Bentham Open



Yüklə 194,25 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix22.05.2017
ölçüsü194,25 Kb.

 

The Open Entomology Journal, 2011, 5, 45-48 

45

 

 



 

1874-4079/11 

2011 Bentham Open

 

Open Access 



Essential  Oil  from  Bush  Mint,  Hyptis  suaveolens,  is  as  Effective  as  DEET 

for Personal Protection against Mosquito Bites 

A.Z. Abagli and T.B.C. Alavo

*

 

Laboratoire d’Entomologie appliquée, Faculté des Sciences et Techniques (FAST), Université d’Abomey-Calavi (UAC), 



Bénin 

Abstract: Concern about the deleterious effects associated with synthetic chemicals has revived interest to explore plants 

as  a  source  of  natural  insecticides  for  mosquito  control.  Ethnobotanical  studies  conducted  in  Kenya  on  plant  species 

including  bush  mint,  Hyptis  suaveolens  Poit.,  showed  that  many  of  them  repel  mosquitoes  effectively  when  burned 

overnight in rooms. Recent field works conducted with H. suaveolens essential oil have demonstrated the potential of this 

essential oil as mosquito repellent. The present work is a comparative study on the persistence of 30% DEET and 10% H. 

suaveolens essential oil for personal protection against mosquitoes in field conditions. Twenty volunteers who have given 

their informed consent have been involved for each of the products and control (no treatment). Results  showed that the 

mean  number  of  mosquitoes  that  landed  on  treated  volunteers  6  hours  post-application  was  0.50  and  0.45  for  10%  H. 

suaveolens essential oil and DEET respectively, against 6 mosquitoes for the control people. Statistical analysis revealed 

that there is no significant difference between 10% H. suaveolens essential oil and DEET indicating that both products are 

similarly effective. The possibility to use H.  suaveolens essential oil as integrated malaria vector management has been 

discussed. 



Keywords: DEET, Hyptis suaveolens, essential oil, repellent, mosquito control. 

INTRODUCTION 

 

Chemical  repellents  are  important  in  protecting  people 



from  blood-feeding  insects,  ticks,  mites,  and  other  arthro-

pods  and  may  therefore  also  reduce  transmission  of  arthro-

pod-borne  diseases  [1].  N,N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide 

(DEET)  is one of the most well-known arthropod repellents 

and has been on the market for almost half a century [2, 3]. 

DEET  is  effective  against  many  different  blood-sucking 

arthropods  [2,  4].  The  protection  efficacy  depends  on  the 

type of formulation, application pattern, species, and feeding 

behavior  of  the  arthropod  [4].  DEET  is  generally  safe  for 

topical  use  if  applied  as  recommended,  although  adverse 

effects such as serious neurologic effects have been reported 

[4,  5].  Many  people  consider  that  DEET  and  related  com-

pounds  are  a  health  and  environmental  hazard  [6].  DEET 

does not readily degrade by hydrolysis at environmental pHs 

and  has  been  identified  as  a  ubiquitous  pollutant  in  aquatic 

ecosystems  [6,  7].  Concern  about  the  deleterious  effects 

associated  with  synthetic  chemicals  has  revived  interest  to 

explore plants as a source of natural insecticides, acaricides, 

and repellents for medical, veterinary and crop protection use 

[1]. 


 

Ethnobotanical  studies  conducted  in  Kenya  on  plant 

species including Hyptis suaveolens Poit. showed that many 

of them repel mosquitoes effectively when burned overnight 

in  rooms  [8].  Duke  [9]  also  includes  H.  suaveolens  in  his  

 

 



 

*Address  correspondence  to  this  author  at  the  Laboratoire  d’Entomologie 

appliquée,  Faculté  des  Sciences  et  Techniques  (FAST),  Université 

d’Abomey-Calavi  (UAC),  BP  215  Godomey,  Bénin;  Tel:  (229)  97875438; 

E-mail: thieryalavo@hotmail.com 

phytochemical  and  ethnobotanical  database  as  an  insect 

repellent. Laboratory study has assessed the repellency rates 

of  various  concentrations  of  H.  suaveolens  essential  oil  and 

6%  of  the  oil  was  said  to  induce  a  high  repellency  rate  in 

laboratory  conditions  [10].  Recent  field  works  conducted 

with H. suaveolens essential oil showed that the effects of a 

solution containing 8% of the oil persisted and repelled up to 

97.56% of mosquitoes by 5 hours post-application [11]. Here 

we report results of a  comparative study carried out  in field 

conditions  on  10%  H.  suaveolens  essential  oil  and  N,N-

diethyl-3-methylbenzamide (DEET). 



MATERIALS AND METHODS  

Extraction of H. suaveolens Essential Oil  

 

The  extraction  of  H.  suaveolens  essential  oil  was  made 



from  leaves  collected  from  plants  cultivated  according  to 

Ahoton et al. [12]. The harvested leaves were air-dried in the 

shade for three days. The extraction of the  essential oil was 

made by steam distillation using 1 m

3

 still. To carry out the 



tests,  the  essential  oil  was  dissolved  in  isopropanol  (99.8% 

pure).  


Study Areas 

 

The  field  works  took  place  in  Ladji,  Towéta  and  Vossa 



districts located in Cotonou (Benin, West Africa). These are 

wetlands and floodable locations without modern infrastruc-

tures  and  contain  many  mosquitoes  breeding  sites.  These 

locations are unhealthy and unfit for human accommodation, 

nevertheless thousands peoples live there in poor health and 

social conditions. 



46     The Open Entomology Journal, 2011, Volume 5 

Abagli and Alavo.

 

Field Study on the Effect of 10% H. suaveolens Essential 



Oil Immediately after Application 

 

To  study  the  effect  of  10%  H.  suaveolens  essential  oil 



immediately  post-application,  a  total  of  20  replicates  were 

carried out through the study areas. The product was applied 

directly  on  both  feet  (from  toes  to  knee)  of  each  of  the 

volunteers who gave their informed consent. The application 

was  made  using  cotton  soaked  in  the  essential  oil  solution. 

For  the  observations,  treated  volunteer  and  the  control 

(untreated person) were  installed at  a distance of about 3  m 

from each other on a stool. Mosquitoes coming to rest on the 

feet  of  the  volunteers  were  then  captured  using  a  mouth 

vacuum  during  a  period  of  15  minutes.  The  collected 

mosquitoes  are  brought  to  the  laboratory  for  counting  and 

identification,  using  a  stereomicroscope  (Motic  China).  The 

experiments have been carried out between 8 pm and 10 pm 

in May-June 2010.  



Comparative  Study  on  the  Persistence  of  10%  H. 

suaveolens Essential Oil and DEET in Field Conditions  

 

The  persistence  of  the  effect  of  10%  H.  suaveolens 



essential oil  as well as DEET has been  investigated 6 hours 

post-application. To assess the persistence of these products 

on mosquito populations after this period of time, the feet of 

volunteers  were  treated  6  hours  before  the  start  time  of  the 

observations  in  the  study  areas.  Twenty  replicates  were 

performed  for  each  product  and  the  control  (untreated 

volunteers).  The  field  observations  and  mosquito  counts 

were  made  in  the  same  manner  as  described  above.  These 

experiments have been carried out in July-August 2010. The 

commercial formulation of N, N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide 

(DEET)  called  ‘Ungava’  has  been  used.  ‘Ungava’  contains 

30% DEET and is manufactured by the Company ‘Aerokure  

International Inc.’ (Canada).  

Statistical Analyses  

 

Non-parametric tests (Mann-Whitney U) were performed 



to determine whether there is significant difference between 

the  number  of  mosquitoes  coming  to  rest  on  the  feet  of 

volunteers  in  tested  variants.  These  tests  were  performed 

since  the  data  did  not  meet  the  ANOVA  hypotheses. 

Statistical  analyses  have  been  performed  using  SPSS 

statistics package version 16.0.  



RESULTS 

Effect  of  10%  H.  suaveolens  Essential  Oil  Immediately 

after Application 

 

The  total  number  of  mosquitoes  that  landed  on  treated 



and control feet during the first 15  minutes post-application 

in all replicates is 0 and 375, respectively (Fig. 1). In  terms 

of  percentage,  these  results  show  that100%  of  the  mos-

quitoes were repelled the first 15 minutes post-application of 

the  solution  containing  10%  of  H.  suaveolens  essential  oil. 

Statistical  analyses  showed  that  there  is  significant  differ-

ence between essential oil treated volunteers and the control. 

Two  species  of  feeding  female  mosquitoes  were  captured 

and identified namely Culex quinquefasciatus and Anopheles 

gambiae;  the  Culex  mosquitoes  prevailing,  however,  in  the 

study areas (Table 1). 

 

Fig.  (1).  Effect  of  10%  H.  suaveolens  essential  oil  on  mosquitoes 

populations in field conditions immediately post-application. 

 

Table 1.  Biodiversity  and  Number  of  Collected  Mosquitoes  on 

Untreated  Controls  Immediately  after  Application  of 

10% H. suaveolens Essential Oil 

 

Mosquito species 

Number of collected individuals 

Culex quinquefasciatus 

367 


Anopheles gambiae 



Aedes sp

 

Persistence of the Effect of 10% Essential Oil and DEET 



in Field Conditions 

 

The  mean  number  of  mosquitoes  that  landed  on  treated 



volunteers  6  hours  post-application  was  0.50  and  0.45  for 

10%  H.  suaveolens  essential  oil  and  DEET  respectively, 

against  6  mosquitoes  for  the  control  (Fig.  2).  This  corres- 

 

 



Fig.  (2).  Mean  number  of  collected  mosquitoes  on  treated 

volunteers 6 hours post-application. 

 

ponds  to  a  repellency  rate  of  about  92%  for  both  products. 



Statistical  analyses  showed  that  there  is  no  significant 

difference  between  10%  H.  suaveolens  essential  oil  and 

DEET  indicating  that  both  products  are  similarly  effective. 


Essential Oil from Bush Mint, Hyptis suaveolens 

The Open Entomology Journal, 2011, Volume 5     47

 

During these field experiments, Culex, Anopheles and Aedes 



mosquitoes  have  been  captured  on  treated  and  untreated 

volunteer feet; Culex mosquitoes prevailing, however, in the 

study areas (Table 2). 

 

Table 2.   Biodiversity  and  Number  of  Mosquitoes  Collected 



on  Treated  and  Control  Volunteers  in  all  Field 

Trials 6 Hours Post-Application 

 

Treatment 

Culex sp. 

Anopheles sp. 

Aedes sp. 

Hyptis 


10 



DEET 



Control 


102 



 

DISCUSSIONS 

 

The  concentration  of  6%  of  H.  suaveolens  essential  oil 



produced  the  best  results  in  laboratory  tests  since  it  has 

repelled  about  97%  of  tested  mosquitoes.  When  tested  in 

field  conditions,  this  concentration  repelled  100%  of  mos-

quitoes  present  in  the  test  areas  the  first  15  minutes  post-

application  [11].  In  the  present  study,  10%  H.  suaveolens 

essential  oil  induced  also  the  maximal  repellency  rate.  This 

confirms  once  again  that  low  concentration  of  this  essential 

oil is highly effective against mosquito populations, the first 

hour  post-application.  Comparative  study  conducted  on  the 

efficacy of insect repellents  against mosquito bites demons-

trated  that  higher  concentrations  of  DEET  provided  longer-

lasting protection [13]. As for DEET, higher concentration of 



H. suaveolens  essential oil provided  also  longer-lasting pro-

tection [11]. In the present study, 10% H. suaveolens essen-

tial  oil  and  a  formulation  containing  30%  DEET  provided 

similar  protection  time  amounting  to  at  least  5  hours.  Our 

data are  in  agreement with Fradin and Day [13] results  that 

revealed a  mean  complete protection time of 5 hours with a 

formulation  containing  23.8%  DEET.  Based  on  these  data, 

we  conclude  that  10%  H.  suaveolens  essential  oil  is  as 

effective  as  30%  DEET  for  personal  protection  against 

mosquito bites.  

 

The majority of mosquitoes captured in the present study 



on  untreated  volunteers  were  predominantly  Culex 

quinquefasciatus  and  occasionally  Anopheles  gambiae,  the 

major  malaria  vector  in  Sub-Saharan  Africa.  Laboratory 

works  have  also  demonstrated  that  low  concentration  (6%) 

of  H.  suaveolens  essential  oil  induced  maximal  repellency 

rate  against  A.  gambiae  [10].  In  Sub-Saharan  Africa,  it  is 

actively  recommended  to  people  to  spend  night  in  imp-

regnated  mosquito  nets  in  order  to  avoid  malaria  infection. 

Nevertheless,  people  who  usually  sleep  under  insecticidal 

nets, still contract malaria from time to time. For instance, in 

a  study  conducted  in  Somalia,  it  was  demonstrated  that  the 

protective  efficacy  of  insecticidal  nets  against  malaria 

transmission is barely 54% among people who regularly use 

mosquito  nets  [14].  Moreover,  Toe-Pare  et  al.  [15]  have 

shown  that  people’s  motivation  to  use  mosquito  nets  consi-

derably  decreased  less  than  a  year  after  the  campaigns  and  

 

people prefer to spend night without insecticidal nets. There-



fore,  mosquito  net  is  not  sufficient  to  effectively  control 

malaria  vectors,  especially  in  the  West  African  countries 

where urbanization promotes the proliferation of mosquitoes 

[16]. Consequently, to achieve successful vectors control and 

reduce  substantially  the  prevalence  of  malaria  and  other 

vector-borne  diseases,  an  integrated  management  of  these 

vectors must be adopted as recommended Okech et al. [17]. 

In  this  perspective,  the  present  study  shows  that  a  formu-

lation containing 10% essential oil of H. suaveolens is a way 

that  may  be  taken  into  account  for  the  integrated  manage-

ment of disease-vectors mosquitoes. 

AKNOWLEGEMENTS  

 

This  work  has  been  supported  by  the  Rectorate  of  the 



University  of  Abomey-Calavi,  Benin.  The  participation  of 

unpaid volunteers in the present study is highly appreciated.  



REFERENCES  

[1] 


Jaenson TGT, Palsson K, Borg-Karlson AK. Evaluation of extracts 

and  oils  of  mosquito  (Diptera:  Culicidae)  repellent  plants  from 

Sweden and Guinea-Bissau. J Med Entomol 2006; 43(1): 113-19. 

[2] 


Brown M, Hebert AA. Insect repellents: an overview. J Am Acad 

Dermatol 1997; 36: 243-49. 

[3] 

Fradin  MS.  Mosquitoes  and  mosquito  repellents:  a  clinician’s 



guide. Ann Intern Med 1998; 128: 931-40. 

[4] 


Qiu  H,  Jun  HW,  McCall  JW.  Pharmacokinetics,  formulation,  and 

safety of insect repellent N,N-dietyl-3-methylbenzamide (DEET): a 

review. J Am Mosq Control Assoc 1998; 14:12-27. 

[5] 


Sudakin DL, Trevathan WR. DEET: a review and update of safety 

and risk in the general population. J Toxicol Clin Toxicol 2003; 41: 

831-9. 

[6] 


Aquino M, Fyfe M, MacDougall L, Remple V. West Nile virus in 

British Columbia. Emerg Infect Dis 2004; 10: 1499-501. 

[7] 

Weigel  S,  Kuhlmann  J,  Huhnerfuss  H.  Drugs  and  personal  care 



products  as  ubiquitous  pollutants:  occurrence  and  distribution  of 

clofibric  acid,  caffeine  and  DEET  in  the  North  Sea.  Sci  Total 

Environ 2002; 295: 131-41. 

[8] 


Seyoum  A,  Kabiru  EW,  Lwande  W,  Killeen  GF,  Hassanali  A, 

Knols  BG.  Repellency  of  live  potted  plants  against  Anopheles 



gambiae  from  human  baits  in  semi-field  experimental  huts.  Am  J 

Trop Med Hyg 2002; 67 (2): 191-5. 

[9] 

Duke JA. Dr. Duke's phytochemical and ethnobotanical databases. 



(http://www.ars-grin.gov/cgi-bin/duke/ethnobot.pl). 

Consulted 

2007 on 11/04/2007. 

[10] 


Abagli  AZ,  Alavo  TBC,  Djouaka  R,  et  al.  Taux  de  répulsion  de 

différentes  concentrations  de  l’huile  essentielle  de  Hyptis 



suaveolens  contre  le  moustique  Anopheles  gambiae  (Diptera : 

Culicidae).  Actes  du  2

e

 colloque  de  l’UAC  des  Sciences,  Cultures 



et Technologies, Sciences agronomiques 2009; pp. 329-49. 

[11] 


Abagli  AZ,  Alavo  TBC,  Avlessi  F,  Moudachirou  M.  Potential  of 

Hyptis  suaveolens  essential  oil  for  personal  protection  against 

mosquitoes (Diptera : Culicidae). Personal Communication



 

2011. 


[12] 

Ahoton  LE,  Alavo  TBC,  Ahomadegbe  MA,  Ahanhanzo  C, 

Agbangla C. Domestication du gros baume (Hyptis suaveolens (L.) 

Poit.): Techniques de production et potentiels insectes ravageurs au 

sud du Bénin. Int J Biol Chem Sci 2010; 4 (3): 608-14. 

[13] 


Fradin  MS,  Day  FJ.  Comparative  efficacy  of  insect  repellents 

against mosquito bites. N Engl J Med 2002; 347 (1): 13-8. 

[14] 

Noor  AM,  Moloney  G,  Borle  M,  Fegan  GW,  Shewchuk  T,  Snow 



RW.  The  use  of mosquito  nets and  the prevalence of  plasmodium 

infection  in  rural  South  Central  Somalia.  PLoS  One  2008;  3(5): 

e2081. 

[15] 


Toe-Pare L, Skovmand O, Damir KR, et al. Decreased motivation 

in  the  use  of  insecticide-treated  nets  in  malaria  endemic  area  in 

Burkina Faso. Malar J 2009; 8(1): 175.  


48     The Open Entomology Journal, 2011, Volume 5 

Abagli and Alavo.

 

[16] 



Alavo  TBC,  Abagli  AZ,  Accodji  M,  Djouaka  R.  Unplanned 

urbanization  promotes  the  proliferation  of  disease  vector 

mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae). Open Entomol J 2010; 4: 1-7. 

[17] 


Okech  BA,  Mwobobia  IK,  Kamau  A,  et  al.  Use  of  integrated 

malaria  management  reduces  malaria  in  Kenya.  PLoS  One  2008; 

3(12): e4050. 

 

Received: March 14, 2011 



Revised: July 07, 2011 

Accepted: July 15, 2011 

 

© Abagli and Alavo; Licensee Bentham Open



 

This is an open access article licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-

nc/3.0/), which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the work is properly cited. 

 

 



 


Yüklə 194,25 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə