B iology of aav V ector



Yüklə 7.56 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
səhifə1/139
tarix11.08.2017
ölçüsü7.56 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   139

 Molecular Therapy 
Volume 16, Supplement 1, May 2008  
 Copyright ©
 
The American Society of Gene Therapy
S1
B
iology
 
of
 AAV V
ector
 t
rAnsduction
Biology of  AAV Vector Transduction
1. 
Dissecting the Intracellular Fate of Gene 
Therapy Vectors Based on the Adeno-Associated 
Virus (AAV)
Miguel Mano,
1
 Lorena Zentilin,
1
 Alejandro Palacios,
1
 Mauro 
Giacca.
1
1
Molecular Medicine Laboratory, International Centre for Genetic 
Engineering and Biotechnology (ICGEB), Trieste, Italy.
While  the  utilization  of  recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus 
(rAAV) vectors in pre-clinical and clinical gene transfer applications 
is rising, several aspects of the life cycle of both the wild type virus 
and the recombinant vectors remain largely obscure. In particular, 
limited information is available on the uncoating of viral particles 
and  intracellular  fate  of  rAAV  DNA  after  internalization. These 
appear to be topics of particular relevance, especially if considering 
that a relatively small number of tissues are permissive to rAAV 
transduction,  despite  the  receptors  for AAV  internalization  are 
widespread  in  most  cell  types  in  vivo.  Here  we  exploit  three 
complementary, high resolution optical methods to monitor different 
steps of AAV vector processing in living cells. We have established 
a procedure for the visualization of AAV genome conversion - i.e. 
single-stranded (ss) to double-stranded (ds) DNA - in living cells, 
based on the interaction of a fusion protein between EGFP and the 
Lac Repressor (LacR) with rAAV genomes carrying 112 tandem 
repeats of the Lac Operator (LacO) site. By using this approach, 
we discovered that the generation of ds rAAV DNA is restricted to 
specific nuclear sites. These rAAV foci are defined in number (5-30 
per cell), increase in size over time, are relatively immobile, and 
their formation correlates with the efficiency of rAAV transduction. 
We  discovered  that  these  structures  overlap  with,  or  lie  in  close 
proximity to, the foci in which proteins of the MRN (Mre11-Rad50-
Nbs1) complex and Mdc1 accumulate after DNA damage. To directly 
visualize rAAV uncoating and elucidate the intracellular fate of the 
incoming ssDNA AAV genomes prior to conversion to dsDNA, issues 
that remain largely unexplored, we are developing a novel approach 
based on the nuclear injection of molecular beacons that specifically 
bind the multiple LacO sites present in the ssDNA rAAV genome. 
Molecular beacons are small self-quenched oligonucleotide probes 
that become fluorescent upon hybridization with target sequences, 
thus allowing the dynamic detection of nucleic acids in living cells 
with high signal-to-background ratios. The single-stranded DNA 
nature of AAV genomes makes them ideal targets for detection with 
molecular beacons; the use of a recombinant AAV vector whose 
genome contains tandem repeats of the sequence that is recognized 
by the molecular beacons will increase the sensitivity of AAV genome 
detection, which is expected to reach a single molecule sensitivity. 
Finally, the detection of single- and double-stranded AAV genomes 
is complemented by the visualization of the intracellular trafficking 
of  rAAV  virons  fluorescently  labeled  by  replacing  the  wild-type 
VP2  capsid  protein  by  a  EYFP-VP2  fusion  protein.  Using  this 
methodology, rAAV vectors of different serotypes were successfully 
produced, at titers comparable to non-modified rAAV. The labeled 
vectors are able to efficiently transduce cells in culture, in a pattern 
similar to that of non-modified vectors. A better understanding of 
rAAV trafficking, uncoating and genome processing will open new 
perspectives for the development of recombinant AAV as efficient 
gene delivery systems.
2. 
Redox Processing of the Viral Capsid Is 
Required for the Productive Infection of Airway 
Epithelial Cells by Adeno-Associated Virus Type 2
Nicholas W. Keiser,
1
 Paul M. Kaminsky,
1
 Liang N. Zhang,
1
 Ziying 
Yang,
1
 John F. Engelhardt.
1
1
Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Iowa, 
Iowa City, IA.
Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in cellular 
responses to normal biological stimuli and also in responses to viral 
infection.  Our  laboratory  has  discovered  a  mechanism  by  which 
infection of cultured adherent cells by adeno-associated virus type 
2 (AAV2) stimulates the catalytic subunit of an NADPH oxidase, 
Nox2, to produce ROS in the endosome. The resulting hydrogen 
peroxide oxidizes a single cysteine in the VP1 protein on the AAV2 
capsid, leading to a conformational change in the virus that allows for 
endosomal escape. Catalase, which neutralizes hydrogen peroxide, 
inhibits AAV2-mediated transduction when loaded into endosomes 
before and during infection. Human airway epithelia (HAE) normally 
generate and secrete hydrogen peroxide to aid in the killing of bacteria 
in  the  lung. We  therefore  hypothesized  that  hydrogen  peroxide 
produced by airway epithelia might influence AAV2 transduction. 
Polarized HAE cell cultures, which maintain essential biological 
characteristics of airway epithelial cells in vivo, were treated with 
catalase before and during apical and basolateral infection with AAV2.
Luciferase. Levels of viral transduction were monitored by luciferase 
assay.  Transduction  via  both  routes  of  entry  was  significantly 
inhibited by catalase, indicating that redox mechanisms of AAV2 
transduction are present in the airway. We noted different levels of 
inhibition depending on whether catalase was applied apically or 
basolaterally, suggesting potential polarity of the redox machinery in 
airway epithelia. Our laboratory has generated a VP1 mutant of AAV2 
that is unable to be oxidized by hydrogen peroxide in the endosome, 
rendering it defective in endosomal escape. Levels of transduction 
of this mutant virus in HAE was significantly lower than with wild-
type AAV2, indicating that redox modification of the AAV2 capsid 
is an important step in the infection of airway epithelial cells by this 
virus. In order to evaluate the molecular source of ROS required for 
AAV2 transduction, in vivo studies were conducted in wild-type and 
Nox2-knockout mice. AAV2-mediated transduction was impaired in 
mice lacking Nox2, highlighting a role for this subunit of NADPH 
oxidase in the infection process. Our results show that AAV2 infection 
of HAE is a redox-mediated process that requires the generation of 
hydrogen peroxide and the oxidation of viral capsid proteins. Nox2 
forms an essential component of this pathway in the mouse lung. We 
are currently using fluorescence detection of viral particles in HAE 
to determine how redox mechanisms influence the precise trafficking 
of AAV2 particles from the apical and basolateral membranes, and 
whether  additional  serotypes  of AAV  require  redox  modification 
for proper trafficking and transduction. This study highlights redox 
modification of the AAV2 capsid as a requirement for trafficking to 
the nucleus in airway cells and identifies potential targets to improve 
gene transfer to the lung.
3. 
Transcriptional Targeted AAV-9 Vectors 
Allows an Efficient and Specific Cardiac Gene 
Transfer
Stefanie Schinkel,
1,2
 Barbara Leuchs,
1
 Renate Eudenbach,
1
 Hugo 
A. Katus,
2
 Juergen A. Kleinschmidt,
1
 Oliver J. Mueller.
2
1
Angewandte Tumorvirologie, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, 
Heidelberg, Germany; 
2
Innere Medizin III, Universitaetsklinikum 
Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany.
Background: Recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors 
are a promising tool for cardiac gene transfer. In contrast to adenoviral 
vectors, AAV  allow  a  long-term  gene  transfer  due  to  their  low 

 Molecular Therapy 
Volume 16, Supplement 1, May 2008  
 Copyright ©
 
The American Society of Gene Therapy
S2
B
iology
 
of
 AAV V
ector
 t
rAnsduction
immunogenicity. Comparison of different AAV serotypes showed that 
especially serotype 8 and 9 allow an efficient systemic gene transfer 
in mice. Aim of our study was to establish a vector for efficient and 
specific myocardial gene transfer in mice. We therefore compared 
expression profiles of AAV-8 with AAV-9 vectors in combination 
with  transcriptional  targeting  using  a  cardiac-specific  promoter 
sequence. Material and Methods: We injected intravenously 10(11) 
genomic particles of AAV-8 and -9 vectors, harboring a luciferase 
reporter  gene  under  control  of  the  CMV-enhanced  myosin  light 
chain promoter, into adult NMRI mice (n=6, n=10, respectively). 
Four weeks post infection, reporter activities were determined in 
representative organs. In order to evaluate spatial distribution within 
the myocardium, 2x10(11) AAV-9 EGFP vectors were intravenously 
injected  in  adult  mice. After  4  weeks,  EGFP  expression  was 
determined using fluourescence and confocal microscopy. Results: 
Reporter gene transfer with AAV-9 vectors resulted in an increase 
in cardiac reporter activity by more than one order of magnitude 
compared to AAV-8 (3.8x10(8) ± 4.4x10(8) relative light units [RLU]/
mg protein versus 1.0x10(7) ±0.8x10(7) RLU/mg protein, p=0.05) 
with increased specificity. Analyzing expression after 9 months using 
in vivo imaging with the Xenogen Imaging System, we could detect 
a strong luciferase signal almost exclusively in the heart. Detection 
of  EGFP  expression  in  cardiac  sections  using  fluourescence  and 
confocal microscopy revealed a transmural transduction in more 
than 40% of cardiomyocytes in the left ventricle. Conclusion: The 
combination  of  transcriptional  targeting  with AAV9  vector  is  an 
efficient and specific approach in systemic cardiac gene transfer in 
adult mice and may be suitable for generating novel animal models 
of cardiovascular diseases.
4. 
Different DNA Recombination/Repair 
Pathways Impact Transduction and Circularization 
of Single-Strand AAV and Self-Complementary 
AAV Vectors
Douglas M. McCarty,
1,2
 Marcela P. Cataldi.
1
1
Center for Gene Therapy, Research Institute at Nationwide 
Children’s Hospital, Columbus, OH; 
2
Dept. of Pediatrics, Ohio 
State University, Columbus, OH.
The  free  DNA  ends  of AAV  genomes  are  targets  for  multiple 
DNA  recombination  pathways,  leading  to  circularization  or 
concatemerization, and infrequently, chromosomal DNA integration. 
We have found previously that these pathways are highly redundant 
with respect to AAV DNA recombination, but varying pathways tend 
to predominate in different cell types, possibly due to cell cycling 
status. In order to determine what features of the AAV vector genome 
are recognized by cellular DNA recombination/repair factors, we 
have characterized the interaction of two homologous recombination 
pathways, mediated by ATM or ATR, with either conventional single-
strand AAV (ssAAV) or self-complementary AAV (scAAV) vectors. 
While these two pathways overlap in signaling and response to DNA 
damage, ATR is generally associated with recognition and response 
to DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) containing regions of single-
strand DNA, frequently induced by UV irradiation. ATM is generally 
associated with repair of DSB resulting from ionizing radiation. We 
tested the roles of these pathways on circularization of AAV vector 
genomes by comparing expression from vectors containing an intact 
GFP coding region, which expresses independently of circularization, 
to a vector with two half-gene segments at the ends of the genome, 
such that GFP expression is circularization-dependent (CD). In normal 
cells, circularization of ssAAV genomes is extremely efficient, with 
no significant difference between intact and CD GFP expression 
at 24 hours post infection. Circularization of scAAV genomes is 
slightly less efficient, ranging from 80-95%. In ATR deficient cells, 
we observed a significant increase in transduction from intact GFP 
ssAAV vectors, as has been observed previously. However, we did not 
see a concomitant increase in the number of ssAAV genomes that were 
circularized. This suggests that ssAAV is preferentially recognized by 
ATR, which has a negative effect on transduction, but contributes to 
efficient circularization. The negative impact on transduction might 
be mediated by an increased probability of vector DNA degradation, 
or by inhibition of second-strand DNA synthesis. In either case, the 
nascent double-strand vectors are efficiently circularized through the 
ATR pathway. In contrast, there was no change in transduction or 
circularization of scAAV genomes, suggesting that they are normally 
not recognized by ATR. In ATM deficient cells, transduction with 
scAAV  was  increased,  again  without  a  concomitant  increase  in 
circularization, while ssAAV transduction and circularization were 
unchanged. Because scAAV vectors do not require second-strand 
synthesis, the increase in transduction is likely to be mediated by 
a decrease in DNA repair-associated vector degradation, with the 
remaining  genomes  preferentially  circularized  through  the ATM 
pathway. These interactions with DNA repair pathways may be the 
mechanism for the recently reported loss of AAV genomes shortly 
after transduction, and are likely to contribute to vector integration via 
interaction with chromosomal DNA double-strand break repair.
5. 
Similarities and Variations in Protein 
Interactions and Capsid Integrity of Adeno-
Associated Virus Serotypes 2 and 8
Samuel L. Murphy,
1
 Shangzhen Zhou,
1
 Shyrie Edmonson,
2
 Anand 
Bhagwhat,
1
 Katherine A. High.
1,2
1
Hematology, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, 
PA; 
2
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Philadelphia, PA.
This  study  was  initiated  to  understand  fundamental  biological 
differences  between  two  hepatotropic AAV  capsids, AAV2  and 
AAV8, which perform differently in cell culture and in animal studies. 
To conduct this study, conformational antibodies that selectively 
recognize intact vector particles were required. While an antibody 
with  this  specificity  was  commercially  available  for AAV2,  this 
was  not  the  case  for AAV8. To  this  end,  mice  were  immunized 
against AAV8 capsid and hybridomas were generated. Screening 
of  monoclonal  antibodies  by  ELISA  against  intact AAV8  vector 
particles  identified  a  clone  with  the  desired  specificity. A  global 
approach was then used to identify key shared and unique properties of 
AAV2 and AAV8 vector particles. Double-cesium purified, genome-
containing vector particles (50 ug/mL) were used to probe protein 
microarrays  containing  greater  than  8,000  baculovirus-expressed 
proteins bound to a glass slide by N-terminal GST tags (Invitrogen 
Human Protein Microarray). Bound vector particles were detected 
by the corresponding monoclonal antibody recognizing intact vector 
particles. Arrays were scanned using an Axon Genepix scanner, and 
quantitative  analysis  was  conducted  using  software  provided  by 
Invitrogen. Of more than 8,000 proteins on the chip, 115 positive 
hits  were  found  for AAV2  and  134  positive  hits  were  found  for 
AAV8. Out of these, 76 hits were shared by both capsid serotypes. 
The highest ranking protein interaction for both AAV2 and AAV8 
was the cell cycle protein complex CDK2/cyclinA. To confirm this 
interaction, purified CDK2/cyclinA was coated on an ELISA plate 
and purified vector particles were used as a probe. Under the assay 
conditions  used, AAV8  but  not AAV2  showed  detectable  direct 
binding to CDK2/cyclinA. To understand the role of CDK2/cyclinA 
in vector transduction, a small-molecule inhibitor of CDK2/cyclinA 
(SU9516) was tested. Treatment with this drug resulted in a 9-fold 
increase in transduction of Hep3B cells by AAV8 and a 2.5-fold 
increase in transduction of Hep3B cells by AAV2. Similar effects were 
observed using 293 cells. Inhibition of CDK2/cyclinA is a natural 
consequence of Rep78 protein activity (Berthet et al., PNAS 102(38)). 
This implies the deletion of Rep in the vectorization of AAV removed 
a natural mechanism to enhance infection, and that this function can 
be chemically simulated to achieve enhanced transduction levels. In 

 Molecular Therapy 
Volume 16, Supplement 1, May 2008  
 Copyright ©
 
The American Society of Gene Therapy
S3
B
iology
 
of
 AAV V
ector
 t
rAnsduction
addition to protein interactions, structural stability and vector genome 
uncoating were compared for AAV2 and AAV8. The disassembly of 
vector particles as measured by conformational antibody recognition 
occurred at a slightly higher temperature for AAV8 than for AAV2 
(71
o
 and 65
o
 C respectively). Vector genome uncoating as measured by 
DNAse sensitivity assay was found to occur at the same temperature 
as  vector  particle  disassembly. This  suggests  that  uncoating  and 
disassembly of vector particles may be linked processes for AAV, 
in contrast to other parvoviruses. Subtle differences between AAV2 
and AAV8  vector  particles  identified  here  may  contribute  to  the 
performance of these vectors in gene transfer studies.
6. 
Similar and Differential Involvement of 
DNA-PKcs and Artemis in Single-Stranded and 
Double-Stranded rAAV Vector Genome Processing 
in Mice
Chuncheng Piao,
1
 Katsuya Inagaki,
1
 Nicole Kotchey,
1
 Congrong 
Ma,
1
 Hiroyuki Nakai.
1
1
Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University 
of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA.
Interactions between viral genomes and host cellular DNA repair 
machinery play important roles in recombinant adeno-associated virus 
(rAAV) vector transduction in vivo. We have recently elucidated that 
DNA-PKcs and Artemis, the two key components of DNA repair 
endonuclease activity in the classical non-homologous end-joining 
(NHEJ)  pathway,  cleave  hairpin  loops  in AAV-inverted  terminal 
repeats (ITRs) and trigger rAAV genome recombination (1). In the 
absence of either factor, ITR hairpin opening is impaired, resulting in 
accumulation of no-end double-stranded linear genomes in a tissue-
specific manner. Based on our knowledge about the roles of DNA-
PKcs and Artemis in the NHEJ pathway, we assumed that these two 
factors function in the same pathway in rAAV transduction; however, 
there has been no direct experimental evidence that this is in fact the 
case, and the possibility has remained that these two cellular factors 
function in different pathways but lead to the same effect. First, to 
address this, we generated DNA-PKcs/Artemis double-knockout mice, 
and injected mice with a single-stranded rAAV8 (ssAAV8) vector via 
the tail vein. A preliminary result showed that ssAAV genomes were 
efficiently processed in the liver, while unrecombined no-end linear 
genomes were readily detected together with recombined genomes in 
the muscle, heart and kidney. This mirrors what we had observed in 
single deficient mice (1), demonstrating that DNA-PKcs and Artemis 
function in the same pathway toward opening ITR hairpin loops of 
ssAAV genomes. Next, we investigated how DNA-PKcs and Artemis 
are involved in double-stranded rAAV (dsAAV) genome processing. 
For this, we injected dsAAV9-CMV-GFP into hind limb muscles (2.5 
x 10e11 vg/site x 3 sites) of wild type, DNA-PKcs (-), and Artemis (-) 
mice. Muscle was chosen as the target tissue due to its low capacity of 
processing ssAAV genomes in the absence of DNA-PKcs or Artemis 
(1). The  average  ds  vector  genome  copy  number  in  muscle  was 
32-58 ds genomes / diploid genome, at which levels unrecombined 
no-end ds linear genomes were readily detected in both DNA-PKcs 
(-) and Artemis (-) mouse muscles transduced with ssAAV (1). No-
end  genomes  derived  from  dsAAV  were  detected  in  DNA-PKcs 
(-) mice; however, in the Artemis (-) mouse muscle, virtually all 
dsAAV genomes underwent recombination and unrecombined no-end 
genomes were barely detected. The experiment was repeated along 
with ssAAV9-CMV-GFP, and yielded consistent results. Interestingly, 
we found that the transgene expression was significantly impaired in 
both DNA-PKcs (-) mice and Artemis (-) mice with both ssAAV and 
dsAAV. Thus, our observations suggest that, although DNA-PKcs 
pathway and Artemis pathway are substantially overlapped for ssAAV 
such that Artemis presumably functions downstream of DNA-PKcs, 
DNA-PKcs is also involved in an undefined Artemis-independent 
pathway(s) in dsAAV genome processing. This raises a possibility that 
ssAAV and dsAAV activate and use similar albeit slightly different 
sets of DNA repair pathways for their genome processing in vivo.  
1. Inagaki et al. J. Virol. 81:11304-11321, 2007.
7. 
Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus 
2 Vector Genomes Are Stably Integrated into 
Chromosomes Following Transduction of Murine 
Hematopoietic Stem Cells
Zongchao Han,
1
 Li Zhong,
1
 Njeri Maina,
2
 Zhongbo Hu,
1
 Xiaomiao 
Li,
1
 Nitin S. Chouthai,
3
 Daniela Bischof,
4
 Kirsten A. Weigel-Van 
Aken,
1
 William B. Slayton,
1
 Mervin C. Yoder,
5
 Arun Srivastava.
1
1
Pediatrics, University of Florida College of Medicine, 
Gainesville, FL; 
2
Microbiology and Immunology, Indiana 
University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN; 
3
Pediatrics, 
Wayne State University, Detroit, MI; 
4
Medical and Molecular 
Genetics, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN; 
5
Pediatrics, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, 
IN.
In  contrast  to  the  wild-type  adeno-associated  virus  2  (AAV) 
genomes, recombinant AAV vector genomes do not integrate site-
specifically into chromosome 19 in human cells in vitro, and have 
been shown to remain episomal in animal models in vivo. However, 
all  previous  studies  have  been  carried  out  with  cells  and  tissues 
that are post-mitotic. In hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which 
must proliferate and differentiate to give rise to progenitor cells, 
recombinant AAV genomes would be lost in the absence of stable 
integration into chromosomal DNA. We have reported that among 
single-stranded adeno-associated virus (ssAAV) serotypes vectors 1 
through 5, ssAAV1 is the most efficient in transducing murine HSCs, 
but viral second-strand DNA synthesis remains a rate-limiting step 
(Hum Gene Ther., 17: 321-333, 2006). Subsequently, using self-
complementary AAV (scAAV) serotype vectors 7 through 10, we 
have observed that scAAV7 vectors also transduce murine HSCs 
efficiently  (Hum  Gene Ther.,  in  revision,  2008).  In  the  present 
studies, we compared ssAAV and scAAV serotype shuttle vectors 
containing the Zeocin gene for transduction of HSCs in a murine bone 
marrow serial transplant model in vivo, which allowed examination 
of AAV proviral integration pattern in the mouse genome as well 
as recovery and nucleotide sequence analyses of AAV-HSC DNA 
junction fragments. The proviral genomes were stably integrated, 
and integration sites were localized to different mouse chromosomes. 
None of the integration sites was found to be in a transcribed gene, 
or near a cellular oncogene.
All animals followed for up to one year exhibited no pathological 
abnormalities.  Thus, AAV  proviral  integration-induced  risk  of 
oncogenesis was not found in our studies, which provide functional 
confirmation  of  stable  transduction  of  long-term  repopulating, 

 Molecular Therapy 
Volume 16, Supplement 1, May 2008  
 Copyright ©
 
The American Society of Gene Therapy
S4



Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   139


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə