Australian Nursery Industry Myrtle Rust



Yüklə 300.29 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə3/4
tarix19.08.2017
ölçüsü300.29 Kb.
1   2   3   4

Crop Situation  Fungicide  

(Fortnight 1) 

Fungicide 

(Fortnight 2) 

Fungicide 

(Fortnight 3) 

Fungicide   

(Fortnight 4) 

Stock receival 

Bayfidan 

Plantvax 

Bayfidan 

Plantvax 

Propagation 

Bayfidan/Tilt  

Mancozeb 

Plantvax 

Amistar 

Growing on 

(Low level risk) 

Bayfidan/Tilt /Plantvax  Mancozeb/Bravo 

Copper/Bravo 

(use 

Bravo only if not used in 

preceding month)

 

Bravo/Amistar 

(use 

Bravo only if not used in 

preceding month)

 

Growing on 

(Medium level 

risk) 

Bayfidan/Tilt/Saprol 

Mancozeb/Copper 

Plantvax 

Bravo/Amistar 

Growing on 

(High level risk) 

Bayfidan + mancozeb 

Copper/Bravo 

Plantvax + mancozeb 

Amistar + mancozeb 

 

5.3 Myrtle Rust Fungicide Treatment Rotation Program (Production/Propagation) 

Medium/low risk season (External environmental conditions not suitable for spore production) 

 

Crop Situation  Fungicide  

(Month 1) 

Fungicide 

(Month 2) 

Fungicide 

(Month 3) 

Fungicide   

(Month 4) 

Stock receival 

Bayfidan 

Plantvax 

Bayfidan 

Amistar 

Propagation 

Bayfidan/Tilt  

Mancozeb/Copper 

Plantvax 

Amistar/Bravo 

Growing on 

(Low level risk) 

Bayfidan/Tilt or 

Plantvax 

Mancozeb/Bravo 

Bravo/Amistar 

(use 


Bravo only if not used in 

preceding month)



 

Copper/Bravo 

(use 


Bravo only if not used in 

preceding month)



 

Growing on 

(Medium level 

risk) 

Bayfidan/Tilt/Saprol 

Mancozeb/Copper 

Plantvax 

Bravo/Amistar 

Growing on 

(High level risk) 

Bayfidan + mancozeb 

Copper/Bravo 

Plantvax + mancozeb 

Amistar + mancozeb 

 

Note:  Test fungicide(s) on a sample of the crop to ensure the product is not phytotoxic to your 

plant species before initial batch treatment.   



 

Note:  Other APVMA Permits are available for: 

 

Native plant food crops – PER12746 



 

Home Gardener – PER12828 



15 

Australian Nursery Industry Myrtle Rust Management Plan (Version 2) – 2012   

Fungicide  rotation  based  on  the  “Chemical  Group  (Mode  of  Action)”  is  designed  to  prevent  the 

pathogen  (myrtle  rust)  from  developing  genetic  resistance  to  a  particular  fungicide  active 

ingredient  due  to  the  over  use  of  that  one  product.        The  above  (Table  5.2)  gives 

recommendations  of  five  product  combinations  (rotations)  based  on  the  degree  of  “risk”  of 

infection a “process” has within a cropping system.  Alternative fungicide rotations are acceptable 

depending on the risk profile the business faces and the results of crop inspections.   

 

As an example from the above table (Table 5.2) “Stock Receival” is live host plant material grown 



off site and imported into the production nursery.  This material has the opportunity to be mixed 

with other plant stock at transport depots, in vehicles, etc as it is transported to the production 

nursery.  Therefore this plant material is a high risk of being infected and should be treated with a 

fungicide  that  is  a  systemic  curative  to  give  a  high  degree  of  confidence  that  any  potential 

infections are dealt with before moving plant stock into the cropping system.  The rotation plan 

(Table 5.2) advises producers to rotate the fungicides every two weeks from Bayfidan to Plantvax 

at the receival point to protect from pathogen resistance.  

 

Defining  each  individual  business’s  risk  level  will  also  be  based  on  key  aspects  such  as  crop 



nutrition  programs,  irrigation  scheduling,  plant  spacing,  host  material  on  the  property  (e.g. 

gardens, hedging or windbreaks), susceptibility of crops, the amount of host material across the 

landscape  outside  of  business  boundaries  and  general  environmental  conditions  (seasonal)  that 

are conductive to increasing spore loads such as high humidity, rainfall, prevailing winds, etc. 

 

The three “Growing on” risk ratings can be explained in the following example



Growing on - Risk 

Risk explanation 

Low level 

Low relative humidity (<50%), outside of wet season,  small number of host 

plants  surrounding  property  plus  not  in  new  growth  flush  phase  and 

relatively tolerant (RT) crop susceptibility 

Medium level 

Increased  relative  humidity  (50%  –  65%),  approaching  wet  season,  small 

number of host plants surrounding property in new growth flush phase and 

moderately susceptible (MS) crop 

High level 

High  relative  humidity  (>65%),  wet  season,  moderate  to  large  number  of 

host  plants  surrounding  property  in  new  growth  flush  phase  and  crops  are 

either highly susceptible (HS) or extremely susceptible (ES) 

 

5.3 Fungicide Application 



 

Applying fungicides  to manage  myrtle  rust  will  require  the  appropriate  application  equipment  is 

available to ensure the chemical is delivered to the target crop within the acceptable parameters 

as defined by industry best management practice.  The aim of using fungicides to manage myrtle 

rust is to ensure the necessary coverage is achieved that allows the fungicide to do its job. 

 

Generally a systemic curative fungicide has some room for applicator error due to the ability of the 



plant to take the fungicide up in plant tissue and translocate it throughout the vegetative material.  

Non-systemic  protectants  such  as  Bravo,  copper  and  mancozeb  provide  a  “protective”  film 

covering the plant surface which requires greater precision in the delivery technique particularly in 

achieving contact with the underside of vegetative material e.g. leaves.   

 

The following list identifies the key aspects that are critical for successful fungicide treatment: 



 

 

Personnel applying fungicides appropriately trained (e.g. ChemCert/AusChem Certified) 



 

APVMA Permit (PER12156) available on-site (defines fungicide rate) 



16 

Australian Nursery Industry Myrtle Rust Management Plan (Version 2) – 2012   

 

Fungicide(s) to be applied within “best before” or “use by date” 



 

Applicable fungicide rotation program selected 

 

Appropriate Personal Protective Equipment available 



 

Signage advising staff not to re-enter treated areas before designated re-entry period 

 

Re-entry period guidelines (if not on Label) are: minimum 24hr’s, if possible 48 hr’s 



 

Ensure overhead irrigation is withheld for approximately 6 - 12 hours after treatment 

 

Application equipment is appropriate for the development of droplets that are within 150 



– 250 microns such as: 

o

 



Powered hydraulic handguns/booms fitted with either solid or hollow cone nozzles 

o

 



Powered hydraulic application equipment rated at 600kpa or higher 

o

 



Three point linkage/backpack powered misters are operated at correct speeds 

o

 



All equipment regularly calibrated 

 

Use a chemical surfactant (wetter/sticker) if recommended on the product label  



 

Test fungicide(s) on a sample of the crop to ensure the product is not phytotoxic to your 

plant species before batch treatment. 

  

Note:    Knapsack  sprayers  powered  by  batteries  or  hand  pumps  are  generally  not  appropriate 

equipment for delivering the droplet spectrum required for fungicide applications on crops. 

 

 6. On-site Biosecurity Actions 



 

Currently (February 2012) myrtle rust is confirmed in New South Wales, Queensland and Victoria 

and as such it is important that businesses in all states and territories, production, wholesale and 

retail, maintain the highest plant health standards to ensure this disease is either suppressed and 

managed  or  not  introduced.    Any  business  purchasing,  or  has  sourced,  myrtle  rust  host  plant 

material  from  an  outside  source  must  survey  their  stock  to  ensure  freedom  from  the  disease.  

Other  businesses  with  host  plants  are  advised  to  maintain  a  structured  monitoring  program 

(weekly)  to  ensure  they  remain  free  of  the  disease  or  detect  infects  early  and  apply  a  suitable 

management strategy.   

 

Myrtle rust can move across the landscape and within a production system by: 

 

Vegetative material (alive or dead) 

 

Contaminated plant containers (pots, trays, etc)  

 

Air movement of spores (dry spores can move great distances – many kilometres) 

 

Human assisted movement (spores on clothing/vehicles/containers/etc) 

 

Water splash from rain and irrigation (wet spores are difficult to move by air) 

 

Animals both native and domestic (possums, cats, birds, insects, etc) 

 

The  following  simple  strategies  should  be  applied  (where  possible)  across  all  businesses 



growing/selling  myrtle  rust  host  material  (myrtaceous  species).    It  is  further  recommended  to 

consider this program for all plants within the Myrtaceae family: 

 

6.1 Production Nursery (including propagation) 

 Ensure a high standard of awareness of the disease at all staff levels 

 

Advise staff to avoid any plant contact prior to arriving at work & wear clean clothes 



 

Have on-site disease (myrtle rust/guava rust) identification information for all staff 

 

Train  staff  on  disease  identification  &  good  hygiene  practices  (see  State  biosecurity 



websites and Nursery Paper December 2004 Issue No: 11 at www.ngia.com.au) 

 

Disinfest  all  equipment/vehicles  that  move  off-site  and  return  to  operate  within  the 



production area 

17 

Australian Nursery Industry Myrtle Rust Management Plan (Version 2) – 2012   

 

Limit the access of people (visitors & staff) to your production areas 



 

Implement  a  hygiene protocol for  essential  visitors  (contractors, etc)  to production  areas 

including  awareness  of  previous  work  sites,  inspection  of  clothing/tools,  etc  and  if 

required provide disposable overalls while on-site  

 

Restrict all non-business vehicles from entry to production areas, disinfest if required on-



site – APVMA Permit:  PER10535 

 

Remove myrtaceous plants from driveways and carparks or prune to avoid possible visitor 



contact 

 

Consolidate all myrtaceous plant species within a defined area on-site away from native or 



landscape  planted  myrtaceous  plant  species  and  avoid  direct  exposure  (buffer)  to  the 

prevailing winds of the season 

 

Allocate specific staff to manage all myrtaceous species 



 

Source  myrtaceous  plant  material  from  known  professional  growers  (e.g.  NIASA 

Accredited) 

 

Request all suppliers of myrtaceous plant material provide evidence that they are adhering 



to this Myrtle Rust Management Plan (see attached declaration page 23) 

 

Maintain a quarantine area for imported nursery stock 



 

Inspect  (at  quarantine  area)  and  treat  (curative  fungicide)  imported  myrtaceous  species 

prior to incorporating into growing areas (7 days and re-inspect).  It is recommend this be 

applied irrespective of the source (see Sampling Protocol below) 

 

Inspect all myrtaceous species prior to despatch (see Sampling Protocol below) 

 

Monitor  all  myrtaceous  plant  species  weekly  across  growing  areas  for  disease  symptoms 



(particularly inspect areas of crop that have high humidity e.g. centre of batch and on the 

side exposed to prevailing winds) (see Monitoring Protocol below) 

 

Ensure growing areas remain free of all waste vegetative material 



 

Increase plant spacings where appropriate to reduce humidity levels within crops 

 

Periodically  (monthly)  survey  myrtaceous  species  growing  on-site  or  along  property 



boundaries/roads/etc.    Pay  particular  attention  to  plants  located  upwind  based  on  the 

most common prevailing wind direction of the season 

 

Implement  a  fortnightly  fungicide  treatment  program  across  all  myrtaceous  plants  (see 

recommended program(s) Section 5.2) 

 

Treat with a disinfectant (e.g. copper) the growing area upon the completion of the crop 



growing cycle before placing a new crop down on the production bed 

 

Dispose  of  all  extraneous  vegetative  plant  material  from  crop  management  such  as 



pruning, detailing or from natural desiccation via bulk waste, composting or deep burial  

 

Assess irrigation system and timing to ensure plant surfaces are dry within a short period 



(less than 6 hours) after irrigation.  Avoid irrigating late afternoon which allows water to sit 

on  surfaces  for  periods  of  6  hours  or  more  during  the  night.    Consider  installing 

drip/capillary or other under canopy irrigation system to myrtaceous plant species 

 

Access industry guidelines such as NIASA and  BioSecure 



HACCP 

for guidance in developing 

monitoring/surveillance/inspection programs and recording templates. 

 

6.2



 

Propagation (specifics) 

  

As above plus: 

 

Maintain  high  health  practices  in  propagation  (surface/implements/equipment 



disinfestation, staff hygiene, etc) 

 

Staff  to  wash  hands  before  commencing  work  in  propagation  area  (start  of  day/after 



breaks/etc) using a recognised hand sanitation product 

18 

Australian Nursery Industry Myrtle Rust Management Plan (Version 2) – 2012   

 

Propagation  staff  to  undertake  any  field  activities  at  end  of  day  and  not  to  re-enter 



propagation area. 

 

If  possible  provide  staff  with  clothing  or  coveralls  (e.g.  disposable  overalls)  for  moving 



outside propagation into production areas if required   

 

Avoid  using  adsorbent  surfaces  such  as  timber,  cement  board,  fibro,  etc  as  propagation 



work  surfaces  unless  covered  with  200  micron  thick  black  plastic  (replace  when 

cut/punctured/damaged) 

 

Regularly disinfest propagation surfaces throughout the day at various points such as upon 



returning from a break, a change of species or batch  

 

Disinfest all items including surfaces using a recognised industry disinfectant such as: 



o

 

Quaternary ammonium (e.g. PathX, Sporekil, etc) 



o

 

Combination of 70% Methylated Spirits and 30% water 



 

Avoid sourcing vegetative propagation material from myrtaceous plant species off-site 

 

Ensure  off-site  motherstock  for  non-myrtaceous  plant  species  are  inspected  and  not 



located within 10m of myrtaceous plants  

 

Prior to taking vegetative propagation material from off-site motherstock survey the area 



and inspect all myrtaceous plants for signs of Myrtle rust  

 

Motherstock must be monitored and inspected at weekly intervals  



 

Implement a fortnightly fungicide treatment program across all myrtaceous motherstock 

(see recommended program(s) Section 5.2) 

 

All  myrtaceous  vegetative  cuttings  should  be  dipped  in  a  bath  containing  a  recognised 



disinfectant  prior  to  sticking  such  as  diluted  chlorine,  a  specific  quaternary  ammonium 

(PathX/Sporekil/etc) that has low phytotoxicity or an approved fungicide.  Note:  Test on a 

sample to ensure the product is not phytotoxic to your plant species 

 

Consolidate all myrtaceous plant species within propagation houses (dedicated house) and 



hardening off/growing areas 

 

Monitor and inspect struck cuttings on a weekly cycle (see Monitoring Process below) 



 

Implement a fortnightly fungicide treatment program across all myrtaceous plant species 

in propagation houses and hardening off/growing areas (see recommended program(s) 

Section 5.2)  

 

 Treat  with  a  fungicide  (e.g.  copper)  the  growing  area  upon  the  completion  of  the  crop 



growing  cycle  before  placing  a  new  crop  down  on  the  propagation  bed/bench  and 

production bed 



 

6.3 Greenlife Markets/Retailers 

 

 

Ensure a high standard of awareness of the disease at all staff levels 



 

Advise staff to avoid any plant contact prior to arriving at work  

 

Have on-site disease (myrtle rust/guava rust) identification information for all staff 



 

Train  staff  on  disease  identification  &  good  hygiene  practices  (see  State  biosecurity 

websites and Nursery Paper December 2004 Issue No: 11 at www.ngia.com.au) 

 

Restrict all non-business vehicles from entry to greenlife stocking areas 



 

If  possible  remove/prune  myrtaceous  plant  species  from  carparks,  driveways,  etc  that 

could come into contact with staff and customers or could overhang greenlife stock 

 

If possible allocate specific staff to manage all myrtaceous species 



 

Request  all  suppliers  of  myrtaceous  plant  species  to  certify  the  plant  material  is  grown 

under this industry Myrtle Rust Management Plan (see declaration template page 23) 

 

Inspect all plant material at receival point with a close inspection of all myrtaceous plant 



species (see Sampling Protocol below) 

19 

Australian Nursery Industry Myrtle Rust Management Plan (Version 2) – 2012   

 

Consolidate all myrtaceous plant species within a defined area on-site away from native or 



landscape  planted  myrtaceous  plant  species  and  avoid  direct  exposure  (buffer)  to  the 

prevailing winds of the season 

 

Keep all areas stocking myrtaceous plant species free of waste vegetative material such as 



leaves/flowers/fruit etc dropped by plants 

 

Periodically, if possible, apply a recognised disinfectant treatment at monthly intervals over 



holding area(s) where myrtaceous plant species are stocked/placed/held 

 

Conduct  weekly  monitoring  inspections  of  all  myrtaceous  plant  species  (see  Monitoring 



Protocol below) 

 

Periodically  (monthly)  survey  myrtaceous  species  growing  on-site  or  along  property 



boundaries/roads/driveways, etc.  Pay particular attention to plants located upwind based 

on the most common prevailing wind direction of the season 

 

Dispose  of  all  extraneous  vegetative  plant  material  from  crop  management  such  as 



pruning, detailing or from natural desiccation via bulk waste, composting or deep burial 

 

Have staff inspect all myrtaceous plant species at paypoint(s) 



 

Assess irrigation system and timing to ensure leaf surfaces are dry within short period after 

irrigation.  Avoid irrigating late afternoon which allows water to sit on surfaces for periods 

of  6  hours  or  more  during  the  night.    Consider  installing  drip/capillary  or  other  under 

canopy irrigation system to myrtaceous plant species 

 

Access industry guidelines such as NIASA and  BioSecure 



HACCP 

for guidance in developing 

monitoring/surveillance/inspection programs and recording templates 

 

Note:  For home garden treatment see APVMA Permit – PER12828 

 

6.4 Infected Crop Management 

Crops found to be infected with myrtle rust can be managed by a range of options depending on 

part or entire batch infections and preferred treatment method.  The treatments identified below 

are in addition to the activities and fungicide treatments being employed by the business under 

this plan (Sections 6.1, 6.2 & 6.3).  After the below strategy is applied immediately reinstate the 

fungicide rotation program under the Myrtle Rust Management Plan. 

 

1   2   3   4


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə