Biodiversity of Butterflies in the Waterfalls sector in the Barra Honda National Park, Nicoya, Guanacaste, Costa Rica. Authors



Yüklə 121.95 Kb.
PDF просмотр
tarix15.08.2017
ölçüsü121.95 Kb.

                          

 

 





 

 

Biodiversity of Butterflies in the Waterfalls sector in the Barra Honda 

National Park, Nicoya, Guanacaste, Costa Rica. 

Authors 

Oscar Mario Cubero Vásquez. 

Oscar Mauricio Rosales Matarrita. 

Eduardo Artavia Durán. 



Date 

25/11/13. 

 

 

 



 

                          

 

 





 

Principal Aim. 

Make  an  inventory  of  butterflies  in  the  area  around  the  waterfalls  and  study  the 

richness of biodiversity at the study site. 

Secondary aims. 

Employ  capture  techniques  that  allow  the  processing  of  specimens  quickly  and 

safely 

Identify the species to obtain a list for the area 



Compare the species caught in the Waterfalls area and Barra Honda Mountain to 

see if we have any difference in species composition between study sites. 



 

Methodology. 

Study area. 

The  project  was  performed  in  Barra  Honda  peninsula  of  Nicoya,  Costa  Rica,  the 

type of forest represented in this area is dry tropical forest transition to wet tropical 

forest  (Holdridge,  1968)  the  precipitation  at  the  site  is  around  1500mm-2000mm 

and the average temperature is 26-28C

o

 (Atlas IGN, 2008). 



Around  the  90%  of  the  national  park  is  covered  by  secondary  forest  but  some 

areas  still  maintain  primary  forest,  the  secondary  forest  in  Barra  Honda  is 

represented  by  species  of  trees  like  Guazuma  ulmifolia,  Spondias  mombin

Eugenia  salamensis  and  Lonchocarpus  minimiflorus,  In  the  primary  forest  we 

found  species  of  trees  that  are  very  important  for  butterflies  like  Trichilia  glabra, 



Manilkara chicle, Brosimun alicastrum and Sideroxylon capiri. 

The  sector  where  we  caught  the  butterflies  is  called  Las  Cascadas,  which  is 

located in the foot slopes of Corralillo hill. It is a rocky area and which holds water 

in the dry season indicating this is an important place for wildlife. 



Sampling techniques. 

                          

 

 



 

For  sampling  we  used  two  different  methodologies.  The  first  was  Van  Someren 



Rydon traps. These are cylindrical in shape with a height of 1,40m. The traps were 

placed at different heights in the forest (2m, 4m, 6m) and each trap one had a plate 

attached. On the plates

, “bait” was placed to attract the butterflies and i

n this case 

ripe  pineapple  fruit  was  successful.  By  using  this  methodology  we  were  able  to 

sample butterflies flying at different heights in the forest. The national park has pre-

determined study sites in the different sectors of the reserve and, in the case of the 

site near the waterfalls; we placed our traps in each corner of the sampling areas. 

These were checked every hour for identifying the captured butterflies. 

The  second  method  used  was  entomological  nets.  This  technique  consisted  of 

hiking in the trails of the area and capturing butterflies encountered. The idea of a 

combination  of  methodologies  was  try  to  have  a  faster  capture  rate  and  a  higher 

number of species recorded in a short time. 



Results. 

We captured a total of 1821 individuals with both methods of capture, for a total of 

68  species  (see  Annex  1).  This  included  six  families  Nymphalidae,  Pieridae, 

Papilionidae, Hesperidae, Lycaenidae and Riodinidae. In the Van Someren Rydon 

traps  we  captured  a  total  of  1296  individuals.  The  most  common  family  captured 

was  Nymphalidae  with  35  species  identified.  The  most  common  of  these  was 



Smyrna blomfildia datis  with a total of 789 individuals, followed by Taygetis laches 

laches  with  122 and  Siproeta  stelenes biplagiata  with  75.  Smyrna blomfildia  datis 

was  the  dominant  species  with  a  total  of  61%  of  the  catch.  Some  species  were 

found  just  once  like  Prepona  dexamaneus  dexamaneus,  Prepona  laertes 

demodice and Manataria hercyna maculata. 

Whilst  recording  the  total  biodiversity  we  found  a  new  species  for  the  area. 



Hamadryas  amphinome  mexicana  belongs  to  the  Nymphalidae  family  and  has 

never been recorded in the region before. The English name is the Cracked Red  



                          

 

 



 

butterfly and was found in February for the first time. The individual was collected 



and placed in the collection of species found in the offices of PNBH.  

A  second  capture  of  special  interest  occurred  in  June.  Hamadryas.  amphinome 



mexicana    is  a  very  rare  species  in  the  National  Park  and  whilst  it  is  common  to 

observe  or  capture  other  species  of  the  genus  Hamadryas,  Hamadryas. 



amphinome  mexicana,  was  not  reported  until  2001  by  the  National  Biodiversity 

Institute of Costa Rica in the conservation area Tempisque. The habitat where the 

capture was made was secondary forest about 40 years old. 

Of the three heights used, more butterflies were found at the height of two meters 

with  a  total  of  472  individuals,  followed  by  the  height  of  four  meters  with  417 

individuals  and finally  the  height  of 6m  with  372  individuals.  Some  of  the  species 

seem to prefer flying at certain levels within the forest as they were only captured 

at  fixed  heights.  Taygetis  mermeria  excavata  was  only  found  at  a  height  of  two 

metres,  Adelpha  fessonia  was  captured  at  four  metres  high  and  Prepona  laertes 

demodice at six metres high. 

With  the  methodology  of  hand  nets  we  were  able  to  capture  a  total  of  525 

individuals  that  represented  a  total  of  43  species  of  Lepidoptera.  This  technique 

obtained a higher percentage of species for the total number of individuals caught. 

In  total,  43  species  from  525  individuals  were  caught  using  nets  whereas  the 

hanging traps recorded 68 species from 1296 individuals. Some species were only 

captured using nets and these included species of the Pieridae. The species most 

frequently  captured  were  Taygetes  laches  laches  with  a  total  of  75  individuals 

followed  by  Ganyra  josephina  josepha

 

and  Smyrna  blomfildia  datys,  with  25 



captures each. 

Whilst  Taygetis  laches  laches  was  the  species  most  captured  during  the  study  it 

was  not  the  species  most  commonly  observed  during  these  months  of  research. 

The results are skewed as this species is often found where the rotten fruits of the 



                          

 

 





Spondias  mombin  tree  lay  on  the  ground.  This  occurs  from  February  through  to 

June  and  so  the  capture  of  this  species  is  made  easier  by  the  access  to  many 

individuals feeding along the trails.  

Of  the  68  species  caught  in  the  Van  Someren  Rydon  traps  in  the  area  of  the 

waterfalls we had species of just one family, Nymphalidae. The hand nets captured 

greater  diversity  in  different  families,  as  shown  in  Annex  6.  familyNymphalidae  is 

dominant  with  67%  of  all  individuals  followed  by  Pieridae  32,  4%,  Papilionidae 

3.6%  followed  by  Riodinidae  0.4%,  unknown  0.4%  and  Hesperidae/  Lycaenidae 

families 0.2% 

We  compared  the  investigation  of  butterflies  performed  in  Barra  Honda  in  2011 

with the study we did in the waterfalls area and the results show us a difference in 

four species, in 2011 we had 31 but in 2013 we got 35. In the study site on Barra 

Honda Mountain we collected six species that were absent from the waterfalls area 

and we registered 13 species that were not found in the first study. It is interesting 

to see these differences between those areas because both sites have different life 

zones (Holdrige, 1966) which should reflect the different diversities found in the two 

areas.  

 

 



                          

 

 



 

Annex1. Butterflies list of Barra Honda National Park, Waterfall Sector. 



Species

 

Family

 

Adelpha iphiclus iphiclus

 

Nymphalidae

 

Anartia jatrophae

 

Nymphalidae

 

Glutophrissa drusilla

 

Pieridae


 

Archaeoprepona demophon centralis

 

Nymphalidae

 

Archaeoprepona demophon gulina

 

Nymphalidae

 

Ganyra josephina josepha

 

Pieridae


 

Caligo telamonius memnon

 

Nymphalidae

 

Callicore pitheas

 

Nymphalidae

 

Chlosyne hippodrome hippodrome

 

Nymphalidae

 

Cissia pseudoconfusa

 

Nymphalidae

 

Colobura dirce dirce

 

Nymphalidae

 

Danaus gilippus thersippus

 

Nymphalidae

 

Danous eresimus montezuma

 

Nymphalidae

 

Danous plexippus

 

Nymphalidae

 

Doxocopa laure laure

 

Nymphalidae

 

Dryas iulia moderata

 

Nymphalidae

 

Eueides isabella eva

 

Nymphalidae

 

Eunica monima 

 

Nymphalidae

 

Euptoieta hegesia meridiania

 

Nymphalidae

 

Eurema daira Eugenia

 

Pieridae


 

Eurema nise nelphe

 

Pieridae


 

Eurema proterpia

 

Pieridae


 

Eurema westwoodi

 

Pieridae


 

Eurybia elvina elvina

 

Nymphalidae

 

Hamadryas glauconome glauconome

 

Nymphalidae

 

Heliconius hecale zuleika

 

Nymphalidae

 

Hermeuptychia Hermes

 

Nymphalidae

 

Isabella demophile centralis 

 

Pieridae


 

Junonia evarete evarete

 

Nymphalidae

 

Leptophobia aripa aripa

 

Pieridae


 

Magneuptychia libye

 

Nymphalidae

 

Marpesia berania fruhstorferi

 

Nymphalidae

 

Marpesia petreus petreus

 

Nymphalidae

 

Mechanitis polymnia isthmia

 

Nymphalidae

 

Memphis oenomais

 

Nymphalidae

 

Microtia elva

 

Nymphalidae

 

Morpho helenor marinita

 

Nymphalidae

 


                          

 

 





Nica flavila canthera

 

Nymphalidae

 

Heraclides cresphontes

 

Papilionidae

 

Parides erithalion sadyattes

 

Papilionidae

 

Parides iphidamas iphidamas

 

Papilionidae

 

Phoebis philea philea

 

Pieridae


 

Pierella luna pallida

 

Nymphalidae

 

Taygetis laches laches

 

Nymphalidae

 

Taygetis mermeria excavata

 

Nymphalidae

 

Taygetis rufomarginata

 

Nymphalidae

 

Tithorea armonia helicaon

 

Nymphalidae

 

Zaretis ellos

 

Nymphalidae

 

Adelpha fessonia

 

Nymphalidae

 

Anaea troglodyta aidea

 

Nymphalidae

 

Archaeoprepona amphimachus amphiktion

 

Nymphalidae

 

Catonephele numilia esite

 

Nymphalidae

 

Eunica monima modesta

 

Nymphalidae

 

Hamadryas amphinome mexicana

 

Nymphalidae

 

Hamadryas februa ferentina

 

Nymphalidae

 

Hamadryas guatemalena guatemalena

 

Nymphalidae

 

Hermeuptychia harmonia

 

Nymphalidae

 

Hermeuptychia Hermes

 

Nymphalidae

 

Historis acheronta acheronta

 

Nymphalidae

 

Historis odius odius

 

Nymphalidae

 

Manataria hercyna maculata

 

Nymphalidae

 

Memphis lyceus

 

Nymphalidae

 

Memphis morous bouisdusvali

 

Nymphalidae

 

Prepona dexamaneus dexamaneus

 

Nymphalidae

 

Prepona laertes demodice

 

Nymphalidae

 

Pyrrhogyra otalais otalais

 

Nymphalidae

 

Siproeta stelenes biplagiata

 

Nymphalidae

 

Smyrna blomfildia datis

 

Nymphalidae

 

(Cubero et al, 2014). 



 

 

 



 

 


                          

 

 



 

Annex  2.  Behavior  of  butterflies  captured  in  the  study  with  Van  Someren  Rydon 



traps. 

(Cubero et al, 2014). 

Annex 3. Behavior of butterflies captured in the studio with the hand traps. 

(Cubero et al, 2014). 



                          

 

 



 

Annex  4.  Species  Captured  with  the  Van  Someren  Rydon  Traps  and  the  relative 



abundances of each species. 

Species 

Number of 

individuals 

Relative 

abundance 

Adelpha fessonia

 

1

 



0,01

 

Adelpha iphiclus iphiclus



 

57

 



0,62

 

Anaea aidea



 

11

 



0,12

 

Archaeoprepona demophon centralis



 

14

 



0,15

 

Archaeoprepona demophon gulina



 

9

 



0,10

 

Archaeoprepona meander



 

1

 



0,01

 

Caligo telamonius memnon



 

4

 



0,04

 

Callicore pitheas



 

6

 



0,07

 

Cantonephela Rumelia



 

1

 



0,01

 

Cissia confusa



 

1

 



0,01

 

Colubura dirce dirce



 

3

 



0,03

 

Doxocopa laure



 

3

 



0,03

 

Eunica monima modesta



 

11

 



0,12

 

Hamadryas amphinome mexicana



 

2

 



0,02

 

Hamadryas februa ferentina



 

11

 



0,12

 

Hamadryas glauconome glauconome



 

38

 



0,41

 

Hamadryas guatemalena guatemalena



 

17

 



0,18

 

Hermeuptychia harmonia



 

1

 



0,01

 

Hermeuptychia Hermes



 

11

 



0,12

 

Historis acheronta acheronta



 

35

 



0,38

 

Historis odius odius



 

20

 



0,22

 

Junonia evarete evarete



 

1

 



0,01

 

Manataria hercyna maculata



 

1

 



0,01

 

Memphis lyceus



 

2

 



0,02

 

Memphis morous bouisdusvali



 

4

 



0,04

 

Memphis oenomais



 

11

 



0,12

 

Morpho helenor marinita



 

7

 



0,08

 

Prepona dexamaneus dexamaneus



 

1

 



0,01

 

Prepona laertes demodice



 

1

 



0,01

 

Pyrrhogyra otalais otalais



 

2

 



0,02

 

Siproeta stelenes biplagiata



 

75

 



0,82

 

Smyrna blomfildia datis



 

789


 

8,58


 

Syderone marpesia

 

1

 



0,01

 

Taygetes laches laches



 

122


 

1,33


 

Zaretis ellos

 

21

 



0,23

 


                          

 

 



10 

(Cubero et al, 2014). 

 

Annex  5.  Species  captured  with  the  hand  nets  methodology  and  the  relative 



abundance of each species. 

Species 

Numbers of 

individual 

Relative 

abundance 

Adelpha iphiclus iphiclus 

22 


0,18 

Anartia jatrophae 

0,01 



Glutophrissa drusilla 

0,02 



Archaeoprepona demophon centralis 

0,01 



Archaeoprepona demophon gulina 

0,01 



Archaeoprepona sp. 

0,01 



Ganyra josephina josepha 

25 


0,20 

Caligo telamonius memnon 

0,03 



Callicore pitheas 

0,03 



Chlosyne hippodrome 

0,01 



Cissia pseudoconfusa 

0,02 



Colobura dirce dirce 

0,01 



Danaus gilippus thersippus 

0,02 



Danous eresimus  

0,02 



Danous plexippus 

0,02 



Doxocopa laure laure 

0,02 



Dryas iulia moderata 

0,01 



Eueides isabella eva 

0,05 



Eunica monima modesta 

0,02 



Eupotoieta hegesia meridiana 

10 


0,08 

Eurema daira 

48 


0,38 

Eurema dina westwoodi 

0,06 



Eurema nise 

0,06 



Eurema proterpia 

0,01 



Eurema westwoodi 

0,01 



Eurybia elvina elvina 

0,03 



Hamadryas glauconome glauconome 

0,01 



Heliconius hecale zuleika  

16 


0,13 

Hermeuptychia Hermes 

0,03 



Hesperidae 

0,03 



Isabella demophile centralis  

27 


0,22 

Junonia evarete evarete 

0,01 



                          

 

 



11 

Leptophobia aripa aripa 

21 


0,17 

Lycaenidae sp 

0,01 



Magneuptychia libye 

0,06 



Marpesia berania 

0,02 



Marpesia petreus 

0,04 



Mechanitis polymnia isthmia 

0,01 



Memphis oenomais 

0,02 



Microtia elva 

19 


0,15 

Morpho helenor marinita 

32 


0,26 

Nica flavila canthera 

0,01 



Papilio Cresphontes 

0,02 



Parides erithalion sodyattes 

0,02 



Parides iphidamas iphidamas 

23 


0,18 

Phoebis philea philea 

0,02 



Pierella luna luna 

0,02 



Siproeta stelenes biplagiata 

46 


0,37 

Smyrna blomfildia datis 

29 


0,23 

Taygetis laches laches 

91 


0,73 

Taygetis mermeria excavata 

0,01 



Taygetis rufomarginata 

0,01 



Tithorea armonia helicaon 

0,01 



Zaretis ellos 

0,02 



(Cubero et al, 2014). 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

                          

 

 



12 

Annex  6.  Distribution  of  families  according  to  the  species  captured  with  the  hand 

traps. 

             



(Cubero et al, 2014). 

 

 



62.9% 

3.6% 


32.4% 

0.2% 


0.4% 

0.2% 


0.4% 

Percentage 

Nymphalidae

Papilionidae

Pieridae


Lycaenidae

Riodinidae

Hesperidae

Desconocida



                          

 

 



13 

Annex 7. Some species we found during the Project in 2013-2014. 

 

Hamadryas amphinome mexicana. (Frontal, Ventral) 

 

 



Phyrrogyra otalais otalais. (Frontal, ventral) 

 

Colobura annulata. (Frontal, ventral) 



                          

 

 



14 

 

Itaballia demophile centralis. (Frontal, ventral) 

 

Cantonepele numilia esite. (Frontal, ventral) 

 

Danus gelipus thersipus. (Frontal, ventral) 



                          

 

 



15 

 

Anartia Jatrophae. (Frontal, ventral) 

 

Historis odius. (Frontal, ventral) 

 

Smyrna blomfildia datis. (Frontal, ventral) 



                          

 

 



16 

 

Taygetis laches laches (Frontal, ventral) 



 

Literature cited. 

  Chacón  I,  Montero  J,  2007.  Mariposas  de  Costa  Rica,  editorial  Instituto 



Nacional de Biodiversidad (INBio), 366 páginas. 

  Cubero  O  y  Gonzales  J,  2011.  Monitoreo  de  anfibios  en  los  principales 



cuerpos  de  agua  del  Parque  Nacional  Barra  Honda,  43  páginas  (no 

publicado) 

  De  Vries  P,  1987,  The  butterflies  of  Costa  Rica  and  their  natural  history, 



volumen  I  Papilionidae,  Pieridae,Nymphalidae,  Princeton  University  Press, 

327 páginas 

  De  Vries  P,  1997,  The  butterflies  of  Costa  Rica  and  their  natural  history, 



volumen II Riodinidae, Princeton University Press,288 páginas 

  Gámez  J,  2010.  Diversidad  y  composición  de  las  comunidades  de  las 



comunidades de mariposas Nymphalidae (Lepidoptera: Rhapalocdera) en el 

área  natural  protegida  la  joya,  del  departamento  de  san  Vicente,  el 

Salvador,  Centroamérica,  Universidad  de  el  Salvador  facultad  de  ciencias 

agronómicas departamentos de protección vegetal. 

  Leiva  Y.  2013.  Evaluación  de  los  ectoparásitos  presentes  en  los 



murciélagos de la Familia Mormoopidae capturados en el Parque  Nacional 

Barra Honda, Guanacaste. 49páginas (no publicado). 



                          

 

 



17 

  Lopez  R,  Sermeño  J,  2010.  Diversidad  de  las  mariposas  diurnas 



(lepidóptera, papilionoidea y hesperoidea) del parque nacional Walter Thilo 

Deininger,  El  Salvador,  con  notas  sobre  su  distribución  y  fenoilogía,  52 

páginas. 

  Pozo  C,  Bousquets  Ll,  Martínez  A,  Vargas  I,  Salas  N,  2005.  Reflexiones 



acerca de los métodos de muestreo para mariposas en las comparaciones 

biogeográficas  



 


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə