African Journal of Biotechnology Vol. 8 (10), pp. 2301-2309, 18 May, 2009



Yüklə 192.15 Kb.
PDF просмотр
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü192.15 Kb.

African Journal of Biotechnology Vol. 8 (10), pp. 2301-2309, 18 May, 2009     

Available online at 

http://www.academicjournals.org/AJB

 

DOI: 10.5897/AJB09.009 



ISSN 1684–5315 © 2009 Academic Journals  

 

 



 

Full Length Research Paper 

 

Antioxidant tannins from Syzygium cumini fruit 

 

Liang Liang Zhang and Yi Ming Lin* 

 

Department of Biology, School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005, China. 



Key Laboratory of Ministry of Education for Coastal and Wetland Ecosystems, Xiamen 361005, China. 

 

Accepted 13 February, 2009 



 

Hydrolysable and condensed tannins in the fruit of Syzygium cumini were identified using NMR, MALDI-

TOF  MS  and  HPLC  analyses.  Hydrolysable  tannins  were  identified  as  ellagitannins,  consisting  of  a 

glucose core surrounded by gallic acid and ellagic acid units. Condensed tannins were identified as B-

type  oligomers  of  epiafzelechin  (propelargonidin)  with  a  degree  of  polymerization  up  to  eleven.  The 

antioxidant  activity  were  measured  by  two  vitro  models:  1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl  (DPPH)  radical 

scavenging  activity  and  ferric  reducing/antioxidant  power  (FRAP).  Tannins  extracted  from  S.  cumini 

fruit  showed  a  very  good  DPPH  radical  scavenging  activity  and  ferric  reducing/antioxidant  power. The 

results  are  promising  thus  indicating  the  utilization  of  the  fruit  of  S.  cumini  as  a  significant  source of 

natural antioxidants. 

 

Key words: Syzygium cumini, tannins, antioxidant activity, MALDI-TOF MS, HPLC. 

 

 



INTRODUCTION 

 

Tannins  are  significant  plant  secondary  metabolites 



subdivided into condensed and  hydrolysable compounds 

in vascular plants. Condensed tannins are also known as 

proanthocyanidins  (PAs),  the  oligomeric  and  polymeric 

flavan-3-ols, which are linked through C4 - C8 or C4 - C6 

linkages.  The  diversity  of  condensed  tannins  is  given  by 

the  structural  variability  of  the  monomer  units  (different 

hydroxylation patterns of the aromatic rings A and B, and 

different  configurations  at  the  chiral  centers  C2  and  C3) 

(Figure  1). The  size  of  PAs molecules  can  be  described 

by  their  degree  of  polymerization  (DP).  The  molecules 

are  water-soluble  and  are  able  to  form  complexes  with 

proteins 

and 

polysaccharides 



(Haslam, 

1998). 


Hydrolysable  tannins  (HTs)  represent  a  large  group  of 

polyphenolic compounds that are widely distributed in the 

plant kingdom. They are esters of a polyol (most often β-

D-glucose)  with  either  gallic  acid  (gallotannins)  or 

hexahydroxydiphenic  acid  (ellagitannins).  These  ester 

forms  vary  from  simple  compounds  such  as  β-D-

glucogallin  to  compounds  with  M

values  in  excess  of 



2,500 (Haslam, 1992). The  structural elucidation of poly-

meric  tannins  is  difficult  because  of  their  heterogeneous 

character. Due to this complexity and diversity,  the  cha- 

 

 



 

*Corresponding  author.  E-mail:  linym@xmu.edu.cn.  Tel.:  +86 

592 2187657.

 

racterization  of  highly  polymerized  condensed  tannins 



thus  remains  very  challenging,  and  less  is  known 

regarding  structure-activity  relationships.  Various  techni-

ques  including  NMR  and  mass  spectroscopy  (MS)  have 

been  used  to  characterize  hydrolysable  and  condensed 

tannins  (Behrens  et  al.,  2003;  Chen  and  Hagerman, 

2004; Vivas et al., 2004). 

The  fruits  of  Syzygium  cumini  (L.)  Skeels  are  edible 

and  are  reported  to  contain  gallic  acid,  tannins, 

anthocyanins  and  other  components  (Benherlal  and 

Arumughan,  2007).  The  juice  of  unripe  fruits  is  used  for 

preparing  vinegar  that  is  considered  to  be  a  stomachic, 

carminative  and  diuretic.  The  ripe  fruits  are  used  for 

making  preserves,  squashes  and  jellies.  The  fruits  are 

astringent. A wine is prepared from the ripe fruits in Goa 

(Wealth  of  India,  1976).  Extract  of  seed,  which  is 

traditionally used in diabetes, has a hypoglycaemic action 

and antioxidant property in alloxan diabetic rats (Prince et 

al., 1998) possibly due to tannins (Bhatia et al., 1971).  

Tannins  are  antioxidants  often  characterized  by  reduc-

ing power (Mi-Yea et al., 2003) and scavenging activities 

(Minussi  et  al.,  2003).  The  antioxidant  capabilities  of 

tannins  depend  on:  (1)  the  extent  of their  colloidal  state; 

(2)  the  ease  of  interflavonoid  bond  cleavage  or  its 

stereochemical  structure;  (3)  the  ease  of  the  pyran  ring 

(C-ring)  opening;  and  (4)  the  relative  number  of  –OH 

groups on A and B rings (Noferi et al., 1997). Compounds 

with a trihydroxyl structure in the B-ring have the greatest  


2302         Afr. J. Biotechnol. 

 

 



 

O

OH



R

1

OH



HO

A

C



B

2

3



4

6

8



R

1

= OH, afzelechin



R

1

= OH, epiafzelechin



2'

3'

4'



5'

6'

HO



OH

OH

O



G: Galloyl group

R

1



= OG, afzelechin gallate

R

1



= OG, epiafzelechin gallate

1

2



3

4

5



6

7

O



OH

OR

1



OH

HO

O



OH

OR

1



OH

HO

4



8

8

4



C4-C8 linkage

R

1



=H, G; propelargonidin

 

 



Figure 1. Chemical structures of flavan-3-ol monomers and polymers. 

 

 



 

antioxidant activity (Rice-Evans et al., 1996). 

The  fruit  of  S.  cumini  has  been  shown  to  contain  a 

large  range  of  hydrolysable  tannins  (Benherlal  and 

Arumughan,  2007).  However,  neither  hydrolysable  nor 

condensed tannins have been characterized in S. cumini

In this study we undertook the structural characterization 

of tannins in S. cumini fruit using a combination of NMR, 

MALDI-TOF  MS  and  HPLC  analyses.  This  would 

contribute  to  a  better  understanding  of  the  chemical 

composition  of  S.  cumini  and  the  applicability  of  NMR, 

MALDI-TOF  MS  and  HPLC  in  the  analyses  of  food 

tannins.  We  also  report  the  evaluation  of  free-radical 

scavenging  properties  and  ferric  reducing/antioxidant 

power of tannins extracted from S. cumini fruit. 

 

 



MATERIALS AND METHODS 

  

Plant materials and chemicals 

 

Mature fruits  of  S. cumini  were collected  at the campus  of Xiamen 



University  (Xiamen,  China)  and  immediately  freeze  dried  and 

ground.  The  resulting  powder  was  extracted  with  acetone:water 

(7:3,  v/v)  and  the  organic  solvent  was  eliminated  by  evaporation 

under vacuum. The remaining crude tannin fraction was chromato-

graphed  on  an  LH-20  column  (Pharmacia  Biotech,  Uppsala, 

Sweden)  which  was  first  eluted  with  methanol:water  (50:50,  v/v) 

and then with acetone : water (7:3, v/v). The last fraction, containing 

the  polymeric  tannins  was  freezed-dried  and  stored  at  -20°C  till 

further use. 

1,1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl  (DPPH),  2,4,6-tripyridyl-S-triazine 

(TPTZ),  potassium  ferricyanide,  butylated  hydroxyanisole  (BHA), 

ascorbic acid, (+)-catechin, cesium chloride, gallic acid, ellagic acid 

and  tannic  acid  were  purchased  from  Sigma  Chemical  Co.  (St. 

Louis,  MO,  USA).  Reagents  and  solvents  were  of  analytical  or 

HPLC grade. Deionised water was used throughout. 

 

 



NMR analysis 

 

13



C NMR spectra  were recorded in  CD

3

COCD



3

-D

2



O mixture  with  a 

Varian Metcury-600 spectrometer (USA) at 150 MHz. 



 

 

MALDI-TOF MS analysis 

 

The  tannin  extract  was  mixed  with  a  1  M  solution  of  dihydroxy-



benzoic  acid (DHB)  in 90% methanol  in  a 1:1 ratio,  and 1 µl  of  the 

mixture was spotted onto a ground stainless steel MALDI target for 

MALDI  analysis  using  the  dry  droplet  method.  Cesium  chloride  (1 

mg/ml)  was  mixed  with  the  analyte/matrix  solution  at  the  1:3 

volumetric  ratio  to  promote  the  formation  of  a  single  type  of  ion 

adduct  (M  +  Cs

+

)  (Xiang  et  al.,  2006). A  Bruker  Reflex  III  MALDI-



TOF MS (Germany)  equipped  with  an N

2

 laser (337 nm) was used 



in  the  MALDI  analysis  and  all  the  data  were  obtained  in  a  positive 

ion reflectron TOF mode. 

 

 

Acid hydrolysis 



 

Acid hydrolysis of the ellagitannins was performed as described by 

Oszmianski  et  al.  (2007).  The  ellagitannins  from  S.  cumini  fruit 

stone (25 mg) were hydrolyzed with 2 ml of 2 mol/l hydrochloric acid 

in  a  boiling water  bath for 1  h. After cooling,  2  ml  of  2 mol/l  NaOH 

and  then  6  ml  methanol  were  added  to  the  vial.  The  slurry  was 

sonicated  for  20  min  with  occasional  shaking.  Further,  the  slurry 

was  centrifuged  at  10,000  g  and  the  supernatant  was  used  for 

HPLC  analysis. The HPLC  apparatus consisted  of  an Agilent  1100 

diode array detector and a quaternary pump.  

The  samples  were  previously  dissolved  in  a  mobile  phase  and 

then  filtrated  through  a  membrane  filter  with  an  aperture  size  of 

0.45  µm.  10  ml  of  the  clear  supernatant  was  injected.  Separation 

was  performed  on  a  Hypersil  ODS  column  (4.6  ×  250  mm,  5  µm) 

thermostatted at 30°C. The mobile phase was composed of solvent 

A (0.1% v/v) trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) in water) and solvent B (0.1% 

v/v)  TFA  in  acetonitrile).  The  gradient  condition  was:  0~2

nd 


min 

100%  A,  2

nd

~6

th



  min  0~5%  B,  6

th

~10



th

  min  5%  B,  10

th

~15


th 

min 


5~10% B, 15

th

~20



th

 min 10% B, 20

th

~30


th

 min  10~20% B, 30

th

~35


th

 

min  20%  B  and  35



th

~40


th

  min  20~30%  B.  Other  chromatographic 

conditions  were  as  follows:  flow  rate  at  1  ml/min,  detection  at  280 

and 254 nm, and scanning performed between 200 and 600 nm. 

The  identification  of  chromatographic  peaks  was  made  by 

comparison  of  their  relative  retention  times  with  those  of  external 

standards,  as  well  as  by  their  UV–visible  spectra.  Ellagic  acid 

(detection  254  nm)  and  gallic  acid  (detection  at  280  nm)  was 

quantified  using  the  calibration  curve  established  with  ellagic  and 

gallic acid standards. Analysis was made in triplicate. 

 

 

Free-radical scavenging activity 



 

The  free-radical  scavenging  activity  was  measured  according  to 

Braca  et  al.  (2001).  A  100  µl  of  the  sample  at  different  concen-

trations (15 – 500 µg/ml) was added to 3 ml of DPPH solution (0.1 

M methanolic solution). 30 min later, the absorbance was measured 


 

 

 



 

at  517  nm.  Lower  absorbance  of  the  reaction  mixture  indicates 

higher  free  radical  scavenging  activity.  The  IC

50 


value,  defined  as 

the  amount  of  antioxidant  necessary  to  decrease  the  initial  DPPH 

concentration by 50%, was calculated from the results and used for 

comparison.  The  capability  to  scavenge  the  DPPH  radical  was 

calculated using the following equation: 

 

DPPH scavenging effect (%) = [(A



1

 – A

2

)/A



1

] × 100


   

 

where  A



1

  is  the  absorbance  of  the  control  reaction  and  A

2

  is  the 



absorbance  in  the  presence  of  the  sample.  BHA,  (+)-catechin  and 

ascorbic acid were used as controls. 

 

 

Ferric reducing/antioxidant power (FRAP) assay 



 

FRAP assay is a simple and reliable colorimetric method commonly 

used  for  measuring  total  antioxidant  capacity  (Benzie  and  Strain, 

1996). Briefly,  3 ml  of  FRAP reagent,  prepared freshly,  was  mixed 

with 100 µl of the test sample, or methanol (for the reagent blank). 

The  FRAP  reagent  was  prepared  from  300  mM,  pH  3.6,  acetate 

buffer,  20  mM  ferric  chloride  and  10  mM  2,4,6-tripyridyl-S-triazine 

made up in 40 mM hydrochloric acid. All three solutions were mixed 

together  in  the  ratio  of  10:1:1  (v/v/v).  The  absorbance  of  reaction 

mixture  at  593  nm  was  measured  spectrophotometrically  after 

incubation  at  25°C  for  10  min.  The  FRAP  values,  expressed  in 

mmol ascorbic acid equivalents (AAE)/g dried tannins, were derived 

from a standard curve. 

 

 



Statistical analyses 

 

All  measurements  were  replicated  three  times  and  one-way  analy-



sis  of  variance  (ANOVA)  was  used  and  the  differences  were 

considered to be significant at < 0.05. All statistical analyses were 

performed with SPSS 11.0. 

 

 



RESULTS AND DISCUSSION 

 

NMR analysis 

 

The  signal  assignment  was  made  based  on  the  publica-



tion  of  Czochanska  et  al.  (1980).  The  spectrum  shows 

distinct  signals  at  157  ppm,  which  are  assignable  to  C4’ 

in 

propelargonidin 



units 

(afzelechin/epiafzelechin). 

Indeed,  procyanidin  units  (catechin/epicatechin)  and 

prodelphinidin 

units 

(gallocatechin/epigallocatechin) 



generally  showed  a  typical  resonance  at  144  -  145  and 

145  -  146  ppm  respectively  (Czochanska  et  al.,  1980; 

Behrens et al., 2003). The absence of a clear signal with 

such  chemical  shift  in  the  spectra  of  the  condensed 

tannins  from  S.  cumini  fruit  skin  revealed  that  they  are 

only composed of propelargonidin units. 

The region between  70 and 90 ppm is  sensitive to the 

stereochemistry  of  the  C-ring.  The  determination  of  the 

ratio  of  the  2,3-cis  to  2,3-trans  stereochemistries  could 

thus  be  achieved  through  distinct  differences  in  their 

respective  C2  chemical  shifts  (Czochanska  et  al.,  1980). 

Whereas  C3  of  both  cis  and  trans  isomers  occurs  at  73 

ppm,  C2  gives  a  resonance  at  76  ppm  for  the  cis  form 

and  at  84  ppm  for  the  trans  form.  The  absence  of  the 

latter signal  peak  in  the  spectrum  of  the  studied  con-  

Zhang and Lin        2303 

 

 

 



densed  tannin  fraction  indicated  the  presence  of  only 

epiafzelechin  subunits.  The  presence  of  a  signal  at  35.9 

ppm was consistent with a C4 being shifted upfield by the 

presence of a 3-O-gallate unit. This was further confirmed 

by  the  observation  of  signals  for  ester  carbonyl  carbons 

at  175.5  ppm  (Gal-C7)  and  galloyl  ring  carbons  at  114.0 

ppm  (Gal-C2,  Gal-C6),  130.8  ppm  (Gal-C1)  and  143  - 

145  ppm  (Gal-C4).  These  results  thus  showed  that  the 

polymeric  propelargonidin  of  the  studied  S.  cumini  fruit 

skin  is  predominantly  constituted  of  propelargonidin  with 

(-)-epiafzelechin as the main constitutive monomer, some 

with galloyl groups attached (Spencer et al., 2007).  

As  indicated  above, 

1

H  and 



13

C  NMR  spectroscopy 

techniques  were used to estimate the degree of polyme-

rization  and  the  number-average  molecular  weight.  The 

C3  in  terminal  units  generally  have  their  chemical  shift 

around 67 ppm. Theoretically, its intensity relative to that 

of the signal of the C3 in extension monomer units at 73 

ppm  could  be  used  for  elucidating  the  polymer  chain 

length.  However,  in  the  case  of  the  spectra  presented 

here, the signal-to-noise ratio is too low to allow for such 

quantification.  

 

 



MALDI-TOF MS analyses 

 

To  obtain  more  detailed  information  on  the  chemical 



structure  of the  condensed  tannins  and  to  overcome the 

problems with determination of polymer chain lengths by 

NMR  spectroscopy,  further  characterization  was  conti-

nued by means of MALDI-TOF MS.

 

MALDI-TOF MS has 



advantages  over  the  other  MS  systems  in  terms  of 

sensitivity  and  mass  range.  The  single  ionization  event 

produced  by  MALDI-TOF  MS  allows  the  simultaneous 

determination of masses in complex mixtures of low and 

high  molecular  weight  compounds.  Several  factors  must 

be  optimized  to  develop  MALDI-TOF  MS  techniques. 

These  factors  include  the  selection  of  an  appropriate 

matrix,  optimal  mixing  and  optimal  selection  of  cationi-

zation  reagent.  In  our  study,  the  Cs

+

  was  used  as  the 



cationization  ragent.  This  resulted  in  the  best  conditions 

for their MALDI-TOF analysis and resulted in a relatively 

simple MALDI-TOF spectrum.

 

Figure 2 shows the MALDI-TOF mass  spectrum of the 



studied polymeric mixture, recorded as Cs

adducts in the 



positive-ion  reflectron  mode  and  showing  a  series  of 

repeating  propelargonidin  polymers.  The  polymeric 

character  is  reflected  by  the  periodic  of  peak  series 

representing different chain lengths. The results indicated 

that  S.  cumini  fruit  skin  tannins  are  characterized  by 

mass spectra with a series of peaks with distances of 272 

Da corresponding to a mass difference of one afzelechin/ 

epiafzelechin  between  each  polymer.  Therefore,  pro-

longation  of  condensed  tannins  is  due  to  the  addition  of 

afzelechin/epiafzelechin monomers. The spectrum show- 

ed  a  series  polyflavan-3-ols  extending  from  the  dimer 

(m/z  679)  to  the  undecamer  (m/z  3129)  that  did  not 

contain ions  with   ∆2  amu  lower  than  predicted  in  the 


2304         Afr. J. Biotechnol. 

 

 



 

 

 



Figure  2.  MALDI-TOF  positive  reflectron  mode  mass  spectrum  of  tannins  from  S.  cumini  fruit  skin. 

Masses represent the epiafzelechin homopolymer of the polyflavan-3-ol series [M+Cs]

+



 



 

 

Table 1. Observed and calculated masses

a

 of heteropolyflavan-3-ols by 



MALDI-TOF MS. 

 

 



 

a

Mass calculations were based on the equation 274 + 272+ 152b + 133, 



where  274  is the  molecular weight  of the terminal  epiafzelechin unit, a  is 

the  degree  of  polymerization  (DP)  contributed  by  the  epiafzelechin 

extending  unit,  b  is  the  number  of  galloyl  esters  and  133  is  the  atomic 

weight  of  cesium;  N,  no  observed  peaks  corresponding  to  those 

calculated ones.

 

 



 

 

positive-ion reflectron mode (Table 1).  



On the basis of the structures described by Krueger et 

al.  (2003),  an  equation

 

was  formulated  to  predict 



heteropolyflavan-3-ols of a  higher  DP.  The  equation  is

 

Polymer 



Number of 

galloylated esters 

Calculated 

[M+Cs]

+ a

 

Observed 

[M+Cs]

+

 

Dimer 



679 

831 


679 

831 


Trimer 



951 

1103 


951 

1103 


Tetramer 



1223 

1375 


1224 

1375 


Pentamer 



1495 

1647 


1496 

1648 


Hexamer 



1767 

1919 


1768 

1921 


Heptamer 



2039 

2191 


2040 

2192 


Octamer 



2311 

2463 


2312 

2463 


Nonamer 



2583 

2735 


2584 

2736 


Decamer 



2855 

3007 


2856 

3008 


Undecamer 



3127 

3279 


3129 



Zhang and Lin        2305 

 

 



 

 

 



Figure 3. MALDI-TOF positive reflectron mode mass spectrum of olligomeric ellagitannins in S. cumini fruit stone. Lableled 

masses are the molecular ions minus 1 proton plus Cs

+

.  


 

 

 



274  +  272a  +  152b  +  133;  where  274  is  the  molecular 

weight  of  the  terminal  epiafzelechin  unit,  a is  the  degree 

of  polymerization  (DP)  contributed  by  the  epiafzelechin 

extending  unit,  b  is  the  number  of  galloyl  esters,  133  is 

the atomic weight of cesium. Application of this equation 

to  the  experimentally  obtained  data  revealed  the 

presence  of  a  series  of  condensed  tannins  consisting  of 

well-resolved  oligomers.  The  broad  peaks  in  these 

spectra  indicate,  however,  that  there  is  large  structural 

heterogeneity within each DP.

 

For  the  condensed  tannins  indicated,  each  peak  was 



always followed by mass signals at a distance of 152 Da 

corresponding  to  the  addition  of  one  galloyl  group  at the 

heterocyclic  C-ring.  Thus,  peak  signals  corresponding  to 

monogalloylated derivatives of various condensed tannin 

oligomers  were  easily  attributed.  No  propelargonidin 

containing  more  than  one  galloyl  group  were  detected. 

Therefore,  MALDI-TOF  MS  indicates  the  simultaneous 

occurrence  of  a  mixture  of  propelargonidin  polymers, 

monogalloylated derivatives of propelargonidin polymers. 

This  showed  that  there  were  a  mixture  of  galloylated 

propelargonidin and propelargonidin in S. cumini fruit skin 

propelargonidin oligomers.

 

No  series  of  compounds  that  are  ∆2  amu  multiples 



lower  than  those  described  in  the  predictive  equation for 

heteropolyflavan-3-ols were detected. So there are no A-

type  interflavan  ether  linkages  occurring  between 

adjacent  flavan-3-ol  subunits.  All  compounds  are  linked 

by B-type.

 

In the case of S. cumini fruit stone tannins (Figure 3), a 



certain  degree  of  regularity  was  observed  in the  MALDI-

TOF  mass  spectrum  and  notably  these  tannins  possess 

very  similar  mass  distributions  but  different  average 

masses.  In  the  spectra,  four  sets  of  peaks  that  are 

separated by 152 Da are evident and have been assign-

ed to a  unit of galloyl group using modeling correlations. 

Structural assignment of these tannins advocates that S. 

cumini 

fruit stone is composed of gallic acid units centred 

upon a core of glucose unit that is different from S. cumini 

fruit skin. So, our study confirms the general classification 

of the S. cumini fruit stone tannins as ellagitannins, that is 

consisting  of  a  glucose  core  surrounded  by  gallic  and 

ellagic acid units (Table 2). Almost superimposable mass 

spectra  were  obtained  for  all  the  S.  cumini  fruit  stone 

ellagitannins  analysed.  Masses  between  1500  and  5000 

correspond  to  structures  of  oligomeric  ellagitannins  in 

which two or more core glucose units are cross-linked by 

dehydrodigalloyl  or valoneoyl  units. This  is  in  agreement 

with previously reported data concerning the same genus 

plant  Syzygium  aromaticum  (Tanaka  et  al.,  1996)  for 

which  two  new  ellagitannins  were  reported.  These 

different chemical groups are frequently composed of the 

same  building  blocks  but  in  different  combinations  and 

numbers.  For  example,  gallic  acid  occurs  naturally  but 

can  dimerize  to  form  ellagic  acid.  Ellagic  acid  can 

dimerize  to  form  gallagic  acid.  Ellagic  acid  can  combine 

with  glucose  to  form  the  unique  compounds  punicalagin 

and  punicalin.  The  different  combinations  and  polymers 

of  the  aforementioned  form  the  large,  diverse  group  of 

compounds  known  as  polyphenols,  which  show  potent 

antioxidant  capacity  and  possible  protective  effects  on 

human  health  (Santos-Buelga  and  Scalbert,  2000). 

These oligomers have been detected in S. cumini for the 

first time in this  study,  although  they  are  known  to  occur 

in other plants (Quideau and Feldman, 1996) and further 

study is required to elucidate their structure.

 


2306         Afr. J. Biotechnol. 

 

 



 

Table  2.  Calculated  and  observed  masses  for  oligomeric  ellagitannins  in  S.  cumini  fruit  stone  and  possible 

monomeric composition. 

 

Mass + Cs 

Observed 

mass 

Monomeric composition 

Glucosyl 

Gallagic 

acid 

Ellagic 

acid 

Gallic 

acid 

Dehydrodigallic 

acid 

Dimers 

1551 


1551 





1553 

1553 




1701 



1701 





1703 

1703 




1853 



1853 





1855 

1855 




2003 



2003 





2005 

2005 






Trimers 

2335 

2336 




2486 



2486 





2488 

2488 




2638 



2638 





2788 

2789 






Tetramers  

3120 

3120 




3270 



3270 





3272 

3272 




3422 



3422 





3574 

3573 






Pentamers 

3905 

3904 




4055 



4055 





4057 

4057 




4207 



4206 





4209 

4209 




4359 



4358 





Hexamer 

4840 


4839 





4992 

4991 




 



 

 

Identification of hydrolytic products of ellagitannins 

 

The ellagic acid in plants is present mainly in the form of 



ellagitannins  and  is  bound  to  glucose.  Acid  hydrolysis 

transforms  glucosylated  and  esterified  ellagic  acid  into 

their  aglycones,  and  liberates  the  parent  compound 

ellagic  acid  and  gallic  acid  (Daniel  et  al.,  1989).  Ellagic 

and gallic acids are major products, as shown by a typical 

HPLC  chromatogram  of  the  hydrolyzed  products  of 

ellagitannins  from  S.  cumini  fruit  stone  (Figure  4)  with 

35.46 ± 3.00 mg/g dry tannins for ellagic acid and 19.73 ± 

0.81 mg/g dry tannins for gallic acid. 

Most quantitative evaluation of ellagitannins in fruit has 

been  on  the  hydrolyzed  ellagitannins  as  ellagic  acid 

equivalents  (Wada  and  Ou,  2002;  Siriwoharn  and 

Wrolstad, 2004). This has significant problems in terms of 

relating  data  to  possible  health  effects,  because  there  is 

significant  evidence  that  larger  molecular  mass  tannins 

(

>1000  Da),  including  ellagitannins  and  procyanidins, 



are not absorbed to any appreciable extent in their native 

state  (Cerda  et  al.,  2004).  Knowledge  of  ellagitannin 

molecular  structure,  composition  and  quantity  is  needed 

to  understand  their  role  in  determining  potential  health 

effects. 

 

 



Radical-scavenging  activities  on  1,1-diphenyl-2-

picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) 

 

Figure 5 shows the dose-response curve of DPPH radical  



Zhang and Lin        2307 

 

 



 

 

 



Figure 4. HPLC chromatograms of ellagitannins from S. cumini fruit stone after hydrolysis, detected by absorbance at 280 

nm (a) and 254 nm (b). The peaks corresponding to gallic acid (1) and ellagic acid (2) are indicated on the chromatogram. 

Other peaks are unidentified phenolics. 

 

 



 

 

Antioxidant concentration (mg/ml)



0

100


200

300


400

500


600

D

P



P

H

 %



 i

n

h



ib

it

io



n

0

20



40

60

80



100

fruit skin

fruit stone

(+)-catechin

BHA

ascorbic acid



 

(µg/ml) 


 

 

Figure  5.  Free  radical-scavenging  activities  of  tannins, 

measured  using  ascorbic  acid,  BHA  and  (+)-catechin  as  DPPH 

assay reference compounds.  

 

 

 



scavenging  activity  of  the  tannin  fractions  from  the  S. 

cumini

  fruits,  compared  with  (+)-catechin,  BHA  and 

ascorbic  acid.  The  tannins  of  the  stone  had  a  higher 

activity  than  that  of  the  skin.  At  a  concentration  of  0.25 

mg/ml,  the  scavenging  activity  of  tannins  of  the  skin 

reached 65.85%, while at the same concentration that of 

the  stone  was  93.31%.  IC

50

  values  were  compared  with 



those  of  ascorbic  acid  and  BHA  in  the  system  to  assess 

the  antioxidant  property  of  S.  cumini  fruit  tannins  (Table 

3).  A  lower  value  of  IC

50

  indicates  greater  antioxidant 



activity. IC

50

 values of tannins from  stone  were  superior  



Table 3. Antioxidant activities of tannins of S. cumini fruit using the 

(DPPH)  free  radical-scavenging  assay  and  the  (FRAP)  ferric-

reducing antioxidant power assay. 

 

 



a

The antioxidant activity was evaluated as the concentration of the 

test  sample  required  to  decrease  the  absorbance  at  517  nm  by 

50% in comparison to the control. 

b

FRAP values are expressed in 



mmol  ascorbic  acid  equivalent  (AAE)/g  sample  in  dry  weight. 

Different  letters  on  the  same  column  show  significant  differences 

from each other at P < 0.05. 

 

 



 

to those of the reference ascorbic acid,  (+)-catechin  and 

BHA. The effect of antioxidants on DPPH is thought to be 

due  to  their  hydrogen  donating  ability  (Baumann  et  al., 

1979).  Though  the  DPPH  radical  scavenging  abilities  of 

tannins from S. cumini fruit skin were less than that of the 

stone,  the  study  showed  that  the  tannins  have  proton-

donating  ability  and  could  serve  as free  radical inhibitors 

or scavengers, acting possibly as primary antioxidants. 

 

 



Ferric reducing antioxidant power 

 

The reducing ability of the tannin fractions from S. cumini 



fruit stone (6.21 mmol AAE/g) was higher than that of the 

skin (3.02 mmol AAE/g) (Table 3). The antioxidant poten-

tial of the tannins from S. cumini fruit were estimated from  

Sample 

Antioxidant activity 

IC

50/DPPH

 (µg/ml)

a

  FRAP (mmol AAE/g)

b

 

Fruit skin 

165.05 ± 3.90a 

3.02 ± 0.06d 

Fruit stone 

82.21 ± 0.77c 

6.21 ± 0.19b 

(+)-catechin 

106.36 ± 4.28b 

4.34 ± 0.07c 

BHA 

113.00 ± 4.28b 



7.43 ± 0.14a 

Ascorbic acid 

85.68 ± 0.46c 

-- 


2308         Afr. J. Biotechnol. 

 

 



 

 

Antioxidant concentration (mg/ml)



0

100


200

300


400

500


600

A

b



s

o

rb



a

n

c



e

0.0


.2

.4

.6



.8

1.0


1.2

1.4


1.6

1.8


fruit skin

fruit stone

(+)-catechin

BHA


(µg/ml) 

 

 



Figure  6.  The  reducing  power  of  tannins  as  compared  to  (+)-

catechin and BHA standards

 

 

 



 

their  ability  to  reduce  TPTZ-Fe

3+

  complex  to  TPTZ-Fe



2+

The  FRAP  value  of  the  skin  tannins  was  significantly 



lower  than  those  of  BHA  and  (+)-catechin.  The  FRAP 

values for the stone tannins on the other hand were signi-

ficantly lower than that of BHA but higher than that of (+)-

catechin. Such potential reducing power activity might be 

attributed  due  to  the  presence  of  hydrolysable  tannins 

present  in  the  stone.  Antioxidant  activity  increased  pro-

portionally  with  tannins  content,  and  all  tannins  showed 

increased  ferric  reducing  power  with  increasing  concen-

tration  (Figure  6).  According  to

 

Oktay  et  al.  (2003),  a 



highly  positive  relationship  between  total  phenols  and 

antioxidant activity appears to be the trend in many plant 

species. 

 

 



Conclusion 

 

The results obtained showed that the condensed tannins 



consisted  of  predominantly  propelargonidin  with  2,3-cis 

stereochemistry.  The  mean  degree  of  polymerization 

determined  through  MALDI-TOF  MS  analysis  was  5.0 

and  the  number-average  molecular  weight  was  1372.45 

Da.  Cationization  by  addition  of  Cs

+

  allowed  us  to  elimi-



nate  the  interference  of  the  ∆16  mass  differences 

between  Na

+

  and  K


+

  with  ∆16  mass  differences  that 

results from pattern of hydroxylation. As a result of these 

techniques,  we  have  observed  larger  structural  hetero-

geneity  of  oligomers  than is  generally  appreciated  in the 

literature  on  plant  tannins.  The  results  from  the  appli-

cation  of  MALDI-TOF  MS  clearly  demonstrate  its  power 

as  a  tool  to  characterize  the  nature  of  tannins.  Tannins 

extracted from S. cumini fruit showed a very good DPPH 

radical scavenging activity and ferric reducing/antioxidant 

power. 

 

 



 

 

 



 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 

 

Project  (No.  30671646)  was  supported  by  the  National 



Natural  Science  Foundation  of  China,  the  Program  for 

New  Century  Excellent  Talents  in  University  (NCET-07-

0725)  and  the  Program for Innovative  Research Team in 

Science and Technology in Fujian Province University. 

 

 

REFERENCES 



 

Baumann J, Wurn G, Bruchlausen FV (1979). Prostaglandin synthetase 

inhibiting 

-2

O  radical  scavenging  properties  of  some  flavonoids  and 



related 

phenolic 

compounds. 

Naunyn-Schmiedebergs 

Arch 

Pharmacol. 307: 1-77. 



Behrens  A,  Maie  N,  Knicker  H,  Kogel-Knabner  I  (2003).  MALDI-TOF 

mass spectrometry and PSD fragmentation as means for the analysis 

of  condensed  tannins  in  plant  leaves  and  needles.  Phytochem.  62: 

1159-1170. 

Benherlal PS,  Arumughan C (2007). Chemical composition  and in  vitro 

antioxidant  studies  on



  Syzygium  cumini 

fruit.  J.  Sci.  Food Agric.  87: 

2560-2569. 

Benzie  IFF,  Strain  JJ  (1996).  The  ferric  reducing  ability  of  plasma 

(FRAP) as a measure of “antioxidant power”: The FRAP assay. Anal. 

Biochem. 239: 70-76. 

Bhatia IS, Bajaj KL, Ghangas GS (1971). Tannins in black plum seeds. 

Phytochem. 10: 219-220. 

Braca  A,  Tommasi  ND,  Bari  LD,  Pizza  C,  Politi  M,  Morelli  I  (2001). 

Antioxidant  principles  from 



Bauhinia  terapotensis

.  J.  Nat.  Prod.  64: 

892-895. 

Cerda  B,  Espin  JC,  Parra  S,  Martinez  P,  Tomas-Barberan  FA  (2004). 

The  potent  in  vitro  antioxidant  ellagitannins  from  pomegranate  juice 

are  metabolised  into  bioavailable  but  poor  antioxidant  hydroxy-



6H

-

dibenzopyran-6-one  derivatives  by  the  colonic  microflora  of  healthy 



humans. Eur. J. Nutr. 43: 205-220. 

Chen Y, Hagerman AE (2004). Characterization of soluble non-covalent 

complexes  between  bovine  serum  albumin  and 

β

-1,2,3,4,6-penta-



O

-

galloyl-



D

-glucopyranose  by  MALDI-TOF  MS.  J.  Agric.  Food  Chem. 

52: 4008-4011. 

Czochanska  Z,  Foo  LY,  Newman  RH,  Porter  LJ  (1980).  Polymeric 

proanthocyanidins:  Stereochemistry,  structural  units  and  molecular 

weight. J. Chem. Soc. Perkin Trans. 1: 2278-2286. 

Daniel  EM,  Krupnick  A,  Heur  YH,  Blinzler  JA,  Nims  RW,  Stoner  GD 

(1989). Extraction, stability and quantification of ellagic acid in various 

fruits and nuts. J. Food Comp. Anal. 2: 338-349. 

Haslam E (1992). In: Plant Polyphenols; Hemingway, R.W., Laks, P.E., 

Eds.; Plenum Press: New York, p. 172. 

Haslam E (1998). Practical Polyphenolics: From  Structure to  Molecular 

Recognition  and  Physiological  Action.  Cambridge  University  Press: 

Cambridge. 

Krueger  CG,  Vestling  MM,  Reed  JD  (2003).  Matrix-assisted  laser 

desorption/ionization 

time-of-flight 

mass 


spectrometry 

of 


heteropolyflavan-3-ols 

and 


glucosylated 

heteropolyflavans 

in 

sorghum. J. Agric. Food Chem. 51: 538-543. 



Minussi RC, Rossi M, Bologna L, Cordi L, Rotilio D, Pastore GM, Duran 

N  (2003).  Phenolic  compounds  and  total  antioxidant  potential  of 

commercial wines. Food Chem. 82: 409-416. 

Mi-Yea  S,  Tae-Hun  K,  Nak-ju  S  (2003).  Antioxidants  and  free  radical 

scavenging 

activity 

of 

Phellinus 

baumii

 

(



Phallinus 

of 

Hymenochaetaceae

). Food Chem. 82: 593-597. 

Noferi  M,  Masson  E,  Merlin  A,  Pizzi  A,  Deglise  X  (1997).  Antioxidant 

characteristics  of  hydrolysable  and  polyflavonoid  tannins:  An  ESR 

kinetics study. J. Appl. Polym. Sci

.

 63: 475-482. 

Oktay  M,  Gulcin  I,  Kufrevioglu  QI  (2003).  Determination  of  in  vitro 

antioxidant  activity  of  fennel  (



Foeniculum  vulgare

)  seed  extracts. 

LWT-Food Sci. Tech. 36: 263-271. 

Oszmianski  J,  Wojdylo  A,  Lamer-Zarawska  E,  Swiader  K  (2007). 

Antioxidant tannins  from  Rosaceae  plant  roots.  Food  Chem.  100:  


 

 

 



 

579-583. 

Prince  PS,  Menon  VP,  Pari  L  (1998).  Hypoglycaemic  activity  of 

Syzygium  cumini

  seeds:  Effect  on  lipid  peroxidation  in  alloxan 

diabetic rats. J. Ethnopharm. 61: 1-7. 

Quideau  S,  Feldman  K  (1996).  Ellagitannin  chemistry.  Chem.  Rev.  96: 

475-503. 

Rice-Evans  CA,  Miller  NJ,  Paganga  G  (1996).  Structure-antioxidant 

activity relationships of flavanoids and phenolic acids. Free Rad. Biol. 

Med. 20: 933-956. 

Santos-Buelga  C,  Scalbert  A  (2000).  Proantocyanidins  and  tannin-like 

compounds-nature, occurrence dietary intake and effects on nutrition 

and health. J. Sci. Food Agric. 80: 1094-1117. 

Siriwoharn T, Wrolstad RE (2004). Polyphenolic composition  of  marion 

and evergreen blackberries. J. Agric. Food Chem. 69: 233-240. 

Spencer P, Sivakumaran A, Fraser K, Foo LY, Lane GA, Edwards PJB, 

Meagher  LP  (2007).  Isolation  and  characterization  of  procyanidins 

from 


Rumex obtusifolius

. Phytochem. Anal. 18: 193-203. 

Tanaka  T, Orii  Y, Nonaka  GI, Nishioka  I, Kouno  I  (1996). 

Syzyginins

  A 


and B, two ellagitannins from 

Syzygium aromaticum

. Phytochem. 43: 

1345-1348.  

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

Zhang and Lin        2309 



 

 

 



Vivas N, Nonier MF, Gaulejac de NV, Absalon C, Bertrand A, Mirabel M 

(2004).  Differentiationof  proanthocyanidin  tannins  from  seeds,  skins 

and  stems  of  grapes  (

Vitis  vinifera

)  and  heartwood  of  Quebracho 

(

Schinopsis  balansae

)  by  matrix-assisted  laser  desorption/ionization 

time-of-flight 

mass 


spectrometry 

and 


thioacidolysis/liquid 

chromatography/electrospray  ionization  mass  spectrometry.  Anal. 

Chim. Acta. 513: 247-256.  

Wada  L,  Ou  B  (2002).  Antioxidant  activity  and  phenolic  content  of 

Oregon caneberries. J. Agric. Food Chem. 50: 3495-3500. 

Wealth  of  India  (1976).  Raw  Materials.  New  Delhi:  CSIR,  Vol  X:  100-

104. 

Xiang  P,  Lin  YM,  Lin  P,  Xiang  C  (2006).  Effects  of  adduct  ions  on 



matrix-assisted  laser  desorption/ionization  time  of  flight  mass  spec-

trometry of condensed tannins: A prerequisite knowledge. Chinese J. 

Anal. Chem. 34: 1019-1022.

 

 




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə