American Journal of Pharmacology and Toxicology, 8 (1): 1-8, 2013



Yüklə 175.92 Kb.
PDF просмотр
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü175.92 Kb.

American Journal of Pharmacology and Toxicology, 8 (1): 1-8, 2013 

ISSN: 1557-4962  

©2013 Science Publication 

doi:10.3844/ajptsp.2013.1.8 Published Online 8 (1) 2013 (http://www.thescipub.com/ajpt.toc)

 

Corresponding Author:  Omale James, Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Kogi State University, 

 

PMB 1008, Anyigba, Kogi State, Nigeria  Tel: 234-08068291727

 

 



Science Publications

 

AJPT 



ANTI-VENOM STUDIES ON OLAX VIRIDIS 

AND SYZYGIUM GUINEENSE EXTRACTS  

Omale James, Ebiloma Unekwuojo Godwin and Ogohi Dorathy Agah 

 

Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Natural Sciences, 



Kogi State University, PMB 1008, Anyigba, Kogi State, Nigeria

 

 



Received 2012-04-27, Revised 2013-01-16; Accepted 2013-04-12 

ABSTRACT

 

Olax viridis (Olacaceae) and  Syzygium guineense (Myrtaceae) are shrubs commonly  found in the tropics. 

They are traditional  folkloric  medicine for a  great number  of sicknesses. Olax viridis  has a  wide range of 

applications  in  ethnomedicine  which  include  treatment  for  ulcers,  veneral  diseases,  ringworm,  sleeping 

sickness, diarrhea, fever. Syzygium guineense has been reported as antidiarrheal agent. Liquid from the bark 

and roots have been reported to act as a purgative when mixed with water. Both plants have been claimed to 

have antivenom properties. However, there are no scientific reports on snake venom neutralizing activities 

of these plants. The plant samples  were collected from Olowa in Dekina  Local Government Area in Kogi 

State,  Nigeria.  The  chemicals  and  reagents  used  were  of  analytical  grade.  Wistar  albino  rats  (male) 

weighing  between  180-200  g  were  randomly  divided  into  seven  groups  of  three  (3).  Groups  1-7  received 

water,  normal  saline,  venom,  venom  and  Olax  viridis,  venom  and  Syzygium  guineense,  Olax  viridis  and 



Syzygium guineense respectively. The extracts were administered orally at the dose of 400 mg kg

1



 b.w of 

rats and 1 h later, the venom (0.08 mk kg

1

) was administered. Pulse rate, blood glucose, rectal temperature, 



plasma cholesterol, triacylglycerol, creatine kinase activity and edema were measured. Significant neutralization 

of  the  effects  of  Naja  katiensis  venom  was  observed  in  the  groups  of  rats  that  received  the  extracts.  Blood 

glucose, pulse rate, rectal  temperature and creatine  kinase  activity  were  elevated in  the  untreated envenomated 

groups.  These  results  suggest  that  oral  administration  of  Olax  viridis  and  Syzygium  guineense  extracts  possess 

antivenom property, thus, providing the rationale for their use in treatment of sake envenomation. 

 

Keywords: Olax Viridis, Syzygium Guineense, Naja Katiensis, Venom and Plant Extract 



 

1. INTRODUCTION 

 

Snake  bites  pose  a  major  health  risk  in  many 



countries,  with  the  global  incidence  of  snake  bites 

exceeding  5,000,000  per  year  (Williams  et  al.,  2010). 

This  problem  is  more  profound  in  the  developing 

countries,  particularly  in  areas  where  the  access  to 

medical  service  and  to  the  antiophidic  treatment  is 

challenging (Mendes et al., 2008). Although, the majority 

of  snake  species  are  non-venomous  and  typically  kill  their 

prey  with  constriction,  venomous  snakes  can  be  found  on 

every  continent  except  Antarctica  (Kasturiratne  et  al., 

2008). The  outcome  of  snake  bite  depends  on  numerous 

factors  including  species  of  snake,  the  area  of  the  body 

bitten, the amount of venom injected and the condition of 

the  victim.  Bites  from  non-venomous  snakes  can  also 

cause injury, often due to lacerations caused by the teeth or 

from  a  resulting  infection.  A  bite  may  also  trigger  an 

anaphylactic reaction, which is potentially fatal. 

 

In  many  parts  of  the  world,  regular  treatment  for 



snake  venom  accident  is  serum  therapy,  which  involves 

the  parentheral  administration  of  antiophidian  serum 

(antivenoms).  This  therapy  efficiently  neutralizes  the 

systemic  toxic  effects,  preventing  death  of  victims. 

However,  antivenoms  have  some  disadvantages,  thus 

limiting their efficient use (Chippaux and Goyffon, 1998; 



Omale James et al. / American Journal of Pharmacology and Toxicology 8 (1): 1-8, 2013 

 



Science Publications

 

AJPT 

Heard et al., 1999; Silva et al., 2007): For example, they 

can  induce  adverse  reactions  ranging  from  mild 

symptoms  to  serious  (anaphylaxis)  and  in  addition  they 

do not neutralize the local tissue damage (Gutierrez et al., 

2009).  Thus,  complementary  therapeutics  needs  to  be 

investigated,  with  plants  being  considered  as  a  major 

source (Soares et al., 2005). 

 

In  many  countries,  plant  extracts  have  long  been  in 



use  traditionally  to  treat  envenomation  (Mors  et  al., 

2000). The exact mechanisms of action of the plant extracts 

remain  largely  illusive,  however,  a  number  of  previous 

reports  indicate  that  plant-derived  compounds  such  as 

rosmarinic  acid  (Ticli  et  al.,  2005;  Aung  et  al.,  2010), 

quercetin  (Nishijima  et  al.,  2009)  and  glycyrrhizin 

(Assafim  et  al.,  2006)  can  inhibit  biological  activities  of 

some snake venoms in vivo and in vitro.  



 

Olax  viridis  (O.  viridis)  has  a  wide  range  of 

application  in  ethnomedicine.  In  West  Africa,  the 

pulverized  bark  and  root  are  used  as  dressing  for  ulcers 

and  treatment  of  veneral  diseases,  ring  worm  (Watt  and 

Bregar-Brandiwik, 1962). In the northern part of Nigeria, 

the  root  is  used  in  the  treatment  of  sleeping  sickness, 

as  anti-diarrheal  agent  and  the  treatment  of  febrile 

headache.  The  leaves  are  also  used  as  remedy  for 

cough, fever and wound (Ajali and Okoye, 2009). 

 

Syzygium guineense (S. guineense) fruits are used as 

remedy  for  dysentery.  In  traditional  medicine,  liquid 

from the pounded bark and roots has been reported to act 

as purgative when mixed with water. The present study was 

carried out to determine the venom neutralizing effects of O. 

viridis and S. guineense in rats.  

2. MATERIALS AND METHODS 

2.1. Plant Material 

 

Fresh leaves of Olax viridis and Syzygium guineense 

were  collected  from  farms  located  in  Olowa  in  Dekina 

Local Government Area of Kogi State, Nigeria. The fresh 

leaves  were  rinsed  with  clean  water  to  remove  dirt  and 

were  air-dried  in  the  laboratory  for  three  weeks  and 

pulverized  into  fine  powders  using  mortar  and  pestle. 

Prior  to  air-drying,  the  plant  samples  were  identified  in 

the  Department  of  Biological  Sciences  (Botany  unit), 

Kogi  State  University,  Anyigba,  Nigeria.  A  voucher 

specimen has been kept. 

2.2. Preparation of Plant Extracts 

 

Powdered samples (200 g) each were extracted using 

cold maceration for 48 h in 1000 mL

1



 of methanol. The 

mixtures  were  there  after  filtered.  The  solvent  from  the 

total  extract  was  distilled  off  and  the  concentrate  was 

evaporated on a water bath to a syrupy consistency. The 

percentage yields of the extracts were 14.5 and 3.55% for 

O. viridis and S. guineense respectively. 

2.3. Animals 

 

Wistar albino rats (male) weighing between 180-300 

g  was obtained from Mr. Friday Emmanuel, Department 

of  Biochemistry,  Kogi  State  University,  Anyigba, 

Nigeria.  This  study  was  approved  by  the  Department  of 

Biochemistry  according  to  the  Institutional  ethics.  These 

animals were used as approved in the study of snake venom 

toxicity.  Rats  were  allowed  to  acclimatize  for  two  weeks 

with  access  to  clean  water  and  animal  feeds  (supplied  by 

Top  feeds,  Anyigba)  in  the  experimental  site.  They  were 

maintained  in  standard  conditions  at  room  temperature, 

60±5% relative humidity and 12 h light dark cycle. 



2.4. Experimental Design 

2.4.1. Animal Grouping and Treatment 

 

The  wistar  albino  rats  were  randomly  divided  into 

seven groups of three rats. 

 

Group: 



Control group that received only water (2 mL) 

Group 2: 

Control  group  that  received  normal  saline  (2 

mL) 


Group 3: 

Envenomed  rats  that  did  not  receive  any 

treatment  

Group 4: 

Envenomed rat treated with Olax viridis 

Group 5: 

Envenomed  rats  treated  with  Syzygium 

guineense 

Group: 


Control group that received only Olax viridis 

Group: 


Control  group  that  received  only  Syzygium 

guineense 

 

 



The extracts  were administered orally at the dose of 

400mg kg


1

 body weight of rats and 1 h later, the venom 



was  administered  intraperitoneally  at  a  dose  of  0.08  mg 

kg



1

 body weight of rats. 



2.5. Antiedematogenic Activity Evaluation Design  

 

Antiedematogenic  property  of  the  extracts  was 

measured in the right hind paw edema model (Bispo et al., 

2001). The rats were divided into four groups of three 

rats each. 

 

Group 1: Received O. viridis extract and venom 



Group 2: Received S. guineense extract and venom 

Group 3: Received venom only (control) 

Group 4: Received indomethacin (positive control) 

 

 



The extracts  were administered orally at the dose of 

400  mg  kg

1

  body  weight  of  rats.  1  h  later,  the  animals 



Omale James et al. / American Journal of Pharmacology and Toxicology 8 (1): 1-8, 2013 

 



Science Publications

 

AJPT 

were  injected  subcutaneously  in  the  right  hind  paw  with 

venom  (0.08  mg  kg

1

  body  weight).  The  paw  volumes 



were measured 1, 2, 4, 6 and 24 h after venom injection. 

Group  4  rats  were  treated  with  indomethacin  (100  mg 

kg



1



  body  weight,  I.P)  as  control  for  anti  inflammatory 

activity.  Group  3,  negative  control  was  injected  with 

venom  only  in  the  right  hind  paw  and  with  normal 

saline  in  the  left  hind  paw.  Edema  was  expressed  as 

percentage of the difference between the left and right 

paw volumes and compared with venom control. 



2.6. Biological Assays 

2.6.1. Determination of Pulse Rate 

 

The  pulse  rate  was  determined  using  the  femoral 

artery in the  groin of the femur of the  hind leg. The rats 

were restrained and once settled, the pulse rate was taken 

by placing finger over the femoral artery. The pulse was 

counted for one min using a stop watch.  



2.7. Blood Glucose Determination 

 

The blood glucose level was determined according to 

the  method  described  by  (Nelson  et  al.,  2012).  ACCU 

Check glucose test meter was used for the determination 

of  the  blood  glucose  in  the  experimental  rats  before  and 

after envenomation. A drop of blood from 2 mL collected 

via  tail  bleeding  of  rats  was  applied  to  the  strip  area 

containing  the  chemical  leading  to  glucose  dye 

oxidoreductase reaction, causing colour change to occur. 

The  strip  was  inserted  into  the  meter  and  the  blood 

glucose  concentration  was  displayed.  Before  the 

determination the rats were fasted overnight. 



2.8. Antipyretic Activity Determination 

 

The method of (Laura and Dorian, 2008) was used to 

evaluate  the  antipyretic  activity  of  the  extracts.  The  rats 

were  fasted  overnight  and  their  rectal  temperature  was 

recorded  using  digital  thermometer  with  a  rectal  probe. 

The  rectal  temperature  was  recorded  before  and  after 

envenomation. 

2.9. Creatine Kinase Activity Assay

 

 

The activity of serum creatine kinase was determined 

according to the method described by Szasz et al. (1976). 

Randox CK 110 kit was used for the quantitative in vitro 

determination  of  the  enzyme  activity.  The  creatine 

activity  was  calculated  using  the  formula:  U/I  =  8095  X 

∆A at 340nm/min where ∆A = Change in absorbance. 

2.10. Plasma Triglyceride Level Measurement 

 

The  plasma  triglyceride  level  was  determined 

according to the method described by Tietz et al. (1990). 

Randox TR 210 kit was used for the quantitative in vitro 

determination of triglyceride in plasma.  

 

Triglyceride  concentration  was  calculated  using  this 



formula: 

 

Absorbanceof sample



Concentration of s tan dard(mmol / L)

Absorbanceof s tan dard

×

 

2.11. Determination of Plasma Cholesterol 



 

The plasma cholesterol was measured by the method 

of Richmond, 1973. Randox CH 200 kit was used for the 

quantitative  in  vitro  determination  of  cholesterol  in 

plasma.  Using  a  standard,  the  concentration  of 

cholesterol in the sample was calculated by the formula: 

 

Absorbanceof sample



Concentration of s tan dard(mmol / L)

Absorbanceof s tan dard

×

 

2.12. Statistical Analysis 



 

The  mean  values  ±  S.E.M  was  calculated  for  each 

parameter.  Results  were  statistically  analyzed  by  one-

way  Analysis-of-Variance  (ANOVA)  followed  by 

Benferonis multiple comparisons. P<0.05 was considered 

as significant. 



3. RESULTS 

3.1. Pulse Rate 

 

In  the  pulse  rate  study,  there  was  a  significant 

(P<0.05)  increase  in  the  pulse  rate  of  the  group  (3) 

administered  Naja  katiensis  venom  compared  with  the 

control  groups  (Table  1).  Reduction  in  the  pulse  rate  of 

the  extract  treated  groups  following  envenomation  was 

observed,  thus,  indicating  hypotensive  effect  of  the 

extracts  and  this  reductions  were  statistically  significant 

(P<0.05) when compared with group 3. 

3.2. Blood Glucose 

 

The  effects  of  the  two  plant  extracts  on  the  blood 

glucose level of rats following envenomation is presented 

in  Table  2.  The  plant  extracts  significantly  (P<0.005) 

reduced  hyperglycemia  induced  by  the  snake  venom 

(Group  3).  As  seen  in  Table  2  for  group  6  and  7,  the 

extracts  reduced  blood  glucose  level  indicative  of 

hypoglycemic properties of the plants. 



3.3. Antipyretic Activity 

 

In  the  antipyretic  study,  the  rectal  temperature  of 

group  3  animals  after  envenomation  is  40.00±0.404°C 

and  34.06±0.493°C  before  envenomation.  The  plant 

extract  treated  groups  showed  significant  (P<0.05) 


Omale James et al. / American Journal of Pharmacology and Toxicology 8 (1): 1-8, 2013 

 



Science Publications

 

AJPT 

reduction  in  rectal  temperature  (Table  3).  S.  guineense 

showed more antipyretic activity than O. viridis



3.4. Creatine Kinase Activity

 

 

There  was  elevated  creatine  kinase  activity  in 

group  3  rats  (Table  4).  The  extract  treated  groups  4 

and  5  showed  reduced  activities  of  the  enzyme 

significantly  (P<0.05).  S.  guineense  had  more 

protective effect than O. viridis



3.5. Lipid Profile 

 

The  lipid  profiles  were  reduced  by  the  venom, 



1.157±0.078  and  1.217±0.110  mmol/L  for  triglyceride 

and  cholesterol  respectively  in  group  3.  The  extract 

treated groups (Table 5) offered some protection for both 

lipids  even  though  this  is  not  statistically  significant 

when  compared  with  the  control  (group  3)  for 

triglyceride  but  significant  for  cholesterol.  Values  in  the 

same  column  with  the  same  superscripts  are  considered 

not significant (P>0.05). Values in the same column with 

different 

superscripts 

are 

statistically 



significant 

(P<0.05), when compared with control (group 3). 



3.6. Antiedematogenic 

Effect 

of 

the 

Plant 

Extracts 

 

The  snake  venom  (Naja  katiensis)  produced  a  rapid 

on set in paw edema in group 3 but not in group 1, 2 and 

4 (Table 6). The plant extracts reduced edema formation 

in  the  treated  groups  and  the  reduction  is  comparable  to 

the standard drug used (indomethacin). 

 

Table 1. Effect of the extracts on pulse rate (per minute) of rats 

after envenomation 

 

Pulse rate before  Pulse rate after 



Treatment groups 

administration 

 administration 

Group 1 administered  

60±1.202

 



61±1.528

ab

 



Water 

Group 2 administered  

56±1.856

a

 



60±1.764

ac

 



Normal Saline 

Group 3 administered 

57±0.088

a

 



75±1.732

ad

 



Venom only 

Group 4 administered 

56±0.88

a

 



61±2.646

ae

 



O. viridis and venom 

Group 5 administered 

57±1.453

a

 



58±1.764

af

 



S. guineense and venom 

Group 6 administered  

58±1.155

a

 



63±3.930

ag

 



O. viridis only 

Group 7 administered 

57±1.453

a

 



58±1.764

ah

 



S. gunieense only 

Values are mean ± SEM (n = 3) 

Values  in  the  same  column  with  the  same  superscripts  are 

considered not significant (P>0.05). Values in the same column 

with  different  superscripts  are  considered  significant  (P<0.05) 

when compared with group 3 (control). 



Table 2. Effect of the plant extracts on blood glucose after Naja 

katiensis envenomation in rats 

 

Glucose (mg/dl) 



Glucose (mg/dl) 

 

before 



after 

Treatment groups 

administration 

administration 

Group 1 administered  

89.67±1.553

 

80.66±3.180



bb

 

Water 



Group 2 administered  

107.33±0.133

b

 

97.33±1.881



bc

 

Normal Saline 



Group 3 administered 

104.67±9.330

b

 

137.00±6.028



bcd

 

Venom 



Group 4 administered 

101.00±2.082

b

 

106.00±2.000



bd

 

O. viridis and venom 

Group 5 administered 

133.00±2.868

bd

 

103.33±2.848



be

 

S. guineense and venom 

Group 6 administered  

102.00±2.517

b

 

90.33±4.333



bf

 

O. viridis only 

Group 7 administered 

99.00±2.082

b

 

88.33±2.333



bg

 

S. gunieense only 

Values are mean ± SEM (n = 3) 

Values  in  the  same  column  with  the  same  superscripts  are 

considered not significant (P>0.05). Values in the same column 

with  different  superscripts  are  considered  significant  (P<0.05) 

when compared with control (group 3). 

 

Table 3.  Antipyretic  activities  of  the  plant  extracts  in  Naja 



katiensis envenomation 

 

Rectal 



Rectal  

 

temperature (°C)  temperature (°C) 



 

before 


after  

Treatment groups 

administration 

administration 

Group 1 administered 

33.200±0.723

 

33.133±0.491



ba

 

Water 



Group 2 administered 

34.99±0.603

b

 

32.500±0.929



bb

 

Normal Saline 



Group 3 administered 

34.067±0.493

b

 

40.000±0.404



bcd

 

Venom only 



Group 4 administered 

33.000±0.854

b

 

34.333±3.486



bd

 

O. viridis and venom 

Group 5 administered 

32.800±0.513

b

 

33.667±0.218



bd

 

S. guineense and venom 

Group 6 administered 

33.500±1.127

b

 

33.133±0.712



be

 

O. viridis only 

Group 7 administered 

34.300±0.251

b

 

33.267±0.693



bf

 

S. gunieense only 

Values are mean ± SEM (n = 3) 

Values  in  the  same  column  with  the  same  superscripts  are 

considered not significant (P>0.05). Values in the same column 

with  different  superscripts  are  considered  significant  (P<0.05) 

when compared with the control group 3. 


Omale James et al. / American Journal of Pharmacology and Toxicology 8 (1): 1-8, 2013 

 



Science Publications

 

AJPT 



Table 4. Effects of the plant extracts on creatine kinase activity

 

Treatment groups 



Creatine kinase activity (U/I) 

Group 1 administered 

50.663±4.674

 



Water 

Group 2 administered 

48.567±4.679

b

 



Normal Saline 

Group 3 administered 

110.630±2.698

cdc


 

Venom only 

Group 4 administered 

80.953±4.674

d

 

O. viridis and venom 



Group 5 administered 

51.268±0.793

c

 

S. guineense and venom 



Group 6 administered 

80.347±0.372

f

 

O. viridis only 



Group 7 administered 

51.000±7.139

g

 

S. gunieense only 



Values are mean ± SEM (n = 3) 

Values  in  the  same  column  with  different  superscripts  are 

considered significant (P<0.05), when compared with the group 

3 (control).

 

 

Table 5. Effects of the plant extracts on plasma lipid profiles in 



rats after Naja katiensis envenomation activity

 

 



Triglyceride 

Cholesterol  

Treatment groups 

(mmol/l) 

(mmol/l) 

Group 1 administered 

1.426±0.082

 



4.921±0.18

aa

 



Water 

Group 2 administered 

1.493±0.098

a

 



4.820±0.139

bb

 



Normal Saline 

Group 3 administered 

1.157±0.078

a

 



1.217±0.110

ccd


 

Venom 


Group 4 administered 

1.494±0.287

a

 

4.620±0.359



dd

 

O. viridis and venom 

Group 5 administered 

1.479±0.218

a

 

4.651±0.819



ee

 

S. guineense and venom 

Group 6 administered 

1.270±0.085

a

 

4.823±0.195



ff

 

O. viridis only 

Group 7 administered 

1.416±0.086

a

 

4.944±0.073



gg

 

S. gunieense only 

Values are mean ± SEM (n = 3) 

4. DISCUSSION 

 

Snake  bites  being  a  major  public  health  problem 

claim a large number of lives in the African continent and 

the world at large. Anti-snake venom remains the specific 

(antidote)  for  snake  venom  poisoning.  This  anti-snake 

venom  are  usually  derived  from  horse  sera.  They  contain 

horse 

immunoglobulins, 



which 

frequently 

causes 

complement  medicated  side  effects  and  other  proteins  that 



cause serum sickness and occasionally, anaphylactic shock. 

Although, the use of plants against the effects of snake bites 

has been long recognized, more scientific attention has been 

given to since last 20 years (Alam and Gomes, 2003).  

 

In this investigation, venom neutralizing potential of O. 



viridis  and S. guineense plant  extracts  were  studied  against 

Naja  katiensis  venom  rats.  Many  biochemical  parameters 

such as blood glucose, lipid profile, creatine kinase activity, 

pulse  rate  were  measured.  The  measurement  of  these 

parameters in plasma is of importance in the assessment of 

the  pathophysiological  state  of  snake  bite  victims.  The 

results  suggest  that  Naja  katiensis  venom  can  disturb  rat 

metabolism  and  the  plant  extracts  were  capable  of 

neutralizing the lethality induced by the venom. 

 

The result of the effect of the plant extracts on pulse 



rate  of  rats  after  envenomation  is  presented  in  Table  1

There  was  a  significant  (P<0.05)  increase  in  the  pulse 

rate  of  group  3  rats  that  were  administered  the  snake 

venom  only.  This  increase  in  pulse  rate  might  be  due  to 

increased metabolic activity or the heart disease (Pangana 

and  Pangana,  2010).  In  other  groups  and  groups  treated 

with  the  plant  extracts  pulse  rate  was  reduced.  This 

reduction  in  the  extract  treated  groups  revealed  the 

hypotensive effect of the plant extracts. In blood glucose 

level  measurement  (Table  2)  there  was  significant 

increase  in  blood  glucose  in  group  3  envenomed  rats. 

Many snake venoms are known to cause hyperglycemia in 

rats  and  mice  (Al-jammaz  et  al.,  1999;  Pung  et  al.,  2005; 

Sleat et al., 2006). A few venoms induced hypoglycemia. 

 

In the present study, the levels of blood glucose were 



significantly  increased  in  the  envenomated  animals  in 

group  3  that  were  not  treated  with  the  extracts.  This 

increase in blood glucose level could be attributed to the 

effects  of  venom  in  glycogen  metabolism  in  the 

hepatocytes, muscle fibres and medullary catecholamines 

that  stimulate  glycogenolysis  and  gluconeogensis  in  the 

tissues (Ohhira et al., 1991; Marsh et al., 1997). In group 

4 and 5 animals that received extracts of Olax viridis and 



Syzygium guineense, there  was no significant increase in 

their  blood  glucose  before  and  after  envenomation. 

Furthermore;  there  was  no  significant  change  in  blood 

glucose  level  in  group  6  and  7  animals  which  only 

received  the  extracts  of  O.  viridis  and  S.  guineense 

without 


envenomation. 

These 


results 

indicate 

hypoglycemic activity of the plants. This might be due to 

insulin-like  mechanism  most  probably  through  the 

peripheral glucose consumption. 

 

Table  3  presents  the  result  obtained  from  the 

evaluation of the antipyretic activity of the plant extracts. 

There was a significant increase in the rectal temperature 

of  group  3  rats  that  were  injected  intraperitoneally  with 

Naja  katiensis  venom  but  were  not  treated  with  extracts 

when  compared  with  the  values  obtained  before 

envenomation. The drastic reduction in rectal temperature in 

extract treated groups is indicative of antipyretic activity of 

the two plant extracts. 


Omale James et al. / American Journal of Pharmacology and Toxicology 8 (1): 1-8, 2013 

 



Science Publications

 

AJPT 



Table 6. Antiedematogenic effects of the plant extracts

 

 



Paw volume (mm) after envenomation 

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 



Treatment groups 



24 h later 



Group 1 received 

56.197±3.081

xab

 

52.357±3.460



xyz

 

45.720±4.535



xyz

 

40.897±2.353



xyz

 

37.683±1.534



xyz

 

O. viridis and venom 

Group 2 received 

60.787±3.081

xab

 

54.013±2.953



xbb

 

45.410±4.712



xac

 

40.153±4.152



xad

 

36.097±4.965



xab

 

S. guineense and venom 

Group 3 received 

78.67±1.414

xaa

 

76.610±237



xab

 

75.877±1.237



xab

 

75.210±1.792



xac

 

75.337±0.999



xad

 

Venom only 



Group 4 received 

35.920±0.184

xcb

 

33.670±0.099



xcd

 

33.580±0.123



xcc

 

33.580±0.123



xcc

 

33.257±0.0633



xcb

 

Indomethacin (100mg kg



1



Values are mean ± SEM (n = 4)

 

Values in the same column and row with different superscripts are considered significant (P<0.05).



 

 

 



There  was  a  significant(P<0.05)  increase  in  the 

activity of Creatine kinase enzyme assayed for in group 3 

rats when compared with group 4 and 5 that received oral 

doses  of  the  plant  extracts  (Table  4).  The  plant  extracts 

showed protective effects, the activity of the enzyme was 

reduced  in  the  extract  treated  groups.  The  increase  in 

activity  obtained  in  group  3  might  be  due  to  muscle 

necrosis  causing  the  enzyme  to  leak  out  of  the  muscle 

into the plasma; however, the plant extracts were able to 

render protection against this. 

 

The results of the effects of the plant extracts for 



the  plasma  lipid  profiles  in  rats  after  Naja  katiensis 

envenomation  is  as  presented  in  Table  5.  There  are  few 

reports on the effects of snake venom on the rate of lipid 

metabolism. 

Decreased 

plasma 


cholesterol 

and 


triglyceride  levels  were  observed  in  group  3  rats.  This 

result  suggests  that  the  snake  venom  might  have 

mobilized lipids from adipose and other tissues. Lipolytic 

enzymes, which are present in many snake venoms, could 

have  splited  tissue  lipid  with  the  liberation  of  free  fatty 

acids (Dev and Papasani, 2006). It has also been reported 

that  increased  total  plasma  lipid  levels  caused  by 

administration  of  snake  venom  and  the  disturbance  of 

lipid metabolism, could be attributed to liver damage and 

destruction  of  cell  membranes  of  animal  tissues  (Al-

Sadoon  et  al.,  2011).  However,  plasma  cholesterol  and 

triglycerides  have  been  shown  to  decrease  following 

some other venoms injection in rats (Salman, 2011). In this 

study, the plant extracts offered some protection against the 

lipolytic  activity  of  the  venom.  Cholesterol  is  more  in  the 

extract treated groups than the control (group 3).  

 

In this study, the antiedematogenic effects of the two 



plant extracts were demonstrated (Table 6). The extracts 

of  the  plants  were  able  to  neutralize  the  edema  induced 

by  Naja  katiensis  venom.  One  of  the  consequences  of 

snake  bite  is  local  inflammation.  The  snake  venom 

induces  a  striking  dose-dependednt  edema.  This  snake 

bite may lead to shock, because of loss of fluid and tissue 

compression (Garfin et al., 1985) which could contribute 

to  the  development  cardiovascular  disturbances.  There 

are  many  inflammatory  mediators  which  participate  in 

the  production  of  edema  in  a  variety  of  inflammatory 

conditions.  Among  others,  histamine,  prostaglandins, 

kinins  and  leukotrienes  could  be  implicated  in  the 

resulting  edema  in  the  case  of  snake  venoms.  Edema 

seems to be clearly related with prostaglandin production, 

because  an  important  reduction  of  the  inflammatory 

effects is induced by indomethacin, a known inhibitor of 

cyclooxygenase. 

 

Olax  viridis  and  Syzygium  guineense  extracts 

significantly  (P<0.05)  reduced  venom  induced  edema. 



Olax  viridis  has  already  been  reported  as  a  plant  that 

inhibits  inflammation  (Ajali  and  Okoye,  2009).  This 

study  therefore  confirms  the  anti-inflammatory  property 

of  this  plant.  Although,  this  study  was  not  designed  to 

investigate the  mechanism of inhibition, it  might be said 

that  the  two  plant  extracts  are  capable  of  inhibiting  the 

production  of  mediators  involved  in  the  inflammation 

induced  by  Naja  katiensis  venom,  effect  that  has  been 

found  in  studies  made  with  plant  extracts  (Kiuchi  et  al., 

1983).  Plant  extracts  constitute  a  rich  source  of  novel 

compounds of potential therapeutic interest in the inhibition 

of venom toxins. This result suggests that the plant extracts 

investigated contain anti- inflammatory agents that reduced 

the Naja katiensis venom-induced edema. 



5. CONCLUSION 

 

In, the results of the present study indicate the potent 



snake venom neutralizing capacity of these plant extracts 

against Naja katiensis venom and have the potential of an 

alternative  or  complementary  treatment  strategy  of 

envenomation  by  Naja  katiensis.  However,  further 

specific  studies  need  to  be  conducted  to  discover  the 

exact  compounds  responsible  for  these  observations, 



Omale James et al. / American Journal of Pharmacology and Toxicology 8 (1): 1-8, 2013 

 



Science Publications

 

AJPT 

their  efficacy,  safety  and  the  antiophidian  mechanism  of 

action which could possibly lead to the development of a 

new chemical antidote for snake envenoming. 

6. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT 

 

The  researcher  are  grateful  to  Mr.  Friday  T. 



Emmanuel for his technical assistance on this study. 

7. REFERENCES 

Ajali,  U.  and  F.B.C.  Okoye,  2009.  Antimicrobial  and 

anti-inflammatory activities of olax viridis root bark 

extracts  and  fractions.  Int.  J.  Applied  Res.  Natural 

Prod., 2: 27-32.  

Alam,  M.I.  and  A.  Gomes,  2003.  Snake  venom 

neutralization  by  Indian  medicinal  plants  (Vitex 

negundo  and  Emblica  officinalis)  root  extracts.  J. 

Ethnopharmacol., 86: 75-80. PMID: 12686445  

Al-Jammaz,  I.,  M.K.  Al-Sadoon  and  A.  Fahim,  1999. 

Effect  of  LD

50 


dose  of  Echis  coloratus  venom  on 

serum  and  tissue  metabolites  and  some  enzyme  of 

male albino rats. J. King Saud Univ. Sci., 11: 61-68.

 

Al-Sadoon,  M.K.,  A.  Fahim,  S.F.  Salama  and  G.  Badr 



2011. The effects of LD50 of Walterinnesia aegyptia 

crude venom on blood parameters of  male rats.  Afr. 

J. 

Microbiol. 



Res., 

6: 


653-659. 

DOI: 


10.5897/AJMR11.395  

Assafim, M., M.S. Ferreira, F.S. Frattani, J.A. Guimaraes 

and R.Q. Monteiro et al., 2006. Counteracting effect 

of  glycyrrhizin  on  the  hemostatic  abnormalities 

induced  by  Bothrops  jararaca  snake  venom.  Br.  J. 

Pharmacol., 

148: 

807-813. 



DOI: 10.1038/sj.bjp.0706786 

Aung,  H.T.,  T.  Nikai,  M.  Niwa  and  Y.  Takaya,  2010. 

Rosmarinic  acid  in  Argusia  argentea  inhibits  snake 

venom-induced  hemorrhage.  J.  Natural  Med.,  64: 

482-486. DOI: 10.1007/s11418-010-0428-3 

Bispo,  M.D.,  R.H.V.  Mourao,  E.M.  Franzotti,  K.B.R. 

Bomfim  and  M.D.F.  Arrigoni-Blank  et  al.,  2001. 

Antinociceptive  and  antiedematogenic  effects  of  the 

aqueous  extract  of  Hyptis  pectinata  leaves  in 

experimental  animals.  J.  Ethnopharmacol.,  76:  81-

86. DOI: 10.1016/S0378-8741(01)00172-6 

Chippaux,  J.P.  and  M.  Goyffon,  1998.  Venoms, 

antivenoms  and  immunotherapy.  Toxicon,  36:  823-

846. DOI: 10.1016/S0041-0101(97)00160-8 

Dev,  K.S.  and  V.S.  Papasani,  2006.  Modulation  of  the 

activity  and  arachidonic  acid  selectivity  of  group  X 

secretory  phospholipase  A2  by  sphingolipids.  J. 

Lipid Res., 48: 683-692. DOI: 10.1194/jlr.M600421-

JLR200 

 Garfin,  S.R.,  R.R.  Castilonia,  S.J.  Mubarak,  A.R. 



Hargens and W.H. Akeson et al., 1985. The effect of 

antivenin  on  intramuscular  pressure  elevations 

induced  by  rattlesnake  venom.  Toxicon,  23:  677-

680PMID: 4060178 

Gutierrez,  J.M,  H.W.  Fan,  C.L.M.  Silva  and  Y.  Angulo, 

2009.  Stability,  distribution  and  use  of  antivenoms 

for  snakebite  envenomation  in  Latin  America: 

Report  of  a  workshop.  Toxicon,  53:  625-630.  DOI: 

10.1016/j.toxicon.2009.01.020 

Heard,  K.,  G.F.  O’Malley  and  R.C.  Dart,  1999. 

Antivenom  therapy  in  the  Americas.  Drugs,  58:  5-

15. PMID: 10439926 

Kasturiratne, A, A.R. Wickremasinghe, N.D. Silva, N.K. 

Gunawardena  and  A.  Pathmewaran,  2008.  The 

global burden of snakebite: A literature analysis and 

modelling 

based 

on 


regional 

estimates 

of 

envenoming and deaths. Lancet, 5: e218-e218. DOI: 



10.1371/journal.pmed.0050218 

Kiuchi,  F.,  M.  Shibuya,  T.  Konoshita  and  U.  Samkawa, 

1983. Inhibition of prostaglandin biosynthesis by the 

constituents of  medicinal plants. Toxicon, 31: 3391-

3396. PMID: 6671219 

Laura, C.Y. and S.H. Dorian, 2008. Thermal tolerance in 

bottlenose  dolphins  (Tursiops  truncatus).  J.  Exp. 

Biol., 211: 3249-3257. DOI: 10.1242/jeb.020610 

Marsh, N., D. Gattullo, P. Pagliaro and G. Losano, 1997. 

The  gaboon  viper,  bitis  gabonica:  Hemorrhagic, 

metabolic,  cardiovascular  and  clinical  effects  of  the 

venom. Life Sci., 61: 763-769. PMID: 9275005 

Mendes,  M.M.,  C.F.  Oliveira,  D.S.  Lopes,  L.H.F.  Vale 

and  T.M.  Alcantara  et  al.,  2008.  Anti-snake  venom 

properties 

of 


Schizolobium 

parahyba 

(Caesalpinoideae) aqueous leaves extract. Phytother. 

Res., 22: 859-866. DOI: 10.1002/ptr.2371 

Mors,  W.B.,  M.C.  Nascimento,  B.M.  Pereira  and  N.A. 

Pereira,  2000.  Plant  natural  products  active  against 

snake bite--the molecular approach. Phytochemistry, 

55: 627-642. PMID: 11130675 

Nelson,  I.O.,  P.C.  Chioli  and I.G.  Samuel,  2012. Effects 

of  aqueous  leaf  extract  of  Ocimum  gratissimum  on 

oral  glucose  tolerance  test  in  type-2  model  diabetic 

rats.  J.  Pharmacy  Pharmacol.,  6:  630-635.  DOI: 

10.5897/AJPP11.811 

Nishijima, C.M., C.M. Rodrigues, M.A. Silva, M. Lopes-

Ferreia  and  W.  Vilegas  et  al.,  2009.  Anti-

hemorrhagic  activity  of  four  brazilian  vegetable 

species against bothrops jararaca venom. Molecules, 

14: 1072-1080. DOI: 10.3390/molecules14031072  


Omale James et al. / American Journal of Pharmacology and Toxicology 8 (1): 1-8, 2013 

 



Science Publications

 

AJPT 

Ohhira,  M.,  S.  Gasa,  A.  Makita,  C.  Sekiya  and  M. 

Namiki, 


1991. 

Elevated 

carbohydrate 

phosphotransferase  activity  in  human  hepatoma  and 

phosphorylation of Cathepsin D. Brazilian J. Cancer, 

63: 905-908. PMID: 1648948 

Pangana, K.D. and T.J. Pangana, 2010. Mosby’s Manual 

of  Diagnostic  and  Laboratory  Tests.  4th  Edn., 

Mosby/Elsevier,  Louis,  ISBN-10:  0323057470,  pp: 

1312. 


Pung,  Y.F.,  P.T  .Wong,  P.P  Kumar,  W.C.  Hudgson  and 

R.M. Kini, 2005. Ohanin, a novel protein from king 

cobra 

venom, 


induces 

hypolocomotion 

and 

hyperalgesia  in  mice.  J.  Biol.  Chem.,  280:  13137-



13147. PMID: 15668253 

Salman,  M.M.A.,  2011.  The  acute  effects  of  scorpion 

(Leiurus 

quinquestriatus) 

venom 

on 


some 

clinicalpathological  parameters  in  Guinea  pigs.  J. 

Am. Sci., 7: 794-801. 

Silva,  D.N.M.,  E.Z.  Arruda,  Y.L.  Murakami,  R.A. 

Moraes  and  C.Z.  El-Kik,  2007.  Evaluation  of  three 

brazilian 

antivenom 

ability 


to 

antagonize 

myonecrosis  and  hemorrhage  induced  by  bothrops 

snake  venoms in a  mouse  model. Toxicon, 50: 196-

205. PMID: 17466354 

Sleat,  D.E.,  Y.  Wang,  I.  Sohar,  H.  Lackland  and  Y.  Li    



et al., 2006. Identification and validation of mannose 

6-phosphate glycoproteins in human plasma reveal a 

wide range of lysosomal and non-lysosomal proteins. 

Mol.  Cell  Proteomics,  5:  1942-1956.  PMID: 

16709564 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

Soares,  A.M.,  F.K.  Ticli,  S.  Marcussi,  M.V.  Lourenco 



and  A.H.  Januario,  2005.  Medicinal  plants  with 

inhibitory  properties  against  snake  venoms.  Curr. 

Med. Chem., 12: 2625-2641. PMID: 16248818 

Szasz, G., W. Gruber and E. Bernt, 1976. Creatine kinase 

in  serum:  1.  Determination  of  optimum  reaction 

conditions. Clin. Chem., 22: 650-656. PMID: 4240 

Ticli,  F.K.,  L.I.  Hage,  R.S  .Cambraia,  P.S.  Pereira  and 

A.J.  Magro  et  al.,  2005.  Rosmarinic  acid,  a  new 

snake  venom  phospholipase  A2  inhibitor  from 

Cordia verbenacea (Boraginaceae): Antiserum action 

potentiation  and  molecular  interaction.  Toxicon,  46: 

318-327. PMID: 15992846 

Tietz, N.W., P.R. Finley, E.L. Pruden and A.B. Amerson 

et  al.,  1990.  Clinical  Guide  to  laboratory  Tests.  2nd 

Edn.,  Saunders  Company,  Philadelphia,  ISBN-10: 

0721624863, pp: 931. 

Watt,  J.M.  and  M.G.  Bregar-Brandiwik,  1962.  The 

Medicinal  and  Poisonous  Plants  of  Southern  and 

Eastern Africa: Being an Account of Their Medicinal 

and  Other  Uses.  2nd  Edn.,  E  and  S  Livingstone, 

Edinburgh, pp: 1457.  

Williams,  D.,  J.M.  Gutierrez,  R.  Harrison,  D.A.  Warrell 

and J. White, 2010. The global snake bite initiative: 

An antidote for snake bite. Lancet, 375: 89-91. DOI: 

10.1016/S0140-6736(09)61159-4 



 

 


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə