence  varied  at  different 

cultivar  and  age  of  leaves  (Table 1).   The   chlorophyll  


 

 

3626         Afr. J. Agric. Res. 



 

 

 



Table 1.

 Chlorophyll fluorescence of new (NL) and mature leaves (ML) and total chlorophyll of three cultivars of S. samarangense. 

 

Cultivars 

F0 

NL 

Fv 

Chlorophyll (Fruit) 

NL 

ML 

NL 

ML 

NL 

ML 

‘Giant green’               

1112±67 

865±36 


3937±74 

3446±178 

2817±59 

2882±198 

3.43±0.18

a

 



‘Masam manis Pink’    

958±25 


922±23 

4068±81 


3664±229 

3150±67 


2754±216 

0.31±0.09

c

 

‘Jambu madu Red’      



880±35 

866±17 


3823±130 

3890±198 

2945±123 

3025±195 

1.33±0.09

b

 



 

ns 


ns 

ns 


ns 

ns 


ns 

** 


 

Means (±S.E) within the same column followed by the same letter, do not differ significantly according to LSD test at ά=0.01 ns, non-significant 

* Significant at 0.05 levels, ** Significant at 0.01 levels FO: lower fluorescence, Fm: maximum fluorescence, Fv: variable fluorescence.  

 

 



 

fluorescence  intensity  was  found  fluctuated  in  all 

cultivars.  The  highest  (3890)  Fm  in  mature  leaves  was 

recorded  in  ‘Jambu  madu  Red’  followed  by  ‘Masam 

manis  Pink’  with  a  value  of  3664,  whilst,  ‘Giant  Green’ 

Cultivar  produced  the  lowest  (3446)  Fm  value.  The 

highest  (922)  lower  fluorescence  was  recorded  in 

‘Masam  manis  Pink’  cultivar  followed  by  ‘Jambu  madu 

Red’  and  ‘Giant  Green’  cultivar  with  a  value  of  866  and 

865.  Fv  was  highest  in  ‘Jambu  madu  Red’  cultivar 

followed  by  ‘Giant  Green’  and  ‘Masam  manis  Pink’ 

cultivars  (Table  1).  In  case  of  new  flush,  ‘Masam  manis 

pink’ cultivar had the highest Fm and Fv compare to the 

‘Jambu madu red’ and ‘Giant Green’ cultivars. New flush 

of ‘Giant Green’ cultivar produced the maximum lower F0 

than  ‘Masam  manis  Pink’  and  ‘Jambu  madu  Red’ 

cultivars  (Table  1),  although  their  differences  were  not 

statistically 

significant. 

Difference 

in 

chlorophyll 



fluorescence  was  attributed  to  difference  in  stomata 

density.  In  a  comparative  investigation  of  ginkgo  trees 

across  a  climatic  gradient  in  China,  it  was  found  that 

ginkgo sun leaves possess a higher stomata density than 

shade leaves (Sun et al., 2003). Also in beech, a tree that 

exhibits  the  strongest  high  irradiance  adaptation 

response  of  its  leaves  and  chloroplasts,  the  stomata 

density of sun leaves amounts to ca. 210 stomata mm−2 

leaf  area  as  compared  to  only  144  in  shade  leaves 

(Lichtenthaler  et  al.,  2004).  A  higher  stomata 

conductance,  together  with  a  higher  stomata  density, 

seems  to  be  a  typical  characteristic  of  sun  leaves  and 

one  prerequisite  for  their  higher  PN  rates  (Boardman, 

1977; Lichtenthaler et al., 2004) 

 

 

Photosynthetic or quantum yield 



 

Cultivars  of S.  samarangense  had  a  significant  effect on 

photosynthetic  yield  or  optimum  quantum  yield.  ‘Jambu 

madu  Red’  and  ‘Masam  manis  Pink’  cultivar  yielded 

significant  difference  from  ‘Giant  Green’  cultivar  on 

photosynthetic  yield  in  new  flash.  Results  showed  that 

highest  (0.78)  photosynthetic  yield  (Fv/Fm)  in  new  flush 

was  in  ‘Masam  manis  Pink’  cultivar  followed  by  ‘Jambu 

madu Red’ cultivar with a value of (0.77), whereas, ‘Giant 

Green’  had  the  least  (0.73)  photosynthetic  yield  (Figure 

3). Photosynthetic yield in mature leaves was also varied 

significantly among the cultivars. As it is shown in Figure 

3b, the highest (0.80) photosynthetic yield  is observed in 

‘Jambu  madu  Red’  cultivar  followed  by  ‘Giant  Green’ 

cultivar  with  a  value  of  (0.79),  whereas,  the  least  (0.72) 

photosynthetic  yield  was  in  ‘Masam manis  Pink’  cultivar. 

The  differences  among  the  cultivar  may  be  genetically 

makeup.  Values  of  quantum  yield  of  this  work  were 

similar with those reported by Gulmira et al. (2007). 

 

 



Total chlorophyll content 

 

It is well documented in the literature that during ripening, 



the  skin  of  fruits  changes  from  green  to  a  different 

brighter color. The most obvious change which take place 

is  the  degradation  of  chlorophyll  and  is  accompanied  by 

the  synthesis  of  other  pigments  usually  either 

anthocyanin or carotenods. In this study the chlorophyll in 

the  peel  of  the  fruits  was  measured  at  the  fully  ripening 

stage. It was observed that the chlorophyll loss gradually 

took place at color turning stage of the fruits. This results 

reported  that  ‘Giant  Green’  cultivar  showed  a  significant 

difference  from  ‘Jambu  madu  Red’  and  ‘Masam  manis 

Pink’  cultivars.  The  highest  (3.43  mg/l)  chlorophyll 

content in fruit peel was recorded in ‘Giant Green’ cultivar 

followed by ‘Jambu madu Red’ cultivar with a chlorophyll 

content of 1.33 mg/l, whilst the lowest chlorophyll content 

(0.31 mg/l) was recorded in ‘Masam manis Pink’ Cultivar 

(Table 1). 

 

 

Fruit ripening after anthesis 



 

 

The  fruit  cultivars  have  a  different  number  of  days  from 



bloom to maturity (Westwood, 1978). It was reported that 

the  FDP  for  ‘McIntosh’  apple  ranges  from  125  to  145 

days,  while  the  FDP for  ‘Golden  Delicious’  apple  ranges 

from  140  to  160  days.  the  variation  of  the  fruit  in  FDP, 

also depends on the air temperatures. Westwood (1978) 

also  reported  that  Pears,  apples  and  peaches  grown  at 

relatively  high  temperatures  during  cell  division  (the


 

 

Al-Saif et al.         3627 



 

 

 



 

 

Figure  3. 

Photosynthetic  yield:  (A)  new  flush  and  (B)  Mature  leaves  of 

three cultivars of Syzygium samarangense. 

 

 

 



first  4  to  8  weeks  after  bloom,  depending  on  species) 

mature  in  fewer  days  than  those  grown  at  lower  post-

bloom temperatures. The fruit developmental period after 

anthesis  varied  significantly  with  different  cultivars  of  S. 



samarangense

. Results showed that ‘Masam manis pink’ 

cultivar  had  the  earliest  fruit  maturity  approximately  38 

days  after  anthesis  followed  by  ‘Jambu  madu  Red’ 

cultivar with nearly 45 days (Figure 4). On the other hand, 

‘Giant  Green’  cultivar  had  late  maturity.  It  takes  longer 

period  of  about  50  days  after  anthesis.  Our  findings 

supported  by  the  results  of  Morton  (1987)  who  reported 

that the average period from anthesis to berry maturity is 

about 35 to 50 days in cultivars of wax jambu (Figure 4). 



 

 

Peel, pulp and Juice color 

 

One  of  the  most  conspicuous  characteristics  to 



consumers of Wax jambu is the external color that is also 

considered as an important varietal character. Fruit peel, 

pulp  and  juice  color  are important  not  only for  consumer 

acceptability  but  also  in  association  with  aroma,  flavor 

and  health  benefits  (Burger  et  al.,  2006).  Variability  with 

respect  to  fruit  peel,  pulp  and  juice  color  also  recorded. 

‘Giant Green’ cultivar had light green to green peel color, 

‘Masam manis Pink’ cultivar had pink to crimson and the 

‘Jambu madu Pink’ cultivar had light red to dark red peel 

Table 2. Cultivars of S. samarangense produced different 

color  of  fruit  pulp.  Greenish  white  pulp  color  was 

observed in ‘Giant Green’ cultivar and ‘Jambu madu Red’ 

cultivars,  whereas,  pinkish  white  and  reddish  white  pulp 

was  recorded  in  ‘Masam  manis  Pink’  (Table  2).  These 

variations  are  due  to  the  genetic  characters.  The  fruits 

peel  and  the  juice  color  is  a  genetic  character  for  each 

cultivar,  species  and  variety.  It  was  observed  that  ‘Giant 

Green’ cultivar had green color juice. Light pink and light 

red color juice were observed in ‘Masam manis pink’ and 

‘Jambu madu Red’ cultivars. Our results confirmed by the 

findings  of  Kumar  et  al.  (1998)    who    reported  that  the 

color of the fruits varies depending on the cultivars and it 

is  also  influenced  by  the  growing  conditions  and  the 

cultural practices. 

 

 

Volume of fruit juice and biomass color



 

 

Fruit  juice  is  an  important  character  in  fruit  processing 



industry.  The  juice  quality  characteristics  vary  with 

cultivar,  fertilization,  frequency  of  irrigation,  date  of 

harvest,  age  of  tree,  tree  spacing,  position  of  fruit  tree, 

climactic condition and the places of growing. There were 

significant variations in juice content of different cultivars. 

The  highest  amount  of  juice  (76.33  ml)  was  recorded  in 

‘Jambu  madu  Red’  cultivar,  followed  by  ‘Masam  manis 

Pink’ with a juice content of 68 ml, whereas, ‘Giant color. 

The  data  observed  for  fruit  pulp  color  are   shown   in

 


 

 

3628        Afr. J. Agric. Res. 



 

 

 



 

 

Figure 4.

 Photograph showing color development of different cultivars of Syzygium 

samarangense.  

 

 



 

Table 2.

 Fruit characteristics of cultivars of S. samarangense during two seasons in 2009 and 2010. All the data represent in the table were 

pooled for two years. 

 

Name of   cultivars



 

Peel color

 

Pulp  color

 

Juice 

(ml)/100

 

Juice 

content

 

Biomass 

flavor

 

Aromatic

 

Texture

 

Taste

 

‘Giant Green’            



 

Green


 

Greenish white



 

Green


 

44±3.5b


 

Green


 

High


 

Crispy


 

Less sweet



 

‘Masam manis  Pink’  



 

Pink


 

Pinkish white



 

Pink


 

68±8.2a


 

Pink


 

Less


 

Spongy


 

Sweet-Sour



 

‘Jambu madu  Red’    



 

Red


 

Redishwhite



 

Red


 

76±8.3a


 

Red


 

Less


 

Spongy


 

Sweet


 

 

--



 

--

 

--

 

**

 

--

 

--

 

--

 

--

 

 

Means  (±S.E)  within  the  same  column  followed  by  the  same  letter,  do  not  differ  significantly  according  to  LSD  test  at  ά=0.01  ns,  non-significant  * 



Significant at 0.05 levels, ** Significant at 0.01 levels. 

 

 



 

Green’ cultivar produced the least (44 ml) amount of fruit 

juice.  From  Table  2,  it  is  revealed  that  the  fruit  biomass 

color  also  depend  on  the  cultivars.  ‘Giant  Green’  cultivar 

had  green  fresh  biomass,  whereas,  ‘Masam  manis  Pink’ 

and ‘Jambu madu Red’ had the pink and red biomass. 

 

 

Firmness, aromatic flavor and taste 



 

A  great  importance  is  given  to  study  the  textural 

properties  and  aroma  composition  the  fruits  for  varietal 

characterization  and  quality  assessment.  ‘Giant  Green’ 

cultivar had the highest aromatic flavor, whereas, ‘Masam 

manis  Pink’  and  ‘Jambu  madu  Red’  cultivars  had  the 

least  aromatic  flavor.  In  case  of  fruit  texture,  ‘Giant 

Green’ cultivar had crispy in nature, while, ‘Masam manis 

pink’ and ‘Jambu madu Red’ were soft and spongy (Table 

2), Cultivar has an important role in determining the taste, 

quality, yield and nutrient composition of fruits. Fruit taste 

is mainly determined by the concentration and the type of 

soluble  solids  and  organic  acids  (Dirlewanger  et  al., 

1999).  From  our  evaluation,  ‘Jambu  madu  Red’  cultivar 

had  a  relatively  sweet  taste  and  ‘Masam  manis  Pink’ 

cultivar  had  sweet-sour  taste.  On  the  other  hand,  ‘Giant 

Green’  cultivar  had  sweet  taste  but  it  bears  also  a  nice 

aromatic flavor and a crispy fruit flesh. These results  are 

supported with the findings of Byrne (2002), who reported 

that fruit taste varies with the cultivars. 

 

 

Correlation 



between 

photosynthetic 

yield 

and 

biomass 

 

Accumulation of dry matter content in plants depends on 



photosynthetic  yield  or  optimum  quantum  yield.  Results 

showed that photosynthetic yield had a strong correlation



 

 

Al-Saif et al.         3629 



 

 

 



 

 

Figure  5.

  Correlation  between  photosynthetic  yield  and  dry  biomass  of  three 

cultivars of Syzygium samarangense. 

 

 

 



(R

2

=0.96)  with  the  fruit  biomass  among  the  cultivars  of 



wax  jambu.  Highest  photosynthetic  yield  and  fruit 

biomass observed in ‘Jambu madu Red’ cultivar followed 

by  ‘Giant  Green’  cultivar,  whilst  ‘Masam  manis  Pink’ 

cultivar  had  the  least  photosynthetic  yields  and  dry  fruit 

biomass  (Figure  5).  The  observations  recorded  in  the 

present investigation suggested that the different cultivars 

varied markedly with respect to photosynthetic yield, fruit 

ripening  and  quality  characteristics.  These  varieties 

appeared to be due to their genetic differences. From our 

observation,  it  can  be  summarized  that  ‘Jambu  madu 

Red’ and ‘Masam manis Pink’ cultivars are comparatively 

better than green cultivar. Finally, it can be recommended 

that  ‘Jambu  madu  Red’  cultivar  is  the  best  cultivars  for 

cultivation of South Asian regions for better market value, 

yield and quality. 

 

 



ACKNOWLEDGEMENT 

 

This  research  was  supported  by  grant from  University  of 



Malaya,  Kuala  Lumpur,  50603,  Malaysia  (Project 

No.PS313-2010A). 

 

 

REFERENCES  



 

Aneela  S,  Muhammad  A,  Akhtar  ME  (2003).  Effect  of  potash  on  boll 

characteristics  and  seed  cotton  yield  in  newly  developed  highly 

resistant cotton varieties, Pakistan J. Biol. Sci., pp. 6813-6815. 

Burger Y, Saar U, Paris HS, Lewin SE, Katzin N, Tadmor Y, Schaffe AA 

(2006).  Genetic  variability  as  a  source  of  new  valuable  fruit  quality 

traits in Cucumis melo. Israel J. Plant Sci., 54: 233-242. 

Boardman (1977) N. Boardman, Ann. Rev. Plant Physiol., 28: 355–377. 

Byrne D (2002). Peach breeding trends: A world wide perspective. 

Proceedings 5

th

 International Symposium  on Peach, Acta Hort., 592: 



49-59. 

Datnoff  LE  (2007).  Mineral  Nutrition  and  Plant  Disease.  The  American 

Phytopathological Society.  

Dirlewanger  E,  Moing  A,  Rothan  C,  Svanella  L,  Pioneer  V,  Guye  A, 

Plomion  C,  Moing  (1999).  Mapping  QTLs  controlling  fruit  quality  in 

peach (Prunus persica (L) Batsch). Theor. Appl. Genet., 98: 18-31. 

Duprat  F,  Pietri  E,  Arakelian  J  (1986).  Procédé  et  appareil  d'analyse 

pénétrométrique  notamment  des  fruits  et  légumes.  French  Patent 

Application No. 86-03799, INRA.  

Eitel JUH, Long DS, Gessler PE, Hunt ER, Brown DJ (2009). Sensitivity 

of  ground-based  remote  sensing  estimates  of  wheat  chlorophyll 

content to variation in soil reflectance. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J., 73: 1715-

1723. 

Gulmira SB, Martin K, Hartmut K, Lichtenthalera (2007). Differences in 



photosynthetic  activity,  chlorophyll  and  carotenoid  levels,  and  in 

chlorophyll  fluorescence  parameters  in  green  sun  and  shade  leaves 

of Ginkgo and Fagus. J. Plant Physiol., 164: 950-955. 

Galan  SV  (1989).  Litchi  cultivation  (in  Spanish)  (Menini,  U.G.,  FAO 

Coordinator).  FAO  Plant  production  and  protection  paper  No.  83, 

FAO, Rome, Italy. 

Govindjee  (1995).  Sixty-three  years  since  Kautsky:  chlorophyll  a 

fluorescence. Aust. J. Plant Physiol., 22: 131-160. 

Gormus O (2002).  Effects  of rate  and  time  of  potassium  application  on 

cotton yield and quality in Turkey, J. Agron. Crop Sci., 188: 382-388.  

Hendry  GAF,  Price  AH  (1993).  Stress  indicators:  Chlorophylls  and 

carotenoids.  In:  Hendry,  G.A.F.,  Grime,  J.P.  (Eds.),  Methods  in 

Comparative Plant Ecology. Chapman & Hall, London, pp. 148–152. 

Ismail  BS,  Kader  AF,  Omar  O  (1995).  Effects  of  Glyphosphate  on 

cellulose Decomposition in two soils. Folia microbial. 40(5): 499-502. 

Kumar  M,  Singh  K,  Das  DK,  Roy  RN  (1998).  Fruit  drop,  fruit  retention 

and  fruit  cracking  in  some  promising  litchi  (Litchi  chinensis  Sonn.) 

trees. J. Res. Birsa Agric. Univ., 10: 203-206. 

Little  JR,  Elbert  L,  Roger  G,  kolmen  S  (1989)  “Syzygium”  Germplasm 

resource Information centre. USDA. 

Lichtenthaler  HK,  Babani  F,  Papageorgiou  GC,  Govindjee  (2004). 

Chlorophyll  fluorescence:  a  signature  of  photosynthesis,  Springer, 

Dordrecht, pp. 713-736  

Morton  J  (1987).  Loquat.    In:  Morton,  J.F.  (Ed.),  Fruits  of  Warm 

Climates. Miami, FL., Inc., Winter vine, NC, pp. 103–108. 

Pettigrew  WT  (1999)  Potassium  deficiency  increases  specific  leaf 

weights  of  leaf  glucose  levels  in  field-grown  cotton,  Agron.  J.,  91: 

962-968. 

Pervez H, Ashraf M,  Makhdum  MI (2004). Influence  of potassium rates

 

and sources on seed cotton yield and yield components of some elite



 

 

 

3630         Afr. J. Agric. Res. 



 

 

 



cotton cultivars, J. Plant Nutr., 27: 1295-1317.  

Pettigrew  WT,  Meredith  WR,  Young  LD  (2005).  Potassium  fertilization 

effects on cotton lint yield, yield components, and reniform nematode 

populations, Agron. J., 97: 1245-1251.  

Richardson  AD,  Duigan  SP,  Berlyn  GP  (2002).  An  evaluation  of 

noninvasive  methods  to  estimate  foliar  chlorophyll  content,  New 

Phytol., 153: 185–194. 

Sangakkara UR, Frehner  M, Nösberger J (2000) Effect  of soil  moisture 

and potassium fertilizer on shoot water potential, photosynthesis and 

partitioning of carbon in mungbean and cowpea, J. Agron. Crop Sci., 

185: 201-207.  

Shu ZH, Meon R, Tirtawinata, Thanarut C (2006). Wax apple production 

in  selected  tropical  Asian  countries.  ISHS.    Acta  Hort.  (ISHS),  773: 

161-164. 

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

Shu ZH, Chu CC, Hwang LC, Shieh CS (2001). Light, temperature and 



sucrose after color, diameter and soluble solids of disks of wax apple 

fruit skin. Hort. Sci., 36: 279-281  

Sun B, Dilcher DI, Beerling DJ, Zhang CD (2003) Yan and E. Kowalski, 

Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA, 100: 7141-7146. 

Westwood  MN  (1978)  Temperate-zone  pomology.  W.H.  Freeman  and 

Company, San Francisco. 



 

 


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə