Appendix b – additional information about the ecological community



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APPENDIX B – ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE ECOLOGICAL COMMUNITY

B1. Relationships to other listed Matters of National Environmental Significance

B1.1. RAMSAR wetlands


As of September 2014, only one wetland of international importance (RAMSAR wetlands) occurs within the wheatbelt region: Toolibin Lake. This is an extensive seasonal wetland system, located about 50 km east of Narrogin, and characterised by a woodland of Casuarina obesa and Melaleuca strobophylla across the bed of the lake. It is the only freshwater wetland in south-western Western Australia that retains living and functional woodlands of this type. The site is also recognised as a nationally endangered ecological community under the name: Perched wetlands of the Wheatbelt region with extensive stands of living sheoak and paperbark across the lake floor (Toolibin Lake). An equivalent ecological community is listed as critically endangered in Western Australia.

The vegetation across the bed and edges of Toolibin Lake is not part of the WA Wheatbelt Woodlands ecological community, as it is a type of non-eucalypt woodland. However, the higher ground around the lake includes some patches of open eucalypt woodland (McMahon, 2006). The eastern and northern sides are dominated by woodlands of Eucalyptus loxophleba - Acacia acuminata, along with Allocasuarina and Banksia woodlands with some heathland. Eucalyptus salmonophloia, E. wandoo and E. longicornis also may be present at the site. An overstorey of E. rudis may formerly have occurred on the lake bed but this tree is now rare across Toolibin Lake.


B1.2. World Heritage properties and National Heritage places


As of June 2015, no world heritage properties are located within the WA wheatbelt.

The National Heritage List includes one item within the wheatbelt. The Goldfields Water Supply Scheme is a pipeline and associated infrastructure that was constructed between the late 1890s and 1903 to supply water to the goldfields region (DoE, 2014b). The pipeline stretches for 560 km between Mundaring Weir, near Perth, and Mount Charlotte Reservoir, near Kalgoorlie, so traverses the wheatbelt and extends into the Great Western Woodlands. The National Heritage listing is limited to the built structures associated with the water supply scheme and does not include any natural features, such as woodland or other native vegetation remnants, through which the pipeline may run. It is therefore separate to the WA Wheatbelt Woodlands, even if some remnants may occur in proximity to the pipeline.


B1.3. Other nationally-listed threatened ecological communities


As of June 2015, two nationally listed ecological communities extend into the wheatbelt region. One of these is Toolibin Lake, described above under Ramsar wetlands.

The other is the critically endangered Claypans of the Swan Coastal Plain ecological community. Most claypans lie in the Swan Coastal Plain bioregion, but a few outlying sites occur in the vicinity of Kojonup, in the Southern Jarrah Forests region. This is a largely cleared area that falls within the definition of wheatbelt for this conservation advice. The claypans are generally shrublands or herbfields associated with poorly draining clay soils that are seasonally inundated after rain, then dry out. Eucalypts are noted as emergents at some claypan sites, but are likely to be too sparse to form a woodland canopy. Hence, there is no significant overlap between the WA Wheatbelt Woodlands and the Claypans of the Swan Coastal Plains ecological communities.

The national claypans ecological community covers three of the six clay-based wetland communities identified by Gibson et al. (2005). Of the other three excluded claypan communities, one (claypan community 4) occurs on floodplain below a woodland canopy of E. wandoo and E. occidentalis, also in the Kojonup area. Given its location and canopy composition, this claypan community is likely to fall within the definition of the WA Wheatbelt Woodlands. Another excluded community (claypan community 6) also occurs in the wheatbelt and generally are woodlands dominated by Casuarina obesa, Melaleuca strobophylla or E. loxophleba. Those elements of community 6 that lie below a York gum-dominated woodland canopy also would be captured in the WA Wheatbelt Woodland ecological community.

While there are several nationally-listed ecological communities in WA that are, or include components of woodlands, these occur in bioregions outside of the wheatbelt and are characterised by tree species and growth forms that are not typical of the WA Wheatbelt Woodland ecological community. Examples include: ‘Corymbia calophylla - Kingia australis woodlands on heavy soils of the Swan Coastal Plain’, which lies within the Swan Coastal Plain bioregion and is dominated by marri; and the ‘Proteaceae Dominated Kwongkan Shrublands of the Southeast Coastal Floristic Province of Western Australia’ that generally lies in the Esperance Plains bioregion, south of the wheatbelt and comprises shrublands dominated by proteaceous species (chiefly Banksia), sometimes with a mallee overstorey. Along with their different bioregional distributions, the dominant presence of marri, Banksia or mallee eucalypt species indicates that the WA Wheatbelt woodlands are not present.


B1.4. Nationally threatened species

Southwestern WA, including the wheatbelt, is a biodiversity hotspot. The region has a very high diversity of native species, many of which occur nowhere else; for instance, of the more than 5700 native plant species in this area, over 70% are endemic to the region. Many species in the wheatbelt are now considered to be threatened as a consequence of widespread clearing and loss of habitats in the past. There are 16 animal taxa and 71 plant taxa that are either known to, or potentially could occur in the WA Wheatbelt Woodland ecological community, and are listed as nationally threatened taxa (Table B1). These include iconic Western Australian animals such as the woylie, numbat, and chuditch, and numerous wildflower species.


Many of the nationally-listed species, along with other species, also are recognised as threatened under Western Australian legislation. Regional guides to the state-listed plant species have been prepared by Graham and Mitchell (2000) for the Katanning district, Durrell and Buehring (2001) for the Narrogin district, Stack et al., (2006) for Wongan-Ballidu Shire, and Collins (2009) for the western central wheatbelt.

Table B1. Nationally listed threatened species that are either known to be present, or are likely to be present to some extent, within the WA Wheatbelt Woodlands ecological community. Current as at April 2015.

B1a) Fauna

Scientific name

Common name

EPBC status

Bettongia penicillata ogilbyi

woylie

Endangered

Botaurus poiciloptilus

Australasian bittern

Endangered

Cacatua pastinator pastinator

Muir's corella (southern)

Vulnerable

Calyptorhynchus banksii naso

forest red-tailed black-cockatoo

Vulnerable

Calyptorhynchus baudinii

Baudin's black-cockatoo

Vulnerable

Calyptorhynchus latirostris

Carnaby's black-cockatoo

Endangered

Dasyurus geoffroii

chuditch, western quoll

Vulnerable

Egernia stokesii badia

western spiny-tailed skink

Endangered

Idiosoma nigrum

shield-backed trapdoor spider

Vulnerable

Leipoa ocellata

malleefowl

Vulnerable

Macrotis lagotis

greater bilby

Vulnerable

Myrmecobius fasciatus

numbat

Vulnerable

Parantechinus apicalis

dibbler

Endangered

Phascogale calura

red-tailed phascogale

Endangered

Rostratula australis

Australian painted snipe

Endangered

Setonix brachyurus

quokka

Vulnerable


B1b) Flora

Scientific name

Common name

EPBC status

Acacia aphylla

leafless rock wattle

Vulnerable

Acacia auratiflora

orange-flowered wattle

Endangered

Acacia brachypoda

western wheatbelt wattle

Endangered

Acacia chapmanii subsp. australis

Chapman’s wattle

Endangered

Acacia insolita subsp. recurva

Yornaning wattle

Endangered

Acacia lanuginophylla

woolly wattle

Endangered

Acacia leptalea

Chinocup wattle

Endangered

Acacia lobulata

Chiddarcooping wattle

Endangered

Acacia recurvata

recurved wattle

Endangered

Asterolasia nivea

Bindoon starbush

Vulnerable

Banksia ionthocarpa

Kkamballup dryandra

Endangered

Banksia oligantha

Wagin banksia

Endangered

Banksia serratuloides subsp. serratuloides

southern serrate dryandra

Vulnerable

Banksia sphaerocarpa var. dolichostyla

ironcaps banksia, ironcap banksia

Vulnerable

Boronia adamsiana

barbalin boronia

Vulnerable

Boronia capitata subsp. capitata

cluster boronia

Endangered

Boronia revoluta

ironcap boronia

Endangered

Caladenia bryceana subsp. bryceana

dwarf spider-orchid

Endangered

Caladenia dorrienii

cossack spider-orchid

Endangered

Caladenia melanema

ballerina orchid

Endangered

Caladenia williamsiae

Williams spider orchid

Endangered

Conostylis seorsiflora subsp. trichophylla

hairy mat conostylis

Endangered

Conostylis setigera subsp. dasys

Boscabel conostylis

Critically endangered

Darwinia carnea

Mogumber bell, Narrogin bell

Endangered

Duma horrida subsp. abdita

remote thorny lignum

Critically endangered

Eleocharis keigheryi

Keighery’s eleocharis

Vulnerable

Eremophila denticulata subsp. denticulata

Fitzgerald eremophila

Vulnerable

Eremophila koobabbiensis

Koobabbie eremophila

Critically endangered

Eremophila nivea

silky eremophila

Endangered

Eremophila pinnatifida

pinnate-leaf eremophila

Endangered

Eremophila resinosa

resinous eremophila

Endangered

Eremophila scaberula

rough emu bush

Endangered

Eremophila subteretifolia

Lake King eremophila

Endangered

Eremophila ternifolia

Wongan eremophila

Endangered

Eremophila verticillata

whorled eremophila

Endangered

Eremophila virens

campion eremophila

Endangered

Eremophila viscida

varnish bush

Endangered

Eucalyptus brevipes

Mukinbudin mallee

Endangered

Eucalyptus criispata

Yandanooka mallee

Vulnerable

Eucalyptus leprophloia

scaly butt mallee

Endangered

Eucalyptus pruiniramis

midlands gum, jingymia gum

Endangered

Eucalyptus recta

silver mallet

Endangered

Eucalyptus rhodantha

rose mallee

Vulnerable

Eucalyptus steedmanii

Steedmans gum

Vulnerable

Gastrolobium diabolophyllum

Bodallin poison

Critically endangered

Gastrolobium graniticum

granite poison

Endangered

Gastrolobium lehmannii

Cranbrook pea

Vulnerable

Grevillea christineae

Christine’s grevillea

Endangered

Grevillea flexuosa

zig zag grevillea

Vulnerable

Grevillea involucrata

Lake Varley grevillea

Endangered

Grevillea murex

a shrub

Endangered

Grevillea scapigera

Corrigin grevillea

Endangered

Hemiandra gardneri

red snakebush

Endangered

Hemigenia ramosissima

branched hemigenia

Critically endangered

Lasiopetalum rotundifolium

round-leaf lasiopetalum

Endangered

Lechenaultia laricina

scarlet leschenaultia

Endangered

Lysiosepalum abollatum

woolly lysiosepalum

Critically endangered

Myoporum cordifolium

Jerramungup myoporum

Vulnerable

Paragoodia crenulata

a pea

Critically endangered

Pultenaea pauciflora

Narrogin pea

Vulnerable

Rhagodia acicularis

Wongan rhagodia

Vulnerable

Rhizanthella gardneri

underground orchid

Endangered

Schoenia filifolia subsp. subulifolia

Mingenew everlasting

Endangered

Symonanthus bancroftii

Bancrofts symonanthus

Endangered

Thelymitra dedmaniarum

cinnamon sun-orchid

Endangered

Thelymitra stellata

star sun-orchid

Endangered

Thomasia glabripetala

sandplain thomasia

Vulnerable

Thomasia montana

hill thomasia

Vulnerable

Thomasia sp. Green Hill (S.Paust 1322)

green hill thomasia

Endangered

Verticordia fimbrilepis subsp. fimbrilepis

shy featherflower

Endangered

Wurmbea tubulosa

long-flowered nancy

Endangered

Sources: DoE (2014c). Protected Matters Search Tool undertaken for the wheatbelt region, as defined in this conservation advice. Scientific and common names, national distributions and available habitat information were checked using the Atlas of Living Australia, WA Herbarium Florabase, DoE (2014d) and Collins (2009).

Каталог: system -> files -> pages -> 4b7f101c-abb7-48b5-b11f-9403951836cf -> files
pages -> Wildlife Trade Operation proposal Harvest and export of native wildlife. Introduction
pages -> Draft banksia Woodlands of the Swan Coastal Plain – Draft description and threats
pages -> This summary has been produced by the Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water
pages -> This summary has been produced by the Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water
pages -> Focusing on the Landscape Biodiversity in Australia’s National Reserve System
pages -> Verticordia harveyi (Autumn Featherflower) Advice Page 1 of 4 Advice to the Minister for the Environment and Heritage from the Threatened Species Scientific Committee
pages -> Consultation Document on Listing Eligibility and Conservation Actions
pages -> Approval of an artificial propagation program
files -> Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999
files -> Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999


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