Available online on



Yüklə 133.41 Kb.
PDF просмотр
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü133.41 Kb.

Available online on 

www.ijppr.com 

International Journal of Pharmacognosy and Phytochemical Research 2016; 8(3); 519-523 

 

 



 

 

ISSN: 0975-4873 



Research Article 

 

*Author for Correspondence 

Evaluation of Antioxidant and Anti-inflammatory Potentials of 

Selected Siddha Herbal Drugs – An In vitro Study 

 

Rajalakshmi P*, Vadivel V, Abirami K, Brindha P 



 

Centre for Advanced Research in Indian System of Medicine (CARISM), SASTRA University, Thanjavur, Tamilnadu, 

India 

 

Available Online: 29

th

 February, 2016 

 

ABSTRACT  



 

Herbal drugs such as  cardamom (Elletaria cardamomum  L.), ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe), arrow root (Maranta 



arundinacea  L.),  yew  leaves  (Abies  webbiana  (D.  Don)  Spach),  Indian  rose  chestnut  (Mesua  ferrea  L.),  pepper (Piper 

nigrum L) and clove (Syzygium aromaticum (L.) Merrill & Perry)  have been  used in the preparation of various Siddha 

formulations. The afore-said herbal drugs exhibited therapeutic effect against the loss of appetite, indigestion, gastric reflex, 

hiccup, flatulence, itching, scabies, cold, cough, head-ache and joint pains. Even though these herbal drugs have been used 

to manage arthritis, there is no scientific evidence regarding mechanism of action. Hence, the present study dealt with the 

evaluation of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory potentials of selected herbal drugs through in vitro studies so as to provide 

scientific evidences for their anti-arthritic effect. 

 

Key words: Herbal drugs, phytochemistry, polyphenols, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory. 

 

INTRODUCTION  

Arthritis  is  a  joint  disorder  accompanied  with  pain,  joint 

stiffness, inflammation, swelling and frequent changes in 

body  structure  due  to  the  age,  trauma  or  infection  in  the 

joints.  According  to  Siddha  system  arthritis  is  called  as 

Santhu  vaatham,  Kizh  vayu,  Moottu  vali,  Aamavatham, 

Megasulai  and  Mudakkuvayu

1

.  Vatham  is  the  causative 



factor  for  pain,  which  is  classified  into  85  types  and  the 

joint pain is called Santhu vaatham

2

. The affected person 



shows  symptoms  of  joint  pain,  disable  to  walk,  morning 

stiffness, difficult to move, muscle weakness, increase the 

pain  after  flex  the  affected  joint  and  tenderness.  Siddha 

literature describes that this disease has the symptoms like 

join  swelling,  pricking  pain,  disable  to  flex  and  fold  the 

joint,  body  tiredness,  giddiness,  tongue  dryness,  or 

excessive  salivary  secretion

1

.  Causes  of  arthritis  are 



calcium  deficiency,  excessive  usage  of  joints,  aging, 

dryness  of  synovial  fluid,  fracture,  oxidative  stress  and 

inflammation

3

.  Vatham-induced  arthritis  was  stimulated 



by  excessive  intake  food  substances  like  potato,  banana, 

cold foods, venereal diseases, genetic disorders, exposure 

to chill weather and moist conditions 

1



The  currently  used  drugs  in  Allopathic  system  are 

Diclofenac sodium and Ibrufen, but they have various side 

effects.  In  Siddha  system  Amukkara  chooranam, 

Thirikaduku  chooranam,  Panchadeepakini  chooranam, 

Astathi  chooranam  Elathi  choornam  and  Thiribala 

chooranam are used for arthritis problem

4

, but they do not 



have  scientific  validation

5

.  Siddha  System  of  medicine 



basically  needs  some  crude  drugs  for  the  preparation  of 

medicine.  The  crude  drugs  are  derived  from  different 

sources  such  as  plants,  animals,  metals  and  minerals

6



Hence, as an alternative, certain plant drugs which are used 

in  Siddha  system  of  medicine  could  be  investigated 

scientifically to act against arthritis

4

. Therefore, the present 



study  focused  on  the  in  vitro  antioxidant  and  anti-

inflammatory  activities  of  selected  herbal  drugs  such  as 

cardamom  (Elletaria  cardamomum  L.),  ginger  (Zingiber 

officinale Roscoe), arrow root (Maranta arundinacea L.), 

yew leaves (Abies webbiana (D. Don) Spach), Indian rose 

chestnut (Mesua ferrea L.), pepper (Piper nigrum L) and 

clove  (Syzygium  aromaticum  (L.)  Merrill  &  Perry)

3

  to 


provide scientific evidence for their anti-arthritic effect 

4, 5


The  afore-said  herbal  drugs  exhibited  therapeutic  effect 

against  the  loss  of  appetite,  indigestion,  gastric  reflex, 

hiccup, flatulence, itching, scabies, cold, cough, head-ache 

and joint pains

7



 

METHODOLOGY 

Preparation of the drugs 

Raw drugs (Elletaria cardamomum L., Zingiber officinale 

Roscoe,  Maranta  arundinacea  L.,  Abies  webbiana  (D. 

Don) Spach, Mesua ferrea L., Piper nigrum L., Syzygium 



aromaticum L. Merrill & Perry) were procured from local 

herbal market, Thanjavur, Tamilnadu, India and identified 

in  the  NABL  accredited  lab  of  CARISM,  SASTRA 

University  and  authenticated  using  macroscopic  and 

microscopic  studies

8,  9


.  All  the  drugs  were  powdered 

(particle size 1 mm) individually using a lab mill and used 

for further analysis. 

Extract preparation 

 

Ten grams of powdered raw  drugs  were taken separately 

in a conical flask and extracted with 100 ml of ethanol and 

kept for 24 h. Then the extract was filtered through filter  



Rajalakshmi et al. / Evaluation of Antioxidant… 

 

                



IJPPR, Volume 8, Issue 3: March 2016 

Page 520 

Table 2: Total phenolic content of selected herbal drugs 

S. No.  Sample Name 

Total Phenol content 

(mg GAE/100 g) 

1. 

Elletaria cardamomum  104.42 ± 1.06 

2. 


Zingiber officinale 

179.42 ± 4.36 

3. 

Maranta arundinacea 

35.00 ± 1.65 

4. 

Abies webbiana 

1314.17 ± 17.68 

5. 

Mesua ferrea 

2194.17 ± 515.01 

6. 

Piper nigrum 

226.75 ± 19.21 

7. 

Syzygium aromaticum 

460.00 ± 49.50 

 

 

 

Table 3: Antioxidant activity of selected herbal drugs 



S. No. 

Sample Name 

Antioxidant 

activity 

(DPPH assay, %) 

1. 


Elletaria cardamomum 

37.53 ± 5.274 

2. 

Zingiber officinale 

80.30 ± 3.461 

3. 

Maranta arundinacea 

26.69 ± 2.967 

4. 

Abies webbiana 

  80.94 ± 1.071 

5. 


Mesua ferrea 

82.52 ± 0.330 

6. 

Piper nigrum 

59.21 ±8.406 

7. 

Syzygium aromaticum 

83.33 ± 0.494 

 

 

 

Table 4: Anti-inflammatory activity of selected herbal 



drugs 

S. 


No. 

Sample Name 

Anti-inflammatory 

assay 


1. 

Elletaria cardamomum 

89.97 ± 0.964 

2. 


Zingiber officinale 

34.34 ± 0.857 

3. 

Maranta arundinacea 



72.17 ± 0.357 

4. 


Abies webbiana 

83.56 ± 1.750 

5. 

Mesua ferrea 



58.64 ± 4.071 

6. 


Piper nigrum 

85.15 ± 3.857 

7. 

Syzygium aromaticum 



4.70 ± 0.429 

 

 



 

paper and used for the analysis. 



Phytochemical screening

 

Phytochemical  profile  of  herbal  drugs  extract  was 



analyzed as per the methodology of Harborne

10

. For  



steroids test one ml of extract was taken and add few drops 

of concentrated sulphuric acid, shake well and kept away 

some time and noted for colour change. Terpenoids were 

analyzed by heating the extract in mild flame with tin and 

thionylchloride and noted the colour change. For alkaloid 

test, 1 ml of sample was added with 1 ml of diluted acetic 

acid and few drops of Dragendorff’s reagent and noted the 

precipitate. For the phenol test 0.5 ml of extract was taken 

with 1 ml of alcoholic ferric chloride and noted for colour 

change. For flavonoids test, 0.5 ml of extract was taken and 

1 mg of magnesium turning and few drops of concentrated 

hydrochloric acid were added, boiled for 5 min and noted 

the colour change. For the tannins experiment, few drops 

of  ferric  chloride  solution  was  added  with  extract  and 

noted  the  colour  change.  Presence  of  saponins  was 

examined  by  taking  the  extract  with  water  and  shaken 

hardly  and  noted  for  froth.  For  the  quinone,  0.5  ml  of 

extract  was added  with 1 ml of  sodium hydroxide (10%) 

and  observed  for  colour  change.  For  the  coumarin 

assessment 0.5 ml of extract was taken in a test tube with 

1 ml NaOH and shaken well and noted the colour change. 

To check the presence of sugars, extract was treated with 

Fehlings  solution  A  and  B  and  boiled  and  noted  for 

precipitation colour. 



Total phenol content 

The total phenolic concentration of ethanolic extract of all 

the drugs was estimated according to the modified Folin-

Ciocaltue reagent method

11

. Extract (10 μl) was taken in a 



96 well microplate and 25 μl of Folin reagent and 230 μl 

of 4.4% of Na

2

CO

3



 were added and incubated

 

for 30 min 



in dark place. Then the absorbance  was  measured  at 750 

nm  in  the  ELISA  plate  reader  (Make:  Biotek,  Model: 

Epoch).

 

A  calibration  curve  was  prepared  using  standard 



gallic  acid  (100  –  1000  mg/L,  R

2

  =  0.9978)  and  used  to 

express the results as gallic acid equivalents (GAE).  

Antioxidant activity 

The antioxidant activity of ethanolic extracts was analyzed 

using DPPH free radical scavenging assay

12

. Extracts (10 



μl)  were  taken  in  the  96  well  microplates  and  200  μl  of 

DPPH solution (2.5 mg/100 ml) and incubated

 

for 30 min 



in dark place. Then the  absorbance  was  measured at 515 

nm  in  the  ELISA  plate  reader  (Make:  Biotek,  Model: 

Epoch). The radical scavenging activity of tested samples 

was  calculated  using  the  formula  (Antioxidant  activity  = 

Abs control – Abs test / Abs control x 100) and expressed 

on percentage basis. 



Anti-inflammatory activity 

The  anti-inflammatory  activity  of  the  ethanolic  extracts 

was  evaluated  using  RBC  membrane  stabilization 

method


13

.  Blood  sample  (2  ml)  was  collected  from 

volunteer in a heparinized tube and washed with PBS twice 

and centifuged at 3000 rpm for 10 min (Centrifuge Make: 

Eppendorf, Model 5810-R). Then RBC was suspended in  

Table 1: Phytochemical screening results of herbal drugs 

S. 

No. 


Phytochemicals 

Cardamom


um 

Ginger 


Arrow 

root   


Abies 

Mesua 


Pepper 

clove 


1. 

Steroids 







2. 


Terpenes 





3. 



Sugars 





4. 



Alkaloids 





5. 



Phenols 





6. 



Flavanoids 





7. 



Tannins 





8. 



Saponins 





9. 



Quinone 





10 



Coumarine 





 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 


Rajalakshmi et al. / Evaluation of Antioxidant… 

 

                



IJPPR, Volume 8, Issue 3: March 2016 

Page 521 

normal saline and taken in a tube (0.5 ml) with 0.5 ml of 

extract and 0.5 ml hypotonic solution and incubated for 30 

min  at  room  temperature.  Then  the  contents  were 

centrifuged  at  1500  rpm  for  10  min  and  the  supernatant 

was collected and the absorbance was read at 560 nm using 

Micro plate reader (Make: Biotek, Model: Epoch). Based 

on  the  absorbance  of  extract  and  control,  the  membrane 

stabilization  effect  was  calculated  and  expressed  on 

percentage basis. 

 

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION 

Data obtained in the preliminary phytochemical screening 

of  herbal  drugs  was  shown  in  Table  1.  Red  colour  was 

formed  when  extract  was  treated  with  few  drops  of 

concentrated sulphuric acid, which shows the presence of 

sterols  in  cardomomum,  ginger,  yew,  Mesua  and  clove. 

This result was similar to earlier reports in cardomomum

14



Extract  given  pink  colour  upon  reaction  with  tin  and 



thionylchloride in terpenoids test in ginger and yew. This 

same result was noted in previous work

15

. For alkaloid test, 



orange red precipitate was formed during extract of pepper 

and clove when treated with acetic acid and few drops of 

Dragendorff’s reagent. Bluish black colour was appeared 

in  phenol  test  in  yew  and  clove  extracts.  Presence  of 

flavonoids was noted in cardomomum, ginger, yew, mesua 

and  pepper,  based  on  formation  of  red  colour  during 

extract  was  reacted  with  magnesium  turning  and 

concentrated hydrochloric acid. Similarly the presence of 

flavonoid was reported in pepper

16

 and yew



17

. Extracts of 

ginger  shows  the  positive  result  of  bluish  black  colour 

when  few  drops  of  ferric  chloride  solution  was  added. 

Presence  of  saponins  was  noted  based  on  appearance  of 

froth  in  ginger,  mesua,  pepper  and  clove.  Similarly  the 

presence of saponins was reported in clove

16

. Quinone was 



found to be present only in clove based on the observation 

of  end  point  colour  when  extract  added  with  sodium 

hydroxide.  Yellow  colour  was  formed  when  extract  was 

treated  with  NaOH,  which  indicated  the  presence  of 

coumarin  in  cardomomum,  ginger  and  mesua.  This  is  in 

agreement  with  previous  result  in  cardomomum

14



Presence  of  sugars  was  recorded  in  the  extracts  of 



cardomomum,  mesua,  pepper  and  clove  which  was 

confirmed  by  the  formation  of  brick  red  coloured 

precipitation upon treatment with Fehlings solution A and 

B.  This  result  was  similar  to  earlier  reports  in  mesua 

buds

18



Among  the  presently  investigated  herbal  drugs  Mesua 

ferrea showed the highest total phenolic content (2194.17 

mg  GAE/100  g),  which  is  followed  by  Abies  webbiana 

(1314.17 mg GAE/100 g). Previous, higher level of total 

phenol content was noted in M. ferrea 98.15mg GAE/g 

19

 

and  A.  webbiana.    Phenolic  compounds  represent  the 



largest  group  known  as  ‘secondary  metabolites’ 

synthesized  by  higher  plants,  probably  as  a  result  of 

antioxidative strategies. Polyphenols can scavenge the free 

radicals such as .OH, O2.-, and ROO. and suppress the free 

radical-mediated oxidation. The formation of free radicals 

may  be  inhibited  by  reducing  hydroperoxides  and 

hydrogen peroxide and by sequestering metal ions through 

complexation  /  chelation  reactions.  The  antioxidant  and 

anti-inflammatory role of polyphenols were proven in past 

studies


20

Antioxidant activity was determined using 1,1-diphenyl-2-



picrylhyrazyl (DPPH) radical method. This assay is based 

on the measurement of the loss of DPPH colour at 517 nm 

after  reaction  with  test  compounds  and  the  reaction  is 

monitored by a spectrophotometer. DPPH is a stable free 

radical  of  purple  colour  and  in  the  presence  of  an 

antioxidant  its  colour  changes  to  yellow  based  on  the 

efficiency of the antioxidant. The change in the absorbance 

with respect to control (DPPH solution, 100 % free radical) 

is  calculated  as  per  cent  scavenging  power.  Radical 

scavenging  action  is  dependent  on  both  reactivity  and 

concentration of the antioxidant.  The antioxidant activity 

of  herbal  drugs  was  measured  in  terms  of  DPPH  radical 

scavenging potential and the results are shown in Table 3. 

Among  the  drugs,  clove  (83.33%),  Mesua  (82.52%), 

ginger (83.33%) and Abies (80.94%) exhibited maximum 

level  of  antioxidant  activities.  The  higher  level  of 

antioxidant  activity  recorded  in  Mesua  and  Abies  is 

correlated  with their  high content polyphenols (Table 2). 

Similar  level  of  antioxidant  activity  was  reported  in 

previous  studies on  Zingiber  officinale (79.0%)

21

Mesua 



(81%)

19

 and clove (93%)



22

Some free radicals such as nitric oxide, superoxide radical 



anion,  and  related  reactive  oxygen  species  (ROS)  and  or 

reactive nitrogen species (RNS) mediate cells in signalling 

processes

23,  24


.  Oxidative  stress  is  an  imbalanced  state 

where  excessive  quantities  of  ROS/RNS  overcome 

endogenous  antioxidant  capacity,  leading  to  oxidation  of 

enzymes, proteins, DNA and lipids. Oxidative stress is the 

contributing  feature  in  the  development  of  chronic 

degenerative  diseases  including  coronary  heart  disease, 

Table 5: Anti-arthritic and related activities reported in various herbal drugs and their major phytoconstituents. 

S. No. 


Name of the drug 

Action 


Compound 



Elletaria cardamomum

30

 

Immuno-modulatory 



1,8-Cineole 



Zingiber officinale

31

 

Analgesic and Anti-inflammation 

Gingerol 



Maranta arundinacea

32

 

Energy producer and Increase bone strength 



Genistein and Daidzein 



Abies webbiana

27

 

Anti-inflammation 



Aziridine and Abiesin 



Mesua ferrea

33

 

Anti arthritic  



 

4-Alkyl- 

and 

4-

phenylcoumarins 



and 

mesuaferrin A 



Piper nigrum

34

 



Antipyretic and Analgesic 

Piperine 



Syzygium aromaticum

35

 



Antipyretic and Analgesic 

Eugenol 


 

 

 

 



Rajalakshmi et al. / Evaluation of Antioxidant… 

 

                



IJPPR, Volume 8, Issue 3: March 2016 

Page 522 

cancer, arthritis, and aging

25

. The DPPH can be used as a 



model free radical to resemble the other biological radicals 

that involved in oxidative stress condition. 

Typical  inflammatory  diseases  such  as  rheumatoid 

arthritis, asthma, colitis and hepatitis are the leading cause 

of  disability  and  death.  The  excessive  production  of 

reactive  oxygen  metabolites  by  phagocytic  leucocytes 

during the inflammatory process, as part of host defence, 

disregulates cellular  function  causing tissue injury  which 

in  turn  augments  the  state  of  inflammation  leading  to 

chronic  inflammatory  diseases.  Antioxidants,  which 

scavenge  these  reactive  oxygen  metabolites,  have  been 

found  to  complement  the  anti-inflammatory  process  and 

promote tissue repair

26

. In the present study, we have used 



RBC  membrane  stabilization  assay  to  evaluate  the  anti-

inflammatory  activity  of  herbal  drugs.  A  possible 

explanation for the membrane stabilization effect could be 

an increase in the surface area / volume ration of the cell. 

The membrane denaturation of RBC was brought about by 

expansion  of  cell  membrane  by  incubating  the  cells  in 

hypotonic solution. 

Among the presently studies herbal drugs of cardamomum 

(89.97%),  pepper  (85.15%)  and  Abies  (83.56%)  were 

exhibited  higher  level  of  anti-inflammatory  activities  in 

terms  of  RBC  membrane  stabilization.  The  notable  anti-

inflammatory  activity  of  Abies  could  be  due  to  the  high 

amount of polyphenols recorded in the same sample of the 

present study (Table 1) These results are supported by the 

previous  in  vivo  studies  on  anti-inflammatory  activity  of 

cardomomum, pepper and Abies 

27-29



Based on literature survey, we have found the presence of 



different  phytochemical  compounds  in  selected  herbal 

drugs  and  their  anti-arthritic  and  related  activities  (Table 

5). So, only the Mesua ferrea exhibits anti-arthritic effect 

based  on  literature  reference,  while  ginger,  pepper  and 

clove were showed analgesic properties. Both ginger and 

Abies  revealed  anti-inflammatory  activity  whereas 

cardamom  displayed  immune-modulatory  property.  So, 

consumption  of  these  herbal  drugs  could  relieve  the 

arthritis pain and also strengthen the bone joints in addition 

improve  the  immune  system  and  prevent  the  cellular 

damages  through  antioxidant  and  anti-inflammatory 

mechanisms.  



 

CONCLUSION 

In the present work, the total phenolic content, antioxidant 

and  anti-inflammatory  activities  of  ethanolic  extract  of 

different  herbal  drugs  were  analyzed.  Even  though  these 

drugs have been used to treat arthritis in folklore medicine, 

the  mechanism of action is not yet proved and hence the 

present  investigation  provides  scientific  evidence  for  the 

action of this drug against arthritis through antioxidant and 

anti-inflammation  pathways.  Among  the  drugs,  ginger, 

Abies,  Mesua  and  clove  are  responsible  for  the  high 

antioxidant  power  while  anti-inflammatory  property  was 

contributed by cardamom, Abies, Maratha and pepper. So, 

combination of these drugs could exhibit both antioxidant 

as  well  anti-inflammatory  activities  and  thus  provides 

therapeutic  effect  against  arthritis  as  indicated  by  the  in 

vitro studies. Further in vivo models are necessary to prove 

the efficacy and mechanism of action of this drug against 

arthritis,  which  is  a  major  burden  for  aged  people 

throughout the world. 



 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT 

Authors  are  thankful  to  the  Hon’ble  Vice  Chancellor  of 

SASTRA University for their constant encouragement and 

support to carry out this research work. 



 

REFERENCES  

1.

 



Kuppusamy  mudhaliyar  KN,  Siddha  maruthuvam 

(pothu),7

th

edition. Department of    Indian Medicine & 



Homeopathy, Chennai, 2007. 

 

2.



 

Sambasivam  Pillai  TV,  Tamil  Dictionary  Vol.1-5. 

Fourth  edition,  Publisher;  Tamilnadu  Siddha  Medical 

Council, Chennai, 1931. 

3.

 

Das PC, Text Book of Medicine.3



rd

edition, 2

nd 

reprint, 



Current  books  International,  Lenin  Saranee,  Calcutta, 

1991. 


4.

 

The  Siddha  Formulary  of  India.  Published  by  the 



Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Department of 

Ayush, Government of India, 1992. 

5.

 

Thankamma 



A, 

Radhika 


LG, 

Soudamini 

C. 

Standardisation of eladichoornam. Ancient Science of 



Life 1998; 18(1): 35-40. 

6.

 



Thyagaraja  Mudaliyar,  Gunapadam  Thaathu  Jeeva 

vaguppu, IIIrd Edn, Indian Medical Association, 1981. 

7.

 

Murugesa  Mudalier  KS.  Gunapadam  Mooligai 



Vaguppu, Fourth edition, Publisher; Tamilnadu Siddha 

Medical Council, Chennai, 1988. 

8.

 

Nadkarani KM, Nadkarani AK. Indian Materia Medica, 



Vol  1,  Publisher:  Popular  Prakash,  Mumbai,  India, 

1954. 


9.

 

Anonymous.  Ayurvedic Pharmacopoeia of India. Part 



I, Vol. IV, 1

st

 Ed., Govt. of India, New Delhi, 2004. 



10.

 

Harborne  JB.  Phytochemical  Metods,  Chapman  and 



Hall, London, 1973. p. 113.  

11.


 

Singleton  VL,  Orthofer  R,  Lamuela-Raventos  RM. 

Analysis of total phenols and other oxidation substrates 

and antioxidants by means of Folin-Ciocalteu reagent. 

Methods in Enzymology, 1999; 299: 152-178. 

12.


 

Sanchez-Moreno C, Larrauri JA, Saura-Calixto F. Free 

radical  scavenging  capacity  and  inhibition  of  lipid 

oxidation  of  wines,  grape  juices  and  related 

polyphenolic constituents. Food Research International 

1999; 32: 407-412. 

13.

 

Sakat  S,  Juvekar  AR,  Gambhire  MN.  In  vitro 



antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity of methanol 

extract  of  Oxalis  corniculata  Linn.  International 

Journal  of  Pharmacy  and  Pharmaceutical  Sciences 

2010; 2(1): 146-155.   

14.

 

Vishwakarma S, Kumar Chandan R, Jeba C, Khushbu 



S.  Comparative  study  of  qualitative  phytochemical 

screening and antioxidant activity of Mentha arvensis



Elettaria  cardamomum  and  Allium  porrum.  Indo 

American  Journal  of  Pharmaceutical  Research  2014; 

4(5): 2238-2556. 

15.


 

Bhargava S, Dhabhai K, Batra A, Sharma A, Malhotra 

B.  Zingiber  officinale:  Chemical  and  phytochemical 

screening and evaluation of its antimicrobial activities. 



Rajalakshmi et al. / Evaluation of Antioxidant… 

 

                



IJPPR, Volume 8, Issue 3: March 2016 

Page 523 

Journal  of  Chemical  and  Pharmaceutical  Research 

2012; 4(1): 360-364. 

16.

 

Shailesh, Preliminary phytochemical and antimicrobial 



screening 

of 


Syzygium 

aromaticum

Elettaria 

cardamomum  and  Piper  nigrum  extracts.  Journal  of 

Pharmacognosy  and    Phytochemistry  2015;  4(3):  85-

89. 

17.


 

Yadav 


DK, 

Ghosh 


AK. 

review 



of 

pharmacognostical, 

phytochemical 

and  


pharmacological  effect  of  Abeis  webbiana  Lindl. 

leaves.  World  Journal  of  Pharmaceutical  Research 

2015; 4(6): 736-740. 

18.


 

Sahu  Alakh  N,  Hemalatha  S,  Sairam  K.  Phyto-

pharmacological  review  of  Mesua  ferrea  Linn. 

International  Journal  of  Phytopharmacology  2014; 

5(1): 6-14. 

19.


 

Udayabhanu  J,  Shanmugapriya  K,  Thangavelu  T. 

Evaluation of phytochemical and antioxidant contents 

of  Mesua  ferrea,  Hemionitis  arifolia  and  Pimenta 



dioica.  International  Journal  of  Advances  in 

Pharmaceutical,  Biological  and  Chemical  Sciences, 

2014; 3(2): 273-276. 

20.


 

Miguel  MG.  Anthocyanins:  Antioxidant  and/or  anti-

inflammatory 

activities. 

Journal 

of 


Applied 

Pharmaceutical Science 2011; 01(6): 7-15. 

21.

 

Maizura M, Aminah A, Wan Aida WM. Total phenolic 



content and antioxidant activity of kesum (Polygonum 

minus),  ginger  (Zingiber  officinale)  and  turmeric 

(Curcuma longa) extract. International Food Research 

Journal 2011; 18: 529-534. 

22.


 

Nassar  MI,  Gaara  AH,  El-Ghorab  AH,  Farrag  ARH, 

Shen  H.  Chemical  constituents  of  clove  (Syzygium 

aromaticum  Fam.  Myrtaceae)  and  their  antioxidant 

activity.  Revista  Latinoamericana  de  Química  2007; 

35(3): 47-57.  

23.


 

Dröge W. Free radicals in the physiological control of 

cell function. Physiological Reviews 2002; 82: 47-95. 

24.


 

Jing P. Purple corn anthocyanins:  Chemical structure, 

chemopreventive 

activity 

and 

structure/function 



relationships.  PhD  thesis,  The  Ohio  State  University, 

U.S.A. 2006; p. 5-90. 

25.

 

Dai  J,  Mumper  RJ.  Plant  phenolics:  Extraction, 



analysis and their antioxidant and anticancer properties. 

Molecules 2010; 15: 7313-7352. 

26.

 

Schinella  GR,  Tournier  HA,  Prieto  JM.  Antioxidant 



activity  of  anti-inflammatory  plant  extracts.  Life 

Sciences 2002; 70(9): 1023-1033.   

27.

 

Nayak SS, Ghosh AK, Debnath B, Vishnoi SP, Jha T. 



Synergistic  effect  of  methanol  extract  of  Abies 

webbiana leaves on sleeping time induced by standard 

sedatives  in  mice  and  anti-inflammatory  activity  of 

extracts  in  rats.  Journal  of  Ethnopharmacology  2004; 

93(2): 397-402. 

28.

 

Bang JS, Oh DH, Choi HM, Sur BJ, Lim SJ, Kim JY, 



Yang  HI,  Yoo  MC,  Hahm  DH,  Kim  KS.  Anti-

inflammatory  and  anti-arthritic  effects  of  piperine  in 

human  interleukin  1β-stimulated  fibroblast-like 

synoviocytes  and  in  rat  arthritis  models.  Arthritis 

Research & Therapy 2009; 11: 2. 

29.


 

Dorota M, Vniewska RL, Nski PS, The effect of anti-

inflammatory  and  antimicrobial  herbal  remedy 

PADMA  28  on  immunological  angiogenesis  and 

granulocytes 

activity 

in 

mice. 


Mediators 

of 


Inflammation 2013; Article ID 853475.

1111


 

30.


 

Sokkar  NM.  Investigations  of  essential  oil  and  n-

hexane extract of Elletaria cardamomum seed. Journal 

of Essential Oil-Bearing Plants 2008; 11: 365-375. 

31.

 

Young  HY,  Luo  Y,  Cheng  HY,  Hsieh  WC,  Liao  JC, 



Peng WH.  Analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities 

of  gingerol.  Journal  of  Ethnopharmacology  2005;  96: 

207-210. 

32.


 

Lee  MY,  Chang  KH.  Effects  of  Cheonggukjang 

containing arrowroot isoflavones on bone metabolism 

in 


ovary-ectomized 

rats. 


Food 

Science 


and 

Biotechnology 2011; 20: 335-341. 

33.

 

Jalalpure SS, Mandavkar YD, Khalure PR, Shinde GS, 



Shelar  PA,  Shah  AS.  Antiarthritic  activity  of  various 

extracts  of  Mesua  ferrea  Linn.  seed.  Journal  of 

Ethnopharmacology, 2011; 138(3): 700-704. 

34.


 

Taher YA, Samud AM, El-Taher FE, Al-Mehdawi BF, 

Salem HA, Awatef M. Experimental evaluation of anti-

inflammatory, antinociceptive and antipyretic activities 

of clove oil in mice. Libyan Journal of Medicine 2015; 

10: Article ID 28685. 

35.

 

Tasleem F, Azhar I, Ali SN, Perveen S, Mahmood ZA. 



Analgesic  and  anti-inflammatory  activities  of  Piper 

nigrum L. Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Medicine 

2014; 7: 461-468. 

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə