Alison hewitt



Yüklə 210.63 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə1/3
tarix06.09.2017
ölçüsü210.63 Kb.
  1   2   3

Seed size and the regeneration niches of one rare

(Melaleuca deanei) and three common (Melaleuca



styphelioidesMelaleuca thymifolia and Melaleuca nodosa)

Melaleuca (Myrtaceae) species of the Sydney region

ALISON HEWITT,

1

* PAUL HOLFORD,



1

ADRIAN RENSHAW,

1

GLENN STONE



2

AND


E. CHARLES MORRIS

1

1



School of Science and Health and

2

School of Computing, Engineering and Mathematics, University of



Western Sydney, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith, New South Wales 2751, Australia

Abstract

Melaleuca species occupy varied habitats across Australia with 16 members of the genus occurring in

the Sydney district including the rare species Melaleuca deanei F. Muell. Little is known of their germination and

recruitment requirements. This paper reports on experiments assessing the effects of temperature, water potential,

fire cues, light and shade levels on germination in four species of Melaleuca native to the Sydney region. For the

shade experiment, seedling survival at 12 months is also reported. The experiments tested the hypothesis that

M. deanei, which exhibits few seedlings in the field, has limited seedling recruitment because of its particular

requirements for germination and establishment. Further, that it differs in these requirements from three common

congenerics: M. nodosa (Sol ex Gaertn.) Sm., M. thymifolia Sm. and M. styphelioides Sm. Results indicate that

M. deanei has a substantially similar temperature and water potential range for germination to the common

congeners from 15 to 35°C, and 0 to

−0.65 ψ. Melaleuca nodosa displayed the broadest regeneration niche on all

factors assessed. Germination of M. styphelioides was significantly reduced in the dark and M. styphelioides and



M. deanei were most sensitive to shade in the seedling establishment/post-germination phase. Melaleuca deanei had

significantly larger seed that was slower to germinate in all experiments. Germination of the four species was

unaffected by the application of heat and smoke. The substantially similar germination parameters exhibited by the

four species, despite differences in habitat, may reflect their close phylogenetic affinities. The effects of fire on

stimulating seed release from the canopy, the high-light environment post-fire together with adequate follow-up

rainfall may all be critical in seedling establishment for M. deanei.



Key words: fire cue, germination, light, phylogenetic niche, shade, temperature, water potential.

INTRODUCTION

Maintaining population numbers through time is

important for any species and is particularly so for

those that are rare (Schemske et al. 1994; Yates

&

Broadhurst



2002;

Gaston


&

Fuller


2008;

Commonwealth of Australia 2014). Failure to main-

tain population numbers via replacement of senescent

individuals can occur as a result of poor reproductive

success (flowering, pollination and seed set) or poor

recruitment success (dispersal, germination and estab-

lishment) (Cropper 1993; Hobbs & Yates 2003). Small

plant populations are particularly at risk of such fail-

ures and further demographic decline, even without

obvious external threats to their persistence (Gilpin &

Soule 1986; Kunin & Gaston 1997).

Melaleuca deanei F. Muell. is a rare, serotinous shrub

of restricted distribution centred on the Sydney region

of New SouthWales (DECCW 2010) where it occurs in

small, disjunct populations that are reproductively iso-

lated from each other. Population sizes range from

relatively small (



<200 plants) to large (>700 plants),

allowing comparison of reproductive and recruitment

success between populations of different sizes. Earlier

work (Hewitt et al. 2014) found poor reproductive

success

within


relatively

smaller


populations

of

M. deanei; these populations had a lower incidence of

flowering, lower proportions of fruiting plants and

lower viable seed loads per unit area, compared with

relatively larger populations or to populations of

three


common

congeners

(M. styphelioides

Sm.,


M. thymifolia Sm. and M. nodosa (Sol ex Gaertn.)

Sm.). However, poor recruitment was recorded in both

large and small populations of M. deanei.When recruit-

ment was observed, it appeared to be tightly coupled to

disturbance by fire and follow-up rainfall (Hewitt et al.

2014). An absence of seedlings and a predominance of

*Corresponding author. School of Science and Health, Uni-

versity of Western Sydney, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith, NSW

2751, Australia (Email: a.hewitt@uws.edu.au)

Accepted for publication January 2015.



Austral Ecology (2015) 40, 661–671

bs_bs_banner

© 2015 The Authors

doi:10.1111/aec.12233

Austral Ecology © 2015 Ecological Society of Australia


older individuals were also recorded within urban,

streamside populations of M. styphelioides.

We hypothesized that given adequate quantities of

viable seed, seedling recruitment of M. deanei and



M. styphelioides may only occur under specific sets of

conditions. If these conditions rarely occur, recruit-

ment events will be few. For example, Robinson et al.

(2006) reported relatively narrow conditions of

favourable salinity, temperature and light for success-

ful germination of Melaleuca ericifolia Sm. (swamp

paperbark), corresponding to field conditions that

occur infrequently. Conversely, germination could be

occurring over a relatively wider range of conditions,

but at suboptimal times for subsequent seedling

establishment. For example, Ramirez-Padilla and

Valverde (2005) reported less specific germination

requirements in a rare species of cactus, compared

with two common species, suggesting that germination

occurred at times of suboptimal seedling survival, a

factor contributing to seedling death and declining

abundance.

If the four congeners have substantially similar ger-

mination responses, it may be that differences in their

environments are influencing recruitment. Melaleuca



deanei is found on Hawkesbury sandstone ridgetops,

whereas the common congeners occur on low-lying

streambanks, or swampy or seasonally inundated posi-

tions that are more typical of the genus. In a large study

of ecological and phylogenetic correlates of germina-

tion in 633 species of alpine meadows, HaiYan et al.

(2009) showed that taxonomic membership accounted

for the majority of variation in germination indices.

Several other studies have reported congeners to share

similarities in ecological traits despite heterogeneous

habitats,

including

seed

germination



strategies

(Thompson & Grime 1979), seed dispersal patterns

(Smith-Ramirez

et al.

1998),


germination

time


(Figueroa & Armesto 2001) and seed mass (Moles et al.

2005). The idea that a shared ancestral history would

have bearing on the current recruitment difficulties

evident in M. deanei is intriguing and suggests that the

rare species could be struggling at the edge of the

evolutionary range or margins of a phylogenetic niche

(sensu Wiens et al. 2010) for members of this genus.

A series of experiments tested the effects of moisture,

temperature, and light and shade on germination and

recruitment of one rare (M. deanei) and three common

(M. styphelioidesM. nodosa and M. thymifolia) species

of Melaleuca in the Sydney region; these factors have

long been considered the most important influences on

these processes (Harper 1977; Bewley et al. 2013). In

addition, the effects of heat and smoke were investi-

gated (Morris 2000; Kenny 2003). The question

common to all experiments was whether the regenera-

tion niche of M. deanei was comparable with that of the

congeners, thus contributing to the low recruitment

success reported from the field.



METHODS

The study species

The four Melaleuca species are serotinous resprouters that

produce fruit in summer (Hewitt et al. 2014). Melaleuca

styphelioides is weakly serotinous, retaining capsules for 1–2

seasons, whereas the other three species are strongly

serotinous, retaining fruit within the canopy for many years.

Melaleuca nodosa is a shrub to 4 m that is found over clay and

shale soils; Melaleuca thymifolia a shrub to 2 m that inhabits

poorly drained soils of shale or clay influence; Melaleuca

styphelioides is a shrub or small tree to 15 m that is often found

over alluvial soils along stream banks; and M. deanei is a shrub

to 3 m that is restricted to disjunct, sandstone ridgetops found

north and south of Sydney from Brisbane Waters to Nowra.



Seed collection and preparation

Seed was collected from eight sites (two sites per species:

Table 1) in February–March of 2009 (see Hewitt et al. 2014

for comprehensive site details). At each site, five mature

infructescences were removed from 10 randomly chosen

fruiting plants from 2 patches per site (20 plants per site in

total). Infructescences were placed into brown paper bags in

the field. The bags were stored upright and open on a bench

at ambient laboratory temperature and low humidity for 4

weeks. Each bag was then individually emptied onto a metal



Table 1.

Provenance of seeds used in experiments on water

potential (

Ψ), temperature and fire cues (T), effect of light

(L) and effect of shade (S)

Species


Site

Experiment



Melaleuca

deanei

Porto Ridge, Brooklyn

T,

Ψ

033° 33



′ 12′S

151° 12


′ 33″E

Nepean Dam

T,

Ψ, S, L


034° 15

′ 13″ S


150° 39

′ 58″ E


Melaleuca

nodosa

Australian Defence

Industry (ADI)

T,

Ψ



033° 43

′ 27″S


150° 38

′ 42″E


Rookwood Cemetery

T,

Ψ, S, L



033° 52

′ 28″S


151° 03

′ 50″E


Melaleuca

styphelioides

Campbell Hill Reserve

T,

Ψ, L


033° 52

′ 16″S


151° 00

′ 09″E


Nurragingy Reserve

T,

Ψ, S



033° 45

′ 42″S


150° 51

′ 22″E


Melaleuca

thymifolia

Castlereagh

T,

Ψ, L


033° 39

′ 35″S


150° 40

′ 48″E


Pheasants Nest

T,

Ψ, S



034° 16

′ 23″S


150° 38

′ 42″E


662

A . H E W I T T ET AL.

© 2015 The Authors

doi:10.1111/aec.12233

Austral Ecology © 2015 Ecological Society of Australia


tray and placed in an oven for 6 h at 40°C. After drying,

coarse materials were removed and discarded.The remaining

seed and frass were returned to the bags and air dried for a

further week before being sieved through metal sieves of

progressively smaller pore aperture. Each seed lot was then

sequentially passed through a Selecta Machinefabriek BV

Aspirator at a feed speed of 4/12 and air fan speeds of 60, 80,

100 and 110 Hz (common species) or 80, 100, 120 and

140 Hz for the larger and heavier seed of M. deanei. Cleaned

seed was then placed into envelopes that were stored over

silica gel. Two weeks later, the seed was surface sterilized in a

0.5% sodium hypochlorite solution for 20 s, rinsed in dis-

tilled water and air dried on paper towels for 24 h then

transferred to labelled glass jars and kept in the dark. For the

experiments, all seeds were individually selected under a

stereomicroscope to exclude visibly damaged seed. The

viability

of

seed



ranged

from


approximately

80%


(M. thymifolia) to approximately 95% (M. styphelioides)

(Hewitt et al. 2014).

Average seed size per site and per species was determined

by weighing three lots of 500 seed per combination of site

and species.

Water potential

The experiment factorially combined 11 treatments of water

potential from 0 to

−1.2 MPa, with the four species each

from two sites. The water potentials were generated with

solutions of polyethylene glycol (PEG) (Sigma-Aldrich, MW

6000) per Michel (1983). Each Petri dish contained a sterile

filter paper, 40 mL of PEG solution and 20 seeds, with four

dishes per combination of species, site and water potential.

The dishes were sealed with Parafilm to prevent evaporation

and placed in a temperature-controlled cabinet at 20°C and

a 12:12 h light : dark photoperiod cycle. Germination, as

assessed by radicle emergence, was recorded every 5 days.

The position of the Petri dishes in the cabinet was

re-randomized every 24–48 h to minimize any effects of posi-

tion in the cabinet on germination. The experiment was

repeated the following year using a second growth cabinet.

Temperature and fire cues

The experimental design had four factors: species, fire cues

(with both heat and smoke or without either), temperature

(10, 15, 20, 25, 30 and 35°C) and site, using two sites per

species. The temperatures were selected to extend above and

below the average monthly maxima for summer (25°C) and

winter (15°C) for the Sydney region.

Half of the seed from each species received an application

of heat and then smoke (fire cues). Heat was applied to each

replicate by placing seeds into an open, glass Petri dish in a

fan-forced oven for 5 min at 80°C (Morrison & Morris

2000). Smoke was generated by burning eucalyptus leaves in

a beekeeper’s burner in a fume hood, the smoke then being

passed through a condensing tube to cool and dry it before

delivery to a partially sealed wooden box in which each Petri

dish was placed.

Treated and untreated seeds (25 per dish) were then indi-

vidually placed into Petri dishes (90 mm) containing 40 mL

of autoclaved germination medium (7 g L

−1

agar (Sigma-



Aldrich) in dH

2

O) and the dishes sealed with Parafilm. Four



replicate dishes were used per combination of site, species,

temperature and treatment (fire cues or not).The dishes were

then placed into six temperature-controlled growth cabinets

with a 12:12 h light : dark cycle; the position of the Petri

dishes was re-randomized every 24–48 h. Germination

counts were made every 5 days.The experiment was repeated

6 months later with temperature re-randomized among the

cabinets.



Light

Seeds of each species were germinated either in the light or in

the dark in two replicate experiments. In each, there were

four Petri dishes for each species and treatment and 25 seeds

per Petri dish. Seeds were placed on filter papers moistened

with 40 mL of water (topped up after 5 days), and the dishes

were maintained in constant light and temperature (22°C).

Dark treatments were triple wrapped in aluminium foil, set

up and inspected under green safelight. Seeds were checked

for germination after 7, 14, 21, 28 and 35 days. After 35 days,

the aluminium foil was removed and germination observed

for a further 10 days.



Shade

Shade cages were constructed by sewing layers of nylon

shadecloth onto cylindrical wire frames (900 mm in height

and 680 mm diameter). Layers of shadecloth were added to

achieve four shade levels (Table 2), with three cages per

shade level. The cages were placed in a glasshouse without

environmental control. Pots (120-mm diameter, 100-mm

high) were filled to 80 mm with Debco RG–2 seedling

potting mix and 60 mL of ‘Osmocote Exact’ 8–9 month

release fertilizer. Vortex sprinkler spray heads were anchored

in large 200 mm pots of pebbles placed centrally in each

shade cage. Eight pots (two pots per species) were placed

equidistant around the sprinklers under each shade cage and

watered, after which 25 seeds were placed on the surface of

each pot. Tap water was used for watering under an auto-

mated system for 5 m at 8 am and 6 pm from October to

April, and at 9 am and 4 pm from May to September. At the

commencement of the experiment, it was ensured that the

spray heads gave equal amounts of water to each surrounding

pot. This was checked again at days 3, 7 and thereafter every



Table 2.

Mean light levels under the shade cages (

μmol m

−2

)



and as a percentage of full sunlight (1800

μmol m


−2

)

Treatment



Average light

level (


μmol m

−2

)



Comparison

to full sun

Control (open)

1260


30% shade

Low


1008

44% shade

Medium

315


82.5% shade

High


12.6

99.3% shade

S E E D S I Z E , R E G E N E R AT I O N N I C H E O F MELALEUCA

663


© 2015 The Authors

doi:10.1111/aec.12233

Austral Ecology © 2015 Ecological Society of Australia


4 weeks. The number of seeds germinating and the number

and proportion of seedlings surviving were assessed every 6

weeks for 12 months.

Light measurements were made under the shade cages

inside the glasshouse (Table 2) using a handheld luxmetre

(Li-Cor Environmental). These light measurements were

similar to those taken at the sites from which the seeds were

collected with a eucalypt canopy attenuating light at ground

level by 6–25% (equivalent to no shade/open-cage treatment

in the glasshouse). Melaleuca thickets were found to attenuate

light levels by 75–96%, these being equivalent to light levels

in the medium and high-shade treatments.



Data analysis

Data with respect to the final percent germination in the

water potential experiment were subjected to linear mixed

modelling using the package, lme4 (Bates et al. 2013).

Models used fixed effects of species and water potential.

Random effects were site and repetition of the experiment.

Assessment of whether species had different responses to

water potential was equivalent to testing for an interaction.

anova was used for the fixed effects, and approximate χ

2

statistics for the random effects (this latter approximation is



justified due to the large number of residual degrees of

freedom).

The data regarding final percent germination in the tem-

perature experiment were subjected to arcsine transforma-

tions, and the data for each species were analyzed separately;

this analysis showed that there was no significant effect of

repetition, fire cues or site. Therefore, the data relating to

these effects were combined, and the data for all four species

were analyzed together using two-way

anova with means

being separated using Tukey’s Honestly Significant Differ-

ence (HSD) tests at P

= 0.05 using Statistica (Version 9.1;

Stat Soft Inc., Tulsa, OK, USA). The analyses described

below also used this package.

The ‘times to 50% of final germination achieved’ (T

50

)

(Grime et al. 1981; Thompson & Grime 1983; Jurado &



Westoby 1992) for both the water potential and temperature

experiments were obtained from a curve of best fit plotted

through the germinant counts using TableCurve 2D (Version

5; AISN Software, Mapleton, OR, USA). The data were then

subjected to the Box-Cox transformation procedure (Box &

Cox 1964) to reduce heteroscedasticity and then subjected to

anova. Means were separated using Tukey’s HSD tests at

P

= 0.05.


Mean final germination data from the light experiment

were analyzed by three-way factorial

anova, with species and

light treated as fixed factors and repetition of the experiment

as a random factor. The factor, repetition, was found to be

non-significant, and the data re-analyzed with this factor

removed.

Data for mean germination and for seedling survival to 12

months from the shade experiment were analyzed by a

mixed-model

anova, with species and shade level as fixed,

orthogonal factors, and application of the shade treatment

(cage)

as

a



third

factor


nested

within


shade

level.


Heteroscedasticity was assessed using Levene’s test, and data

were transformed as required. Post-hoc comparisons of

means were made using Student–Newman–Keuls tests at

P

= 0.05.


RESULTS

Seed size

Significant (F

3,24

= 69.3, ≤ 0.001) differences were



found among the mean seed masses. The seed mass

varied between 21 and 65

μg per seed with M. deanei

having the largest seed and M. thymifolia the smallest

(Table 3).

Water potential

There were significant effects of species (F

3,659

= 851.8;


P

< 0.001) and water potential (F

10,659


= 762.3; <

0.001) on germination, and a significant (F

30,659

=

53.19; P



< 0.001) interaction between these factors.

However, there was no significant effect of either site

(F

1,659


= 1.15; = 0.285) or experimental repetition

(F

1,659

= 2.43; = 0.120; Appendix S1). The data for



both repetitions were combined, and the mean values

for each combination of species, water potential and

site are presented in Figure 1. The effects of water

potential were similar for M. deaneiM. nodosa and



M. styphelioides. At experimental water potentials from

0.0 to


−0.8 MPa, between 75% and 100% of seeds

germinated (Appendix S2). However, when the water

potential

dropped


below

−0.8 MPa, germination

quickly reduced to 0%. For M. thymifolia, fewer seeds

germinated, and those that did were more greatly

affected by lowered water potential than for the other

species. From 0.0 to

−0.4 MPa, germination was only

55–65%. When the water potential dropped below this

value, germination quickly fell to below 20%; and after

−0.95 MPa, no seeds germinated.

Due to poor germination at

−0.85 MPa and below,

only the data estimating the T

50

collected at



−0.75 MPa

and above were analyzed. Initially, the data for the T

50

for each species were examined separately and, for each



species, there were no significant effects of repetition

(P

= 0.55–0.95) or site (= 0.24–0.91).Therefore, the

data associated with these factors were combined, and

a second analysis using the data from all species

was conducted. All species showed a significantly


  1   2   3


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə