Antibacterial triterpenes from Syzygium guineense



Yüklə 80.93 Kb.
PDF просмотр
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü80.93 Kb.

Antibacterial triterpenes from Syzygium guineense (Myrtaceae)

J.D. Djoukeng

a

,b

, E. Abou-Mansour



a

,∗

, R. Tabacchi



a

, A.L. Tapondjou

b

,

H. Bouda



b

, D. Lontsi

c

a

Universit´e of Neuchˆatel, Institut de Chimie, av. Bellevaux 51, CH-2000 Neuchˆatel, Switzerland



b

Universit´e de Dschang, Laboratoire de Chimie Appliqu´ee et Environnemental, BP 183 Dschang, Cameroon

c

Universit´e de Yaound´e I, D´epartement de Chimie, BP 812 Yaound´e, Cameroon



Abstract

Antibacterial bioassay-guided fractionation of Syzygium guineense leaf extracts afforded 10 triterpenes, namely betulinic acid 1, oleanolic

acid 2, a mixture of 2-hydroxyoleanolic acid 3a, 2-hydroxyursolic acid 3b, arjunolic acid 4a, asiatic acid 4b, a mixture of terminolic acid

5a, 6-hydroxyasiatic acid 5b, and a mixture of arjunolic acid 28-

␤-glucopyranosyl ester 6a and the asiatic acid 28-␤-glucopyranosyl ester



6b. Isolated compounds were submitted to an antibacterial assay system against gram-positive and -negative bacteria and human pathogen

bacteria. Compounds 4a and 4b showed the most significant antibacterial activity against Escherichia coliBacillus subtilis and Shigella



sonnei. The fraction 5a5b was the least active, whereas compounds 1and the mixtures of 3a3b and 6a6b were inactive in the assays.

Keywords: Syzygium guineense; Triterpenes; Antibacterial activity

1. Introduction

Syzygium guineense (Myrtaceae) is a small tree with

edible fruits (Amb´e, 2001). It is widespread in Subsaha-

ran Africa (Uganda, Swaziland and Cameroon) where the

bark is traditionally used to treat stomachache and diarrhea

(Tsakala et al., 1996; Hamil et al., 2000; Oluwole et al.,

2002). Previous work on this species reported the antibac-

terial activity of hydrosoluble dry extracts (Tsakala et

al., 1996), but until today no phytochemical studies has been

carried out to identify the active metabolites. In our system-

atic search for new and/or bioactive metabolites from plants,

we investigated the methanolic extract from the leaves of

Syzygium guineense. In this paper, we report the antibacte-

rial bioassay-guided identification and characterisation from

the leaves of Syzygium guineense of 10 triterpenes deriva-

tives, namely, betulinic acid 1, oleanolic acid 2, a mixture

of 2-hydroxyoleanolic acid 3a and 2-hydroxyursolic acid

Corresponding author. Tel.: +41 32 718 24 54; fax: +41 32 718 25 11.



E-mail address: eliane.abou-mansour@unine.ch (E. Abou-Mansour).

3b, arjunolic acid 4a, asiatic acid 4b, a mixture of termi-

nolic acid 5a and 6-hydroxyasiatic acid 5b, and a mixture

of arjunolic acid 28-

␤-glucopyranosyl ester 6a and asiatic

acid 28-

␤-glucopyranosyl ester 6b. Some structure–activity

relationships are also discussed.

2. Materials and methods

2.1. Plant material

Leaves of Syzygium guineense were collected in

August 2002 in Fongo-Tongo, Menoua subdivision, western

Cameroon. The plant material was identified by Dr. Sata-

bier, former director of the National Herbarium of Cameroon.

Voucher specimens have been deposited in the Cameroon

National Herbarium.

2.2. Identification of pure compounds

Structures of isolated compounds were elucidated by spec-

troscopic methods using an Agilent 1100 ESI/LCMSD/Trap

Published in Journal of Ethnopharmacology 101, issues 1-3, 283-286, 2005

which should be used for any reference to this work

1


for mass spectra measurement.

1

H NMR (400 MHz),



13

C

NMR (100 MHz), DEPTs and 2D NMR spectra (COSY,



NOESY, HMQC, and HMBC) were recorded in CD

3

OD on



a Bruker AVANCE 400 spectrometer.

2.3. Extraction and isolation

The dried and finely ground leaves of Syzygium



guineense (1.5 kg) were extracted at room temperature with

dichloromethane (CH

2

Cl

2



)/methanol (MeOH) (1/1 v/v) for

one day and concentrated under vacuum to afford 180 g of

crude extract. Extract (100 g) was dissolved in water and

successively extracted with hexane, ethyl acetate (EtOAc)

and n-butanol to yield, respectively, 20, 45, and 18 g. The

resultant extracts were tested for antibacterial activity via the

disc diffusion method (Hadacek and Greger, 2000) against

Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis.

The active extracts, ethyl acetate and n-butanol, were

fractionated by column chromatography over silica gel using

a gradient of CH

2

Cl

2



–MeOH as solvents. All fractions were

tested for antimicrobial activity by direct bioautography on

TLC plates (Hadacek and Greger, 2000) against Escherichia

coli and Bacillus subtilis. Ethyl acetate extract (40 g), the

main active fraction, was subjected to a column chromatog-

raphy (75

× 5.2) filled with silica gel (63–200, 60 ˚A) and

eluted with a gradient of MeOH in CH

2

Cl



2

. Sixty-eight

fractions of 200 ml were collected and regrouped on the basic

of analytical TLC in three fractions. The main active fraction

12 g was subjected to repeated column chromatography

(60 cm


× 3 cm) filled with silica gel (32–63, 60 ˚A) eluted

with a gradient of MeOH in CHCl

3

to yield compound 1



(50 mg, 1.25

× 10


−3

%), (70 mg, 1.75

× 10

−3

%), (60 mg,



1.5

× 10


−3

%) a mixture of two isomers, and (105 mg,

2.62

× 10


−3

%). Fraction (100 mg), which was a mixture

of two compounds, was separated by the method of Lewis

(Lewis and Tucker, 1983), followed by a silica gel column

(50 cm

× 1.5 cm) using isocratic system CHCl



3

–MeOH


(95–5) to afford 4a (10 mg, 0.1%) and 4b (2 mg, 0.02%).

Butanolic extract (15 g) was subjected to silica gel column

chromatography (60 cm

× 3 cm) eluted with a gradient of

MeOH in EtOAc. Forty fractions of 200 ml was collected and

regrouped in three fractions also on the basic of analytical

TLC. The active fraction was purified on silica gel column

chromatography using a gradient of MeOH in CHCl

3

as

eluent to afford (10 mg, 0.66



× 10

−3

%) and (12 mg,



0.8

× 10


−3

%). Each fraction was a mixture of two isomers.

Further purification of these compounds was not achieved

because of lack of quantity. The Rf values of compounds



1in CHCl

3

–MeOH (9:1) are 0.59, 0.54, 0.47, 0.35, 0.23,



and 0.05, respectively.

2.4. Microorganisms

Three bacteria were used in the bioguided assay.



Escherichia coli (NEU 1006) and Bacillus subtilis (NEU

1) obtained from culture collection at the Institute of

Microbiology (Neuchˆatel), and Shigella sonnei (COP/2004/

4212) from the Institut Neuchˆatelois de Microbiologie

(La Chaux-De-Fonds, Switzerland). Only pure compounds

showing activity against Escherichia coli and Bacillus



subtilis were tested against Shigella sonnei at the Institut

Neuchˆatelois de Microbiologie.



2.5. Antibacterial assays

2.5.1. Disk diffusion

The crude extract of Syzygium guineense (1 mg) was

tested at five different concentrations ranging from 0.0625

to 1 mg/ml in acetone and 40

␮l of the solution were applied

to 8 mm diameter paper disks. After evaporation of the sol-

vent, two paper disks were placed in Petri dishes of 9 cm

diameter containing nutrient agar previously inoculated with

0.2 ml of suspension of bacteria (10

8

–10



9

CFU/ml). After 2

days of incubation at 30

C for Bacillus subtilis and 37



C

for Escherichia coli, the inhibition zone for the active extract



was measured (Hadacek and Greger, 2000).

2.5.2. Bioautography on thin-layer plates

Different concentrations of test compounds were prepared

by the method of two-fold serial dilution. Test solutions

(10


␮l) were applied as small spots on TLC plates (Silica

gel G, 20

× 20, 500 ␮m, Analtech) to give a concentration

series of 0.1–30

␮g/application zone. The organic solvent was

evaporated by steam air and plates were eluted by the ade-

quate solvent to obtain different Rf. The solvent was one more

time evaporated by steam air. TLC plates were homogenously

sprayed with 10 ml of nutrient agar infected by 1 ml of nutri-

ent broth containing bacteria (10

8

–10


9

CFU/ml). Plates were

incubated for 2 days at the corresponding temperature of each

bacterium in the dark. The appearance of blank after spraying

the plate with a solution of thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bro-

mide indicated antibacterial activity (Hadacek and Greger,

2000). Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) against

Escherichia coliBacillus subtilis, and Shigella sonnei were

determined from the lowest test compound concentration

causing recognisable bacterial growth inhibition on nutri-

ent agar. In these two methods of assays, chloramphenicol

(Sigma) was used as a positive control and acetone as a neg-

ative control.



3. Results

The ethyl acetate and n-butanol extracts from leaves

of S. guineese which exhibited antibacterial activity were

subjected to chromatographic isolation and purification to

yield 10 triterpenes. From the ethyl acetate extract alone, six

compounds were identified. Negative ion ESI/MS combined

to 1D NMR,

1

H,



13

C NMR and 2D NMR, COSY, HMQC,

and HMBC identified the compounds as betulinic acid and

oleanolic acid with m/455 (M–H)

and the molecular



formula of C

30

H



48

O

3



(Shashi and Asish, 1994), a mixture

2


Table 1

MICs of compounds isolated from Syzygium guineense against gram-

positive and -negative bacteria in (

␮g/spot)


Compound

Escherichia coli

Bacillus subtilis

Shigella sonnei

1

NA

NA



NT

2

NA

NA



NT

3a3b

NA

NA



NT

4a

3

0.5



30

4b

5

0.75



30

5a5b

6

3



50

6a6b

NA

NA



NT

chloramphenicol

0.3

0.1


2

NA: no activity observed; NT: not tested.

of 2-hydroxylursolic acid 3a and 2-hydroxyloleanolic acid

3b with m/471 (M–H)

corresponding to C



30

H

48



O

4

(Chandan, 1990) and a mixture of isomers in fraction 4



with m/487 (M–H)

relating to C



30

H

48



O

5

. All fractions



were submitted to the antibacterial assays and further

purification was carried out on the active fractions. Only

fraction exhibits a significant antibacterial activity against

Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis by thin-layer bioautog-

raphy (Table 1). Compounds 4a and 4b precipitate as a white

powder in CHCl

3

:MeOH (9:1).



1

H NMR data were similar,

with the main differences noted in the DEPT experiment,

were 4a and 4b possessed ten and nine CH

2

, six and eight



CH, respectively, with the number of methyl groups for each

compound being seven. The

13

C NMR spectra showed 30



carbon atoms for each. The chemical shift of the carbon

atoms C


12

and C


13

at

δ 122.4; 144.4 and δ 125.7; 138.8 for 4a



and 4b, respectively, suggested the presence of two classes

of triterpenes, the oleanane and ursane. Derivatisation of

100 mg of fraction according to Lewis method (Lewis and

Tucker, 1983) lead to 10 mg of arjunolic acid 4a and 2 mg of

asiatic acid 4b (Tsutomu et al., 1987; Collins et al., 1992).

For these compounds, the data obtained correlated very well

with the literature.

The bioassay-guided fractionation of the n-butanol extract

by column chromatography lead to fractions with m/503

(M–H)


C

30



H

48

O



6

and m/649 (M–H)

C

36



H

58

O



10

. Each


fraction was a mixture of two inseparable compounds. Frac-

tion was obtained as a white powder in CHCl

3

:MeOH (8:2).



The main differences compared to 4a and 4b being related to

the nature of the R

2

. The presence of one C



6

H (


δ

C

68.7,



δ

H

5.11) in 5 and the absence of C



6

H

2



(

δ

C



18,

δ

H



1.41) in the

1

H,



13

C and DEPT spectra led to the identification of 5a as

terminolic acid and 5b as 6-hydroxy asiatic acid in the ration

3–2. While the constituents of fraction were identified as

arjunolic acid 28-

␤-glucopyranosyl ester 6a (Adnyana et al.,

2000) and a homologue to asiatic acid 28-

␤-glucopyranosyl

ester 6b (Tsutomu et al., 1987) following the ratio 1/1. The

Fig. 1. Chemical structures of isolated triterpenes.

3


1

H NMR spectrum of 6b showed one anomeric proton sig-

nal at

δ

H



5.37 (H-1 ,

3

J

1 ,2

= 8.1 Hz) and carbon atom (



δ

C

95.7) indicating the presence of one monosaccharide bonded



as a glucosyl ester. The sugar moiety was identified as 28-

␤-glucopyranosyl ester based on the coupling constants of

each proton and the

13

C NMR chemical shifts (



δ

C

62.2, 71.2,



74.3, 78.8, 79.4, 95.7). The glucosidation of position C

28

was



indicated by the long-range correlation between the anomeric

proton H-1 and the carboxyl carbon (C-28,

δ

C

178.06) in the



HMBC spectrum. The

1

H and



13

C NMR data of the agly-

cone moiety were similar to those recorded for arjulonic acid

4a and asiatic acid 4b. Asiatic acid and asiaticoside are well

known. This is the first time that compound 6b (Fig. 1) is iden-

tified where only one glucose is found to be attached to the

carboxylic acid group. While minimal antibacterial activity

was noted in fraction and no activity recorded in fraction 6,

no further purification was carried out due to lack of sufficient

material.

4. Discussion and conclusions

Isolated compounds showed different activities according

to the position of the different substituent groups. It appears

from the biological assay results that the hydroxyl group at the

position C

23

makes an important contribution to the expres-



sion of activity in 4a and 4b. The presence of one hydroxyl

group at the position C

6

reduces considerably the activity



of metabolites 5a5b. Furthermore, when the proton of the

acid function is substituted by a glucopyranosyl ester func-

tion or when the hydroxyl group at position C

23

is absent, the



metabolites loss all their activities.

Metabolites 4a and 4b showed significant antibacterial

activity against Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and inter-

estingly against Shigella sonnei with MICs of 3, 0.5, and

30

␮g for 4a and 5, 0.75, and 30 ␮g for 4b. The mixture 5a



and 5b were less active with MICs of 6, 3, and 50

␮g, whereas

no activity was recorded on metabolites 12, the mixture of

3a3b, and 6a6b on Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis

(Table 1).

Asiatic acid found in Centella asiatica (Niranjan et al.,

1989) has been traditionally used as a tonic in skin diseases

and leprosy (Shukla et al., 1999) whereas arjunolic acid has

been isolated from Syzygium samarangense (Srivastava et al.,

1995) and Syzygium cordatum (Candy et al., 1968). Arjuno-

lic and asiatic acid isolated from Syzygium claviflorum were

identified as anti-HIV agents with IC

50

of 36 and 8



␮g/ml

(Yoshiki et al., 1998), but this is the first time that their

antibacterial activity specially on human pathogen bacteria

is reported. Terminolic acid 5a and 6-hydroxy asiatic acid 5b

are identified for the first time from the Syzygium genus. This

might explain the use of this plant in folk medicine for treat-

ment of various infectious diseases. Further investigations

will focus on the in vivo antimicrobial activities.



Acknowledgments

We are thankful to Dr. Hans Siegrist (Institut Neuchˆatelois

de Microbiologie, La Chaux-De-Fonds Switzerland), for per-

forming the assay on Shigella sonnei. This work was sup-

ported by a grant from the Swiss Confederation for Foreign

Students. The authors are grateful to Nicolas Mottier and

Bernard Jean-Denis for ESI-MS measurements.

References

Adnyana, K.I., Tezuka, Y., Banskota, A.H., Xiong, Q., Tran, K.Q., Kadota,

S., 2000. Quadranosides I–V, new triterpene glucosides from the

seeds of Combretum quadrangulare. Journal of Natural Products 63,

496–500.

Amb´e, G.-A., 2001. Les fruits sauvages comestibles des savanes

guin´eennes de Cˆote-d’Ivoire: ´etat de la connaissance par une pop-

ulation locale, les malink´es. Biotechnologie Agronomie et Societ´e

Environnementale 5, 43–58.

Candy, H.A., McGarry, E.J., Pegel, K.H., 1968. Constituents of Syzygium



cordatum. Phytochemistry 7, 889–890.

Chandan, S., 1990. 2-

␣-Hydroxymicromeric acid, a pentacyclic triterpene

from Terminalia chebula. Phytochemistry 29, 2348–2350.

Collins, J.D., Pilloti, A.C., Wallis, A.F.A., 1992. Triterpene acids from

some Papua New Guinea Terminalia species. Phytochemistry 31,

881–884.

Hadacek, F., Greger, H., 2000. Testing of antifungal natural products:

methodologies, comparability of results and assay choice. Phytochem-

ical Analysis 11, 137–147.

Hamil, F.A., Apio, S., Mubiru, N.K., Mosango, M., Bukenya-Ziraba,

R., Maganyi, O.W., Soejarto, D.D., 2000. Traditional herbal drugs

of southern Uganda, I. Journal of Ethnopharmacology 70, 281–300.

Lewis, K.G., Tucker, D.J., 1983. The separation of substituted olean-12-

en-28-oic acids from the corresponding urs-12-en-28-oic acid isomers.

Australian Journal of Chemistry 36, 2297–2305.

Niranjan, P.S, Subodh, K.R., Shashi, B.M., 1989. Spectroscopic deter-

mination of structures of triterpenoid trisaccharides from Centella



asiatica. Phytochemistry 28, 2852–2854.

Oluwole, O.G.A., Pricilla, S.D., Jerome, D.M., Lydia, P.M., 2002. Some

herbal remedies from Manzini region of Swaziland. Journal of

Ethnopharmacology 79, 109–112.

Shashi, B.M., Asish, P.K., 1994.

13

C NMR spectra of pentacyclic



triterpenoids—a compilation and some salient features. Phytochem-

istry 37, 1517–1575.

Shukla, A., Rasik, A.M., Jain, G.K:, Shankar, R., Kulshreshtha, D.K.,

Dhawan, B.N., 1999. In vitro and in vivo wound healing activity of

asiaticoside isolated from Centella asiatica. Journal of Ethnopharma-

cology 65, 1–11.

Srivastava, R., Shaw, A., Kulshreshtha, D.K., 1995. Triterpenoids and

chalcone from Syzygium samarangense. Phytochemistry 38, 687–689.

Tsakala, T.M., Penge, O., John, K., 1996. Screening in vitro antibacterial

activity from Syzygium guineense (Willd) hydrosoluble dry extract.

Annales Pharmaceutiques Franc¸aises 54, 276–279.

Tsutomu, F., Yutaka, O., Chisato, H., 1987. Triterpenoids from Eucalyptus



perriniana cultured cells. Phytochemistry 26, 715–719.

Yoshiki, K., Hui-Kang, W., Tsuneatsu, N., Susumu, K., Ichiro, Y., Toshi-

hiro, F., Takashi, Y., Cosentino, L.M., Mutsuo, K., Hikaru, O.,

Yasumasa, I., Chang-Qi Hu, Yeh, E., Kuo-Hsiung, L., 1998. Anti-

AIDS agents. 30. Anti-HIV activity of oleanolic acid, pomolic acid

and structurally related triterpenoids. Journal of Natural Products 61,



1090–1095.

4

Document Outline



Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə