Available online a



Yüklə 97.47 Kb.
PDF просмотр
tarix19.08.2017
ölçüsü97.47 Kb.

www.pelagiaresearchlibrary.com



Available online a

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pelagia Research Library

 

 

European Journal of Experimental Biology, 2015, 5(11):12-19          



 

 

 

 

 



ISSN: 2248 –9215

 

CODEN (USA): 

EJEBAU

 

 

12



 

Pelagia Research Library

 

Prediction of suitable habitats for Syzygium caryophyllatum, an 



endangered medicinal tree by using species distribution modelling 

for conservation planning 

 

N. Stalin and Swamy P. S.



 

Department of Plant Science, School of Biological Sciences, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai, Tamil Nadu, 

India 

_____________________________________________________________________________________________ 



 

ABSTRACT  

 

The  aim  of  this  study  was  to  use  species  distribution  models  (SDMs)  to  estimate  the  effects  of  environmental 

variables on the habitat suitability of Syzygium caryophyllatum (L.) Alston. SDMs help to identify suitable habitats 

for  the  development  of  threatened  plant  populations  to  prevent  extinctions,  especially  in  the  face  of  the  global 

environmental  change.  In  the  present  study  three  different  modelling  algorithms  were  used  to  predict  the  habitat 

suitability  of  an  endangered  plant  species  S.  caryophyllatum  towards  developing  conservation  strategies.  The 

BIOCLIM,  GARP  (GARP  with  the  best  subsets-new  open  modeller  implementation)  and  MaxEnt  algorithms  were 

run using the Open Modeller Desktop version 1.1.0 software. Jackknife test was used to evaluate the importance of 

the  environmental  variables  for  predictive  modelling.  Bioclim  and  GARP  models  were  more  accurate  with 

statistically  significant  AUC  (area  under  the  receiver  operating  characteristic  curve)  values  of  0.99  and  0.97 

compared to MaxEnt model which showed the AUC value of 0.91. This approach could be promising in predicting 

the potential habitat suitability of endangered plant species S. caryophyllatum with minimum number of occurrence 

points and thus, it can be used as an effective tool for species restoration and conservation planning. 

 

Keywords: Modelling algorithms, S. caryophyllatum, AUC, Bioclim, MaxEnt, GARP. 

_____________________________________________________________________________________________ 

 

INTRODUCTION 

 

Species  distribution  models  (SDMs)  or  ecological  niche  models  (ENM)  that  use  environmental  factors  based  on 

historical collections are increasingly being used to analyze species distributions and also to predict the presence or 

absence of species in unrecorded areas [1-3]. These  models establish relationships between occurrences of species 

and biophysical and environmental conditions in the study area. SDMs have been used to predict potentially suitable 

areas  for  the  conservation  of  endangered  and  rare  species  [4-8]  for  the  identification  of  suitable  sites  for 

reintroduction  or  restoration  [9,10]  and  for  assessing  potential  effects  of  future  climate  change  on  species 

distributions  as  well  as  on  local  species  diversity  [11,12].  It  is  also  used  to  enable  the  analysis  of  the  impacts  of 

climate change on species, it is essential to quantify the relative importance of climate relative to other descriptors of 

the environment [13,14]. 

 

The  ecological  niche  models  have  also  been  used  in  a  wide  range  of  applications  such  as  in  locating  rare  and 



threatened species habitats [15,16] predicting the spread of crop pests [17] and in estimating the response of species 

to  global  climate  change  [18].  Recent  works  in  this  field  deals  with  methodological  challenges  specific  to  best 

ENM-based predictions of suitable areas and identification of conservation priorities[19,20].  

 


N. Stalin and Swamy P. S. 

Euro. J. Exp. Bio., 2015, 5(11):12-19         

_____________________________________________________________________________ 

13

 



Pelagia Research Library

 

The  Western  Ghats  comprises  the  major  portion  of  the  Western  Ghats  and  Sri  Lanka  Hotspot,  one  of  34  global 



biodiversity hotspots for conservation and one of the five on the Indian subcontinent. The area is extraordinarily rich 

in biodiversity. Although the total area is less than 6 percent of the land area of India, the Western Ghats contains 

more than 30 percent of fauna and flora found in India. Like other hotspots, the Western Ghats has a high proportion 

of endemic species. The Western Ghats contains numerous medicinal plants and important genetic resources such as 

the wild relatives of grains, fruits and spices. In addition to rich biodiversity, the Western Ghats is home to diverse 

social, religious, and linguistic groups. The high cultural diversity of rituals, customs, and lifestyles has led to the 

establishment  of  several  religious  institutions  that  strongly  influence  public  opinion  and  the  political  decision-

making process. Conservation challenges lie in engaging these heterogeneous social groups and involving them in 

community efforts aimed at biodiversity conservation and consolidation of fragmented habitats in the hotspot. 

 

Syzygium  caryophyllatum  (L.)  Alston.,  commonly  known  as  Wild  black  plum,  a  medium  sized  tropical  evergreen 

tree  belongs  to  the  family  Myrtaceae.  The  vernacular  name  of  this  plant  is  Jangli  jamun  in  Hindi,  Kattunjara, 

Kanipazham or Jnarapazham  in Malayalam,  Kunta nerale in Kannada. S.caryophyllatum is  native to India and  Sri 

Lanka;  in  India  the  distribution  mainly  occur  in  the  forests  of  Western  Ghats.  Tree  grows  along  margin 

of evergreen forests or in open formations from low to higher elevations. Fruits are edible, sweet and astringent in 

taste and they are useful in stomatitis and intestinal disorder. The seeds and bark were dried and its decoction was 

used  for  the  treatment  of  Diabetes  mellitus  [21]  .  The  leaf  and  bark  extracts  of  this  plant  are  well  known  for  its 

antibacterial  and  antioxidant  efficacy  [22]  . Tribal  peoples  were  considering  this  plant  as  a  boon  of  nature  and  its 

fruits and seeds were consumed by Paniya tribal community of Waynad district, Kerala [23]. 

 

Based  on  the  previous  reports  the  extended  distribution  of  this  plant  species  is  reported in  Kalakad  Mundanthurai 



Tiger  Reserve  (KMTR)  forest  located  in  the  Southern  Western  Ghats  in  the  Tirunelveli  district  of  Tamil  Nadu, 

South India [24] and Annamalai hills that form of the Western Ghats-Sri Lanka biodiversity hotspots [25] . Based on 

the threat perception due to its habitat loss and human activities natural populations of this species are on the decline 

mode.  Due  to  these  pressures  this  species  has  been  listed  under  the  endangered  category  of  IUCN  Red  List.  The 

ecological conditions necessary for the survival of this species can greatly help in conservation scenario. The aim of 

this  study  was  to  predict  suitable  habitat  distribution  for  threatened  tree  species  Syzygium  caryophyllatum  using 

known  presence  observations  with  three  different  modelling  algorithms  (BIOCLIM,  GARP  and  MaxEnt).  To 

identify  the  environmental  factors  associated  with  S.caryophyllatum  habitat  distribution  and  to  predict  suitable 

habitat for reintroduction and future conservation of this species.  

 

MATERIALS AND METHODS 

 

Species occurrence data for Ecological niche modelling 

The occurrence points of S. caryophyllatum were identified based on the field surveys in the Western Ghats region 

of Tamilnadu, Kerala, Maharastra and Karnataka states of India and also from the secondary data collected from the 

literature  survey.  Thirty  two  occurrence  points  of  S.  caryophyllatum  were  used  in  the  present  study.  The  primary 

presence only data was used for modelling the distribution of this endangered species. 

 

Environmental data 

The environmental variables were nineteen bioclimatic variables used for all the three modelling algorithms (Table 

1). These bioclimatic variables were derived from the monthly temperature and rainfall values in order to generate 

more  biologically  significant  variables.  The  bioclimatic  variables  represent,  annual  trends  (e.g.  mean  annual 

temperature,  annual  precipitation),  seasonality  (e.g.  annual  range  in  temperature  and  precipitation)  and  extreme  or 

limiting  environmental  factors  (e.g.  temperature  of  the  coldest  and  warmest  month,  precipitation  of  wet  and  dry 

quarters).  These  variables  were  obtained  from  globally  interpolated  datasets  (source:  http://www.worldclim.org) 

which are presumed to be relevant to plant existence [12, 26, 27]. Analyses were conducted at the 1 x 1 km pixels 

spatial resolution of the environmental data sets.  



 

Model development  

Three different modelling algorithms were used in the present study following the Open Modeller Desktop version 

1.1.0  (downloaded  from  http://openmodeller.sourceforge.net)  software.  BIOCLIM,  GARP  (GARP  with  the  best 

subsets – new open  modeller implementation) and MaxEnt algorithms  were run  using the above software [28-31]. 

BIOCLIM  is  one  of  the  earlier  modelling  techniques,  based  on  climatic  envelop  theory.  For  each  given 

environmental  variable  the  algorithm  finds  the  mean  and  standard  deviation  (assuming  normal  distribution) 

associated  with  the  occurrence  points.  Each  variable  has  its  own  envelope  represented  by  the  interval  [M  -  CO* 

StDev,  M  +  C*  StDev],  where  'M'  is  the  mean;  'CO'  is  the  cut  off  input  parameter;  and  ’StDev’  is  the  standard 

deviation. Besides the envelope, each environmental variable has additional upper and lower limits taken from the 

maximum and minimum values related to the set of occurrence points [28]. 



N. Stalin and Swamy P. S. 

Euro. J. Exp. Bio., 2015, 5(11):12-19         

_____________________________________________________________________________ 

14

 



Pelagia Research Library

 

Table 1 Bioclimatic variables used in the model development 



 

Variables 

Details 

Bio1  


Annual mean temperature (º C) 

Bio2  


Mean diurnal temperature range [mean of monthly (max temp–min temp)] 

Bio3  


Isothermality (Bio2/Bio7) (×100) 

Bio4  


Bio 5 

Bio 6 


Temperature seasonality (standard deviation×100) (º C) 

Maximum temperature of warmest month (º C) 

Minimum temperature of coldest month(º C) 

Bio7  


Temperature annual range (P5–P6) (º C) 

Bio8  


Mean temperature of wettest quarter (º C) 

Bio9  


Mean temperature of driest quarter (º C) 

Bio10 


 Mean temperature of warmest quarter (º C) 

Bio11  


Mean temperature of coldest quarter (º C) 

Bio12  


Annual precipitation (mm) 

Bio 13 


Precipitation of the wettest month (mm) 

Bio 14 


Precipitation of the driest month (mm) 

Bio15  


Precipitation seasonality (coefficient of variation) (mm) 

Bio16  


Precipitation of wettest quarter (mm) 

Bio17  


Precipitation of driest quarter (mm) 

Bio18  


Precipitation of warmest quarter (mm) 

Bio19  


Precipitation of coldest quarter (mm) 

 

GARP  (genetic  algorithm  for  rule  set  prediction)  is  an  ecological  niche  modelling  method  based  on  a  genetic 

algorithm. This modelling approach predicts the suitable environmental conditions under which the species should 

be able to maintain populations. For input, GARP uses a set of point localities where the species is known to occur 

and a set of geographical layers that might limit the specie’s capabilities to survive. This model is a random set of 

mathematical rules which can be read as limiting environmental conditions [31]. 

 

The  maximum entropy (MaxEnt) approach estimates a target probability distribution of the  species by  finding the 



probability distribution of maximum entropy (i.e., that is most spread out or closest to uniform with reference to a 

set  of  environmental  variables).  Default  values  of  different  parameters,  maximum  iterations  =  500,  convergence 

threshold = 0.00001 and 50% of data points were used as a random test percentage in the present study [29,30]. 

 

Model validation  

A  receiver  operating  characteristics  (ROC)  plot  was  generated  by  incorporating  the  sensitivity  values,  the  true 

positive  fraction  against  the  false  positive  fraction  for  all  available  probability  thresholds  to  measure  prediction 

accuracy  of  the  models  output  [32-34].  The  sensitivity  values  were  calculated  using  confusion  matrix.  A  curve 

which  maximizes  sensitivity  against  low  false  positive  fraction  values  is  considered  as  good  model  which  was 

evaluated  by  using  the  area  under  the  curve  (AUC).  Cross-validated  AUC  values  were  summarized  to  present 

overall  model  performance  by  taking  mean  AUC  values  of  all  model  accuracies.  The  range  of  AUC  is  from  0.0 

to1.0. A  model providing excellent prediction has an  AUC higher than 0.9, a fair model has an  AUC between 0.7 

and  0.9  and  a  model  with  AUC  below  0.7  is  considered poor  (Swets  1988). The  Jackknife  procedure  was  used  to 

assess the importance and percentage of contribution of bioclimatic variables. The final potential species distribution 

maps  had  a  range  of  values  from  0  to  1  which  were  regrouped  into  three  classes  of  potential  habitats  viz.,  ‘high 

potential’ (>0.6), ‘medium potential’ (0.2–0.4) and ‘low potential’ (<0.2).  

 

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION 

 

The  prediction  of  suitable  habitats  for  conservation  of  the  endangered  tree  species  S.  caryophyllatum  was 



successfully predicted by three species distribution models (BIOCLIM, GARP and MaxEnt). Model outputs varied 

with the  modelling techniques used in the present study (Figure 1 a, b & c). SDMs outputs revealed that, MaxEnt 

predicted  largest  area  (75.95%)  under  potential  distribution  compared  to  BIOCLIM  (1.73%)  and  GARP  (5.26%). 

Both GARP and MaxEnt showed a  wide range of distribution from low to high probability area in India  whereas, 

BIOCLIM  output  is  restricted  to  Western  ghats  regions  of  India.    The  AUC  values  for  the  current  potential 

distribution  of  S.  caryophyllatum  were  high  indicating  good  predictive  model  performance.  BIOCLIM  and  GARP 

models showed a good performance with AUC values of 0.99 and 0.97 compared with MaxEnt AUC value of 0.91 

(Table 2 ).  



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

N. Stalin and Swamy P. S. 

Euro. J. Exp. Bio., 2015, 5(11):12-19         

_____________________________________________________________________________ 

15

 



Pelagia Research Library

 

Figure 1 Predicted suitable habitats for S. caryophyllatum a) BioClim b) GARP c) MaxEnt 

 

 

Table 2 Comparative account of various model outputs 



 

Parameters 

Bioclim 

GARP 

MaxEnt 

Accuracy (%) 

100 

96.7742 


100 

AUC Values 

0.99 

0.97 


0.91 

Omission error 

0.0322581 



Commision error 





Threshold 

50 % 


20 % 

30.598% 


% of cells predicted present 

1.73229 % 

5.26753 % 

75.9551% 



 

The  jacknife  test  of  variable  importance  in  MaxEnt  has  identified  the  precipitation  of  coldest  quarter  (bioclimatic 

variable 19) as the most important environmental variable contributed to the model development (Figure 2). Other 

variables like Isothermality  (bioclimatic variable 3), Temperature seasonality  (bioclimatic variable 4), Temperature 

annual range (bioclimatic variable 7), Annual precipitation (bioclimatic variable 12), Precipitation of driest quarter 

(bioclimatic  variable  17),  Annual  mean  temperature  (bioclimatic  variable  1)  and  Mean  diurnal  temperature  range 

(bioclimatic  variable  2)  also  have  considerable  predictive  values  with  regard  to  distribution  of  S.caryophyllatum 


N. Stalin and Swamy P. S. 

Euro. J. Exp. Bio., 2015, 5(11):12-19         

_____________________________________________________________________________ 

16

 



Pelagia Research Library

 

(Figure.  3).  Considering  the  permutation  importance,  only  9  variables  out  of  19  contributed  to  the  model  output. 



Among the 9 variables, temperature seasonality (bio 4) (94 %) had maximum influence on habitat suitability model 

followed  by  annual  precipitation  (bio  12)  (3.5%)  and  precipitation  of  driest  quarter  (bio  17)  (1.8  %).  All  three 

variables  together  contributed  to  99.3%  of  the  variation  (Table.  3).  Potential  distribution  maps  show  various 

possibilities for conservation and management of this endangered tree species. Both MaxEnt and GARP have shown 

a wider range of distribution from medium to high probability in South-west and north-east states of India and also 

showed  high  probability  in  some  areas  of  Sri  Lanka,  it  is  an  another  native  region  of  S.  caryophyllatum  whereas, 

Bioclim distribution is restricted as high probability areas in and around the occurrence points of its existing natural 

populations. 



 

Table 3 Analysis of percent contribution and permutation importance of Bioclimatic variables to MaxEnt model 

 

Variables 

Percentage contribution 

Permutation importance 

Bio 19 


49.5 

1.3 


Bio 3 

17.1 


0.1 

Bio 4 


9.5 

94 


Bio 7 

7.5 


0.2 

Bio 12 


5.3 

3.5 


Bio 17 

3.5 


1.8 

Bio 1 


3.4 

0.6 


Bio 2 

1.4 


Bio 6 


0.8 

0.1 


Bio 18 

0.7 


Bio 15 


0.6 

0.3 


bio16 

0.5 




 

Figure 2 The Jackknife test for evaluation of relative importance of environmental variables for S. caryophyllatum 

 

 

The major role of SDM is to estimate the probability of occurrence of a given species based on observed presence 

and (or absence locations) as well as environmental and climatic covariates. A common application of this method is 

to predict species ranges with climate data as predictors. Several studies were done successfully and predict suitable 

distribution  habitats  for  many  threatened  plant  species  using  different  modelling  algorithms  like  Artemisia  sieberi 

and Artemisia aucheri, Justicia adhatoda ,Coscinium fenestratum, Tapirus pinchaque and Monotropa uniflora [35-

39].  Ray  et  al.  (2011)  [40]  reported  the  predictive  distribution  modelling  of  a  rare  Himalayan  medicinal  plant 



Berberis aristata using the three algorithms used in the present study.  Also in the previous studies, distribution map 

of suitable habitat for conservation of Nepeta septemcrenata [41] and an endangered tree Canacomyricca moniticola 

[10] using MaxEnt algorithm with low omission error was predicted.  

 

Distribution  data  on  threatened  species  often  have  few  records  and  are  geographically  close  together,  making  it 



difficult  to  model  their  appropriate  habitat  distribution  using  commonly  used  modelling  approaches  because  such 

data provide limited information for determining the relationships between the species and their environments [10]. 

Maximum entropy (Maxent) models present good results even for small sample size [42]. Maxent is a multivariate 

approach to study the geographic distribution of species on a large scale using only presence data of the species [30]. 



 

N. Stalin and Swamy P. S. 

Euro. J. Exp. Bio., 2015, 5(11):12-19         

_____________________________________________________________________________ 

17

 



Pelagia Research Library

 

Figure 3 Response curves of the variables that most contributed to explain the potential distribution of S.caryophyllatum (Isothermality 



(Bio 3), Temperature seasonality (Bio 4), Temperature annual range (Bio 7), Annual precipitation (Bio 12), precipitation of the driest 

quarter (Bio17) and precipitation of the coldest quarter (Bio19) 

 

 

 

The  presence  points  of  the  species  were  considered  as  appropriate  places  for  their  occurrence.  The  essential  data 



layers were imported for this model and then statistical analysis was performed by Maxent software to map potential 

habitat of distribution pattern of threatened and endangered plant species. Maxent has several strong characteristics, 

it  needs  only  species  occurrence  data  and  environmental  factors;  it  can  examine  factor  importance  by  way  of  a 

jackknife procedure and also facilitates model interpretation [30,43]. 



N. Stalin and Swamy P. S. 

Euro. J. Exp. Bio., 2015, 5(11):12-19         

_____________________________________________________________________________ 

18

 



Pelagia Research Library

 

Geographical  data  of  threatened  species  provide  the  degree  of  species  threats,  their  distributions,  and  habitat 



requirements of species. It will also be useful in identifying potentially sensitive or uniquely fragile ecosystems. A 

threatened  species is the one  with  narrow  habitat range, low climate tolerance;  specialised adaptation requiring an 

outside  agency  for  pollination,  poor  dispersal  strategies,  few  seeds  per  fruit  and  poor  viability  of  seeds  [44].  The 

conservation status of a species can best be developed by synthesising information on each of its known populations, 

viewed  together  with  any  information  on  changes  in  historical  range  and  evidence  of  vulnerability  of  its 

characteristic habitat. Mapping by such intrinsic features of the  land as  natural regions  and physiographic areas is 

the best way of presenting plant distributions data. Species and habitat relationship modelling with precise locality 

data on microclimate, topography and soil in association with site-specific location data of concerned taxa helps in 

understanding  the  interrelationships  and  controls  of  biotic  and  abiotic  factors  on  species  distribution  pattern  [45]. 

Natural populations of S. caryophyllatum have always been small, but our modelling distribution prediction results 

showed  potential  habitat  greater  than  the  area  of  the  actual  distribution.  These  results  give  an  insight  into  the 

availability of areas suitable for the species’ regeneration, possibly through ex vitro conservation planning. 



 

CONCLUSION 

 

Our  results  of  potential  habitat  distribution  maps  for  S.  caryophyllatum  may  help  to  discover  new  populations, 

identify  top-priority  study  sites  or  set  priorities  to  restore  its  natural  habitat  for  more  effective  conservation. 

Moreover the effective conservation planning is necessary for this tree species for its further existence in the natural 

forests. 

 

Acknowledgment 

First  author  thank  University  Grant  Commission  for  the  award  of  meritorious  fellowship.  Corresponding  author 

thank partial financial support through UGC for the funding of UGC-CAS, DST-IPLS and DST-Purse programme. 

 

REFERENCES 

 

[1] Araujo MB, Pearson RG, Thuiller W, Erhard M, Glob Change Biol,2005,11, 1504. 



[2] Elith J, Leathwick JR, Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution and Systematics, 2009, 40, 677. 

[3] Guisan A, Hofer U, J Biogeogr, 2003, 30, 1233. 

[4] Gallagher  RV, Hughe L, Leishman MR, Wilson PO, Biol Invasions, 2010, 12, 4049. 

[5] Papes M, Gaubert P, Divers Distrib, 2007, 13, 890. 

[6] Rebelo H, Jones G, J Appl Ecol, 2010, 47, 410. 

[7] Solano E, Feria TP, Biodiv and Conser, 2007, 16, 188. 

[8] Arun KD, Rameshprabu N, Swamy PS,  Paper Proceedings of International Conference on Biodiversity (ICBD), 

Colombo, Sri Lanka, 2013, pp 5. 

[9] Klar N, Fernandez N, Kramer-Schadt S, Herrmann M, Trinzen M, Buttner I, Niemitz C, Biol Conser, 2008, 141, 

308. 


[10] Kumar S, Thomas J, Stohlgren, J Ecol Natural Environ, 2009, 1(4), 94. 

[11] Hole DG, Willis SG, Pain  DJ, Fishpool LD, Butchart SHM, Collingham YC, Rahbek C, Huntley B, Ecol Lett, 



2009, 12, 420. 

[12] Pearson RG, Dawson TP, Global Ecol Biogeogr, 2003, 12, 361. 

[13] Morueta-Holme N, Flojgaard C, Svenning JC, PLos One, 20105(4), 10. 

[14] Newbold T, Progress in Physical Geography, 2010,  34(1), 3. 

[15] Jackson CR, Robertson MP,  J Nat Conserv, 2011, 19, 87.  

[16] Peterson  AT,  Martínez-Campos  C,  Nakazawa  Y,  Martínez-Meyer  E,  Transactions  of  the Royal  Society  of 



Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 2005, 99, 647.  

[17] Ganeshaiah KN, Barve N, Nath N, Chandrashekara K, Swamy M, Cur Sci, 2003, 85, 1526. 

[18] Barve N, Bonilla AJ, Brandes J, Brown  JC, Brunsell N, Rev Mex Biodivers, 2012, 83, 817. 

[19] Loiselle BA, Howell CA, Graham CH, Goerck JM, Brooks T, Smith KG, Williams PH, Conserv Biol, 2003, 17, 

1591. 

[20] Peterson AT, Kluza DA, Anim Conserv, 2003, 6, 47. 



[21] Ediriweera  ERHSS, Ratnasooriya WD, Ayu, 2009, 30(4), 373. 

[22] Shilpa KJ, Krishnakumar G, Int J of Pharm Pharm Sci, 2012, 4, 198. 

[23] Ratheesh NMK, Anilkumar N, Balakrishnan V, Sivadasan M,  Ahmed Alfarhan H, Alatar AA,  J Med Plants 

Res2011, 5(15), 3520. 

[24] Parthasarathy  N, Biodiv and Conser, 20098, 1365. 

[25] Muthuramkumar  S, Ayyappan N, Parthasarathy N, Mudappa D, Shankar Raman TR,  Arthur Selwyn M, Arul 

Pragasan L, Biotropica, 200638(2), 143. 

[26]   Hijmans RJ, Cameron S, Parra J, Jones P, Jarvis A, Int J Climatol, 2005, 25, 1965. 


N. Stalin and Swamy P. S. 

Euro. J. Exp. Bio., 2015, 5(11):12-19         

_____________________________________________________________________________ 

19

 



Pelagia Research Library

 

[27] Irfan-Ullah M, Giriraj A, Murthy MSR, Peterson AT, Biodiv  Conser, 2007, 16(6), 1917.  



[28] Busby JR, BIOCLIM - A Bioclimatic Analysis and Prediction System. In: Margules, C.R & M.P. Austin (eds.) 

Nature Conservation: Cost Effective Biological Surveys and Data Analysis. Canberra: CSIRO, 1991, pp 64. 

[29] Peterson AT, The Condor, 2001, 103(3), 599. 

[30] Phillips  SJ,  Dudik  M,  Schapire  RE,  In  proceedings  of  the 21



st

  International  conference on  machine  learning, 

AMC Press, New York, 2004, pp 655. 

[31] Stockwell DRB, Peters D, Int J Geogr Inf Sci, 1999, 13 (2), 143. 

[32] Boubli JP, de Lima MG,  Int J Primatol, 2009, 30. 

[33] Lobo JM, Jime´nez-Valverde A, Real R, Global Ecol  Biogeogr, 2008, 17, 145. 

[34] VanDerWal J, Shoo LP, Graham C, Williams SE, Ecol Model, 2009, 220, 589. 

[35] Hosseini SZ, Kappas M, ZareChahouki MA, Ecol Inform, 2013, 18, 61. 

[36]  Yang XQ, Kushwaha SPS, Saran S, Ecol Eng, 2013, 51, 83. 

[37] Thriveni HN,  Srikanth V, Gunaga HN, Babu R, Vasudeva R, Trop Ecol,201556(1), 101. 

[38]  Ortega-Andrade HM, Prieto-Torres DA, Gómez-Lora I, Lizcano DJ, PLoS ONE, 2015, 10(3), e0121137. 

[39]  Pradhan P,  Biodiversitas, 2015, 16( 2), 109. 

[40] Ray R, Gururaja KV.,  Ramachandra TV, J Env  Biol, 2011, 32(6), 725. 

[41] Khafaga O, Hatab EE, Omar K, Academia Arena, 2011, 3(7), 45. 

[42]  Phillips SJ,  Anderson RP,  Schapired RE, Ecol Model2006, 190, 231. 

[43]  Scheldeman X, van Zonneveld M, Biodiversity International2010, 139. 

[44] Nayar MP, Hot spots of endemic plants of India, Nepal and Bhutan, TBGRI, Trivandrum, 1996, pp 252. 



[45]  Varghese AO, Joshi AK, Krishna Murthy YVN, J Indian Soc Remote2010, 38 (3), 523.

 


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə