Australian Nursery Industry Myrtle Rust



Yüklə 300.29 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə1/4
tarix19.08.2017
ölçüsü300.29 Kb.
  1   2   3   4

 

 

 

 

 

Australian  

Nursery Industry 

Myrtle Rust 

(Uredo rangelii) 

Management Plan 

2012 

 

 

 

Developed for the  

Australian Nursery Industry 

 

 

Production  

Wholesale 

Retail 

V2 



Australian Nursery Industry Myrtle Rust Management Plan (Version 2) – 2012   

Acknowledgements 

 

This Myrtle Rust Management Plan has been developed by the Nursery & Garden Industry 

Queensland (John McDonald - Nursery Industry Development Manager) for the  

Australian Nursery Industry.  

 

Version 02 February 2012 



 

Photographs sourced from I&I NSW, NGIQ and Queensland DEEDI. 

 

Various sources have contributed to the content of this plan including: 



 

Nursery Industry Accreditation Scheme Australia (NIASA) 

 

BioSecure 



HACCP

 

 



Nursery Industry Guava Rust Plant Pest Contingency Plan 

 

DEEDI Queensland Myrtle Rust Fact Sheets 



 

I&I NSW Myrtle Rust Fact Sheets and Updates  

 

Biosecurity Queensland Myrtle Rust Program 



 

Preparation of this document has been financially supported by Nursery & Garden Industry 

Queensland, Nursery & Garden Industry Australia and Horticulture Australia Ltd. 

 

Published by Nursery & Garden Industry Australia, Sydney 2012 



© Nursery & Garden Industry Queensland 2012 

 

While every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of contents, Nursery & Garden Industry 



Queensland accepts no liability for the information contained within this plan. 

 

 



For further information contact: 

 

John McDonald 



Industry Development Manager 

NGIQ 


Ph:  07 3277 7900 

Email:  


nido@ngiq.asn.au

  

 



 

 

 



 

 

 





Australian Nursery Industry Myrtle Rust Management Plan (Version 2) – 2012   

Table of Contents

 

 



 

1.  Introduction – Myrtle Rust in the Australian Nursery Industry 



 

2.  Myrtaceae Family – Genera  

 

 

 

 

 



 

3.  Myrtle Rust (Uredo rangelii)  

 

 

 

 

 



 

4.  Known Hosts of Myrtle Rust in Australia  

 

 

 



 

 

4.1 Queensland known hosts   

 

 

 

 



 

4.2 New South Wales additional hosts 

 

 

 

12 

 

4.3 Victorian known hosts 

 

 

 

 

 

12 

 

5.  Fungicide Treatment   

 

 

 

 

 

 

13 

 

 

5.1 Fungicide Table 

 

 

 

 

 

 

13 

 

5.2 Myrtle Rust Fungicide Treatment Rotation Program   

14 

 

5.3 Fungicide Application 

 

 

 

 

 

15 

 

6.  On-site Biosecurity Actions   

 

 

 

 

 

16 

 

 

6.1 Production Nursery   

 

 

 

 

 

16 

 

6.2 Propagation (specifics) 

 

 

 

 

 

17 

 

6.3 Greenlife Markets/Retailers 

 

 

 

 

18 

 

6.4 Infected Crop Management 

 

 

 

 

19 

 

 

6.4.1 Entire crop infected 

 

 

 

 

19 

 

 

6.4.2 Part crop infected   

 

 

 

 

19 

 

7.  Monitoring and Inspection Sampling Protocol   

 

 

20 

 

 

7.1 Monitoring Process   

 

 

 

 

 

20 

 

 

7.2 Despatch Sampling Process  

 

 

 

 

21 

 

8.  Interstate Movement Controls 

 

 

 

 

 

22 

 

9.  Myrtle Rust Management Plan Declaration 

 

 

 

23 

 

10.  Myrtle Rust Identification Photographs  

 

 

 

24 

 




Australian Nursery Industry Myrtle Rust Management Plan (Version 2) – 2012   

1.  Introduction  Myrtle Rust in the Australian Nursery Industry  

 

Myrtle  rust  (Uredo  rangelii)  has  the  potential  to  infect  all  myrtaceous  plants  in  both  our  built 



(gardens  &  landscape)  and  natural  environments  plus  a  range  of  industries  (nursery  production, 

timber, cut flower, etc) more likely along the coastline of Australia due to suitable environmental 

conditions.    Under  threat  from  this  disease,  if  it  becomes  widely  established,  are  a  number  of 

identified threatened native  plant  species  across  Australia plus a  number  of  endangered  wildlife 

habitat(s) that could have a major impact on our natural biodiversity.  

 

In  April  2010  Myrtle  rust  was  detected  in  Australia  on  the  Central  Coast  of  New  South  Wales 



(NSW).    A  national  response  was  agreed  to  under  the  Emergency  Plant  Pest  Response  Deed 

(EPPRD)  and  a  comprehensive  surveillance  and management  program was  initiated  within NSW.  

By November 2010 more than 140 infected premises had been identified across NSW with the first 

detections  outside  horticultural  industries  being  recorded  in  state  forests  and  nature  reserves.  

The  initial  detections  of  the  disease  in  Queensland  occurred  on  the  27

th

  December  2010  in  the 



south  east  of  the  state  with  further  detections  noted  in  Cairns,  Townsville,  Rockhampton, 

Gladstone  and  Hervey  Bay  during  2011.    The  most  recent  detections  outside  of  NSW  and  Qld 

occurred  in  Victoria  during  the  first  week  of  January  2012  with  more  than  28  sites  around 

Melbourne infected by early February 2012. 

 

On December 22



nd

 2010 the Myrtle Rust National Management Group agreed the disease was not 

technically feasible to eradicate in New South Wales and cancelled the Myrtle Rust Response Plan 

previously enacted under the EPPRD.  Due to the impact the disease could have across Australia it 

was further agreed to implement a structured management plan to limit the establishment of the 

pathogen  within  industries  and  the  natural  environment.    The  federal  government,  through  the 

Department of Agriculture Fisheries & Forestry (DAFF), established the Myrtle Rust Coordination 

Group to plan the investment of $1.5 million of research funding across six key themes: 

 

National Transition to Management Plan: 

 

 

Theme 1: Coordination and communication 

 

Theme 2: Immediate disease management 

 

Theme 3: Taxonomy and identity of the pathogen 

 

Theme 4: Potential impact and distribution 

 

Theme 5: Chemical control options  

 

Theme 6: Resistance breeding options 

    


The  development  of  this  industry  specific  Myrtle  Rust  Management  Plan,  by  the  Australian 

Nursery  Industry,  is  in  direct  response  to  the  agreed  national  position  in  which  the  industry 

participated  in  developing.    As  a  professional  and  responsible  industry  it  is  appropriate  that  all 

growers,  wholesalers  and  retailers  apply  the  relevant  strategies  to  manage  myrtle  rust  as 

described in this plan.    

 

Myrtle  rust  is  a  notifiable  pathogen  in  all  Australian  jurisdictions,  where  currently  no  positive 



detections have been recorded, requiring any detection of the disease be reported to the relevant 

state or territory biosecurity agency within 24 – 48 hours. 

 

 

National Exotic Plant Pest Hotline:  1800 084 881         



 



Australian Nursery Industry Myrtle Rust Management Plan (Version 2) – 2012   

This  Myrtle  Rust  Management  Plan  has  been  developed  for  use  by  production  nurseries  and 

retailers of greenlife including garden centres, greenlife markets (wholesalers), big box hardware, 

supermarkets, chain stores, etc.  The plan provides a detailed framework for growers and retailers 

to  apply  on-site  in  the  management  of  myrtle  rust  on  plants  of  the  Myrtaceae  family.    It  is 

recommended  that  the  industry  apply  this  plan  to  all  plants  of  the  Myrtaceae  family  not  only 

those that have been currently identified as hosts. 

 

For further information on whole of property biosecurity in the nursery industry including on-farm 



programs such as BioSecure 

HACCP

 and the industry Biosecurity Manual contact your state industry 

peak body or go to 

www.ngia.com.au

 and follow the links.   

 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



(Source:  NGIQ – Myrtle rust on Syzygium jambos

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

(Source:  NGIQ – Myrtle rust on Syzygium jambos)

 

 

Note:  State/territory laws and requirements including interstate movement 



protocols over-ride this Industry Myrtle Rust Management Plan.

 




Australian Nursery Industry Myrtle Rust Management Plan (Version 2) – 2012   

2.  Myrtaceae Family – Genera currently found in Australia 

 

It is possible that all genera listed may be susceptible to myrtle rust under optimum conditions in 



Australia.  The list below may change in the future. 

 

Myrtaceae - Genera 

Myrtaceae - Genera 

Myrtaceae - Genera 

Acmena spp. 

Eremaea spp. 

Paragonis spp. 

Acmenosperma spp. 

Eucalyptus spp. 

Pericalymma spp. 

Actinodium spp. 

Eugenia spp. 

Petraeomyrtus spp. 

Agonis spp. 

Euryomyrtus spp. 

Phymatocarpus spp. 

Allosyncarpia spp. 

Gossia spp. 

Pileanthus spp. 

Aluta spp. 

Harmogia spp. 

Pilidiostigma spp. 

Anetholea anisata 

Homalocalyx spp. 

Regelia spp. 

Angasomyrtus spp. 

Homalospermum spp. 

Rhodamnia spp. 

Angophora spp. 

Homoranthus spp. 

Rhodomyrtus spp. 

Archirhodomyrtus spp. 

Hypocalymma spp. 

Rinzia spp. 

Astartea spp. 

Kardomia spp. 

Ristantia spp. 

Asteromyrtus spp. 

Kunzea spp. 

Scholtzia spp. 

Astus spp. 

Lamarchea spp. 

Seorsus spp. 

Austromyrtus spp. 

Lenwebbia spp. 

Sphaerantia spp. 

Babingtonia spp. 

Leptospermum spp. 

Stenostegia congesta 

Backhousia spp. 

Lindsayomyrtus spp. 

Stockwellia spp. 

Baeckea spp. 

Lithomyrtus spp. 

Syncarpia spp. 

Balaustion spp. 

Lophomyrtus spp. 

Syzygium spp. 

Barongia spp. 

Lophostemon spp. 

Thaleropia spp. 

Beaufortia spp. 

Lysicarpus spp. 

Thryptomene spp. 

Callistemon spp. 

Malleostemon spp. 

Triplarina spp. 

Calothamnus spp. 

Melaleuca spp. 

Tristania spp. 

Calytrix spp. 

Metrosideros spp. 

Tristaniopsis spp. 

Chamelaucium spp. 

Micromyrtus spp. 

Ugni spp. 

Choricarpia spp. 

Mitrantia spp. 

Uromyrtus spp. 

Conothamnus spp. 

Myrciaria spp. 

Verticordia spp. 

Corymbia spp. 

Myrtus spp. 

Waterhousea spp. 

Corynanthera spp. 

Neofabricia spp. 

Welchiodendron spp. 

Darwinia spp. 

Ochrosperma spp. 

Xanthostemon spp.

 

Decaspermum spp.

 

Osbornia spp. 

 

(Source:  DEEDI/DERM February 2012)

 

Note:  Genera highlighted in yellow have had species, within these genera, return positive 

infections in the field (natural infection) in New South Wales and Queensland between 2010 and 

January 2012. 





Australian Nursery Industry Myrtle Rust Management Plan (Version 2) – 2012   

3. Myrtle Rust (Uredo rangelii) 

 

Myrtle  rust  (Uredo  rangelii),  a plant fungal  disease  native to South  America,  is  a  member of  the 



fungal complex known as the guava rust (Puccinia psidii) group.  Based on experiences in Australia 

between  April  2010  and  February  2012,  information  from  New  South  Wales  and  Queensland, 

shows myrtle rust has an expanding host range currently infecting approximately 179 species from 

41 genera or approximately 46% of known genera (Myrtaceae) in Australia.   

 

The pathogen infects young, actively growing, emerging leaves, buds, flowers,  green stems,  fruit 



and  shoots  of  plants  within  the  Myrtaceae  family.    In  Queensland  to  date  the  most  severe 

infections of the disease have been recorded on: 

 

Botanical name 

Common name 

Agonis flexuosa   

Willow myrtle 

Chamelaucium uncinatum   

Geraldton wax 

Decaspermum humile  

Silky myrtle 

Eugenia reinwardtiana   

Beach cherry 

Gossia inophloia (syn. Austromyrtus inophloia)    Thready barked myrtle 

Melaleuca quinquenervia 

Broad-leaved paperbark 

Rhodamnia angustifolia 

Narrow-leaved malletwood 

Rhodamnia maideniana 

Smooth scrub turpentine 

Rhodamnia rubescens 

Scrub turpentine 

Syzygium jambos 

Rose apple 

 

(Source:  DEEDI February 2012) 



 

Myrtle rust may infect plants under a wide range of environmental conditions, however infection 

rates may be heightened when the following conditions are present: 

 

 



Soft new growth/tissue 

 

High humidity 



 

Free water on plant surfaces for 6 hours or more 

 

Night temperatures (optimal) within 15 - 25⁰C  however as low as 10°C 



(CSIRO. 2012)

 

 



Low  light  conditions  including  darkness  (minimum  of  8  hours)  after  spore  contact  can 

increase germination success 

 

Life cycle can be as short as 10 – 14 days (spore to spore) 



 

Myrtle  rust  has  the  ability  to  complete  its  entire  lifecycle  on  a  single  host  plant.    Myrtle  rust 

initially causes light infection on young leaves and new shoots which can appear as yellow flecks. 

Lesions expand radially and can coalesce (join) with age and susceptible tissue shrivels and dies. 

Secondary infections within the plant can occur within days of the first pustules appearing.  Repeat 

infection may result in plant death, although this is likely to vary from species to species

The level 



of  susceptibility  of  many  potential  and  recognized  hosts  in  Australia  is  unknown.    As  the  plant 

drops dead leaves the pathogen will reinfect new growth limiting the plants ability to recover.  

 

It is possible that as this disease establishes in Australia the host range may grow to include many 



of  the  internationally recorded  plant  species  infected  by  guava  rust.    The  nursery  industry  must 

consider all myrtaceous species as potential hosts of myrtle rust.   

 

Note:    Guava  rust  (Puccinia  psidii)  is  also  known  as  eucalyptus  rust  and  has  caused  heavy  crop 

losses in the Brazilian hardwood industry through the decimation of planted Eucalyptus seedlings 





Australian Nursery Industry Myrtle Rust Management Plan (Version 2) – 2012   

in  the  field.    For  identification  purposes  myrtle  rust  and  guava  rust  are  visually  and 

symptomatically identical therefore identification tools are interchangeable.     

 

The general symptoms of myrtle rust/guava rust include: 



(Myrtle  rust  generally  attacks  soft  new  growth  including  leaf  surfaces,  shoots,  buds,  flowers, 

young green stems and fruit) 

 

 



Tiny, raised spots or pustules with possible yellow flecking 

 

  1   2   3   4


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə