Atlas of the Potential Vegetation



Yüklə 1.25 Mb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə1/13
tarix12.08.2017
ölçüsü1.25 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   13
26828

A
T
L
A
S
 O
F
 T
H
E
 P
O
TE
N
TI
A
L
 V
E
G
E
T
A
T
IO
N
 O
F
 ET
HI
O
P
IA
K>
o
M
o
Atlas of the Potential Vegetation
of Ethiopia
By 
Ib  F riis,  Sebsebe Dem issew
 and 
P a u lo van B reu gel
The Royal Danish Academy of Sciences and Letters 
Det  K on gelige  Danske Videnskabernes  Selskab 
2010
Ib Friis and Sebsebe Demissew nearKorem, Ethiopia, 200g.
Ib  Friis  (b.  1945  at  Svendborg,  Denmark)  is  Danish.  Educat­
ed  at  the  University  of Copenhagen,  he  obtained  a  degree  as 
Cand.  Scient,  in  systematic  botany.  He  later  became  Fil.  Dr. 
at  the  University of Uppsala  on  a  thesis  about  the  systematics 
of African  Urticaceae  and  Dr.  Scient,  at  the  University of C o ­
penhagen  on  a  thesis  about  the  ecology  and  phytogeography 
of forests  in  the  Horn of Africa.  Having been  associate profes­
sor in  systematic botany  at  the  Institute  of Systematic  Botany, 
University o f Copenhagen,  he  is  now  professor of botany and 
phytogeography at  the  Natural  History  Museum of Denmark. 
Nearly  every  year  since  1970  he  has  carried  out  field  work  in 
Tropical  East  Africa  or  the  Horn  of Africa,  particularly Ethio­
pia,  and  has  supervised  M.Sc.  and  Ph.D.  students  from Ethio­
pia,  Tanzania  and  Uganda.  He  has  written  or  co-authored  c. 
240 papers and books,  mainly on floristics, ecology and phyto­
geography o f the Horn of Africa, the systematics of Urticaceae, 
botanical  nomenclature  and  the  history of botany.  Ib  Friis  has 
been elected member of the Royal Danish Academy o f Sciences 
and  Letters,  of the  Royal  Physiographic  Society of Lund, Swe­
den,  and  is  honorary  research  associate  at  the  Royal  Botanic 
Gardens,  Kew,  UK.
Sebsebe  Demissew  (b.  1953  at  Butajira,  Ethiopia)  is  Ethio­
pian. Educated at the University of Addis Ababa, he obtained a 
degree as  M.Sc  in botany.  He  later became  Fil.  Dr.  at  the Uni­
versity of Uppsala on a thesis about the systematics of the genus 
Maytenus  (Celastraceae).  He  is  professor  at  the  University  of 
Addis Ababa, has been leader of the Ethiopian Flora Project, of 
the  National  Herbarium  of Ethiopia  and  General  Secretary  of 
L’Association pour l’Étude Taxonomique de la Flora d’Afrique 
Tropicale  (AETFAT)  and  has  regularly  carried  out  field work 
in  Ethiopia and other parts  of Africa.  He has  written  or co-au­
thored c.  120 scientific papers and books, mainly on the system­
atics of Celastraceae, Convolvulaceae,  Lamiaceae, Verbenaceae

Atlas of the Potential Vegetation
of Ethiopia
B y lb  Frits,  Sebsebe Dem issew  a n d  P a u lo van B reugel
Det Kongelige Danske Videnskabernes Selskab 
The Royal Danish Academy of Sciences and Letters

DET  KONGELIGE  DANSKE  VIDENSKABERNES  SELSKAB 
udgiver følgende publikationsrækker:
THE  ROYAL  DANISH  ACADEMY  OF  SCIENCES  AND  LETTERS 
issues the following series of publications:
Historisk-Jilosojiske Meddelelser,  8°
Historisk-Jilosqfiske Skrifter, 4° 
(History,  Philosophy,  Philology, 
Archaeology, Art  History)
Matematisk-Jysiske Meddelelser,  8° 
(Mathematics,  Physics, 
Chemistry, Astronomy, Geology)
Biologiske Skrifter, 4°
(Botany,  Zoology,  Palaeontology, 
General  Biology)
Oversigt, Annual Report,  8 °
AUTHORIZED  ABBREVIATIONS 
Hist.Fil.Medd.Dan.Vid.Selsk.
(printed area 180  x  107  mm, c.  2470 units)
Hist.Filos.Skr.Dan.Vid.Selsk.
(printed area 2  columns, 
each  215  x  80  mm, c.  2180  units)
Mat.Fys.Medd.Dan.Vid.Selsk.
(printed area 200  x  123  mm,  c.  3120 units)
Biol.Skr.Dan.Vid.Selsk.
(printed area 2  columns, 
each  215 x  80  mm,  c.  2180  units)
Overs.Dan.Vid.Selsk.
Correspondence 
Manuscripts are to be  sent to
The  Editor
Det  Kongelige  Danske Videnskabernes  Selskab 
H.  C. Andersens  Boulevard 35 
DK-1553 Copenhagen V,  Denmark.
Tel:  +45 33 
43 53 
00  ‘  Fax: 
+45 33 43 53 OI­
E-mail:  kdvs@royalacademy.dk. 
www.royalacademy.dk
Questions concerning subscription  to  the  series should be directed  to the Academy 
Editor Marita Akhøj  Nielsen
©  2010.  Det  Kongelige  Danske Videnskabernes  Selskab.  All  rights reserved.  No part o f this publication 
may be reproduced  in  any form without  the written permission  o f the copyright owner.

Atlas of the Potential Vegetation of Ethiopia

Synopsis
A  new map of the potential vegetation  types o f Ethio­
pia has been produced at the scale o f 1:2,000,000.  It is 
published  here  as  an  atlas  with  29  map  plates.  The 
map  shows  the  distribution  o f twelve  potential  vege­
tation  types  that can be mapped  using environmental 
parameters  and  GIS-methodology.  In  the  accompa­
nying text these vegetation types have been described 
and  further  divided  into  a  number  o f subtypes.  The 
types  and  subtypes  are:  (1)  Desert and semi-desert scrub­
land.  (2)  Acacia-Commiphora woodland and bushland  (with 
the  subtypes  (2a)  Acacia-Commiphora woodland and bush­
land proper and  (2b) Acacia  wooded grassland of the Riß Val­
ley).  (3)  Wooded grassland of the western Gambela region.  (4) 
Combretum-Terminalia  woodland  and  wooded grassland.  (5) 
Dry evergreen Afromontaneforest and grassland complex  (with 
the  subtypes  (5a)  Undifferentiated Afromontane forest,  (5b) 
Dry single-dominant Afromontane forest of the Ethiopian  high­
lands,  (5c)  Afromontane  woodland,  wooded  grassland  and 
grassland,  (5d)  Transition between Afromontane vegetation and 
Acacia-Commiphora bushland on the Eastern escarpment).  (6) 
Moist evergreen Afromontane forest  (with  the  subtypes  (6a) 
Primary or mature secondary moist evergreen Afromontane forest, 
and  (6b)  Edges of moist evergreen Afromontane forest,  bush­
land, woodland and wooded grassland.  (7)  Transitional rainfor­
est.  (8)  Ericaceous belt.  (9) Afroalpine belt.  (10)  Riverine veg­
etation.  (11) Fresh-water lakes, etc.  (with  the subtypes  (na) 
Fresh-water lake vegetation (open water)  and  (nb)  Freshwater 
marshes  and  swamps, floodplains  and  lake  shore  vegetation). 
(12)  Salt lakes, etc.  (with  the subtypes  (12a)  Salt lake vege­
tation  (open-water)  and  (12b)  Saltpans,  saline/brackish and 
intermittent wetlands and salt-lake shore vegetation). The taxo­
nomic  revision  o f  the  Ethiopian  flora  for  the  Flora of 
Ethiopia and Eritrea  has  been  completed,  and  intensive 
field  studies  o f  the  flora  have  been  carried  out  over 
nearly  the entire country,  after the  publication of two 
previous  detailed  vegetation  maps  of  Ethiopia,  by 
Pichi  Sermolli  in  1957  and  by  Frank  White  in  1983  - 
both  at  the scale  of 1:5,000,000;  this  new  information 
has  been  incorporated  in  the  present  map.  New ideas 
about  the  classification  o f Ethiopian  vegetation  have 
also  been  put  forward  on  maps  produced  on  smaller 
scale.  Here,  the vegetation  types  used  for the last  two 
vegetation  maps  in  1:5,000,000 and  the later maps  on 
smaller  scales  are  reviewed  and  discussed,  and  the 
definitions  o f  most  previously  accepted  vegetation 
types  have  been  revised.  Definition  o f a characteristic 
forest type, Transitional rainforest, in south-western Ethi­
opia  has  been  completely  reworked,  and,  for  the  first 
time,  it  has  been  attempted  to  classify  saline  vegeta­
tion  on  a vegetation  map  o f Ethiopia.  The vegetation 
atlas  has  been  produced  using  a  digital  elevation 
model  with  a  resolution  o f 90  x  90  metres  in  connec­
tion  with  GIS  technology;  it  is  based  on  information 
from  previous  literature,  field  experience  o f  the  au­
thors,  as  well  as  on  an  analysis  of information  about 
approximately  1300  species  of  woody  plants  in  the 
completed Flora of Ethiopia and Eritrea.
Ib Friis
Botanical Garden and Museum
Natural History Museum of Denmark
Gothersgade 
130
DK
-1123
 Copenhagen K
Denmark
ibf@snm.ku.dk
Sebsebe Demissew
National Herbarium of Ethiopia
Addis Abeba University
P.O. Box 
3434
Addis Abeba
Ethiopia
sebsebcd@bio.aau.edu.et;
s_demissew@yahoo.com
Paulo van Breugel
c/o World Agroforestry Centre
ICRAF
PO Box 
30677-00100
Nairobi
Kenya
p.vanbreugel@cgiar.org;
p_vanbreugel@yahoo.com

Atlas of the Potential Vegetation
of Ethiopia
B y Ib  F riis,  Sebsebe Dem issew  an d  P a u lo van B reugel
Biologiske Skrifter 
58
DET  KONGELIGE  DANSKE  VIDENSKABERNES  SELSKAB

Atlas of the Potential Vegetation of Ethiopia
© Det Kongelige Danske Videnskabernes Selskab 
2010 
Printed in Denmark by Spccialtrykkeriet Viborg a-s 
is s n
 
0366-3612
 • 
i s b n
 
978
-
87
-
7304
-
347-9
Submitted to the Academy September 
2009 
Published June 
2010

Table of Contents
Synopsis  2 
Introduction  9
Need for a new vegetation map of Ethiopia realised in 
connection with  the  Ethiopian  Flora project  9
The  VECEA-project  -  “Vegetation  map  for  land-use 
planning,  natural  resource  management  and  conser­
vation  of biodiversity in  Eastern Africa”  10
Acknowledgements  12
Topography, geology, soil and climate o f Ethiopia  13
Topography,  place  names,  floristic  units  o f the Flora of 
Ethiopia and Eritrea  13
Place names  18
Geology and soils  18
Climate  22
Methods:  sources  and  scale  o f  the  new  vegetation 
map  26
Field  surveys  26 
Resolution  26
Boundaries  between vegetation  types  26 
The  scale  1:2,000,000  27 
Comparisons with  older maps  27 
Parameters  and software  28 
Availability of data  set  28
Previous  vegetation  maps  o f  Ethiopia  and  their 
mapping units  29
Mapping units  used  by  Pichi  Sermolli  (1957)  for veg­
etation  in  Ethiopia  29
Mapping units used by White  (1983)  for vegetation in 
Ethiopia  32
New  vegetation  types  from  little-known  Ethiopian 
forests  (1970-1992)  34
Mapping units used in  small-scale vegetation  maps of 
Ethiopia  (1996-2009)  36
Mapping units  used here  39
Potential vegetation  types  in Ethiopia  42
(1)  Desert and semi-desert scrubland (DSS)  44
(2) Acacia-Commiphora woodland and bushland (ACB)  47 
(Subtype  2a)  Acacia-Commiphora  woodland and bush­
land proper (ACB)  48
(Subtype  2b) Acacia  wooded  grassland  of the  Rift 
Valley  (AC B/RV)  55
(3)  Wooded grassland of the western Gambela region 
(W GG)  58
(4) Combretum-Terminalia  woodland  and  wooded  grassland 
(CTW )  61
(5) Dry  evergreen  AJromontane forest  and  grassland  complex 
(DAF)  70
(Subtype 5a)  Undifferentiated AJromontane forest 
(DAF/U)  72
(Subtype  5b)  Dry single-dominant AJromontane forest of 
the Ethiopian highlands  (DAF/SD)  77 
(Subtype  5c)  AJromontane woodland,  wooded grassland 
and grassland { DAF/WG)  81
(Subtype  5d)  Transition between AJromontane vegetation 
and Acacia-Commiphora bushland on the Eastern escarpment 
(DAF/TR)  88
(6) Moist evergreen AJromontaneforest (MAF)  92 
(Subtype 6a) Primary or mature secondary moist evergreen 
Afromontaneforest  (MAF/P)  97
5

T A B L E   O F   C O N T E N T S
BS  5 8
(Subtype  6b)  Edges of moist evergreen Afromontane forest, 
bushland,  woodland and wooded grassland 
(MAF/BW)  103
(7)  Transitional rainforest  (TRF)  106
(8) Ericaceous belt (EB)  113
(9) Afro alpine belt (AA)  118
(10)  Riverine vegetation  (RV)  127
(11)  Fresh-water lakes, lake shores, marsh andfoodplain vegeta­
tion  (FLV)  136
(Subtype  11a)  Freshwater lakes - Open water vegetation 
(FLV/OW)  136
(Subtype  11b)  Freshwater marshes and swamps, food- 
plains and lake shore vegetation  (FLV/M FS)  142
(12)  Salt-water lakes, salt-lake shores, marsh and pan vegetation 
(SLV)  147
(Subtype  12a)  Salt-water lakes - open water vegetation 
(SLV/OW)  148
(Subtype  12b)  Saltpans, saline /brackish and intermit­
tent wetlands and salt-lake shore vegetation 
(SLV/SSS)  151
A P P E N D IX   I
The vegetation  types o f Ethiopia according to 
Pichi  Sermolli  (1957)  157
(1)  Deserto  [Desert]  157
(2) Steppa  graminosa,  perenniboscosa  e  sufruticosa  [Grass, 
perennial  herb  and  subshrub  steppe]  157
(3)  Steppa arbustata  [Shrub steppe]  157
(4) Fruticetosubdesertico  [Subdesert  scrub]  158
(5) Fruticeto subdesertico succulento alberato 
[Subdesert  trees succulent scrub]  158
(6) Boscaglia xerofla rada
[Broken  xerophilous  open woodland]  158
(7) Boscaglia xerofla  [Xerophilous  open woodland]  159
(8) Boscaglia  a  bambu  (Oxytenanthera)  [Bamboo  thicket 
(1Oxytenanthera)]  159
(10)  Boscaglia efruticeto sempreverdi montani  [Montane  ev­
ergreen  thicket and  scrub]  160
(11)  Savanna (vari tipi)  [Savanna  (various  types)]  160
(12)  Savanna montana  [Montane savanna]  161
(13)  Bosco caducifolio  [Deciduous woodland]  161
(15)  Forestå secca sempreverde montana
[Montane dry evergreen  forest]  162
(17)  Forestå umida sempreverde montana 
[Montane  moist evergreen  forest]  162
(18)  Forestå a bambu (Arundinaria) [Bamboo  forest 
(Arundinaria)]  163
(19)  Fruticeto e steppa altimontani 
[Altimontane  scrub and  steppe]  163
(20) Formazioni afroalpine 
[Afroalpine  formations]  164
(23)  Formazioni riparie [Riparian formations]  165
(24) Formazionipalustri [Swamp  formations]  165
a p p e n d i x
  2
The vegetation  types o f Ethiopia according to
White  (1983)  167
(19a)  Undifferentiated  montane  vegetation  (A)  Afromontane 
167
(29b) Undifferentiated  [Sudanian]  woodland  (B)  Ethiopian 
169
(42) Somalia-Masai  Acacia-Commiphora  deciduous  bushland 
and thicket  170
(54)  Semi-desert grassland and shrubland  (B)  Somalia-Masai 
170
(65) Altimontane vegetation in tropical Africa  171
(71)  Regs, hamadas, wadis  171
W hite’s  mapping units with  doubtful or marginal  o c ­
currence  in  Ethiopia  172
(17)  Cultivation and secondary grassland replacing upland and 
montane forest in Africa 
vjq
.
6

BS  5 8
T A B L E   O F   C O N T E N T S
(43)  Sahel  Acacia  wooded grassland and deciduous  bushland 
l72
(62)  Mosaic of edaphic grassland and Acacia  wooded grassland
m
(35)  Transition from undifferentiated woodland to Acacia decid­
uous  bushland and  wooded grassland  (B)  Ethiopian  type 
and (61) Edaphic grassland ofthe Upper Kile basin  173
(38)  East African  evergreen  and semi-evergreen  bushland  and 
thicket  175
(64) Mosaic  of edaphic grassland and semi-aquatic  vegetation 
(II) Sudanian Region  176
A P P E N D IX   3
W oody  plants  in  the  Flora  of Ethiopia  and  Eritrea
assigned  to vegetation  types  177
a p p e n d i x
 
4
Development  o f  classification  system  criteria  and 
their  implementation  in  G RASS  G IS  script  for  the 
Atlas of the Potential Vegetation o f Ethiopia  238
A P P E N D IX   5
Officially  recognised  classification  o f the  ecosystems 
o f Ethiopia  251
1.  Afroalpine and  Subafroalpine Ecosystem  251
2.  Dry  Evergreen  Montane  Forest  and  Grassland 
complex  251
3.  Moist Evergreen  Montane  Forest Ecosystem  252
4.  Acacia-Commiphora Woodland  Ecosystem  252
5.  Combretum-Terminalia Woodland Ecosystem  252
6.  Lowland,  Semi-evergreen  Forest  Ecosystem  253
7.  Desert and  Semi-desert  Scrubland  Ecosystem  253
8.  Aquatic Ecosystem  253
References  255
Map  plates  o f the  potential  vegetation  o f Ethiopia. 
1:2,000,000  259
Index to plant names  293
Index to Ethiopian place names  303

Introduction
Generalised  vegetation  maps  showing  plant  forma­
tions  or  floristically  characterized  associations  have 
for  long  been  published  for  Africa  as  a  whole  or  for 
various parts  of the  continent.  Early vegetation  maps 
o f this  type were  first published  by German  botanists 
by  the  end  of the  19th  Century,  for  example  Engler’s 
first  map  o f  the  vegetation  of Africa  (Engler,  1882), 
showing  the  difference  between  the  parts  of  Africa 
covered by  forests  (Engler’s  Waldgebiet -  forest region) 
and  those  covered  by  woodlands  and  wooded  grass­
lands  (Engler’s  Steppengebiet  -  grassland  and  wooded 
grassland region).  Engler further developed his views 
on  the  geographical  distribution  of  African  vegeta­
tion  in  a  number  o f subsequent  works  (Engler,  1908, 
1910),  but  his  basic  distinction  between  forest on  one 
side  and  woodland,  wooded  grassland  and  grassland 
on  the  other,  remained  the  same,  and  has  survived  to 
the present work.
The  first vegetation  map covering  the  Horn  o f A f­
rica  (comprising  the  present  states  o f Eritrea,  Ethio­
pia,  Djibouti  and  Somalia)  was  published  by  Negri 
(1940)  at a  scale o f 1:7,000,000,  but  that pioneer work 
has  been  completely  superseded  by  later  vegetation 
maps.
Need for a new vegetation map of Ethiopia 
realised in connection with the Ethiopian 
Flora project
In  connection  with  the  third  International  Symposi­
um on  the Flora of Ethiopia and Eritrea in Copenhagen  in 
1999,  Friis  and  Sebsebe  Demissew  (
qooi
)  provided  a 
detailed account o f how the vegetation types of Ethio­
pia  had  been  conceptualized  by  earlier  authors,  and 
how they had visualised their various ideas about gen­
eralised vegetation  categories  in Ethiopia.  Apart from 
the  maps  by  Pichi  Sermolli 
(1955,  1957), 
the  review 
dealt  chiefly  with  the  UNESCO-AETFAT-UNSO 
Vegetation  map  o f Africa  (White,  1983),  but  present­
ed also a detailed discussion of the vegetation  types of
Ethiopia  by  Breitenbach  (1963),  the  analyses  of  the 
forests o f the Horn o f Africa by Friis  (1992) and a new 
synthesis  o f  a  generalised  map  o f  the  vegetation  of 
Ethiopia  on  a  small  scale  by  Sebsebe  Demissew  etal. 
(1996).
Since  the  review  by  Friis  and  Sebsebe  Demissew 
(2001),  a  number  o f  classifications  and  maps  have 
been produced on a relatively small scale, for example 
1:10,000,000  or  smaller  (CSE,  1997;  Sebsebe  De­
missew  etal.,  2004).  This  was,  almost  unchanged,  ac­
cepted  as  the  official  classification  o f  Ethiopian  eco­
systems  in  the  first  printed  version  o f  2005  (IBC, 
2005),  and  is  still  accepted,  as  appears  from  the  ver­
sion  placed on  the  Internet by  the Ethiopian  Institute 
o f  Biodiversity  Conservation  and  rendered  here  in 
Appendix  5  (p.  251).  However,  discussions  at  the 
Third  International  Symposium on  the Flora of Ethiopia 
and Eritrea  in  Copenhagen  in  1999  (Friis  &  Ryding, 
2001)  showed that there was a considerable interest in 
a  new vegetation  map  on a bigger scale in connection 
with  the conclusion  o f the  Ethiopian  Flora  Project.  It 
was  not  thought  realistic  to  produce  a  map  on  a  big­
ger  scale  than  1:5,000,000  in  connection  with  the  ac­
tual  Flora  volumes.  A   range  o f  proposals  were  put 
forward  at  the  symposium,  particularly  as  to  how  de­
tailed a  map it would be  feasible to produce, and how 
to  tackle  the problems  o f potential  vegetation  in  rela­
tion  to  the  actual  Ethiopian  vegetation  that  is  deeply 
influenced by  man.
It  is  not  rare  that  large-scale  vegetation  maps  are 
produced  in connection with  flora projects,  for exam­
ple  a  vegetation  map  in  1:2,500,000  o f  the  countries 
(now  Zambia,  Malawi,  Zimbabwe,  Botswana  and  the 
Caprivi  Strip  of  Namibia)  covered  by  the  Flora 
Zambesiaca  (Wild  &  Grandvaux  Barbosa,  1967). 
However,  when  the deadline  for actual  production  of 
the  general  volume  o f  the  Flora of Ethiopia  and Eritrea 
drew  near  in  2007-2008,  it  was  not  possible  to  con­
sider production  o f a  detailed vegetation  map  as  part 
o f the  Ethiopian  Flora  Project  itself.  Instead,  a  brief
9

IN T R O D U C T IO N
BS  5 8
review, with  a small-scale generalised vegetation map, 
was produced and published in Volume 8 o f the Flora 
(Sebsebe  Demissew Sc  Friis,  2009).  This  solution was 
somewhat  unsatisfactory  because  it  left  unresolved 
many  o f the  problems  that  had  been  raised  and  dis­
cussed by  Friis and  Sebsebe  Demissew  (2001).
The VECEA-project - 
“Vegetation map for land-use planning, 
natural resource management and conser­
vation of biodiversity in Eastern Africa”
Taking  into  consideration  the  somewhat  unsatisfac­
tory  situation  for  producing  a  vegetation  map  in 
connection  with  the  final  volume  o f the  Flora of Ethio­
pia and Eritrea  and  the  conclusion  o f  the  Ethiopian 
Flora  project,  it  was  with  pleasure  and  relief  that 
Sebsebe  Demissew  and  lb   Friis  accepted  an  oppor­
tunity  for  a  more  detailed  study  and  the  production 
o f  a  new  GIS-based  potential  vegetation  map  of 
Ethiopia.  This  opening  turned  up  when  the  two  au­
thors  were  introduced  to  the  VECEA-project,  which 
acronym stands for  Vegetation and Climate Change in East­
ern Africa: A high resolution digital vegetation map for land use 
planning,  natural resource management and conservation of bi­
odiversity  in  Eastern Africa.  The  project  was  proposed 
jointly  by  the  institute  Forest  &  Landscape  Den­
mark,  University  o f  Copenhagen,  and  scientists  at 
World  Agroforestry  Centre  (ICR AF),  Nairobi,  Ken­
ya,  and  a  proposal  for  financing  by  the  Rockefeller 
Foundation  was  put  forward  by  the  two  institutions 
in  November  2007.
A  first  grant  was  given  to  the  VECEA-project  to 
cover work  in  the years  2008-2010, and work began  in 
2008, involving scientists from a range o f East African 
countries  (Ethiopia,  Kenya,  Uganda,  Tanzania, 
Rwanda,  Malawi  and  Zambia).  Sebsebe  Demissew  is 
the  botanist  invited  to  represent  Ethiopia.  As  men­
tioned,  he  and  lb   Friis  have  previously  published  a 
critical  review  o f previous  works  on  the vegetation  of 
Ethiopia  (Friis Sc  Sebsebe  Demissew,  2001). The  third 
author  o f  this  publication,  Paulo  van  Breugel,  c/o 
World  Agroforestry  Centre,  ICRAF,  has  become  in­
volved  in  this work  through  the VECEA-project.  The
authors want to stress that all  three have been contrib­
uting essential  parts o f the  text and  the map.
The  rationale  behind  the  VECEA-project  was  to 
mobilise existing knowledge o f the distribution of veg ­
etation types in Africa, both represented in the form o f 
existing  vegetation  maps,  and  in  the  knowledge  o f 
botanists,  who  are  familiar  with  the vegetation of the 
involved  countries.  The  ultimate  purpose  o f  the  V E ­
CEA-project  is  to  enhance  natural  resource  manage­
ment and biodiversity conservation in the East African 
region now and in the future. The idea is to link occur­
rence of vegetation with  agricultural  potential, and  to 
correlate  distribution  o f vegetation  types  with  spatial 
changes  in  climatic  and  edaphic  conditions.  This  in­
formation  will  tell  foresters  and  agronomists  about 
likely  changes  in  agricultural  potential  as  a  result  o f 
climate change, and help providing for design of adap­
tive  strategies  to  counterbalance  that  change  (unpub­
lished project proposal,  November 2007).
For most o f the countries  involved in  the VECEA- 
project,  generalised  vegetation  maps  had  been  pro­
duced  during  the  colonial  period,  or  later  in  connec­
tion with more recent development projects.  However, 
for Ethiopia the situation is different. The country has 
escaped  colonisation,  although  it  was  invaded  and 
partly occupied by  Fascist  Italy in  1935-1941.  For Ethi­
opia no vegetation  map has been produced on the b a­
sis o f as detailed studies as  the vegetation maps cover­
ing  the  East  African  countries  further  to  the  south. 
The  two  previous  large-scaled  vegetation  maps  o f 
Ethiopia,  both  in  1:5,000,000,  that produced by Pichi 
Sermolli  (1957), part  o f a vegetation  map o f the Horn 
o f Africa,  and  that  by  White  (1983),  part  o f a  vegeta­
tion  map  covering  the  whole  of Africa,  showed  con­
siderable  differences  with  regard  to  the  vegetation 
types  mapped and  their extent.
Digitalisation of the maps by Pichi Sermolli (1957) 
and  White  (1983),  and  the  import  o f these  digitised 
maps  into  GIS,  demonstrated  clearly  that  the  maps 
were  largely  at  variance  with  each  other when  super­
imposed, in such a way that  the extents of related v e g ­
etation  types  on  the  two  maps  were  not  congruent. 
Moreover,  the  vegetation  types  on  the  two  maps, 
which  are  largely  related  to  altitude,  did  not  agree
10

BS  5 8
IN T R O D U C T IO N
with  the  complex  relief of  Ethiopia,  as  the  topogra­
phy of that country is known today. The most striking 
example,  but only one o f many,  is  the Afroalpine veg­
etation on  the Sanetti  plateau,  the highest part  of the 
Bale  mountains.  This  high  plateau,  between  20  and 
30  kilometres across,  is  the  most extensive area  above 
4000 metres altitude in tropical Africa, but this moun­
tain  massif had  not  at  all  been  indicated  on  the  map 
by  Pichi  Sermolli  (1957).  Instead,  Pichi  Sermolli’s 
map  had  indicated  continuous  montane  savanna  for 
the area where the  Sanetti plateau  is.  The  Sanetti pla­
teau  is  marked,  but  not  precisely located,  on  the  map 
o f  White  (1983).  Sufficiently  detailed  topographic 
maps of Ethiopia were not available to cover the need 
o f vegetation  mapping.  O nly modern satellite  images 
have made  available  detailed  topographical  mapping 
o f even  the  remotest  parts of Ethiopia.
The  current  publication  is  a  combination  of  the 
new  vegetation  map  needed  for  the  Ethiopian  Flora 
Project,  and  at  the  same  time  an  input  for  Ethiopia  to 
the  VECEA-project,  a  substitute  for  the  previous  re­
gional  vegetation  maps  that  were  never  produced  for 
Ethiopia. A  new and better vegetation map of this top­
ographically  complex  country  is  possible  now,  when 
GIS-technique  has  been  developed  and  can  be  used 
with  detailed  digital  elevation  models  (DEMs)  that 
have now been produced and made publicly available.
The  first  DEM  to  be  used  in  connection  with  the 
Ethiopian  Flora  Project  was  GLOBE  (blastings  etal., 
1999),  which  had  a  resolution  o f  one  kilometre  and 
was  utilised,  for example,  in  maps  showing the distri­
bution o f species of Solanum studied for the Ethiopian 
Flora  Project  (Friis,  2006).  Here we have used a mod­
el  with  much  higher  resolution,  the  SRTM   (Shuttle 
Radar  Topography  Mission)  90  x  90  metres  Digital 
Elevation  Model,  as  provided  by  the  CGIAR-CSI 
(The  Consultative  Group  on  International  Agricul­
tural  research,  Consortium  for  Spatial  Information 
(CGIAR-CSI,  2008)).  The  data  set  for  this  DEM  is 
freely  available  from  the  home  page  of  C G IA R  
(http://csi.cgiar.org/).
In  this  work,  the  vegetation  o f Ethiopia  has  been 
divided  into  twelve  major  types,  some  o f these  divid­
ed  into  subtypes.  The  vegetation  types  are  based  on 
information  from  previous  literature,  field experience 
o f the  authors,  as  well  as  on  an  analysis  of the  infor­
mation  about  approximately  1300  species  o f woody 
plants  in  the Flora of Ethiopia and Eritrea.  It  has  been  at­
tempted  to  define  simple  criteria  for  the  vegetation 
types  and  relate  them  to  altitude  and  other  topo­
graphical  features,  for  example  rivers  and  lakes,  and 
rainfall  patterns,  in  short  such  parameters  that  could 
be handled by GIS.  It is clear from detailed studies of 
the  maps  by  Pichi  Sermolli  (1957)  and  White  (1983) 
that  they  have  also  used  topography  as  an  important 
guide  in  the  delimitation  o f  their  vegetation  types, 
but now it is possible to greatly refine their results.  O f 
the  vegetation  types  and  subtypes  described  in  the 
text,  we  have  found  it  possible  to  map  fifteen  units 
that  have  large  enough  extension  to  appear  on  the 
map  and  can  be  defined  in  relation  to  topographic 
features  (altitude,  rivers and  lakes)  and  rainfall.

Acknowledgements
This  work  is  the  result  of  the  converged  efforts  of 
many  projects,  funding  bodies  and  institutions,  and 
we wish  to thank  them all.  However, most support for 
this  work  can  be  grouped  into  two  major  categories, 
which  we  could  call  the  two  “legs”  on  which  our  ef­
forts stand.
The  older  “leg”  is  the  Ethiopian  Flora  Project, 
which began  in  1980 in order to produce a new manu­
al,  the Flora of Ethiopia and Eritrea.  This project  has pub­
lished  the  last  two  volumes  of the  Flora  in  2009.  The 
core support  for the Ethiopian  Flora  Project  has been 
provided  by  the  Swedish  Government  via  SIDA/ 
SAREC  (acronyms  for,  respectively,  the  Swedish  In­
ternational  Development  Cooperation  Agency,  and 
SIDA’s  sector  department  for  support  to  research  in 
partner countries,  and  research  o f importance  for  the 
development  of  these  countries).  The  “leg”  of  the 
Ethiopian  Flora  Project  has  from  Danish  side  been 
supported  by grants  from  the  Carlsberg  Foundation, 
which  has  partly  financed  the  activities  o f lb   Friis  in 
Ethiopia  for  nearly  forty  years,  and  sometimes  also 
the collaboration o f Sebsebe Demissew. The Carlsberg 
grants have mainly been  used  for field work  in  remote 
and  little  known  parts  o f Ethiopia.  Other  of Sebsebe 
Demissew’s  field  activities  were  supported  by  the 
Norwegian  Programme  for  Development,  Research 
and  Education  (N UFU)  and  activities  carried  out  in 
collaboration  with  Prof.  Inger  Nordal,  University  of 
Oslo.
The  second  “leg,”  the  VECEA-project  described 
earlier  in  the  Introduction,  has  come  about  in  2008
due  to  the  Forest  &  Landscape  Denmark,  University 
of  Copenhagen,  the  World  Agroforestry  Centre 
(ICRAF),  Nairobi,  Kenya,  and  the  Rockefeller Foun­
dation.  The authors  are  indebted to  these  institutions 
for  support  and  encouragement  while  carrying  out 
the present work.
Sebsebe  Demissew  and  lb   Friis  would  also like  to 
thank  their  universities,  the  Addis  Abeba  University 
and  the  University o f Copenhagen  for enabling them 
to work with  the Flora of Ethiopia and Eritrea and  the V E ­
CEA-project.  The  funding  from  SAREC,  NUFU  and 
the  Carlsberg  Foundation  has  been  administrated 
through  these two  universities,  and  it would  not have 
been  possible  for  Sebsebe  Demissew  to participate  in 
SIDA/SAREC-financed  activities  if the  Addis  Abeba 
University was  not an  official  SIDA/SAREC  partner. 
All  three  authors  are  grateful  to  their  employers  and 
sponsors  for the support  they have  received  in the p e ­
riod  o f data  gathering  for,  and  in  the  final  execution 
o f this work. The authors would also like to thank two 
anonymous  reviewers  for  their  suggestions,  and  Vic­
toria Gordon  Friis, for reading the text and proposing 
corrections  with  regard  to  readability  and  linguistic 
precision.  She  did  this  after  having  seen  most  of the 
vegetation types in the field  in Ethiopia.  However, the 
responsibility for errors in  this  work  remains with  the 
authors.
Last, but not least, we would like to thank the Roy­
al  Danish  Academy  o f Sciences  and  Letters  for pub­
lishing  this  atlas  and  the  accompanying  descriptive 
text.
12

Topography, geology, soil and climate of Ethiopia
Details about distribution  of the  potential vegetation 
types presented in  this atlas are based on a number of 
parameters:  altitude  (also  representing  temperature), 
precipitation  and  a  number  o f other  factors  that  are 
mentioned  or  used  if  they  have  been  available  in  a 
GIS-usable  form,  for example  drainage  system,  pres­
ence of water bodies and flood plains, salinity and the 
presence  o f  certain  soil  types,  particularly  vertisols 
(black  cotton  soils).  It  has  been  considered  better  to 
use a high-resolution digital elevation model  to repre­
sent  temperature  than  to  use  extrapolated  tempera­
ture  data  from  the  rather  few  meteorological  stations 
in  the country.  O ther environmental factors o f impor­
tance  for  the  development  of potential  have  not been 
available in a form  that could be used in the GIS-anaI- 
yses.
In  order  to  make  the  atlas  as  reader-friendly  as 
possible,  this  chapter  presents  a  summary  o f general 
information  about  the  topography  of  Ethiopia  and 
additional  information  about  environmental  factors, 
including  geology,  soil  types  and  the  seasonal  distri­
bution of precipitation, some o f which is has not been 
possible  to  include  directly in  the GIS-analyses.
Topography, place names, floristic units of
the 
Flora of Ethiopia and Eritrea
Ethiopia is a land-locked country in the central part of 
the  Horn  o f Africa.  It  shares  borders  with  the  follow­
ing countries  (clockwise  from  the  north,  with  the  ap­
proximate  length  o f  the  shared  borders  indicated  in 
brackets):  Eritrea  (approximately  910  kilometres), 
Djibouti  (approximately  350  kilometres),  Somalia 
(approximately  1600  kilometres),  Kenya  (approxi­
mately  860  kilometres),  and  Sudan  (approximately 
1600  kilometres).
Ethiopia  extends  from  30  24’  to  140  53’  northern 
latitude and  from 330 00’  to 48° oo’ eastern longitude. 
The  extension  o f  the  country  is  approximately  1270 
kilometres  in  the  direction  north-south,  and  approxi­
mately  1650 kilometres  in  the direction west-east.  The 
area o f Ethiopia  is  1,104,300  square  kilometres.  In A f­
rica Sudan, Algeria, the  Democratic  Republic o f Con­
go,  Libya,  Chad,  Niger,  Angola,  Mali  and  South  A f­
rica  are  larger  than  Ethiopia,  but  Ethiopia  is  larger 
than any country in Western Europe, covering an area 
approximately  the  combined  size  o f  France  and 
Spain.  The  altitudes  o f Ethiopia  range  from  125  me­
tres below sea level  to 4533 metres above sea level, and 
although  the mountains in Ethiopia are not as high as 
the  highest  peaks  in  Tanzania,  Kenya,  Uganda  and 
the  Democratic  Republic  o f  Congo,  Ethiopia  has 
more  ground  above  2000  metres  altitude  than  any 
other country in Africa.
Major  features  of the  topography  o f Ethiopia  can 
be  seen  in  Fig.  r  (p.  14),  which  indicates  names  of 
these features, and Fig.  2  (p.  15), which shows the gen­
eral  relief in  more  than  detail  than  in  Fig.  1.  Ethiopia 
consists o f extensive areas of highland, surrounded by 
lowland  on  all  sides  except  to  the  north,  where  the 
Western  highlands  continue  into  Eritrea.  The  high­
lands  are  divided  by  the  Ethiopian  sector  o f the  East 
African Rift Valley that runs from the Red Sea through 
Ethiopia  and  southward  through  eastern  Africa  to 
Mozambique  (the  southernmost  branch  of  the  East 
African  Rift  is  the  valley  of the  Shire  tributary  to  the 
River Zambezi).
The  sector o f the  East African  Rift Valley  running 
through  central  Ethiopia  is  marked  in  the  north  by 
the triangular Afar lowlands in the AF floristic region, 
with  the widest part  towards  the  Red  Sea coast  in  Eri­
trea.  The  Eritrean  coastal  lowland,  20  to  80  kilome­
tres  wide,  is  separated  from  the  Ethiopian  part  o f the 
Afar lowlands by a row o f volcanic peaks,  the  Danakil 
Alps.  The  scarce  run-off  towards  the  east  from  the 
northern  part  o f the Western  highlands  and  from  the 
Danakil  Alps  drains  into  saline  lakes  in  the Afar  low­
lands,  from which  commercial  salt is extracted.
Further to the south, from approximately 90 north­
ern  latitude,  the  Rift  Valley  becomes  a  rather  narrow
r3

T O P O G R A P H Y ,  G E O L O G Y ,  S O IL   A N D   C L IM A T E   O F   E T H IO P IA
BS  5 8
f ig

i.  Names and positions of important topographic features of Ethiopia. The solid grey lines indicate the floristic regions 
of the Flora of Ethiopia and Eritrea; see further in  Fig. 3 for the standard abbreviations used for these regions used  for reference 
in this work.  Red diamond: Addis Abeba. The names of some topographic features are indicated by letters or numbers. 
Mountain massifs:  1 -  Semien, with  numerous peaks, including Ras Dejen and Bwahit.  2  - Amba-Alage. 3 - Abune Yosef.  4 
- Guna. 5 - Amba Farit.  6 - Abuye Mcda. 7 - Choke.  8 - Gurage. 9  -  Mountains of Arsi,  including Chilalo,  Badda and 
Kaka.  10 - Gara Muleta.  n - Bale mountains, including Batu and Tulu  Dimtu;  the Sanetti plateau makes up most of the 
brown  under the number n; the  Harenna forest covers most of the southern slope to the lowland south of the  number n. 
Lakes and reservoirs: A - Turkana.  B  - Chew Bahir.  C - Chamo.  D - Abaya. E - Central group of Rift valley lakes, includ­
ing (from south  to north)  the isolated Awasa, the dense cluster of Shala, Abijata, Langeno and Ziway;  further to the north 
in the Rift Valley the  Koka Dam on the Awash river.  F -  Metahara [Beseka]. G - Cluster of desert lakes,  including Afambo, 
Bario,  Laitaf, Gamari, and Abe.  H  - Afrera. J - Cluster of desert lakes with Asale,  Karum and unnamed lakes in  the 
northern part of the Afar lowlands.  K - Ashange  [Ashenge].  L - Hayk and Ardibo.  M - Tana.  N - Wonchi.  P -  Fincha and 
Chomen reservoirs.  Rivers:  a -  Mereb.  b - Tekeze. c - Abay [Blue Nile],  d - Baro, with the southern tributaries Akobo and 
Gilo, e - Omo, with the northern tributaries Gojeb and Gibe,  f - Genale. g - Wabi Shebcle.  h  - Awash.
and deep-sided  trench  that separates  the Western and 
Eastern  highlands  o f Ethiopia.  The  Rift  Valley  is  ap­
proximately  fifty  kilometres  wide  in  this  part.  The 
southern  half  o f  the  Ethiopian  segment  o f  the  Rift
Valley  is  dotted  by  a  chain  of  relatively  large  lakes, 
some  of which  hold  fresh water,  others  contain saline 
water.  The  Rift  Valley  lakes  are  fed  by  small  streams 
mainly from  the east and  the  south.
14

BS  5 8
T O P O G R A P H Y ,  P L A C E   N A M E S,  F L O R IS T IC   U N IT S  O F   T H E   FLO R A   O F  E T H IO P IA   A N D   ER IT R EA
Eritrea
350
>4500
4250-4500
4000-4250
3750-4000
3500-3750
3250-3500
3000-3250
2750-3000
2500-2750
2250-2500
2000-2250
1750-2000
1500-1750
1250-1500
1000-1250
750-1000
500-750
250-500
0-250
Sudan
Kenya
Uganda
F
i g

2. Altitudes in Ethiopia indicated at intervals of 
250
 metres each. A small area below sea level in the Afar depression 
has been included with the 
0-250
 metres interval. The map is based on the same digital elevation model (DEM) as used 
for the vegetation analyses in this work, the SRTM (Shuttle Radar Topography Mission) 
90
 x 
90
 metres Digital Eleva­
tion Model. The DEM has been provided by the CGIAR-CSI (The Consultative Group on International Agricultural 
research, Consortium for Spatial Information (CGIAR-CSI, 
2008
)).
The Eastern highlands of Ethiopia slope gently to­
wards  the  Southern  and  South-eastern  lowlands  that 
continue  into  Somalia  and  extend  to  the  Indian 
Ocean;  these  areas  range  from  altitudes  o f  approxi­
mately 350  to  1500  metres.  West  of the  Western  high­
lands,  towards  the  border  with  Sudan,  is  a  strip  of 
lowland,  the  Western  lowlands,  ranging  from  alti­
tudes  of approximately 350  to  1500  metres.  The  high­
lands  of  Ethiopia,  on  both  sides  of  the  Rift  Valley, 
have a general elevation  ranging from  altitudes o f ap­
proximately  1500  to  3000  metres,  but  most  areas  are 
below  2500  metres  altitude.  Scattered  over  the  high­
lands are higher mountain massifs and volcanic cones 
that  often  reach  altitudes  over  4000  metres.  Both  the 
large  massifs  and  the volcanic  cones  tend  to  be  high­
est  in  a  zone  on  either  side  o f the  Rift  Valley.  Along 
the western side of the Western highlands, where they 
meet  with  the  Western  lowlands,  there  is  an  escarp­
ment  that  in  this  work  is  referred  to  as  the  Western 
escarpment.  Along  the  eastern  side  o f  the  Western 
highlands,  where  they  meet  with  the  Afar  lowlands, 
there  is  also  a steep escarpment, which  in  this  book  is 
referred  to as  the  Eastern  escarpment;  the  Eastern es­
carpment  is generally steeper  than  the Western.
!5

T O P O G R A P H Y ,  G E O L O G Y ,  S O IL   AN D   C L IM A T E   O F   E T H IO P IA
BS  5 8
f i g

3
. Floristic regions of Ethiopia and Eritrea used for recording distributions in the 
Flora 
of Ethiopia and Eritrea
 and in this work. The floristic regions are based on the former adminis­
trative units that were used under the government of Haile Selassie I and continued to be 
used up to the complete reorganisation of the administrative system following the new 
constitution as a federal republic in 
1995
. Borders between traditional regions follow 
topographical features, while borders between the new states follow ethno-linguistic 
patterns. EW: western Eritrea, above 
1000
 metres altitude. EE: eastern Eritrea, delimited 
towards EW by the contour at an altitude of 
1000
 metres. AF: Afar, delimited towards TU, 
WU, SU, AR and HA by the contour at an altitude of 
1000
 metres, and towards EE by the 
old border. TU: upland Tigray; the previous Tigray region above the contour at an 
altitude of 
1000
 metres. WU: upland Welo, the previous Welo region above the contour at 
an altitude of 
1000
 metres. GD: the previous Gonder region. GJ: the previous Gojam 
region. SU: upland Shewa, the previous Shewa region above the contour at an altitude of 
1000
 metres. AR: the previous Arsi region. WG: the previous Welega region. IL: the 
previous Illubabor region. KF: the previous Kefa region. GG: the previous Gamo-Gofa 
region. SD: the previous Sidamo region. BA: the previous Bale region. HA: the previous 
Harerge region, modified in such a way that it is delimited against AF by the contour at an 
altitude of 
1000
 metres. Reproduced with permission from the 
Flora of Ethiopia and Eritrea.
16

BS  5 8
T O P O G R A P H Y ,  P L A C E  N A M E S,  F L O R IS T IC   U N IT S  O F   T H E   FLO R A   O F   E T H IO P IA   A N D   ER IT R E A
The  morphology  o f  the  Ethiopian  mountains  has 
been shaped by erosion, and most mountains are rela­
tively  steep-sided.  Few  of the  peaks  rising  above  the 
plateau  are  flat  except  for  a  number  of level-topped 
mountains  in  the  central  and  northern  part  o f  the 
country,  where  the  original  plateau  form  the  top  of 
mountains  with  eroded  sides;  these  steep-sided,  flat- 
topped  mountains  are  in  Ethiopia  known  as  ambas 
(from a word in G e ’ez and Amharic, amba\  in Tigrinya 
emba or imba).
The  two  largest  and  highest  massifs  in  the  Ethio­
pia  highlands  are  the  Semien  mountains  in  the  north 
and  the Bale mountains in the south-east. The highest 
peak  in  the  Semien  mountains,  and  the  highest point 
in  Ethiopia,  is  Ras Dejen  that reaches 4533 metres alti­
tude,  but  there  are  many  peaks  in  the  Semien  moun­
tains that reach above an altitude of 4000 metres. The 
highest  peak  in  the  Bale  mountains  is  Tulu  Dimtu 
that  reaches  4377  metres  altitude.
The  south-western  part  of the  Western  highlands 
is  not  as  high  as  the  northern  section,  and  is  cut  by 
many wide valleys.
A  list of the prominent mountain peaks with maxi­
mum  heights  above  3200  metres  altitude  has  been 
given  in  Table 3  (p.  125),  which  has  been  placed  near 
the description of the vegetation  types of these peaks, 
the Ericaceous belt (EB)  and  the Afro alpine belt  (AA).
Rivers  have  eroded  deep  valleys  into  the  high­
lands,  particularly  into  the  Western  highlands.  In 
places  the  rivers  now  run  more  than  1800  metres  be­
low the level o f the plateau, and the largest river gorg­
es may be up to 30 kilometres wide. The water level in 
these  rivers  is  highly  fluctuation  with  the  seasons.  In 
the  dry seasons  the  rivers  at  the bottom  o f the gorges 
may  be  reduced  to  small  streams  filling  only  a  small 
part  o f the  usually  rocky or gravelly river bed,  be  dis­
solved into a chain o f stagnant pools or be completely 
dried out, but during the rainy seasons  the water level 
of  these  rivers  rises  dramatically,  often  within  a  few 
hours  after  the  onset  o f heavy  rain,  and  the  rivers  are 
transformed  into rapid streams unsuitable  for naviga­
tion  and almost  impossible  to cross without  a  bridge. 
Due  to  the  high  rainfall  in  the  south-western  part  of 
Ethiopia,  the  rivers  and  streams  in  that  part  o f  the
country have  a  constant water supply  throughout  the 
year.
The major systems o f rivers and tributaries of Ethi­
opia  have  traditionally been  used  to  divide  the  coun­
try  into  geographical  units.  These  units  are  partly 
identical  with  the  floristic  units  used  for  the  Flora of 
Ethiopia and Eritrea  and  shown  in  Fig.  3,  with  a  list  of 
the  full  names  o f the  flora  regions  in  the  legend.  For 
practical reasons  the floristic  units used  for the Flora of 
Ethiopia and Eritrea are also used here to refer to specific 
parts o f Ethiopia.  O nly  the standard  abbreviations  of 
the  floristic  regions,  each  abbreviation  consisting  of 
two  capital  letters,  are  used,  with  an  indication  that 
the abbreviation  refers  to a  floristic  region.
Because of the general westward slope o f the West­
ern  highlands,  many large  rivers are  tributaries o f the 
Nile system, which drains an extensive area o f the cen­
tral portion o f the  plateau.  The Abay  [Blue  Nile],  the 
Tekeze,  and  the  Baro  river  systems  are  among  these, 
and  these  rivers  account  for  about  half o f  the  coun­
try’s  water outflow.  In  an  increasing  number  o f cases 
the  potential  o f the  rivers  as  sources  of hydroelectric 
power  is  being  utilized,  and  a  number  o f man-made 
reservoirs  are  being  created.  The  major  river  systems 
in Ethiopia have been listed in Table 4 (p. 133)  together 
with  the description o f (10)  Riverine vegetation  (RV).
•  The  Mereb river.
•  The  river system  of the  northern part of the Afar low­
lands.  The  rivers  terminate  in  saline lakes  in  the Afar 
lowlands.
•  The Awash  river.  The  river  terminates  in  large,  saline 
lakes near the border with  Djibouti.
•  The  Wabi  Shebele  river  system.  Most  years  the  Wabi 
Shebele  river  does  not  reach  the  Indian  Ocean,  but 
dries out before.
•  The Genale-Weyb-Dawa river system, with the Welmel 
and  the Weyb  and other rivers.  At  the  Ethiopian  bor­
der the rivers  meet and form  the large River Juba that 
flows  through  the  South-eastern  lowlands  into  the 
southern part of Somalia and meets  the Indian Ocean 
near the  town of Kisimaayo on the coast.
•  The  rivers of the central  and  southern part of the  Rift 
Valley. The rivers  terminate in  the  Rift Valley lakes.

T O P O G R A P H Y ,  G E O L O G Y ,  SO IL   A N D   C L IM A T E   O F   E T H IO P IA
•  The Gibe-Omo river system, with  the Gojeb river as a 
large tributary. The river terminates  in  Lake Turkana.
•  The  Baro-Akobo-Gilo  river  system.  At  the  Ethiopian 
border  the  rivers  meet  and  run  to  the  White  Nile  in 
Sudan as one stream.
•  The  Abay  [Blue  Nile]  river  system,  with  the  Shinfa 
and  Dinder rivers.  Several  of the  rivers  in  this  system 
cross  the  Ethiopian  border  as  individual  streams  and 
meet in  Sudan  before joining the White  Nile at  Khar­
toum.
•  The  Tekeze-Angereb-Atbara  river  system.  Several  of 
the rivers  in  this  system  cross  the  Ethiopian  border as 
individual  streams  and  meet  in  Sudan  before joining 
the White  Nile.
Lakes are scattered over the Western highlands, in the 
central and southern part of the  Rift Valley and in  the 
Afar lowlands.  O n  the plateau  there  is  one  large  lake, 
Lake  Tana,  and  a  number  o f  smaller  lakes,  Lake 
Ashange  [Ashenge],  Lake  Hayk,  etc.,  as  well  as  a 
number  o f very  small  lakes,  many  o f which  are  vol­
canic crater lakes.  In the central part o f the Rift Valley 
there  are  two  large  lakes,  Lake  Abaya  and  Lake  Cha­
mo,  further north  there  is a range o f smaller lakes,  for 
example  Lake  Langeno,  Lake  Shala,  etc.,  and  a 
number  of small  crater  lakes;  some  o f these  lakes  are 
saline.  Saline  and  freshwater  lakes  exist  in  the  Afar 
lowlands.  Tables  of freshwater lakes, Table 5  (p.  140), 
and  o f saline  lakes,  Table  6  (p.155),  have  been  placed 
together  with  descriptions  o f the  vegetation  of these 
two  kinds  of habitats  ((Subtype  11a)  Freshwater lakes - 
Open water vegetation (FLV/OW)  and (Subtype 12a)  Salt­
water lakes - open water vegetation  (SLV/OW)).
Place names
Names  o f Ethiopian  localities  are often  transliterated 
rather differently by various authors, and the position 
of the places they represent is not always easily traced. 
In order to alleviate these problems, and to help read­
ers  localising  the  place  names,  the  authors  have  tried 
to  refer  to  or  cite  the  abbreviated  names  of the  flora 
regions  used in  the Flora of Ethiopia and Eritrea wherever 
appropriate.  See the map of the flora regions in Fig. 3.
b s
 
58
The  authors  have  also  tried  to  follow  a  well-known 
map o f Ethiopia in 1:2,000,000, produced by the Ethi­
opian  Mapping Authority  (Anonymous,  1997), as  au­
thority  of place  names  and  their  spelling.  This  map 
has  been  based  on  similar  maps  from  before  Eritrean 
independence, and has been frequently reprinted also 
after 1997.
For  the  present  text  it  has  been  necessary  also  to 
use  a  number  of  place  names  or  topographic  terms 
not  indicated  on  this  map,  for  example  the  Danakil 
Alps, the Semien mountains, the Bale mountains, with 
the  Sanetti  plateau  and  the  Harenna  forest,  the 
Ogaden,  etc.  These  names  or  terms  can  be  found  in 
Fig.  1  (p.  14),  and  they  may  also  sometimes  be  found 
on  maps  commercially  available  outside  Ethiopia. 
The  authors  have  for  such  names  selected  a  spelling 
that  is  commonly used.
The  authors  have  also  accepted  commonly  used 
designations  for  major  geographical  features,  for  ex­
ample  Western  highlands,  Eastern  highlands,  West­
ern  escarpment,  Eastern  escarpment,  Western  low ­
lands,  Afar  lowlands,  Southern  and  South-eastern 
lowlands.  These  names  are  not  used  on  the  above 
mentioned map of Ethiopia in 1:2,000,000. The name 
Riß  Valley  is  used  for  the  entire  rift  from  the  border 
with  Kenya to the border with Eritrea, which includes 
the Afar lowlands  and  the  area below sea  level  (Dana­
kil depression).  Where  possible,  these  names  are  indi­
cated  in  Fig.  1  or  explained  in  the  legend  to  that  fig­
ure.  Place  names  cited  from  other  authors  that apply 
different spelling from  the one used  in  this book have 
been  identified  with  names  on  the  above  mentioned 
map o f Ethiopia in  1:2,000,000, as  far as  this has been 
possible.
Geology and soils
A detailed  survey o f the geology o f Ethiopia has  been 
given  by  Mohr  (1971),  and  a  short  geological  history 
of Ethiopia  is  presented  by  Last  (2009).  This summa­
ry presentation  is intended only as background to  the 
biogeographical  information.  The  oldest  rocks  in 
Ethiopia  are  part  o f the  Crystalline  Basement, which 
is  pre-Cambrian  in  origin.  The  original  igneous  and
18

BS  5 8
G E O L O G Y   A N D   SO ILS
Sudan
Uganda
Legend
Cretaceous
Qaternary eolian
|   Tertiary
1   lower Cretaceous
|  
Cretaceous-Jurassic
Quaternary
I   Tertiary extrusiv and itrusiv
lower Jurassic
|   Jurassic
|  
Quaternary extrusiv and intrusiv

Triassic
1   preCambrian
^  
Ordovician
|  
Quaternary-Tertiary
j§§ 
Triassic-Permian
Paleozoic extrusiv and intrusiv 
^  
Pleistocene
f i g

4
. Geology of Ethiopia. Map compiled by ILRI (International Livestock Research Institute).
sedimentary  rocks  are  interbedded  with  schists  and 
gneisses  and  subsequent  igneous  intrusions.  The 
whole system is referred to as the Basement Complex.
A  number of transgressions of the sea in the Meso­
zoic  era  deposited  sandstones  (Adigrat  Sandstone) 
and limestones (Antalo  Limestone)  in the T U   floristic 
region  of  northern  Ethiopia.  Later  Mesozoic  sand­
stones  are  deposited  in  eastern  Ethiopia,  particularly 
in  the  HA  and  SD  floristic  regions.  The  Ogaden  re­
mained  covered  by  sea  to  the  end  o f  the  Cretaceous 
period.
A dramatic  uplift o f the highlands  marked  the  be­
ginning o f the Tertiary period. This was accompanied 
by massive outpour o f lava from numerous volcanoes,
r9

T O P O G R A P H Y ,  G E O L O G Y ,  S O IL   A N D   C L IM A T E   O F   E T H IO P IA
resulting in  the  often  more  than  one  thousand  metres 
thick basaltic shield  (the Trap Series o f lava deposits). 
The  formation  o f  the  Rift  Valley  resulted  in  further 
uplifting o f the parts o f the highlands next to the Rift, 
and  there  is  often  a difference o f more  than  thousand 
metres,  sometimes  up  to  two  thousand  metres,  be­
tween  the  floor o f the  Rift  and  the surrounding edges 
o f the  highlands.  Heavy  rainfall  and  fracturing o f the 
uplifted  highlands  initiated  the  early  development  of 
the continuously expanding river gorges  still  in  exist­
ence  on  the  highlands  and  described  above.  The  vol­
canic  activity  continued,  both  in  restricted  areas  on 
the  highlands  and  throughout  the  entire  Rift  Valley 
system  (the Aden  Series  of lava deposits).
A broad survey of the geology o f Ethiopia is shown 
in  Fig.  4  (p.  19). This map demonstrates  the  relatively 
uniform  geological  structure  o f  the  highlands  domi­
nated  by Tertiary extrusive and  intrusive  rocks  which 
clearly  contrasts  with  the  Palaeozoic  and  Mesozoic 
complex o f the T U  floristic region, the predominantly 
Mesozoic rocks prominent  in  the  BA and  HA  floristic 
regions,  the  Precambrian  and  Jurassic  rocks  in  the 
Abay [Blue Nile] gorge, and the many Quaternary ex­
trusive,  intrusive  and  eolian  formations  in  the AF  flo­
ristic region.
Pre-Cambrian  rocks  underlie  all  other  rocks  in 
Ethiopia.  They  form  a  peneplained  basement  o f ex­
tremely  folded,  metamorphosed  sediments  and  igne­
ous  intrusions.  The  Pre-Cambrian  rocks  include  met­
amorphosed  sandstone,  schists,  amphibole,  chlorite, 
quartzite and quartzo-feldspathic rocks,  as well  as oc­
casional intrusions of granites. These crystalline rocks 
are  visible  on  the  escarpments  o f the  highlands,  and 
they  form  the  rock  near  the  bottom  o f  many  of  the 
deep river valleys.
The  Mesozoic  rocks  of  Ethiopia  consist  o f sand­
stone  and  limestone.  They  appear  in  the  deep  river 
valleys  o f the  central  part  o f the  Western  highlands, 
and arc visible in the much eroded TU  floristic region, 
where  Enticho  Sandstone,  Adigrat  Sandstone,  Angu­
la Shale and Antalo Limestone are particularly promi­
nent.  Mesozoic  rocks  are  also  common  on  the  south­
eastern  slope  o f  the  Eastern  highlands,  where 
limestone  is  common.  Large  areas  in  the  eastern  part
b s
 
58
of the  SD  floristic  region,  in  the  southern  part of the 
BA floristic region  and  the  Ogaden  in the eastern and 
south-eastern  parts  o f the  H A  floristic  region  consist 
of Mesozoic  limestone,  gypsum  or geologically relat­
ed  rocks.
The  major  parts  o f  the  highlands  consist  of v o l­
canic  rocks dating mainly  from  the Tertiary  (the Trap 
Series).  The  volcanic  rocks  include  rhyolites,  trach­
ytes,  tuffs,  ignimbrites,  agglomerates  and  basalts. 
These rocks,  the major part o f which  is basaltic, are o f 
considerable thickness,  reaching a maximum of 3000­
3500  metres  in  the  Semien  mountains,  though values 
o f 500-2500  metres  are  more  frequent.  Quite  recent 
lava  is  found  in  the  Rift  Valley  and  in  many  parts  o f 
the AF  floristic region.
The mosaic o f soil  types in Ethiopia is highly com ­
plex  and  dependent  on  the  complicated  topography. 
The soils o f Ethiopia have not yet been well described 
in  the  literature,  and  only  a  very  superficial  impres­
sion can be given here. A  broad overview o f the many 
types  of Ethiopian  soils  based on  the  FAO  soil classi­
fication  (http://www.fao.org/)  can  be seen in  Fig.  5.
The  FAO  soil classification  is based on generaliza­
tions about soils paedogenesis.  It  is  therefore not  sur­
prising  that  a  classification  o f soils  in  Ethiopia shows 
broad  agreement  between  the  division  in  highland 
and  lowland  and  the geographical  distribution of the 
major  soil  types,  as well  as  a correlation  with  the  p at­
terns shown by the geological formations o f the coun­
try.
A  pattern  with  broadly  defined  distinction  be­
tween  the  soils  o f the  Western  lowlands,  the Western 
and  Eastern  highlands,  the  South-eastern  lowlands 
and  the  Afar  lowlands  can  also  be  generalised  from 
Fig.  5.  Red  or brown  Ferralsols derived from volcanic 
parent material are found in the highlands.  Umbrisols 
are found chiefly in  the humid parts of the highlands. 
Andosols  are  associated  with  recent  volcanic  activity 
in  tectonically  active  areas,  mainly  in  the  highlands. 
Cambisols are soils with a beginning of soil formation 
or because  soil  formation  is  comparatively  slow,  as  in 
cool,  high  altitude  areas;  the  horizontal  differentia­
tion  o f cambisols  is  weak.  Stony  Leptosols  are partic­
ularly  associated  with  the  escarpments  and  the  Afar
20

BS  5 8
G E O L O G Y   A N D   SO ILS
Eritrea
Djibouti
0
Kenya
Yemen
Sudan
Somalia
87
 
5
Uganda
Legend
/   .
P   Calcaric Arenosols

Eutric Cambisols
Haplic Luvisols
Rendzic Leptosols
Calcarte Cambisols
H   Eutric Leptosols
P   Haplic Nitosols
P   Rhodic Ferralsols
|  < Calcaric Fluvisols
P   Eutric Regosols
Haplic Phaeozems
P   Salic Fluvisols
|   Calcaric Regosols
P   Eutric Vertisols
P   Haplic Solonchaks
P   Sodic Solonchaks
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   13


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə