Article: Health Economics Estimating the current and future costs of Type 1 and



Yüklə 180,58 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix25.12.2016
ölçüsü180,58 Kb.

Article: Health Economics

Estimating the current and future costs of Type 1 and

Type 2 diabetes in the UK, including direct health costs

and indirect societal and productivity costs

N. Hex, C. Bartlett, D. Wright, M. Taylor and D. Varley

York Health Economics Consortium Ltd, University of York, York, UK

Accepted 25 April 2012

Abstract


Aims

To estimate the current and future economic burdens of Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes in the UK.

Methods

A top-down approach was used to estimate costs for 2010 ⁄ 2011 from aggregated data sets and literature.



Prevalence and population data were used to project costs for 2035 ⁄ 2036. Direct health costs were estimated from data on

diagnosis, lifestyle interventions, ongoing treatment and management, and complications. Indirect costs were estimated from

data on mortality, sickness, presenteeism (potential loss of productivity among people who remain in work) and informal

care.


Results

Diabetes cost approximately £23.7bn in the UK in 2010 ⁄ 2011: £9.8bn in direct costs (£1bn for Type 1 diabetes

and £8.8bn for Type 2 diabetes) and £13.9bn in indirect costs (£0.9bn and £13bn). In real terms, the 2035 ⁄ 2036 cost is

estimated at £39.8bn: £16.9bn in direct costs (£1.8bn for Type 1 diabetes and £15.1bn for Type 2 diabetes) and £22.9bn in

indirect costs (£2.4bn and £20.5bn). Sensitivity analysis applied to the direct costs produced a range of costs: between £7.9bn

and £11.7bn in 2010 ⁄ 2011 and between £13.8bn and £20bn in 2035 ⁄ 2036. Diabetes currently accounts for approximately

10% of the total health resource expenditure and is projected to account for around 17% in 2035 ⁄ 2036.

Conclusions

Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes are prominent diseases in the UK and are a significant economic burden. Data

differentiating between the costs of Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes are sparse. Complications related to the diseases account for

a substantial proportion of the direct health costs. As prevalence increases, the cost of treating complications will grow if

current care regimes are maintained.

Diabet. Med. 29, 855–862 (2012)

Keywords


diabetes, economics, epidemiology, prevalence, treatment

Introduction

Diabetes mellitus is amongst the most common chronic

illnesses in the UK. Its prevalence is increasing and it has sig-

nificant economic importance. As well as the direct costs of

treating the illness and its associated complications, diabetes

also has a number of indirect social and productivity costs,

including those related to increased mortality and morbidity

and the need for informal care. Diabetes UK reports that one in

10 people admitted to hospital have diabetes and approxi-

mately 15% of deaths per year are caused by diabetes.

There are two primary forms of diabetes, which are more

often than not implicitly grouped together, but the causes and

costs of which are different. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune

disease that affects 10–15% of those with diabetes [1]. It is

caused by an absence of insulin produced in the body, with

onset mostly before the age of 30 years, the exact cause being

unknown. Type 2 diabetes affects 85–90% of those with

diabetes and is caused by the body not effectively using the

insulin it produces because its cells are resistant to the action of

the insulin [1]. It is often caused by obesity, age and genetic risk

factors, with onset usually after the age of 40 years. These two

main subtypes of diabetes mellitus are rarely distinguished in

the media and even in some academic studies.

A number of studies have put the broad cost burden of

diabetes mellitus to the National Health Service (NHS) at

Correspondence to: Nick Hex, Project Director, York Health Economics

Consortium Ltd, Market Square, University of York, York YO10 5NH, UK.

E-mail: nick.hex@york.ac.uk

DIABETICMedicine

DOI: 10.1111/j.1464-5491.2012.03698.x

ª 2012 The Authors.

Diabetic Medicine

ª 2012 Diabetes UK

855


between 5 and 10%, but with no breakdown between Types 1

and 2 [2,3].

The primary method of mapping the economic impact of a

disease is burden-of-illness analysis. The aims of this paper are:

(1) to quantify the current direct costs to the NHS and indirect

costs to society of diabetes mellitus in the UK; (2) to project the

future direct and indirect costs of diabetes to the UK; (3) to

provide a distinction between Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes in

each of these analyses in order that they can be considered

separately.

Methods

The study adopted a top-down approach, estimating the cost



burdens for Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes from aggregated data

sets, utilizing secondary research sources. These were identified

through targeted literature searches in MEDLINE, reports from

diabetes organizations and UK national statistics.

A comprehensive map of the factors contributing to the

direct costs of diabetes was established, including: prevalence,

incidence and mortality of those with diabetes; undiagnosed

and newly diagnosed people with diabetes; lifestyle interven-

tions; ongoing treatment and management; and secondary and

tertiary care consultations for complications. The financial year

2010 ⁄ 2011 was taken as the baseline for estimating these costs.

Prevalence data

Prevalence data were sourced from the Association of Public

Health Observatories (APHO) Diabetes Prevalence Model,

identifying the prevalence of diabetes in various age groups

aged 16 years and over [4). Prevalence data for children up to

16 years were sourced from a 2009 UK study [5]. Prevalence

data were applied to Office for National Statistics (ONS)

population data for 2010 to estimate the UK population with

diabetes. Prevalence of Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes was esti-

mated on the basis of a split of 15 and 85%, respectively, of the

overall population, or a split of 10 and 90%, respectively, for

the adult population [6]. The Association of Public Health

Observatories has projected diabetes prevalence up to the year

2030. These data were used, along with projected and

extrapolated Office for National Statistics population data, to

give a projected UK diabetes population estimate for the year

2035 [4]. Data relating to England only were adjusted to the

UK level using an appropriate population ratio [7]. Approxi-

mately 150 000 people are diagnosed annually with Type 1 or

Type 2 diabetes in the UK [8]. Approximately 850 000 people

are estimated to have Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes but are

undiagnosed; no direct costs were applied to this population

[1].


Estimation of treatment costs

Cost data were obtained from either literature or national data

sources such as NHS Reference Costs. Where appropriate,

historic costs were projected forward to 2010 (base year) using

the Hospital and Community Health Services index of inflation

[9]. Costs for 2035 ⁄ 2036 were estimated based on the growth

in prevalence of diabetes, with the effects of cost inflation over

the intervening period being disregarded.

Diabetes treatment costs have been calculated on the basis of

Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) data and prevalence data for

Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. The following treatment and

intervention costs were estimated: (1) diagnosis testing; (2)

primary care consultations; (3) prescribing (drugs, consumables

and monitoring devices); (4) non-diabetic prescription drugs

prescribed to people with diabetes with a medical exemption

certificate; (5) insulin pumps and continuous glucose monitor-

ing equipment; (6) structured education courses (diabetes edu-

cation, smoking cessation). This is not an exhaustive list and

there are other interventions for which costs were not obtained,

such as foot care clinics, and the costs of monitoring tests in

primary care. Therefore, treatment costs may be understated.

The economic burden associated with diabetes diagnosis was

calculated by identifying the costs of screening, testing and

primary care. The costs of testing items and the time of clini-

cians were obtained from the British National Formulary

(BNF) and from health and social services unit costs respec-

tively [10.11]. Screening for retinopathy was extracted from the

national screening programme [12].

The excess primary care consultation rate for people with

diabetes was estimated by subtracting the additional factor for

diabetes patients from the national consultation rate [13,14].

This was applied to the costs of general practitioner and clinic

consultations, which were apportioned based on NHS Infor-

mation Centre data on trends in consultation rates [11,13].

Influenza immunization activity was sourced from Quality and

Outcomes Framework data and the cost of the vaccine from

British National Formulary data [10,11,15].

Prescription costs data for 2010 ⁄ 2011 were obtained for

England from the NHS Information Centre and extrapolated

for the UK. Each of the four elements of these data (short-acting

insulins; intermediate and long-acting insulins; anti-diabetic

drugs; diagnostic and monitoring devices, including consum-

ables) was apportioned between Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes

based on findings from targeted literature searches [16–19]. The

NHS Information Centre was used to source the average cost

and total number of non-diabetic prescription items claimed by

people with diabetes holding a medical exemption certificate

[20]. It was assumed that non-diabetic prescription items were

only claimed by people with diabetes using their exemption

certificate amongst the working age population, as everyone

above and below that age group qualifies for free prescriptions.

The cost of insulin pumps was calculated as an average of the

range and the lifetime of the pump plus the annual cost of

consumables [21,22]. The audit of insulin pumps by the

National Diabetes Information Service gave estimates of the

percentage of people with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes who use

an insulin pump and this was applied to the respective popu-

lations, along with associated education costs [23].

DIABETICMedicine

Estimating current and future costs of Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes in the UK

• N. Hex et al.

ª 2012 The Authors.

856

Diabetic Medicine



ª 2012 Diabetes UK

The costs of treatment for gestational diabetes were calcu-

lated by estimating the prevalence of gestational diabetes in

pregnant women at between 2 and 5% [24], the costs for which

were estimated by the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Net-

work (SIGN) [25–27].

The costs of education courses were estimated by extracting

the number of attendees each year and the cost per course

sourced from Dose Adjustment For Normal Eating (DAFNE)

(course for Type 1 diabetes) and X-PERT (course for Type 2

diabetes) [28–30]. Smoking cessation activity and cost data

were sourced from NHS Stop Smoking services, with the

prevalence of smokers on the course with diabetes assumed to

mirror that of the general population prevalence. Studies have

shown that smoking enhances risk for micro- and macrovas-

cular disease associated with diabetes [31].

Estimation of the costs of diabetes complications

Activity data for the incidence of diabetes-related ischaemic

heart disease, myocardial infarction, heart failure and stroke

were sourced using 2010 ⁄ 2011 Hospital Episode Statistics,

data where diabetes was coded as a primary diagnosis [32].

These data were also used to estimate the number of people

receiving ongoing treatment for diabetes-related complications

that had developed in previous years. Cost data from National

Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guideline

CG66, based on the UK Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS),

were used to estimate the cost burden of these complications

[23]. Hospital Episode Statistics data were also used to estimate

other diabetes-related episodes of cardiovascular disease, which

were costed based on the findings of a burden-of-illness study

[33]. The costs of renal replacement therapy as a result of renal

failure attributable to diabetes were estimated using incidence

and prevalence data from the UK Renal Registry and NICE

cost data [34]. Other diabetes-related renal costs for microal-

buminuria, overt nephropathy and kidney transplantation were

estimated based on a burden-of-illness study [35].

Hospital Episode Statistics data were used to identify the

incidence of ketoacidosis, hyperglycaemia, hypoglycaemia and

retinopathy during 2010 ⁄ 2011 and NHS Reference Costs were

applied to provide costs estimates for these complications [36].

The split of severe hypoglycaemia between patients with

Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, and the incidence of moderate

hypoglycaemia in patients with Type 1 diabetes, were identified

from an observational study [29]. The cost of moderate hyp-

oglycaemia and its incidence in people with Type 2 diabetes

was extracted from a different study [37]. The cost of emer-

gency services for hypoglycaemia was included based on an

observational study [38].

Neuropathy costs were sourced from a study that also split

the cost between patients with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes

[39]. Foot care costs included the cost of ulcerations and

amputations [23,40]. Incidence and prevalence data were

sourced from studies and Diabetes UK [1,41–43]. The annual

cost of and the number of men affected by erectile dysfunction

was extracted from a study and a percentage of this cost

attributed to men with diabetes [44,45]. The cost of dyslip-

idaemia was estimated by using the number of people in the

UK who take statins and the average cost of annual treatment

and applying diabetes prevalence data [46]. General diabetes

prevalence data were applied to the known direct costs of

depression in the population with diabetes [47]. For all com-

plications, the incidence among the general population has

been discounted from the diabetes cost estimate. The costs of

complications resulting in fatalities have been taken into ac-

count.


According to NHS Diabetes, patients with diabetes admitted

for routine surgery stay on average 2.6 days longer than those

without diabetes [48]. To demonstrate the potential additional

cost of excess inpatient bed days, estimates of the proportion of

‘other medical’ and ‘non-medical’ admissions were calculated,

based on the NHS Diabetes Inpatient Audit [49]. These esti-

mates were costed using the estimate of 2.6 additional days

multiplied by the average NHS bed day price [50]. Outpatient

costs were calculated based on Hospital Episode Statistics data

and NHS Reference Costs.

Non-health service costs (indirect)

The economic costs of diabetes include both social and

productivity costs. There is little literature on the non-health

related costs of diabetes, but targeted literature searching

identified some data that have been used to provide estimates.

Mortality data for diabetes were obtained from the National

Diabetes Audit and these were used to provide an estimate of

the numbers of people who die prematurely from diabetes-

related illnesses and the potential years of life lost [51]. This

was used, along with an estimate of the average salary, to

estimate the productivity cost of mortality from diabetes [52].

An Australian study concluded that approximately 38% of

people with diabetes over the age of 45 years are not in

employment and this was factored into the overall productivity

loss cost [53]. Other productivity losses were estimated for

sickness absence and presenteeism. Data on diabetes-related

sickness absence were obtained from a National Audit Office

report and these were extrapolated for the rest of the UK to

provide an estimate of the productivity loss [54]. Presenteeism

relates to the potential loss of productivity among people who

remain in work and this is a more subjective calculation.

Estimates were calculated for the burden of diabetes-related

presenteeism, based on a US study, although it is acknowledged

that this is an underdeveloped area of research and these esti-

mates may not be reliable [55]. The estimates were based on the

loss of productive time to ill health caused by diabetes among

the working population, the loss being a burden to the indi-

vidual or the employer. In respect of social costs, the economic

burden of additional care for people with diabetes was esti-

mated based on a US study, which identified the additional

number of hours per week older people with diabetes receive

[56].


DIABETICMedicine

Original article

ª 2012 The Authors.

Diabetic Medicine

ª 2012 Diabetes UK

857


Sensitivity analysis

Most of the cost estimates in this study were derived by taking

estimates of incidence and prevalence and aggregating them

using unit costs. In some cases, costs have been extracted from

other studies. The two key variables for sensitivity analysis are

incidence ⁄ prevalence and cost. A full sensitivity simulation was

not carried out, but the variables were adjusted to reflect the

underlying uncertainty that exists in the data. For diagnosis and

treatment, sensitivity analysis of Æ 20% was applied to inci-

dence and prevalence. This is on the basis that there is variation

in estimates of diabetes prevalence and incidence and approx-

imately 20% of people with diabetes may be undiagnosed.

Based on the premise that incidence and prevalence may vary

Æ 20%, sensitivity analysis of Æ 10% was applied to the

incidence of complications. This is because an increase in

incidence and prevalence of the disease would not necessarily

equate to a similar increase in complications, which tend to

occur in people who have had diabetes for a number of years.

The costs variable was adjusted by Æ 20% to examine how

sensitive the estimates are to fluctuations in cost.

Results

The prevalence of diabetes in the UK is estimated at approxi-



mately 400 000 people with Type 1 diabetes and 3 400 000

people with Type 2 diabetes [58]. Using Office for National

Statistics projections, and assuming that there is no change in

the way in which diabetes is treated, it is estimated that prev-

alence will rise to approximately 650 000 people with Type 1

diabetes and over 5 600 000 people with Type 2 diabetes by

2035 ⁄ 2036. Diabetes UK estimates that there are 150 000

people diagnosed with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes annually.

The cost estimate for screening and testing shown in Table 2 is

based on the estimate of the numbers annually diagnosed.

The total cost of direct patient care for diabetes in

2010 ⁄ 2011 is estimated at £9.8bn. The indirect costs associated

with diabetes are estimated at £13.9bn (Table 3). The direct

costs of diabetes have been categorized as treatment ⁄ interven-

tion and complications or adverse events. The cost of diagno-

sis ⁄ screening, treatment and interventions was over £2bn. The

cost of complications experienced by those with Type 1 or

Type 2 diabetes was estimated at £7.7bn. Peer-reviewed liter-

ature suggests that a significant proportion of these complica-

tions are caused directly by diabetes, although some may be

caused by co-morbidities such as obesity.

The cost burden of diabetes in 2010 ⁄ 2011 was approxi-

mately 10% of total NHS resource expenditure [59]. If no

changes are made to the way diabetes is treated by 2035 ⁄ 2036,

this will rise to c. 17% of NHS expenditure. By the same

rationale, the indirect costs of diabetes are likely to increase to

over £22bn by 2035 ⁄ 2036.

Approximately 37 000 working years were lost from deaths

from Type 1 diabetes and approximately 288 000 from deaths

from Type 2 diabetes in 2010 ⁄ 2011. The cost of mortality was

estimated at c. £0.6bn for Type 1 diabetes and £4.2bn for

Type 2 diabetes.

An estimated 830 000 sickness days were taken for Type 1

diabetes and more than 7 million sickness days for Type 2

diabetes. The cost of sickness was over £94mn for Type 1

diabetes and over £850mn for Type 2 diabetes. The cost of

presenteeism was over £91mn for Type 1 diabetes and £2.9bn

for Type 2 diabetes.

An estimated 1 160 000 people with diabetes (over the age

of 70 years) required informal care in the UK in 2010 ⁄ 2011

and over 336 million hours were used to care for them. The

estimated cost of this was over £153mn for people with Type 1

diabetes and nearly £5bn for people with Type 2 diabetes. The

cost of informal care is skewed towards Type 2 diabetes more

so than other indirect costs because of the increasing prevalence

of Type 2 diabetes with age.

Sensitivity analysis

The results of the sensitivity analysis (Tables 4 and 5) show

that the cost estimates in this research are sensitive to changes

in variables such as incidence and prevalence, and cost. The

analysis shows a potential range for the overall cost of diabetes

in 2010 ⁄ 2011 to be between £7.9bn and £11.7bn. For

2035 ⁄ 2036 the range was between £13.8bn and £20bn.

A US study has ascribed a cost burden to those people with

undiagnosed diabetes. This study has not attempted to cost

undiagnosed diabetes but, if the same rationale was applied to

the UK, the cost would be approximately £1.5bn. This dem-

onstrates the underlying uncertainty of providing an estimate of

the costs of diabetes [60].

Discussion

The analysis of the treatment and complications costs for

diabetes demonstrates that the estimate that the cost of

diabetes accounts for approximately one tenth of NHS

expenditure is accurate. This analysis also demonstrates that

less than a quarter of that cost relates to the treatment and

ongoing management of diabetes, with the rest being

accounted for by the costs of treating the complications of

diabetes. These are effectively ‘adverse events’ and are a sig-

nificant area of expenditure for the NHS. The Scottish

Diabetes Survey has shown that c. 38% of patients with

Table 1

Estimated UK prevalence of diabetes 2010 ⁄ 2011 and



2035 ⁄ 2036

2010 ⁄ 2011

2035 ⁄ 2036

Type 1 diabetes: adult

369 818

603 572


Type 1 diabetes: child

29 000


48 630

Type 1 diabetes: total

398 818

652 201


Type 2 diabetes: adult

3 419 142

5 636 924

Type 2 diabetes: child

585

800


Type 2 diabetes: total

3 419 727

5 637 724

DIABETICMedicine

Estimating current and future costs of Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes in the UK

• N. Hex et al.

ª 2012 The Authors.

858


Diabetic Medicine

ª 2012 Diabetes UK



Type 1 diabetes and nearly 14% of patients with Type 2

diabetes in Scotland have poor glycaemic control. This sug-

gests scope for improvement in the current approach to the

treatment and management of diabetes and the potential for

cost savings to be achieved.

This analysis has also apportioned the costs of diabetes

between Types 1 and 2. One of the main problems in trying to

identify the costs of diabetes is the variable nature of the data

on the numbers of people with diabetes. There are various

sources for estimates, but there is wide variation in those esti-

mates. None of the sources provide an accurate indication of

the numbers of people with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, with

the exception of the Scottish Diabetes Survey [57].

Table 2


Estimated UK costs of diabetes 2010 ⁄ 2011 and 2035 ⁄ 2036

Screening and testing

2010 ⁄ 2011

2035 ⁄ 2036

Type 1

diabetes (£)



Type 2

diabetes (£)

Total (£)

Type 1


diabetes (£)

Type 2


diabetes (£)

Total (£)

Diagnosis

1 442 501

8 174 172

9 616 673

2 420 086

13 713 821

16 133 907

Retinopathy screening

267 390

2 414 554



2 681 943

376 168


3 396 833

3 773 001

Total

1 709 891



10 588 726

12 298 616

2 796 254

17 110 654

19 906 908

Treatment and management

Type 1

diabetes (£)



Type 2

diabetes (£)

Total (£)

Type 1


diabetes (£)

Type 2


diabetes (£)

Total (£)

Primary care

98 081 332

950 713 826

1 048 795 159

174 078 027

1 517 045 735

1 691 123 762

Prescriptions

155 481 614

701 792 008

857 273 623

310 933 710

1 126 628 120

1 437 561 830

Insulin pump

19 940 905

143 452

20 084 357



32 956 690

237 086


33 193 776

Continuous glucose monitoring

570 063

0

570 063



955 938

0

955 938



Influenza immunization

5 738 559

49 206 159

54 944 718

9 213 678

82 923 101

92 136 779

Medical exemption

5 334 853

48 013 679

53 348 532

14 567 430

131 106 873

145 674 303

Education programmes

4 034 119

766 333

4 800 453



6 764 813

1 285 064

8 049 877

Smoking cessation

programmes

644 265


5 524 345

6 168 610

1 080 367

9 263 773

10 344 139

Total


289 825 710

1 756 159 802

2 045 985 515

550 550 655

2 868 489 752

3 419 040 406

Complications

Type 1


diabetes (£)

Type 2


diabetes (£)

Total (£)

Type 1

diabetes (£)



Type 2

diabetes (£)

Total (£)

Hypoglycaemia (moderate)

19 186 916

22 614 644

41 801 561

31 710 560

37 986 266

69 696 826

Hypoglycaemia (severe)

13 942 854

16 433 734

30 376 589

19 155 289

21 462 166

40 617 455

Dyslipidaemia

2 746 194

24 715 746

27 461 940

7 591 501

68 323 506

75 915 007

Neuropathy

43 004 556

266 628 248

309 632 804

72 114 221

447 108 170

519 222 391

Erectile dysfunction

1 850 053

11 470 329

13 320 382

3 097 539

19 204 739

22 302 278

Ketoacidosis

15 957 160

0

15 957 160



26 758 556

0

26 758 556



Hyperglycaemia

5 644 425

50 799 826

56 444 251

9 465 134

85 186 209

94 651 343

Ischaemic heart disease

50 965 633

458 690 699

509 656 332

85 028 410

765 255 689

850 284 099

Myocardial infarction

29 272 208

573 797 013

603 069 221

48 619 363

953 042 070

1 001 661 433

Heart failure

30 815 781

277 342 025

308 157 806

51 544 764

463 902 877

515 447 641

Stroke

13 932 978



273 998 966

287 931 944

23 255 554

457 332 080

480 587 634

Kidney failure

135 061 944

379 004 594

514 066 538

226 416 514

635 359 572

861 776 086

Other renal costs

51 557 273

374 838 822

426 396 095

86 525 184

628 760 182

715 285 366

Retinopathy

5 774 184

51 967 658

57 741 842

9 682 727

87 144 546

96 827 274

Foot ulcers and amputations

111 594 920

874 005 362

985 600 282

216 268 111

1 888 596 612

2 104 864 723

Depression

3 320 927

29 888 347

33 209 275

4 841 398

43 572 579

48 413 977

Gestational diabetes

0

4 293 009



4 293 009

0

6 039 473



6 039 473

Other cardiovascular disease

165 485 511

1 489 369 602

1 654 855 114

284 845 714

2 563 611 422

2 848 457 136

Diabetic medicine outpatients

1 634 073

14 706 658

16 340 731

2 740 177

24 661 589

27 401 766

Excess inpatient days

17 357 369

1 805 472 271

1 822 829 640

29 106 626

3 027 597 751

3 056 704 377

Total

719 104 959



7 000 037 553

7 719 142 516

1 238 767 342

12 224 147 498

13 462 914 840

Overall 2010/2011

cost

£23.7bn


Direct costs

£9.8bn


Type 1 direct 

costs


£1.0bn

Type 2 direct 

costs

£8.8bn


Indirect costs

£13.9bn


Type 1 indirect 

costs 


£0.9bn

Type 2 indirect 

costs 

£13.0bn


FIGURE 1

Breakdown of direct and indirect costs of diabetes in the UK

for 2010 ⁄ 2011.

DIABETICMedicine

Original article

ª 2012 The Authors.

Diabetic Medicine

ª 2012 Diabetes UK

859


The indirect costs of diabetes are considerably higher than

the direct costs and many relate to a cost to the individual with

diabetes or their carers. Cost estimates for productivity and

social costs are often opportunity costs, such as time lost that

could be spent on other activities. Any improvements in the

way that diabetes is treated that lead to better glycaemic con-

trol and fewer complications could have a significant impact on

these costs, but this remains to be assessed.

The categorization of diabetes costs into treatment ⁄ inter-

vention and complications provides a baseline model, which

can be used to examine how changes to the way diabetes is

treated might affect the overall cost burden for diabetes. If

treatment or intervention costs are considered to be ‘inputs’ and

complications are considered to be ‘outcomes’, it is possible to

examine different treatment scenarios and how the cost of

complications may change as a result. The costs estimated

provide a measure of the cost burden associated with the

current treatment model for diabetes and the associated cost of

complications. Further research will be carried out to examine

what the cost impact would be if NICE guidelines were fully

adopted across the UK, including the extent of cost savings that

could potentially accrue from reduced or delayed complica-

tions. This will allow the model to show how investment in

effective treatment could potentially reduce the overall cost

burden of diabetes.

Competing interests

This research was funded by Sanofi. CB is a member of the

Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) and Diabetes

UK.

References



1 Diabetes UK. Diabetes in the UK 2011 ⁄ 12: Key Statistics on

Diabetes. London: Diabetes UK, 2011. Available at http://www.

diabetes.org.uk/Documents/Reports/Diabetes-in-the-UK-2011-12.

pdf Last accessed 28 February 2012.

2 Yorkshire and Humber Public Health Observatory. Diabetes Key

Facts. York: Yorkshire and Humber Public Health Observatory,

2006. Available at http://www.yhpho.org.uk/resource/view.aspx?

RID=8872 Last accessed 28 February 2012.

3 Department of Health. Turning the Corner: Improving Diabetes

Care. London: Department of Health, 2006. Available at http://

www.dh.gov.uk/en/Publicationsandstatistics/Publications/Publica-

tionsPolicyAndGuidance/DH_4136141 Last accessed 28 February

2012.

4 Yorkshire and Humber Public Health Observatory. APHO



Diabetes Prevalence Model: Key Findings for England. York:

Yorkshire and Humber Public Health Observatory, 2010. Available

at http://www.yhpho.org.uk/resource/view.aspx?RID=81124 Last

accessed 28 February 2012.

5 Haines L, Kramer Z. Growing up with Diabetes: Children and

Young People with Diabetes in England 2009. London: Royal

College of Paediatrics and Child Health, 2009.

6 Department of Health. National Service Framework for Diabetes.

London: Department of Health, 2001.

7 UK National Statistics. Statistical Bulletin Annual Mid-Year

Population Estimates, 2010. Newport: UK National Statistics,

2010.


8 Diabetes UK. Website. 2012. Available at http://www.diabe-

tes.org.uk Last accessed 28 February 2012.

Table 3

Indirect UK costs of diabetes 2010 ⁄ 2011 and 2035 ⁄ 2036



2010 ⁄ 2011 (£)

2035 ⁄ 2036 (£)

Mortality—Type 1

560 343 917

737 832 017

Mortality—Type 2

4 203 544 262

5 611 608 152

Sickness

absence—Type 1

94 557 277

141 242 443

Sickness

absence—Type 2

851 015 494

1 271 181 991

Presenteeism—Type 1

91 045 606

374 734 092

Presenteeism—Type 2

2 943 807 935

3 372 606 827

Informal care—Type 1

153 291 454

1 134 246 562

Informal care—Type 2

4 956 423 686

10 208 219 059

Total—Type 1

899 238 255

2 388 055 114

Total—Type 2

12 954 791 376

20 463 616 029

Grand total

13 854 029 631

22 851 671 143

Table 4


Sensitivity analysis for Type 1 diabetes costs

Year


Variable

Sensitivity:

lower value

Model


value

Sensitivity:

upper value

2010 ⁄ 2011

Incidence

£0.89bn


£1.01bn

£1.14bn


Cost

£0.82bn


£1.01bn

£1.08bn


2035 ⁄ 2036

Incidence

£1.53bn

£1.79bn


£2.05bn

Cost


£1.47bn

£1.79bn


£2.11bn

Table 5


Sensitivity analysis for Type 2 diabetes costs

Year


Variabler

Sensitivity:

lower value

Model


value

Sensitivity:

upper value

2010 ⁄ 11

Incidence

£7.72bn


£8.79bn

£9.88bn


Cost

£7.12bn


£8.79bn

£10.52bn


2035 ⁄ 36

Incidence

£13.00bn

£15.11bn


£17.26bn

Cost


£12.36bn

£15.11bn


£17.86bn

Overall 2035/2036

cost

£39.8bn


Direct costs

£16.9bn


Type 1 direct 

costs


£1.8bn

Type 2 direct 

costs

£15.1bn


Indirect costs

£22.9bn


Type 1 indirect 

costs 


£2.4bn

Type 2 indirect 

costs 

£20.5bn


FIGURE 2

Breakdown of direct and indirect costs of diabetes in the UK

for 2035 ⁄ 2036.

DIABETICMedicine

Estimating current and future costs of Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes in the UK

• N. Hex et al.

ª 2012 The Authors.

860


Diabetic Medicine

ª 2012 Diabetes UK



9 Personal Social Services Research Unit. Unit Costs of Health and

Social Care, 2010. Canterbury: Personal Social Services Research

Unit, 2010. Available at http://www.pssru.ac.uk/ Last accessed 28

February 2012.

10 British National Formulary. Website. 2011. Available at http://

bnf.org/bnf/index.htm Last accessed 28 Feburary 2012.

11 Personal Social Services Research Unit. Unit Costs of Health and

Social Care, 2010. Canterbury: Personal Social Services Research

Unit, 2010. Available at http://www.pssru.ac.uk/ Last accessed 28

February 2012.

12 UK National Screening Committee. Annual Report English National

Screening Programme for Diabtic Retinopathy. Gloucester: UK

National Screening Committee, 2011. Available at http://diabeticeye.

screening.nhs.uk/getdata.php?id=11196 Last accessed 28 February

2012.

13 The Information Centre. Trends in Consultation Rates in General



Practice 1995 ⁄ 1996 to 2008 ⁄ 2009: Analysis of the QResearch

Database. 2009. Available at http://www.ic.nhs.uk/webfiles/publi-

cations/gp/Trends_in_Consultation_Rates_in_General_Practice_1995_

96_to_2008_09.pdf Last accessed 28 February 2012.

14 Schellevis FG, Van De Lisdonk EH, Van Der Velden J, Hoogbergen

SHJL, Van Eijk JTM, Van Weel C. Consultation rates and incidence

of intercurrent morbidity among patients with chronic disease in

general practice. Br J Gen Pract 1994; 44: 259–262.

15 Quality and Outcomes Framework. Quality and Outcomes Fra-

mework (QOF) 2010 ⁄ 11, England. Available at http://www.ic.

nhs.uk/qof Last accessed 28 February 2012.

16 The Health and Social Care Information Centre. Prescribing for

Diabetes in England: 2005 ⁄ 2006 to 2010 ⁄ 2011. 2011. Available at

http://www.ic.nhs.uk/webfiles/publications/prescribing%20diabetes%

20200506%20to%20201011/Prescribing_for_Diabetes_in_England_

20056_to_201011.pdf Last accessed 28 February 2012.

17 Holden SE, Poole CD, Morgan CL, Currie CJ. Evaluation of the

incremental cost to the National Health Service of prescribing

analogue insulin. Br Med J 2011; 1: e000258.

18 The Hormone Foundation. Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes Treatment

Options. Maryland USA: The Hormone Foundation, 2012.

Available at http://www.hormone.org/diabetes/treatment.cfm Last

accessed 28 February 2012.

19 Belsey JD, Pittard JB, Rao S, Urdahl H, Jameson K, Dixon T. Self blood

glucose monitoring in type 2 diabetes. A financial impact analysis

based on UK primary care. Int J Clin Pract 2009; 63: 439–448.

20 The Health and Social Care Information Centre. Prescriptions

Dispensed in the Community. Statistics for 1997 to 2007: England.

Leeds: The Health and Social Care Information Centre, 2008;

Available at http://www.ic.nhs.uk/webfiles/publications/PCA%20

publication/Final%20version%20210708.pdf Last accessed 28

February 2012.

21 Diabetes UK. Insulin Pumps. London: Diabetes UK, 2012. Avail-

able at http://www.diabetes.org.uk/insulin_pumps Last accessed 28

February 2012.

22 DiabetesWellBeing.com.

Insulin

Pump


Price.

Florida,


USA:

DiabetesWellBeing.com, 2012.

23 The National Collaborating Centre for Chronic Conditions. Type 2

Diabetes. National Clinical Guideline for Management in Primary

and Secondary Care (update). London: Royal College of Physicians,

2008. Available at http://www.nice.org.uk/nicemedia/live/11983/

40803/40803.pdf Last accessed 28 February 2012.

24 NICE. Diabetes in Pregnancy: Management of Diabetes and its

Complications from Pre-Conception to the Postnatal Period. NICE

clinical guideline 63. London: National Institute for Health and

Clinical Excellence, 2008.

25 National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse (NDIC). National

Diabetes Statistics, 2011. Maryland, USA: National Diabetes

Information Clearinghouse, 2011.

26 Office for National Statistics. Maternity Statistics, England: 2010–

2011. London: Office for National Statistics, 2011.

27 SIGN. Management of Diabetes: A Clinical and Resource Impact

Assessment. Edinburgh: Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Net-

work, 2010.

28 X-PERT Health CIC. X-PERT National Results. Organisation

Comparison. How are you doing? Hebdon Bridge: X-PERT Health

CIC, 2011. Available at http://www.xperthealth.org.uk/images/

stories/downloads/x-pert%20audit%20report%20feb%202011.pdf

Last accessed 28 February 2012.

29 Leese G, Wang J, Broomhall J, Kelly P, Marsden A, Morrison W

et al. Frequency of severe hypoglycemia requiring emergency

treatment in type 1 and type 2 diabetes: a population-based study

of health service resource use. Diabetes Care 2003; 26: 1176–1180.

30 Gillett M, Dallosso H, Brennan A, Carey M, Campbell M, Heller S

et al. Delivering the diabetes education and self management for

ongoing and newly diagnosed (DESMOND) programme for people

with newly diagnosed Type 2 diabetes: cost-effectiveness analysis.

Br Med J 2010; 341: 1–10.

31 Haire-Joshu D, Glasgow R, Tibbs T. Smoking and diabetes.

Diabetes Care 1999; 22: 1887–1898.

32 NHS Information Centre. Hospital Episode Statistics HES (Admitted

Patient Care) England 2010–2011. Leeds: NHS Information

Centre, 2011. Available at http://www.ic.nhs.uk/statistics-and-data-

collections/hospital-care/hospital-activity-hospital-episode-statistics–

hes/hospital-episode-statistics-hes-admitted-patient-care-england-

2010-11 Last accessed 28 February 2012.

33 Luengo-Fernandez R, Leal J, Gray A, Petersen S, Rayner M. Cost of

cardiovascular disease in the UK. Heart 2010; 92: 1384–1389.

34 UK Renal Registry. 13th Annual Report. Bristol: UK Renal Regis-

try, 2010.

35 Gordois A, Scuffham P, Shearer A, Oglesby A. The health care costs

of diabetic nephropathy in the USA and the UK. J Diabetes Com-

plications 2004; 18: 18–26.

36 NHS Information Centre. NHS Reference Costs. Leeds: NHS

Information Centre, 2012.

37 Jonsson L, Bolinder B, Lundkvist J. Cost of hypoglycemia in

patients with Type 2 diabetes in Sweden. Value Health 2006; 9:

193–198.

38 Farmer A, Brockbank K, Keech M, England E, Deakin C. Incidence

and costs of severe hypoglycaemia requiring attendance by the

emergency medical services in South Central England. Diabet Med

2012; doi: 10.1111/j.1464-5491.2012.03657.x.

39 Scuffham P, Gordois A, Shearer A, Oglesby A. The health care costs

of diabetic peripheral neuropathy in the UK. Diabetologica 2003;

46: A445.

40 Hutton J, Harry M. Orthotic Service in the NHS: Improving Service

Provision. York: York Health Economics Consortium, 2009.

41 White R, McIntosh C. Topical therapies for diabetic foot ulcers:

standard treatments. J Wound Care 2008; 18: 426–432.

42 Schofield C, Libby G, Brennan G, MacAlpine R, Morris A, Leese G

et al. Mortality and hospitalization in patients after amputation: a

comparison between patients with and without diabetes. Diabetes

Care 2006; 29: 2252–2256.

43 Information Services Division NHS Scotland. The Amputee

Statistical Database for the UK 2006 ⁄ 2007. 2009. Available at

http://www.limbless-statistics.org/documents/Report2006-07.pdf

Last accessed 28 February 2012.

44 Plumb J, Guest J. Annual cost of erectile dysfunction to UK society.

Pharmacoeconomics 1999; 16: 699–709.

45 Library DI. Information about Diabetes. 2012. Available at http://

www.diabeteslibrary.org/ Last accessed 28 February 2012.

46 Carlyle R. Statins. Folkestone: SAGA, 2012. Available from: http://

www.saga.co.uk/health/medicines/statins.aspx Last accessed 28

February 2012.

DIABETICMedicine

Original article

ª 2012 The Authors.

Diabetic Medicine

ª 2012 Diabetes UK

861


47 Thomas C, Morris S. Cost of depression among adults in England in

2000. Br J Psychiatry 2003; 183: 514–519.

48 NHS Diabetes. Areas of Care—Inpatient and Emergency. London:

NHS Diabetes, 2012. Available at http://www.diabetes.nhs.uk/

areas_of_care/emergency_and_inpatient/ Last accessed 29 February

2012.


49 NHS Diabetes. National Diabetes Inpatient Audit 2010. London:

NHS Diabetes, 2011.

50 NHS—Institute for Innovation and Improvement. Length of

Stay—Reducing Length of Stay. Coventry: NHS—Institute for

Innovation and Improvement, 2008. Available at http://www.

institute.nhs.uk/quality_and_service_improvement_tools/quality_and_

service_improvement_tools/length_of_stay.html Last accessed 28

February 2012.

51 NHS Information Centre. National Diabetes Audit Mortality

Analysis 2007–2008. Leeds: NHS Information Centre, 2011.

Available at http://www.ic.nhs.uk/webfiles/Services/NCASP/Diabe-

tes/200910%20annual%20report%20documents/NHS_Diabe-

tes_Audit_Mortality_Report_2011_Final.pdf

Last


accessed

28

February 2012.



52 Office for National Statistics. 2011 Annual Survey of Hours and

Earnings.

2011.

Available



at

http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/

dcp171778_241497.pdf Last accessed 28 February 2012.

53 Schofield D, Percival R, Passey M, Shrestha R, Callander E, Kelly S.

The financial vulnerability of individuals with diabetes. Br J

Diabetes Vasc Dis 2010; 10: 300–304.

54 National Audit Office. Tackling Obesity in England. London:

National Audit Office, 2001. Available at http://www.nao.org.uk/

publications/0001/tackling_obesity_in_england.aspx Last accessed

28 February 2012.

55 American Diabetes Association. Economic costs of diabetes in the

US in 2007. Diabetes Care 2008; 31: 1271.

56 Langa K, Vijan S, Hayward R, Chernew M, Blaum C, Kabeto M

et al. Informal caregiving for diabetes and diabetic complications

among elderly Americans. J Gerentol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci 2002;

57: S177–S186.

57 Scottish Diabetes Survey Monitoring Group. Scottish Diabetes

Survey 2010. Available at http://www.diabetesinscotland.org.uk/

Publications/SDS%202010.pdf Last accessed 28 February 2012.

58 Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health. Growing up with

Diabetes: Children and Young People with Diabetes in England.

London: Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health, 2009.

59 Department of Health. Department of Health—Spending Review

2010. London: Department of Health, 2010. Available at http://

www.dh.gov.uk/en/MediaCentre/Pressreleases/DH_120676

Last


accessed 28 February 2012.

60 Zhang Y, Dall T, Mann S, Chen Y, Martin J, Moore V et al. The

economic costs of undiagnosed diabetes. Popul Health Manag

2009; 12: 95–101.

DIABETICMedicine

Estimating current and future costs of Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes in the UK

• N. Hex et al.

ª 2012 The Authors.



862

Diabetic Medicine



ª 2012 Diabetes UK


Yüklə 180,58 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə