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POLICY

No

7



POLICY No 7

LANDSCAPING

 

 

 



 

 

 



August, 2006 

 

Page 48 

 

DOUGLAS SHIRE COUNCIL PLANNING SCHEME POLICY NO 7



 

 

Landscaping 

 

Intent 

 

The intent of this Policy is to specify landscaping procedures, design requirements and a Plant 



Species Schedule for developments which have landscaping requirements.  This Policy should be 

read in conjunction with the Landscaping Code and other relevant parts of the Planning Scheme. 

 

Objectives 

 

The objectives of this Policy are: 



 

• 

to ensure high quality landscaping throughout the Shire; 



• 

to provide for a distinctive landscape character to develop in different Localities throughout the 

Shire; and 

• 

to establish guidelines which ensure high quality landscaping is provided and maintained as an 



important visual element which contributes to the landscape integrity of the Shire. 

 

Content 



 

This Landscaping Policy incorporates the following: 

 

• 

Landscape Procedures and Assessment; 



• 

Minimum Design Requirements for Development 

• 

Minimum Design Requirements for Reconfiguring a Lot 



• 

Landscape Zones in the Douglas Shire 

• 

Plant Species Schedule 



 

Information to be Provided 

 

Detailed Landscape Plans prepared by a suitably qualified professional drawn to scale, are to be 



submitted to the Council for assessment prior to the issue of a Building Permit.  However, in the case 

of developments which are Code assessable or Impact assessable, a Landscape Plan is to be 

submitted with the Development Assessment Application.  The Landscape Plan is to address the 

requirements set out in the Landscaping Code and to include: 

 

• 

the location, size, and species of existing vegetation; 



• 

vegetation to be retained and necessary protective measures; 

• 

any vegetation proposed to be removed



• 

existing and proposed surface levels



 

 

 



 

 

 



August, 2006 

 

Page 49 

• 

location of hard and soft landscaped areas; 



• 

the indicative location, number, size and species of plants; and 

• 

a Statement of Intent outlining the intent of each element of the Plan. 



 

It is accepted that some of the above details may alter during the development and assessment stage. 

 

The final Landscape Plan submitted prior to the issue of a Building Permit should include the 



following: 

 

For Site Works 

 

• 

the location, size and species of existing vegetation on site; 



• 

vegetation to be retained on site and necessary protective measures; 

• 

any vegetation proposed to be removed from the site; 



• 

existing contours; 

• 

finished surface levels; 



• 

details of temporary protective drainage and slope stabilisation measures; 

• 

details of the location of underground and overhead services; 



• 

a Statement of Intent outlining the intent of each element of the Plan; 

• 

a Maintenance Schedule, referred to below. 



 

For Hardscape 

 

• 



paving; 

• 

walls; 



• 

fences; 


• 

structures; 

• 

pools; 


• 

water features; 

• 

recreation facilities; 



• 

irrigation system including backflow prevention, filtration details and method of drainage. 

 

For Softscape 

 

• 



proposed plant materials including species (both scientific and common name), numbers and 

details of the minimum size at planting

• 

details of preparation and mulching of planting bed; 



• 

detailed turfing and edging treatments; 

• 

details of the proposed Maintenance Schedule as referred to below; 



• 

details of the height and spread of the proposed species at 2 and 5 years from planting; 

• 

endemic or native species to be planted suitable to the area; and 



• 

details of the costs for the proposed softscape component. 

 


 

 

 



 

 

 



August, 2006 

 

Page 50 

Maintenance Schedule 

 

A Maintenance Schedule is required to detail the specified time periods and work required for routine 

maintenance over a period of a year once the landscaping has been established.  The Maintenance 

Schedule should outline requirements and details of pruning, trimming, weeding, re-mulching and 

restructuring of plants.  

 

Minimum Design Requirements for Development 

 

Outlined below are the minimum design requirements for any development proposed in the Douglas 



Shire.  These requirements should be read in conjunction with the Landscaping Code and the 

Performance Criteria and Acceptable Solutions of the particular Planning Area and Locality and, if 

relevant, the applicable Land Use Code.   

 

• 



Wherever possible, existing native vegetation on site is to be retained, incorporated into the site 

design and protected during works.  Mature vegetation on site is retained wherever possible to 

provide shade and screening from adjoining properties, and enhance the new development. 

 

• 



Existing native plant species characteristic of the area are to be included in the landscape 

design. 


 

• 

Landscaping is to provide a buffer or screening between adjoining developments with dense 



planting, with consideration given to location of window openings, private open space and 

service areas, such as bin enclosures.   

 

• 

Dense planting is to be used, with the three tier approach of trees, shrubs and groundcovers.  



Densities are to be as follows: 

 



Trees up to 3 metre centres in landscape buffer/screen planting areas and up to 6 metres in 

other areas; 

Shrubs up to 1.5 metre centres; and 



Groundcovers up to 0.6 metre centres. 

 

• 

Plant selection is to be in accordance with the requirements of each Locality, or otherwise set 



out below specifically for the following Localities: 

 



Mossman and Environs: 60% of the total proposed species are endemic or native species. 

Port Douglas and Environs: 60% of the total proposed species are endemic or native 



species. 

Coastal Suburbs, Villages and Townships: 60% of the total proposed species are endemic 



or native species. 

 

And in all Localities 75% of dense planting is to be endemic or native species, and palms used 



as accent plants only unless a greater percentage is specified in the Locality Code. 

 


 

 

 



 

 

 



August, 2006 

 

Page 51 

• 

Reticulated irrigation systems are to be in accordance with Australian Standards. 



 

• 

Soil preparation is to be in accordance with landscaping best practice, including high quality 



soil mix, slow release fertiliser or manure and high quality mulch. 

 

Minimum Design Requirements for Reconfiguring a Lot 

 

Existing Native Vegetation 

 

Existing on site native vegetation should be taken into account in the reconfiguration design and 

wherever possible should be retained.  Native vegetation significantly enhances the character and 

visual appeal of an area as well as providing an established habitat for local wildlife.  The root system 

of existing vegetation to be retained on site during development should be protected as much as 

possible to the drip system and by a root curtain or sheet piling. 

 

The designation of parkland should incorporate stands of existing native vegetation in order to 



preserve the vegetation and improve the amenity of the area. 

 

Viewscapes 



 

Views are an important feature within any proposed development.  A reconfiguration layout should 

maximise the opportunities presented by the natural setting.  This may be achieved by: 

 

• 



preserving existing views; 

• 

enhancing existing views eg. by screen planting to screen adjacent buildings



• 

creating views into and out of the subdivision eg. by tree planting to frame vistas, by removing 

unwanted structures; 

• 

encouraging viewing areas, and providing for connectivity using bike paths/walking trails. 



 

Street Tree Planting 

 

Shaded, tree lined streets can significantly add to the amenity of an area, for example: 

 

• 

an individual character may be achieved by using a specific tree species for each street; 



 

• 

create and reduce heat and glare from the road pavement;   



 

• 

provide shade for parked cars during the summer months; 



 

• 

native flowering trees can provide a source of food and shelter for insects, birds and animals. 



 

It is the Council’s intention to promote the value of the streetscape by ensuring that street trees are 

planted as part of the development process.  In order to ensure a well balanced workable, and low 

maintenance landscape, all street tree planting should conform to the minimum standards listed 

below: 


 

 

 



 

 

 



August, 2006 

 

Page 52 

 

Species, Selection and Size 



 

An avenue of trees of identical species and size planted at regular intervals has far greater visual and 

aesthetic impact than a mismatched selection of incompatible trees.  In order to promote continuity in 

new streetscapes, a single species should be nominated for each street.  Where a development is 

occurring in an established street setting, an assessment of the existing street trees should be made

and the most prevalent, healthy and appropriate species chosen for footpath planting. 

 

Tree species should be selected for their suitability to the site conditions eg. small trees under power 



lines, drought resistance, soil suitability, refer to the Plant Species Schedule. 

 

To ensure consistency in growth rate and form all new street trees are to be no less than 2 metres in 



height and should be well established in their root and branch formation.  A minimum 25 litre 

container should ensure a good survival factor. 

 

Alignment and Placement 

 

• 

Tree canopies at maturity are not to be within 4.0 metres of electricity or telephone poles or 



pillars. 

 

• 



Tree canopies at maturity are not to be within 7.5 metres of street lights, to ensure effective 

street lighting. 

 

• 

Tree canopies at maturity are not to be within a 4 metres radius of high voltage transmission 



lines. 

 

• 



Trees are to be planted at 5 metre centres under power lines and generally 8-12 metres 

elsewhere to achieve an effective design. 

 

• 

Trees are to be placed a minimum of 600 mm and a maximum of 1000 mm from the back of 



kerbs. 

 

• 



Trees are to be placed a minimum of 3 metres from any driveway. 

 

• 



At intersections, trees are to be placed a minimum of 10 metres back from the face of the kerb 

of the adjoining street. 

 

• 

Trees are to be located so as not to obstruct access to any services or signage. 



 

• 

Trees are to be located so as not to obstruct pedestrian or vehicular traffic, nor create a traffic 



hazard or cause damage to existing trees. 

 

• 



Trees are not to be within 2 metres of a side entrance stormwater pit. 

 


 

 

 



 

 

 



August, 2006 

 

Page 53 

Landscape Zones in the Douglas Shire 

 

The Douglas Shire can be separated into three distinct landscape zones based on natural vegetation 



associations of a similar visual character.  There is no precise delineation between zones and an 

individual assessment of each site in the vicinity of the boundaries between zones should be made.  

The zones are: 

 

Port Douglas and Coastal Communities 

 

The areas of Port Douglas and the coastal communities have their own unique landscape identities, 



with a mix of coastal and eucalyptus vegetation, melaleuca swamp communities as well as altered 

landscapes surrounding existing residential and tourist developments, comprising of endemic, native 

and exotic species.  This area incorporates Port Douglas, Oak Beach, Cooya Beach, Newell Beach, 

Wonga Beach and Wangetti. 

 

Mossman to Daintree 

 

This area is characterised by closed forest types (rainforest) on heavier clay loam soils to the west of 



the coastal communities.  The area incorporates rainforest, riparian forest (vegetation along creeks) 

and regrowth forest. 

 

North of the Daintree River to the Bloomfield River 

 

This area is characterised by closed forest occurring on a variety of soil types and incorporates Cape 



Kimberley, Cow Bay, Cape Tribulation and areas to the east and west of Cape Tribulation Road. 

 

Plant Species Schedule 

 

The Plant Species Schedule provides a list of endemic and native species suitable for use in 



landscaping projects in each of the Landscape Zones. The street tree list also identifies street trees for 

use in the Douglas Shire. 

 

In preparing Landscape Concept Plans and final Landscape Plans, selections from the Plant Species 



Schedule can be supplemented by other species.  For more information regarding species selection 

consult the Parks and Gardens Section of the Douglas Shire Council. 

 


 

 

 



 

 

 



August, 2006 

 

Page 54 

 

PLANT SPECIES SCHEDULE 



 

Port Douglas and Coastal Communities 

 

 

Botanical Name 

 

Common Name 

 

Height at 

Maturity 

 

Suitable as 

a Street 

Tree 

 

 

Suitable 

Under a 

Powerline

Abelmoschus moschatus 

subsp. tuberosus 

 

Ground 



Cover 

No Yes 

Abutilon auritum 

 

1-1½m No Yes 



Acacia falciformis 

 

2-3m No Yes 



Acacia hylonoma 

 

8m Yes 



No 

Acacia leptocarpa 

Swamp Wattle 



6m Yes 

No 

Acacia leptoloba 

 

3-5m No No 



Acacia leptostachya 

 

3m No 



Yes 

Acacia pubirhachis 

 

3-5m Yes No 



Acacia racospermoides 

White-barked Wattle



3-5m Yes No 

Acacia simsii 

 

2-3m No Yes 



Acalypha lyonsii 

 

1-3m No Yes 



Acanthus ilicifolius 

Holly-leaf 

Mangrove 

1m No 

Yes 

Acmena hemilampra  

Blush Satinash 



6-10m Yes No 

Acmena smithii 

Lillipilli 



2-6m Yes No 

Acmena sp. Mt. Misery 

 

5-8m No 



 No 

Acrostichum aureum 

 

1-3m No Yes 



Acrostichum speciosum 

Mangrove Fern 



1-2m No Yes 

Adenanthera pavonina 

False Red 

Sandalwood 

6-10m Yes No 

Adenia heterophylla 

 

Large Vine 



No 

No 

Adiantum atroviride 

Maidenhair Fern 



Ground 

Cover 

No  

Yes 

Adiantum hispidulum 

Maidenhair Fern 



Ground 

Cover 

No Yes 

Aglaia elaeagnoidea 

Coastal Aglaia 



6-8m Yes No 

Aidia racemosa 

Wild Randa 



6-8 Yes 

No 

Aidia sp. Gap Creek 

 

6-8m Yes No 



Alchornea ilicifolia 

 

1-3m No Yes 



Alchornea thozetiana 

 

2-5m No No 



Alectryon connatus 

Alectryon 



6-8m Yes No 

Alectryon tomentosus 

Woolly Rambutan 



6-8m Yes No 

Allocasuarina littoralis 

Black She Oak 



3-8m No No 

 

 

 



 

 

 



August, 2006 

 

Page 55 

 

Botanical Name 

 

Common Name 

 

Height at 

Maturity 

 

Suitable as 

a Street 

Tree 

 

 

Suitable 

Under a 

Powerline

Alocasia brisbanensis 

 

1m No 



Yes 

Alpinia arctiflora 

Native Ginger 



1-2m No Yes 

Alpinia caerulea  

Common Ginger 



1-2m No Yes 

Alpinia hylandii 

Native Ginger 



1m No 

Yes 

Alpinia modesta 

Native Ginger 



1m No 

Yes 

Alyxia ruscifolia 

 

1-1½m No Yes 



Amomum dallachyi 

 

2m No 



Yes 

Amorphallus galbra 

 

1m No 



 

Yes 

Amphineuron terminans 

 

1m No 



Yes 

Antidesma bunius 

Herbert River 

Cherry 

6-8m Yes No 

Antidesma erostre 

Native Currant 



6-8m Yes No 

Antidesma parvifolium 

 

2-3m No Yes 



Aphananthe philippinensis  Native Elm 

2-5m No No 

Archidendron 

grandiflorum 

Laceflower Tree 



3-6m Yes No 

Archidendron hendersonii 

White Laceflower 



3-5m No No 

Archidendron lucyi 

Scarlet Bean 



5-8m Yes No 

Archirhodomyrtus beckleri  Rose Myrtle 

2-3m No 

Yes 

Archontophoenix 

alexandrae 

Alexandra Palm 



6-8m Yes No 

Arenga australasica 

Arenga 


6-8m No 

No 

Argophyllum lejourdanii 

 

2-3m No Yes 



Argophyllum sp. 

Koolmoon Creek 

 

2m No 



Yes 

Argophyllum verae 

 

2m No 



Yes 

Argusia argentea 

 

2-3m No Yes 



Aryterya divaricata 

Rose Tamarind 



5-6m Yes No 

Aryterya paucifolia 

Pink Tamarind 



2-3m No Yes 

Asplenium australasicum 

Bird’s Nest Fern 



1m No 

Yes 

Asplenium nidus 

Bird’s Nest Fern 



1m No 

Yes 

Asteromyrtus angustifolia 

 

3-5m No No 


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