Available online a



Yüklə 246.02 Kb.
Pdf просмотр
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü246.02 Kb.

www.derpharmachemica.com



Available online a

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

Scholars Research Library

 

 

Der Pharma Chemica, 2014, 6(3):256-260



 

(http://derpharmachemica.com/archive.html)

 

 

 



 

ISSN 0975-413X

 

CODEN (USA): PCHHAX

 

 

256



 

www.scholarsresearchlibrary.com

 

Chemical constituents of Syzygium samarangense 

 

Consolacion Y. Ragasa

1,2*

, Francisco C. Franco Jr.

2

, Dennis D. Raga

3

 and Chien-Chang Shen

 

1



Chemistry Department, De La Salle University Science & Technology Complex Leandro V. Locsin Campus, Biñan 

City, Laguna, Philippines 

2

Chemistry Department and Center for Natural Sciences and Ecological Research, De La Salle University, 2401 

Taft Avenue, Manila, Philippines 

3

Biology Department and Center for Natural Sciences and Ecological Research, De La Salle University-Manila 

4

National Research Institute of Chinese Medicine, 155-1, Li-Nong St., Sec 2, Taipei, Taiwan 

_____________________________________________________________________________________________ 



 

ABSTRACT 

 

The  dichloromethane  extract  of  the  leaves  of  Syzygium  samarangense  (Blume)  Merr.  &  Perry  afforded 

2



,4



-

dihydroxy-6



-methoxy-3



-methylchalcone 

(1), 

2



,4



-dihydroxy-6



-methoxy-3



,5



-dimethylchalcone



  (2), 

2



-hydroxy-



4



,6



-dimethoxy-3



-methyl  chalcone



  (3),  squalene  (4),  betulin  (5),  lupeol  (6),  sitosterol  (7),  and  a  mixture  of 

cycloartenyl  stearate  (8a),  lupenyl  stearate  (8b),  β-sitosteryl  stearate  (8c),  and  24-

methylenecycloartenyl 

stearate 

(8d).  The structures of 1-35, 7, and 8a-8d were elucidated by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy.   Sample was tested 

for hypoglycemic and antimicrobial potentials.  It showed negative hypoglycemic potential and

 exhibited moderate 

antifungal activity against C. albicans, low activity against T. mentagrophytes and low antibacterial activity against 

E. coli, S. aureus and P. aeruginosa.   It was inactive against B. subtilis and A. niger.   

 

Keywords:  Syzygium samarangense, 

Myrtaceae, 

cycloartenyl stearate, lupenyl stearate,  β -sitosteryl stearate, 24-

methylenecycloartenyl

 stearate  

_____________________________________________________________________________________________ 

 

INTRODUCTION 

 

Syzygium  samarangense  (syn.  Eugenia  javanica  Linn.)  commonly  known  as  ‘makopa’  is  grown  throughout  the 

Philippines  for  its  fruits.  The  tree  is  used  as  an  antipyretic  and  a  diuretic  [1]

.    Four  flavonoids  isolated  from  the 

hexane  extract  of  S.  samarangense  showed  dose-dependent  spasmolytic  activity  [2].    Another  study  reported  that 

2



,4



-dihydroxy-6

-methoxy-3



,5



-dimethylchalcone

  from  S.  samarangense  exhibited  significant  differential 

cytotoxicity  against  the  MCF-7  cell  line  and  significant  selective  cytotoxicity  against  RAD  52  yeast  mutant  strain 

[3].  Compounds isolated from the hexane extract of the leaves of S. 



samarangense:

 

2



,4



-dihydroxy-6

-methoxy-3



-

methylchalcone



2



,4

-dihydroxy-6



-methoxy-3

-methyl 


dihydrochalcone, 

2



-hydroxy-4

,6



-dimethoxy-3

-

methylchalcone, 



α

-  and 


β

-carotene,  lupeol,  betulin, 

epi-betulinic

  acid,    and 

β

-D-sitosterylglucoside  exhibited 



significant  and  selective  inhibition  against  prolyl  endopeptidase  [4].    An  earlier  study  reported  that  the  methanol 

extract of makopa leaves exhibited high antidiabetic activity [5], while a recent study reported that 

2



,4



-di hydroxy-

6



-methoxy-3



,5



-dimethylchalcone 

and 5-


O-

methyl-


4

-desmethoxy matteucinol from S. samarangense significantly 



lowered the blood glucose levels in hyperglycaemic  mice  when administered 15  minutes after glucose load,  while 

2



,4

-dihydroxy-6



-methoxy-3

,5



-dimethylchalcone  significantly  lowered  the  blood  glucose  levels  of  alloxan 

diabetic  mice  [6].    Recently,  we  reported  the  potent  analgesic  and  anti-inflammatory  activities  and  the  negligible 

toxicity  on  zebrafish  embryonic  tissues  of  a  mixture  of 

cycloartenyl  stearate  (8a),  lupenyl  stearate  (8b),  sitosteryl 

stearate (8c), and 24-

methylenecycloartenyl 

stearate (8d) from the dichloromethane extract of the air-dried leaves of 

S. samarangense [7]. 

 


Consolacion Y. Ragasa

 

et al 

Der Pharma Chemica, 2014, 6 (3):256-260 

_____________________________________________________________________________

 

257



 

www.scholarsresearchlibrary.com

 

We  report  herein  the  isolation  and  identification  of  2



,4



-dihydroxy-6

-methoxy-3



-methylchalcone 

(1), 

2



,4

-



dihydroxy-6

-methoxy-3



,5



-dimethylchalcone

 (2), 

2



-hydroxy-4



,6



-dimethoxy-3

-methylchalcone



 (3), squalene (4), 

betulin (5), lupeol (6), sitosterol (7), and a mixture of cycloartenyl stearate (8a), lupenyl stearate (8b), β-sitosteryl 

stearate (8c), and 24-

methylenecycloartenyl 

stearate (8d) (Fig.1) from the air-dried leaves of S. samarangense.  To 

the best of our knowledge this is the first report on the isolation of 8a-8d from the tree.  Results of the hypoglycemic 

and antimicrobial tests on a mixture of 8a-8d are likewise reported. 

                                                                 

R

R

1



4

6

1 0



1 1

1 4


1 7

1 8


1 9

2 0


2 1

2 4


2 6

2 8


3 0

2 8


2 4

2 9


3 0

1 9


1 8

2 0


2 1

3 1


2 6

2 8


3 0

2 7


2 5

2 2


2 0

1 9


1 7

1 4


1 1

6

1



6    R   =   O H

8 b    R   =   C H

3

(

C H



2

)

1 6



C O O  

H O


C H

2

O H



R

R

1



6

1 1


1 4

2 0


2 5

2 6


2 1

1 9


1 8

2 9


1    R   =   O H ,     R '   =   H

2    R   =   O H ,     R '   =   C H

3

3    R   =   O C H



3

,     R '   =   H

5 '

3 '


1 '

α

β



4

1

O C H



3

O

O H



R

H

3



C

R '


7    R   =   O H

8 c    R   =   C H

3

(

C H



2

)

1 6



C O O  

5

8 a    R   =   C H



3

(

C H



2

)

1 6



C O O  

8 d    R   =   C H

3

(

C H



2

)

1 6



C O O  

4

 



 

Figure 1:  The compounds from S. samarangense: 2



,4



-dihydroxy-6



-methoxy-3



-methylchalcone 

(1), 

2



,4



-dihydroxy-6



-methoxy-3



,5



-



dimethylchalcone

 (2), 

2



-hydroxy-4



,6



-dimethoxy-3



-methylchalcone

 (3), squalene (4), betulin (5), lupeol (6), sitosterol (7), cycloartenyl 

stearate (8a), lupenyl stearate (8b), β-sitosteryl stearate (8c), and 24-

methylenecycloartenyl 

stearate (8d)

 

 

MATERIALS AND METHODS 

 

General Experimental Procedures  

NMR spectra were recorded on a Varian VNMRS spectrometer in CDCl

3

 at 600 MHz for 



1

H NMR and 150 MHz 

for 

13

C NMR spectra.  2D NMR (COSY, HSQC, HMBC) spectra were recorded on a Varian VNMRS spectrometer.  



MS was obtained on a Finnigan MAT LCQ mass spectrometer.  Column chromatography was performed with silica 

gel  60  (70-230  mesh);  TLC  was  performed  with  plastic  backed  plates  coated  with  silica  gel  F

254 

;  plates  were 



visualized by spraying with vanillin sulfuric acid, followed by warming.  

 

Sample Collection 

Fresh leaves of Syzygium samarangense (5 kg) were collected from Antipolo City in December 2008.  Specimens of 

the sample  were authenticated at the Institute of Biology, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City.  A 

voucher specimen # 140 was deposited at the Chemistry Department, De La Salle University-Manila.  



 

 

 

Consolacion Y. Ragasa

 

et al 

Der Pharma Chemica, 2014, 6 (3):256-260 

_____________________________________________________________________________

 

258



 

www.scholarsresearchlibrary.com

 

Isolation 

The air-dried leaves of Syzygium samarangense (1 kg) were ground in an osterizer, soaked in CH

2

Cl



2

 for three days 

and  then  filtered.  The  filtrate  was  concentrated  under  vacuum  to  afford  a  crude  extract  (45.86  g)  which  was 

chromatographed in increasing volumes of acetone in CH

2

Cl

2



 at 10 % increment.  The CH

2

Cl



2

 and 10 % acetone in 

CH

2

Cl



2

 fractions were combined and rechromatographed in petroleum ether.  The less polar fractions afforded (55 

mg).  The  more  polar  fractions  were  rechromatographed  in  increasing  percentage  of  EtOAc  in  petroleum  ether 

(0.5%,  1%,  2.5%  and  5%  by  volume)  to  afford  sample  8  which  is  a  mixture  of  8a-8d  (1g).    The  20%  and  30% 

acetone in CH

2

Cl



2

 fractions were combined and rechromatographed (5 ×) in CH

2

Cl

2



 to afford 6 (25 mg) and (35 

mg).    The  40%  and  50%  acetone  in  CH

2

Cl

2



  fractions  were  combined  and  rechromatographed  in 

CH

3



CN:Et

2

O:CH



2

Cl

2



  (1:1:8)  by  volume  ratio.    The  less  polar  fractions  were  rechromatographed  (4  ×)  in 

CH

3



CN:Et

2

O:CH



2

Cl

2



 (0.5:0.5:9) by volume ratio to afford (18 mg) and (8 mg).  The more polar fractions were 

rechromatographed (6 ×) in CH

3

CN:Et


2

O:CH


2

Cl

2



 (1:1:8) by volume ratio to afford 1 (24 mg) and (32 mg). 

 

Antimicrobial Test 

The microorganisms used were obtained from the University of the Philippines Culture Collection (UPCC).   These 

are  Pseudomonas  aeruginosa  (UPCC  1244),  Bacillus  subtilis  (UPCC  1149),  Escherichia  coli  (UPCC  1195), 



Staphylococcus aureus (UPCC 1143), Candida albicans (UPCC 2168), Trichophyton mentagrophytes (UPCC 4193) 

and Aspergillus niger (UPCC 3701).  Sample 8  was tested for antimicrobial activity against these  microorganisms 

using the procedure reported in the literature  [8].   

 

Experimental Animals 

A total of 50 male albino mice (Mus musculus L.) of an inbred ICR strain (7 weeks old) weighing 19.0 ±2.0 g were 

acclimatized  for  7  days  prior  to  conducting  the  bioassay.    The  animals  (n  =  9)  were  procured  from  the  Food  and 

Drugs  Authority,  Muntinlupa  City,  Philippines  and  housed  at  the  animal  containment  unit  of  DLSU-Manila  with 

12h daylight and 12h darkness with free access to food pellets and water.  A 16h fasting period was carried out prior 

to each treatment procedure [9].  All animal handling procedures were in accordance with the existing policies and 

guidelines  of  the  Philippine  Association  of  Laboratory  Animal  Science  (PALAS)  for  care  and  use  of  laboratory 

animals and with Administrative Order 40 of the Bureau of Animal Industry relative to the Rep. Act. No.8485.  



 

 

Hypoglycemic Test 

The anti-diabetes assay was performed modified from the procedure [9].  Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (5 g/kg BW) 

was performed on normoglycemic mice, followed by measurement of blood glucose level (mg/dL) using OneTouch 

Horizon  Glucometer  (Lifescan,  Johnson  &  Johnson,  USA).    Polysorbate  80  (25  mg/kg  BW,  Tween-80,  AJAX, 

Finechem Pty. Ltd., Australia) as the negative control for sample 8  (8a-8d).  Solosa (16.7 

µ

g/kg BW, Glimepiride 



solosa,  Aventis,  Italy)  dissolved  in  distilled  H

2

O  was  orally  administered  as  the  positive  control,  while  sample  8 



(100 mg/kg BW, 50 mg/kg BW, and 25 mg/kg BW) dissolved in Polysorbate 80 were given as the test compounds.  

Blood glucose was measured within a 3h period at 30 minutes intervals.  Blood glucose reduction was computed as 

percent  reduction  ([initial  blood  glucose  –  final  blood  glucose]  /  initial  x  100)  and  was  used  in  the  statistical 

analysis. 



 

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION 

 

Silica gel chromatography of the dichloromethane extract of the air-dried leaves of  S. samarangense afforded 2

,4



-

dihydroxy-6

-methoxy-3



-methylchalcone 

(1), 

2



,4

-dihydroxy-6



-methoxy-3

,5



-dimethylchalcone

  (2), 

2



-hydroxy-



4

,6



-dimethoxy-3

-methylchalcone



  (3),  squalene  (4),  betulin  (5),  lupeol  (6),  sitosterol  (7),  and  a  mixture  of 

cycloartenyl  stearate  (8a),  lupenyl  stearate  (8b),  β-sitosteryl  stearate  (8c),  and  24-

methylenecycloartenyl

  stearate 

(8d).  

The  structures  of  1,  2,  3,  5  and  7  were  elucidated  by  extensive  1D  and  2D  NMR  analyses  and  confirmed  by 

comparison of their  

1

H and 



13

C NMR data with those of  2

,4



-dihydroxy-6

-methoxy-3



-methylchalcone [10], 2

,4



-

dihydroxy-6

-methoxy-3



,5



-dimethylchalcone  [11],  2

-hydroxy-4



,6



-dimethoxy-3

-methylchalcone  (aurentiacin) 



[12], betulin [13] and sitosterol [14], respectively.  Compound 4  was identified by comparison of its 

1

H NMR data 



with  those  of  squalene  [15].      The  structure  of  6  was  deduced  by  comparison  of  its 

13

C



 

NMR  data  with  those  of 

lupeol [13]. 

 

The structures of 8a-8d were elucidated by extensive 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy.  The resonances attributed to 



the  major  compound,  8a  suggested  a  cycloartenol  esterified  to  a  fatty  acid.   

Confirmatory  evidences  are  the 

13



NMR  data  of 



8a  and 

cycloartenyl  acetate  [16]  for  the  triterpene  part  and  the  fatty  acid  ester  of  16-

hydroxycycloartenyl palmitate [17] for the fatty acid part, which match in all essential respects. The fatty acid chain 

length was determined by the mass spectrum of sample which gave a molecular ion at m/z = 694.2 corresponding 

to the molecular formula of C

48

H



86

O

2



 and an [M

+

-C



18

H

35



O

2

] of m/z 409 which resulted from the loss of stearic acid 



Consolacion Y. Ragasa

 

et al 

Der Pharma Chemica, 2014, 6 (3):256-260 

_____________________________________________________________________________

 

259



 

www.scholarsresearchlibrary.com

 

from the molecular ion peak.  The resonances assigned to 8b indicated that it is lupenyl stearate [18], while



 8c is β-

sitosteryl  stearate  [19].

   

On  the  other  hand,  8d  is 



24-

methylenecycloratenyl  stearate  as  confirmed  by  similar 

13



NMR  data  with 



24-methylenecycloartenyl  acetate  [20]  for  the  triterpene  part  and  the  fatty  acid  ester  of  16-

hydroxycycloartenyl palmitate [17] for the fatty acid part. 

 

As part of our continuing search for antimicrobial compounds from Philippine medicinal plants, sample 8 was tested 



for possible antimicrobial activities by the agar well method.  Results of the study (Table 1) indicated that sample 8 

is  moderately  active  against  the  fungus,  C.  albicans  with  an  activity  index  (AI  =  0.3),    slightly  active  against  the 

fungus, T. mentagrophytes (AI = 0.3), slightly active against the bacteria: E. coli (AI = 0.1), P. aeruginosa (0.3) and 

S. aureus (AI = 0.1).  It was inactive against B. subtilis and A. niger.  

 

Table 1.  Antimicrobial Test Results on Sample 8 



 

Organism 

Sample (30

µ

g) 



Clearing Zone 

(mm)


Activity Index (AI) 



E. coli 

Sample 8 

11 

0.1 


Chloramphenicol

23 



2.8 

P. aeruginosa 

Sample 8 

12 

0.2 


Chloramphenicol

14 



1.3 

S. aureus 

Sample 8 

12 

0.2 


Chloramphenicol

25 



3.2 

B. subtilis 

Sample 8 

-



0



 

Chloramphenicol

20 


2.3 

C. albicans 

Sample 8 

13 

0.3 


Canesten, 0.2g

18 



0.8 

T. mentagrophytes 

Sample 8 

12 

0.2 


Canesten, 0.2g

55 



4.5 

A. niger 

Sample 8 



Canesten, 0.2g



23 


1.3 



Average of three trials;  

b

Chloramphenicol disc - 

 

6 mm diameter; 

c

Contains 1% chlotrimazile; 

d

No clearing zone 

 

An earlier study reported that the methanol extract of the leaves of makopa exhibited high antidiabetes activity [5].  



Another study reported that the chalcones (1-3)  isolated from S. samarangense have been tested for hypoglycemic 

activity  where  2  significantly  lowered  the  blood  glucose  levels  of  alloxan  diabetic  mice  [6]

.    Since  8a-8d  were 

obtained for the first time from S. samarangense and the leaves are known to have antidiabetes property, sample 8 

was tested for hypoglycemic potential.

 

 



Glucose  challenged  mice  were  given  three  doses  of  sample  8  (25  mg/kg  BW,  50  mg/kg  BW,  100  mg/kg  BW), 

Solosa®  or  P80  as  experimental,  positive  and  negative  controls,  respectively.    Blood  glucose  was  measured  30 

minutes after oral gavage and after every 30 minutes for 3h.  Percent blood glucose reduction was found highest in 

mice administered with 50 mg/kg BW sample 8 at 0.5h (Table 2).  This observed reduction however is statistically 

similar with the negative control and 100 mg/kg BW.  This implies that there was minimal blood glucose reduction 

as affected by the treatment.  The effect however was very minimal that it is not possible to statistically identify it 

from the effects of the negative control.  Glimipiride Solosa on the other hand was found to have its effects at 1.0h 

similar  to  our  previous  reports  [21].    Although  the  observed  blood  glucose  reduction  at  0.5

h

  revealed  significant 



differences  (P<0.05)  between  means,  such  percent  reduction  cannot  be  accounted  to  the  effect  of  sample  8  in  all 

dosages  of  the  treatment  groups  but  rather  to  the  net  effects  of  insulin.    The  results  however  revealed  no 

hypoglycemic potential of sample 8

 

Table 2.



 

 Percent blood glucose reduction in mice administered with sample 8 across a 3h observation period 

 

Group 


0.5 h 

1.0 h 


1.5 h 

2.0 h 


2.5 h 

Control (P80) 

62.07±2.91

 ab


 

27.78±5.94

 b

 

17.40±5.36 



-4.91±4.99 

4.22±2.37 

Glymipiride Solosa 

32.96±3.72

 c

 

59.24±3.40



 a

 

19.81±3.44 



-11.28±4.7 

0.15±4.57 

25 mg/Kg BW 

sample 8 

 

53.60±4.54



 b

 

26.01±4.10



 b

 

15.30±2.54 



0.31±4.83 

-0.15±4.39 

50 mg/Kg BW 

sample 8

 

64.67±2.76



a

 

33.63±4.39



 b

 

10.13±2.86 



-16.89±3.91 

10.16±3.24 

100 mg/Kg BW 

sample 8

 

63.05±2.81



 ab

 

21.80±6.09



 b

 

6.87±4.38 



-7.93±2.47 

6.57±2.62 



*means followed by the same letter are not significantly different at α=0.05 DMRT

 

Statistical Analysis 

The  results  were  analyzed  using  SPSS  ver.  10.5  for  windows.      One  way  Analysis  of  Variance  was  performed  to 

determine  the  significant  effects  on  anti-diabetic  potentials  of  sample  8.    Significant  differences  within  group 



Consolacion Y. Ragasa

 

et al 

Der Pharma Chemica, 2014, 6 (3):256-260 

_____________________________________________________________________________

 

260



 

www.scholarsresearchlibrary.com

 

variables  were  determined  by  post  hoc  analysis  at  95%  DMRT.    Results  were  considered  significant  at 



α

  =  0.05.  

The data was presented as Mean±SD.  

 

Acknowledgment 

The antimicrobial tests were conducted at the University of the Philippines-Natural Sciences Research Institute (UP-

NSRI).  A  research  grant  from  the  De  La  Salle  University  Science  Foundation  through  the  University  Research 

Coordination Office is gratefully acknowledged. 

 

REFERENCES 



 

[1]  Y. Kuo, L. Yang, L. Lin, Planta Med.,  2004, 70, 1237-1239. 

[2]  M. N. Ghayur, A. H.  Gilani, A. Khan, I. M. Villasenor, M. I. Choudhary, Phytother. Res., 2006, 20(1). 49-52. 

[3]  E. Amor, I. M. Villasenor, R. Antemano, Z. Perveen; G. P. Concepcion, M. I. Choudhary, Pharm. Biol.2007, 

45(10), 777-783. 

[4] E. Amor, I. M. Villasenor, A. Yasin, M. Choudhary, ZNaturforsch. 2004, 59c, 86-92. 

[5]    I.  M.  Villasenor,  M.  A.  Cabrera,  K.  B.  Meneses,  V.  R.  R.  Rivera,  R.  M.  Villasenor,    Philipp.  J.    Sci.,  1998, 

127(4), 261-266.  

[6]  M. H. C. Resurreccion-Magno, I. M. Villasenor, N. Harada, K. Monde, Phytother. Res., 2005, 19(3), 246-251.  

[7]  D. D. Raga, C. L. C. Cheng, K. C. I. C. Lee, W. Z. P. Olaziman, V. J. A. De Guzman, C.-C. Shen, F. C. Franco, 

C. Y. Ragasa Z. Naturforsch. C.  2011, 66c, 235-244.  

[8]  B. Q. Guevara, B. V. Recio,  Acta Manilana Suppl.1985, 45-50. 

[9]  B. Meddah, R. Ducroc, M. E. A. Faouzi, B. Eto,  L. Mahraoui, A. Benhaddou-Andaloussi, L. C. Martineau, Y. 

Cherrah,  P. S. Haddad,  J. Ethnopharmacol., 2009, 121, 419-424. 

[10]  Y. Kuo, L. Yang, L. Lin, Planta Med.2004, 70, 1237-1239. 

[11]  M. M. Salem, K. A. Werbovertz,  J. Nat. Prod., 2005, 68, 108-111. 

[12]  G. Solladie, N. Gehrold, J. Maignan, Eur. J. Org. Chem.1999, 9, 2309-2314. 

[13]  M. Sholichin, K. Yamasaki, R. Kasai, O. Tanaka,  Chem. Pharm. Bull.2004, 28(3), 1006-1008. 

[14]  J. M. Cayme, C. Y. Ragasa, Kimika2004, 20(1-2), 5-12.  

[15]  V. M. L. Inte, C. Y. Ragasa, J. A. Rideout,  Asia Life  



Sci., 1998, 7(1), 11-21. 

[16]  J. De Pascual Teresa, J. G. Urones, I. S. Marcos,  P. Basabe, M.

J. Sexmero Cuadrado, R. Fernandez Moro, 



Phytochem., 1987, 26(6), 1767-1776.   

[17]  C. Y. Ragasa, F. Tiu, J. Rideout, Nat. Prod. Res.2004, 18(4), 319-323. 

[18]  X. K. Liu, Z. R. Li, M. H. Qui, R. L. Nie,  Acta Botanica Yunnanica, 1998, 20(3),  369-373.  

[19]  V. Parmar, S. C. Jain, S. Gupta,  S. Talwar, V. K. Rajwanshi, R. Kumar, A. Azim,  S. Malhotra, N. Kumar, R. 

Jain, N. K. Sharma, O. M. Tyagi, S. J. Lawrie, W. Errington, O. W. Howarth, C. E. Olsen, S. K. Singh, J. Wengel, 

Phytochem.1998, 49(4), 1069-1078. 

[20]  C. Y. Ragasa,  H. Ngo, J. A. Rideout,  J. Asian Nat. Prod. Res.1998, 7(1), 7-12. 



[21]  C. Y. Ragasa, A. B. Alimboyoguen, S. Urban, D. D. Raga, Nat. Prod. Commun., 2008, 3(3), 1663-1666. 

 



Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə