Biodiversity survey pilot project at Charles Darwin Reserve, Western Australia Vascular Plants



Yüklə 155.24 Kb.
PDF просмотр
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü155.24 Kb.

Biodiversity survey pilot project at Charles 

Darwin Reserve, Western Australia  

 

Vascular Plants 

 

 



 

 

 



Report to Australian Biological Resources Study, Department of the Environment, 

Water, Heritage and the Arts, Canberra 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Terry D. Macfarlane  

Western Australian  Herbarium, Science Division, Department of Environment and 

Conservation, Western Australia.  

 

 

 

31 August 2009 


 

2

 



Cover picture: View of York gum (Eucalyptus loxophleba) woodland below a greenstone ridge, with 

extensive Acacia shrubland in the distance, northern Charles Darwin Reserve, May 2009. (Photo T.D. 

Macfarlane). 


 

3

Biodiversity survey pilot project at Charles 



Darwin Reserve, Western Australia

 

 



 

Terry D. Macfarlane 

Western Australian  Herbarium, Science Division, Department of Environment and Conservation, 

Western Australia. Address: DEC, Locked Bag 2, Manjimup WA 6258 

 

Project aim 

 

This project was conceived to carry out a biological survey of a reserve forming part 



of the National Reserve System, to provide biodiversity information for reserve 

management and to contribute to taxonomic knowledge including description of new 

species as appropriate. 

 

Survey structure 

 

A team of scientists specialising in different organism groups each with a team of 



Earthwatch volunteer assistants, driver and vehicle, carried out the survey following 

individually devised field programs, over the 1 week period 5-9 May 2009. 

 

Science teams 

 

Five science teams, each led by one of the scientists, specialised on the following 



organism groups: 

 

Plants, Insects (Lepidoptera), Insects (Heteroptera), Vertebrates , Arachnids. 



 

Plants were collected by the Plants team and also by some of the animal scientists, 

particularly Celia Symonds, in order to accurately document the insect host plants. 

These additional collections were identified along with the other flora vouchers, and 

contribute to the flora results reported here. 

 

Flora: introduction 

 

The Charles Darwin Reserve consists of a mosaic of plant communities which inhabit 



extensive plains of yellow sand, red sandy clay or loam, granite rocks, lateritic 

breakways, greenstone ridges or hills, and wetlands such as salt lakes, claypans and 

ephemeral swamps. The vegetation includes extensive areas of species-rich shrubland 

of several variants that are representative of flora considered characteristic of the 

Wheatbelt, Acacia-dominated shrubland on red soil plains, and Eucalyptus woodlands 

on heavier clay-containing soils, and these are of different kinds: York Gum (E. 



loxophleba) woodland, Salmon Gum (E. salmonophloia) woodland, and Gimlet (E. 

salubris) woodland, and chenopod shrublands on saline sites. The vegetation can be 

 

4

considered as containing significant proportions of types characteristic of the 



Wheatbelt and of the arid zone Rangelands. 

 

The Reserve was formerly White Wells pastoral station and was grazed intermittently 



by sheep for about 80 years (Nicholson 2007). However the vegetation was not 

cleared, except for a relatively small area near the homestead which has been cropped. 

Overlaying the mosaic of plant communities is another mosaic, of fire history, and the 

age since fire can have as dramatic a visual effect as differences in vegetation type. 

Examples are evident in parts of the Reserve now. Recency of fire can also govern the 

occurrence of species since some live for only a short time after fire (or physical 

disturbance such as track work). The condition of the vegetation and therefore the 

success of biological survey work is also affected substantially by the season and the 

amount of rain that has fallen in the preceding period. 

 

The vegetation and species of plants occurring in the Charles Darwin Reserve are 



moderately well known, but as the results of this survey show, the Reserve has not 

been exhaustively surveyed. The list of possibly new taxa also demonstrates that the 

Reserve flora is consistent with the general situation in south western Australia, which 

is that taxonomic knowledge is far from complete. 

 

Previous collecting has been fairly extensive, and has been carried out by WA 



volunteer groups including the WA Wildflower Society and the WA Naturalists Club, 

the Agriculture Department Rangelands Survey group (Payne et al. 1998), Bush 

Heritage reserve managers, environmental consultants, Department of Environment 

and Conservation (DEC) flora officers, and passing botanists. A large proportion of 

the records have been made over many years by botanists from throughout Australia 

and elsewhere passing along the Great Northern Highway which traverses the south 

east corner of the Reserve. A longer stretch of the Highway falls within the buffer 

zone used in the preparation of the list and is one reason for the wider WAHERB list 

exceeding the Reserve list (see below) by such a large number of species (Map1).  

 

 



The Survey 

 

 



Objectives of the flora survey 

 

The flora survey was based on covering as many habitat types as possible over as 



wide a range of the reserve as possible. Plots were not used since the emphasis was on 

the species diversity and inventory rather than vegetation communities, although other 

surveys have used a plot-based approach in parts of the reserve previously. 

 

In keeping with the overall project plan, there was a particular focus on species that 



for any reason were suspected of not having been collected on the reserve, that were 

in flower at the time since the survey was carried out at a season when most species 

are not in flower, and any species seen in fruit where the collection of fruits was 

considered likely to be a useful addition to Herbarium scientific collections. In 

addition, requests made by colleagues were fulfilled as far as possible, relating to rare 

species, putatively new species or variation that needed to be checked. An especial 

search was made for plants in my particular taxonomic specialty groups, Wurmbea 


 

5

and other petaloid monocots, and grasses. The seasonal conditions meant that weeds, 



which are mostly annuals here, were scarcely visible. 

 

Of particular interest for the overall project were species that might be new records 



for the reserve, and species that might be new to science. 

 

 



 

Methods 

 

In preparation for the survey I prepared species lists for the Reserve from the Western 



Australian Herbarium specimen database WAHERB as a guide to species known to 

be present and to aid recognition of new records. There were two lists, the first of 

which will be referred to as the wider WAHERB list, covered the Reserve plus an 

arbitrary buffer chosen so as to limit the inclusion of habitats that are not 

characteristic of the Reserve such as the large salt lakes and the Mt Gibson range. It 

comprised about 570 vascular plant taxa and 60 non-vascular plants and fungi. The 

buffer was included so as to improve the prospect of obtaining a species list that was 

reasonably indicative of the flora of the Reserve. The second list, the Reserve list, 

used coordinates closely approximating the Reserve boundaries (i.e. excluding the 

buffer), and comprised about 350 vascular plant taxa. This list indicates what species 

have actually been collected from the Reserve, and as expected it was significantly 

less complete than the wider list, given that the Reserve has not been thoroughly 

surveyed for flora.  There are other less complete lists in existence, one important one 

having been supplied by ABRS from Federal Government databases, and that one has 

been reconciled with the Reserve list here.  

 

Most regions of the Reserve were visited, including as many as possible of the known 



vegetation types and soil and geological substrates. The vegetation is varied and 

complex in distribution. Very few species were in flower, but selected collections 

were made when flowers were encountered, when fruiting collections seemed likely 

to be useful, when the identity of plants needed to be checked for this or other science 

projects, or when new records were suspected. 

 

The work was assisted by Earthwatch volunteers and staff and I was also 



accompanied most of the time by Dr Matt Appleby, Bush Heritage plant ecologist, 

who was seeing the Reserve for the first time and who discussed species, plant 

communities and ecological and management issues. Dr Peter Lang from the TERN 

team also joined the team when possible, which allowed us to share our knowledge of 

the flora from our respective state perspectives. 

 

Identifying the collections and vouchering 

 

Plant identification was based on my existing knowledge supplemented by advice 



from other botanists, specialists in the taxonomy of particular groups (see 

acknowledgements), available keys in floras and revisions, online resources especially 

the Western Australian Herbarium’s FloraBase Web resource and the AVH 

(Australia’s Virtual Herbarium), and WA Herbarium collections. The sterile state of 

many collections has made the process more difficult than usual. 

 


 

6

Most collections were retained for lodgement in the Western Australian Herbarium as 



vouchers verifying the records, but very poor specimens were not kept. The vouchers 

are readily retrieved from the WAHERB database by querying for “CDR” in the 

voucher field. The records are accessible to AVH queries and contribute to the AVH 

maps. 


 

 

 



 

Figure 1. Eremophila latrobei subsp. latrobei, flowering during the biological survey of the Charles 

Darwin Reserve. (Photo T.D. Macfarlane). 

 


 

7

Results 

 

The species list 

 

A full list of the vascular plants of the Charles Darwin Reserve (CDR) based on 



known specimen records is presented in Appendix 1. The list contains 372 taxa, 

including species, subspecies, and varieties, with care taken to avoid double counting 

of taxa at species and infraspecies level. For this report the list is simply presented 

alphabetically by genus. 

 

The flora list  was rather strictly limited to the area within the boundaries of the 



Reserve in keeping with the objectives. One consequence is that an idea of the 

collecting intensity can be gained. A comparison of the 372 taxa of this list with the  

c. 570 taxa of the wider Waherb list prepared at the outset suggests that many species 

that could be expected to occur in the vegetation types on the CDR have not yet been 

collected there. There may also be some effect of the buffer area possibly including 

habitats not present on the Reserve, but the buffers were selected to reduce this. 

Figure 1 shows the distribution of collections prior to the survey. 

 

Because of the strict limitation of the list to the CDR the new taxon records reported 



here include some that could be regarded as merely minor new occurrences of taxa 

that are widespread and common in the general region. However it is important that 

the biodiversity actually present on the reserve be documented for reserve 

management reasons, for demonstrating conservation of as many species and plant 

communities as possible, and for adding to general floristic knowledge, so all records 

are reported. 

 

 

Map 1. Distribution of collections for the Charles Darwin Reserve and the buffer region (Western 



Australian Herbarium collection), showing the concentration along Great Northern Highway. 

 


 

8

 



 

Taxa newly recorded for Charles Darwin Reserve 

 

Appendix 1 includes an indication of taxa thought to be newly recorded for the 



Reserve as a result of the collections made during this May 2009 survey by the plant 

research team led by me, and by other scientists whose collections I undertook to 

identify. The latter are not individually indicated, but the information is on record. 

The new records are for convenience presented separately in Table 1. 

 

 

Taxon 



Comment 

Acacia acuminata 

Widespread, a local collecting gap, 

occurring as a narrow phyllode 

variant 

Acacia assimilis var. assimilis 

Widespread, local collecting gap 

Acacia aulacophylla 

Widespread, poorly collected in the 

region 


Acacia exocarpoides 

Widespread, at southwesterly edge 

of distribution 

Acacia kalgoorliensis 

Widespread but very scattered 

Acacia umbraculiformis 

Widespread, local collecting gap 

Arthropodium dyeri 

Widespread, local collecting gap 

Atriplex vesicaria  

Widespread, local collecting gap 

Baeckea sp. Bencubbin-Koorda (M.E. 

Trudgen 5421) 

A considerable northward extension 

Bossiaea walkeri 

Widespread but relatively under-

collected 

Chamaexeros fimbriata 

Widespread but regional collecting 

gap 


Chamaexeros macranthera  

Previously recorded from buffer 

area. Limited distribution in CDR 

Comesperma volubile 

Widespread but regional collecting 

gap 


Cryptandra imbricata 

Moderately widespread, poorly 

collected in the region 

Cryptandra micrantha 

Moderately widespread, 

inadequately collected 

Enekbatus sessilis ms 

Moderately widespread, an easterly 

extension 

Eremophila latrobei subsp. latrobei 

Widespread, flowering irregularly, in 

flower during survey 

Eucalyptus leptophylla 

Widespread, poorly collected in 

region 

Grevillea nematophylla 



Widespread, local collecting gap, an 

arid zone species at its western limit  

Hakea francisiana 

Widespread, local collecting gap 

Kunzea pulchella  

Widespread but specific habitat 

(granite rocks) 

Lepidosperma sp. Blue Hills (A. Markey & S. 

Recently recognised taxon, range 


 

9

Dillon 3468) 



poorly known. 

Melaleuca longistaminea subsp. longistaminea  Relatively widespread, an eastward 

extension 

Mirbelia ramulosa  

Widespread, minor local collecting 

gap 


Patersonia drummondii  

Widespread, local collecting gap, a 

significantly variable taxon 

Philotheca brucei subsp. brucei 

Widespread and common, local 

collecting gap 

Psammomoya choretroides 

Widespread, local collecting gap 

Senna artemisioides subsp. petiolaris 

Very scattered distribution, regional 

collecting gap 

Tecticornia aff. halocnemoides 

Part of a widespread species 

complex, poorly known so range 

uncertain. Identification with a 

phrase name is premature. 

Wurmbea sp. White Wells (T.D. Macfarlane 

et al. TDM 4345) 

Discovered for the first time in the 

CDR in 2008, also occurs outside the 

CDR 

Xerolirion divaricata 



Previously known from reserve but 

apparently not collected, specific to 

breakaways 

 

Table 1. Taxa newly recorded from the Charles Darwin Reserve based on the 



collections of the survey. 

 

10

A selection of species newly recorded or collected from the Reserve (photos by 



T.D. Macfarlane) 

 

 



Figure 2. Patersonia drummondii, newly 

recorded for the Charles Darwin Reserve. 

 

 

Figure 3. Chamaexeros macranthera, northern 



edge of the Charles Darwin Reserve, with old 

capsules (fruits), the plants forming large long-

lived tufts.  

 

Figure 4. Chamaexeros fimbriata, central 



Charles Darwin Reserve in woodland, flowering 

June 2008. 

 

Figure 5. Xerolirion divaricata, growing on a 



harsh breakaway site, central Charles Darwin 

Reserve. This is the only population known in 

the Reserve. 

 

 



Figure 6. Cryptandra micrantha, in post-fire 

sandplain, southern Charles Darwin Reserve. 

 

 

 



 

Figure 7. Enekbatus sessilis ms, with distinctive 

red foliage probably resulting from drought stress. 

In post-fire sandplain, southern Charles Darwin 

Reserve. 

 


 

Species excluded from the Reserve list 

 

There are a few species that have appeared in database extracts or other lists which the 



checking carried out for this project suggests do not occur in the CDR, as listed in 

Table 2. The reason for the erroneous records is probably usually incorrect 

identification of specimens or inaccurate geographic coordinates on the specimen or 

in the database (e.g. Melaleuca filifolia), and both of these types of errors are 

indicated by records that seem far out of range. Genuine outliers can occur but in 

these cases it is considered unlikely. Rulingia kempeana is not listed in the table even 

though there are no WA records from the region, because the available records of the 

species are widely scattered and it could occur there. The Jacksonia case probably 

originated by a confusion  of names between the western Australian J. rhadinoclada 

and the eastern Australian J. rhadinoclona via synonymy with J. stackhousei or 

(correctly) stackhousii.  

 

Eucalyptus 



foecunda 

Hibbertia 

recurvifolia 

Melaleuca 

adnata   

Melaleuca 

filifolia 

Rulingia 

loxophylla 

Jacksonia 

stackhousei 

 

Table 2. Species previously listed for the CDR or surrounding area which do not 



occur there. 

  

 



Un-named  taxa 

 

Taxa occurring on the Reserve or within the adjacent buffer region which are putative 



un-named taxa are listed in Table 3. In general these require research to determine 

their taxonomic status. Often such taxa are inadequately collected, in the sense of 

insufficient knowledge of their geographic range and how they approach their closest 

relatives, insufficient material to determine their variation, or the available material 

lacking relevant stages such as flowers. The prospect of the formal description and 

naming of these taxa being able to be accelerated varies. It is likely that not all of 

these putative taxa will ultimately be described as new, because they may turn out to 

have an existing name, or because they prove not to be different or different enough to 

warrant recognition and naming. 

 

There are also 20 specimens in PERTH not named to species, which may yield further 



un-named taxa when checked.  

 

None of the putatively un-named taxa are thought to be endemic to the Reserve. 



 

 

Acacia sp. Goodlands (B.R. Maslin 7761) 



Acacia sp. Kalannie (B.R. Maslin 7706) 

Acacia sp. narrow phyllode (B.R. Maslin 7831) 

Baeckea sp. Perenjori (J.W. Green 1516) 

Bossiaea sp. Jackson Range (G. Cockerton & S. McNee LCS 13614) 



 

12

Calandrinia sp. Bungalbin (G.J. Keighery & N. Gibson 1656) 



Calandrinia sp. ridged papillate (M. Hislop & E. Hudson MH161) 

Calandrinia sp. Truncate capsules (A. Markey & S. Dillon 3474) 

Calytrix sp. Paynes Find (F. & J. Hort 1188) 

Hemigenia sp. Yuna (A.C. Burns 95) 

Lepidosperma sp. Wolga Rock (S.D. Hopper 6513) 

Leucopogon sp. Clyde Hill (M.A. Burgman 1207) 

Microcorys sp. Mt Gibson (S. Patrick 2098) 

Micromyrtus sp. Warriedar (S. Patrick 1879A) 

Senna sp. Austin (A. Strid 20210) 

Sida sp. Dark green fruits (S. van Leeuwen 2260) 

Tecticornia sp. Dennys Crossing (K.A. Shepherd & J. English KS 552) 

Wurmbea sp. Paynes Find (C.J. French 1237) 

Wurmbea sp. White Wells (T.D. Macfarlane et al. TDM 4345) 

Wurmbea sp. Wanarra (T.D. Macfarlane et al. TDM 4348)

 

Baeckea benthamii Trudgen ms 



Baeckea megaflora Trudgen ms 

Chamelaucium pauciflorum subsp. thryptomenioides (D.A.Herb.) N.G.Marchant & 

Keighery ms 

 

Table 3. Putatively un-named or unformalised taxa in or adjacent to the Charles 



Darwin Reserve. 

 

 



New species to be described 

 

Three of the un-named taxa belong to one of my specialist research groups, the genus 



Wurmbea (Colchicaceae), often known by the common name Nancy. Two of these 

occur on the Reserve and the third occurs on the neighbouring pastoral property and is 

very likely to grow around granite on the Reserve as well but has not been searched 

for as yet. All of these species have been recognised as new in the past two years, and 

two of them were seen for the first time in 2008, on or adjacent to the CDR. This 

association with the Reserve makes it appropriate for me and my colleagues to 

undertake the formal description of them in association with this survey project, even 

though they were not collected during the survey itself because the survey was too 

early in the year. However an already named congener, W. densiflora, with which W

sp. Paynes Find has long been confused, was collected during the survey. At the time 

I considered it to be a new record but subsequently noted it in the ABRS list, 

apparently based on a herbarium record not seen by me. These Wurmbea species 

represent a good example of taxa which are being discovered through fieldwork 

carried out at appropriate times and in good seasons, and since many of the new 

discoveries are in pastoral areas, they will be conserved on reserves such as the CDR.  

 

These new species are currently in preparation for publication (Macfarlane, Brown & 



French, in prep.). 

 

Wurmbea sp. Paynes Find (C.J. French 1237) 



Wurmbea sp. White Wells (T.D. Macfarlane et al. TDM 4345) 

Wurmbea sp. Wanarra (T.D. Macfarlane et al. TDM 4348)

 

Table 4. New species to be described in association with the CDR survey project. 


 

13

 



Wurmbea sp. Paynes Find  

 

Formal phrase name: Wurmbea sp. Paynes Find (C.J. French 1237) 



 

This recently recognised species has been long confused with W. densiflora. It is quite 

widespread, and is known from Charles Darwin Reserve (e.g. the collection M.G. 

Corrick 11608, PERTH). It is a tall plant with 2-8 pink flowers in a relatively loose 

inflorescence, the petals spreading widely so that the flower is more or less flat, the 

nectaries are concealed, and the anthers are yellow. It flowers in Spring, August to 

September. 

 

 

 



 

 

Figure 8. Wurmbea sp. Paynes Find (C.J. French 1237), plant (photo A.P. Brown) and map. 



 

 

14

Wurmbea sp. White Wells  

 

Formal phrase name: Wurmbea sp. White Wells (T.D. Macfarlane et al. TDM 4345) 



 

This recently discovered species was first recognised as a distinct species at the 

Charles Darwin Reserve, and has subsequently been found elsewhere, and may also 

have been collected in earlier years. It is closely related to W. inframediana, which 

grows further north. It is a small plant about 10 cm tall, with 1-5 pink or almost white 

flowers in a relatively compact inflorescence, the petals bearing nectaries that are 

straight, and the anthers are dark red. It flowers in Winter, June to July. 

 

 



 

 

Figure 9. Wurmbea sp. White Wells, plant (photo T.D. Macfarlane) and map. 



 

Wurmbea sp. Wanarra  

 

Formal phrase name: Wurmbea sp. Wanarra (T.D. Macfarlane et al. TDM 4348) 



 

Discovered for the first time in 2008 and still only known from two locations close 

together just east of Charles Darwin reserve, this species is expected to also occur on 

the Reserve around granitic outcrops. The plants are small, 2-5 cm tall, with usually 

separate male and female plants. The flowers are white to pink-tinged, the petals each 

bearing two small marginal nectaries the same colour as the rest of the petal. It 

flowers in Winter, June to July. 

 

 



 

 

Figure 10. Wurmbea sp. Wanarra, female plant (photo T.D. Macfarlane) and map. 



 

 

15

 



 

Acknowledgements 

 

Department of Environment and Conservation (DEC) Science Division, and in 



particular Dr Kelly Shepherd and Dr Kevin Thiele, for arranging my participation in 

this pilot project. The following organisations and individuals provided project 

development, logistical, financial and field support and information concerning the 

Reserve: Australian Biological Resources Study, Earthwatch Australia staff, and the 

volunteers themselves for willing participation, Bush Heritage Australia staff and 

reserve managers, Chris Darwin, Dr Matt Appleby, and Dr Peter Lang of DEH South 

Australia. I thank the other scientists for an excellent cooperative field experience. 

Botanical colleagues who provided plants identifications, particularly in their 

specialist groups: Russell Barrett (Lepidosperma), Andrew Brown (Eremophila), Ray 

Cranfield (various), Mike Hislop (various), Bruce Maslin (Acacia), Barbara Rye 

(Baeckea group of Myrtaceae), Kelly Shepherd (samphires). The database and 

curation staff of the W.A. Herbarium are thanked for efficiently processing the 

collections. 

 

 



References 

 

Nicholson, C. (2007). Charles Darwin Reserve, Social History. 



http://www.bushheritage.org.au/cdr_history/social/homestead.html

 

 



Payne, A.L., Van Vreeswyk, A.M.E., Pringle, H.J.R., Leighton, K.A. and Hennig, P. 

(1998). An inventory and condition survey of the Sandstone-Yalgoo-Paynes Find 

area, Western Australia. Agriculture Western Australia, Technical Bulletin No. 90. 

 

 



 

16

Appendix 1. List of vascular plants known to occur on the Charles Darwin 



Reserve (as at August 2009).  

 

Number of taxa: 372 (including subspecies and varieties but without double counting 



at species and infraspecific levels). Listed alphabetically by genus. 

 

 



Sources:

 

 



1. WAHERB, specimen database of the Western Australian Herbarium, within the 

boundaries of the Reserve. 

2. + indicates additions from the survey collections (31 taxa): 

Macfarlane collection, May 2009 (plus a July 2008 visit) 

Symonds collection, May 2009 

Lang collection, May 2009 

3. (+) indicates additions sourced from an ABRS list within the boundaries of the 

Reserve (10 taxa). Some of these records may be vouchered at Herbaria other than 

PERTH. These additions are consistent with the range of the species. A few other 

records were not accepted as being probably erroneous. 

4. * indicates a naturalised non-native taxon. 

 

 



 

Acacia acanthoclada subsp. glaucescens 

Acacia acuaria   

Acacia acuminata 

Acacia andrewsii   



Acacia aneura   

Acacia anthochaera   

Acacia assimilis subsp. assimilis 

Acacia aulacophylla  + 



Acacia burkittii   

Acacia cerastes   

Acacia colletioides   

Acacia coolgardiensis   

Acacia duriuscula   

Acacia effusifolia   

Acacia erinacea   

Acacia exocarpoides   + 

Acacia formidabilis   

Acacia inceana subsp. conformis 

Acacia jennerae   

Acacia jibberdingensis   

Acacia kalgoorliensis   

Acacia kochii   



Acacia latior   

Acacia lineolata subsp. lineolata 

Acacia longiphyllodinea   

Acacia longispinea   

Acacia murrayana   

Acacia obtecta   



 

17

Acacia prainii   



Acacia ramulosa var. ramulosa 

Acacia resinimarginea   

Acacia restiacea   

Acacia sericocarpa   

Acacia sibina   

Acacia sp. Goodlands (B.R. Maslin 7761)   

Acacia sp. Kalannie (B.R. Maslin 7519)   

Acacia sp. narrow phyllode (B.R. Maslin 7831)   

Acacia steedmanii subsp. steedmanii 

Acacia stereophylla var. stereophylla 

Acacia tetragonophylla   

Acacia tysonii   

Acacia umbraculiformis   

Acacia yorkrakinensis subsp. acrita 



Actinobole uliginosum   

Actinotus humilis   

Allocasuarina acutivalvis subsp. prinsepiana 

Allocasuarina campestris   

Allocasuarina dielsiana   

Allocasuarina tessellata   

Aluta aspera subsp. hesperia (Thryptomene aspera subsp. Paynes Find (C.A. Gardner 

11996)) 


Alyogyne hakeifolia   

Alyogyne pinoniana   

Alyxia buxifolia   

Amphipogon caricinus var. caricinus 

Amyema nestor   

Amyema preissii   

Angianthus tomentosus   

Anthotroche pannosa   

Aristida contorta   

Arthropodium dyeri    + 

Astroloma serratifolium   

Atriplex bunburyana   

Atriplex stipitata   

Atriplex vesicaria   

Austrostipa elegantissima   



Austrostipa trichophylla   

Baeckea benthamii   

Baeckea elderiana   

Baeckea sp. Bencubbin-Koorda (M.E. Trudgen 5421)   

Bellida graminea   



Blennospora drummondii   

Borya constricta   

Bossiaea sp. Jackson Range (G. Cockerton & S. McNee LCS 13614)   

Bossiaea walkeri   

Brachyscome pusilla   



* Bromus rubens   

Brunonia australis   

Bursaria occidentalis   


 

18

Caladenia roei   



Calandrinia eremaea   

Calandrinia translucens   

Callitris columellaris   

Calothamnus aridus   

Calothamnus gilesii   

Calycopeplus paucifolius   

Calytrix glutinosa   

Calytrix leschenaultii   

Calytrix sp. Paynes Find (F. & J. Hort 1188)   

Cephalipterum drummondii   

Chamaexeros fimbriata   

Chamaexeros macranthera    + 



Cheilanthes adiantoides   

Cheiranthera simplicifolia   

Chthonocephalus pseudevax   (+) 

Codonocarpus cotinifolius   

Comesperma griffinii   

Comesperma integerrimum   

Comesperma volubile   

Commersonia stowardii   



Cryptandra apetala   

Cryptandra imbricata   

Cryptandra micrantha   



Cyanicula amplexans   

(+) 

Cyanostegia angustifolia   



Cyanostegia microphylla   

Dampiera eriocephala   

Dampiera incana var. fuscescens 

Dampiera luteiflora   

Dampiera wellsiana   

Daucus glochidiatus   

Dianella revoluta   

Dicrastylis parvifolia   

Dicrastylis soliparma   

Dodonaea adenophora   

Dodonaea inaequifolia   

Dodonaea viscosa subsp. angustissima 

Drosera macrantha subsp. macrantha 

Duboisia hopwoodii   

Ecdeiocolea monostachya   

Enchylaena lanata   

Enekbatus sessilis ms  + 

Enekbatus stowardii ms (Baeckea stowardii) 

Eremophila clarkei   

Eremophila decipiens subsp. decipiens 

Eremophila eriocalyx   

Eremophila forrestii subsp. forrestii 

Eremophila glabra subsp. elegans 

Eremophila glutinosa   

Eremophila latrobei subsp. latrobei  + 


 

19

Eremophila miniata   



Eremophila oldfieldii subsp. angustifolia 

Eremophila oldfieldii subsp. oldfieldii 

Eremophila oppositifolia subsp. angustifolia 

Eremophila serrulata   

Eremophila shonae subsp. shonae 

Eriachne ovata   

Eriachne pulchella   

Erodium cygnorum   

Erymophyllum glossanthus   

Erymophyllum ramosum subsp. involucratum 

Erymophyllum tenellum   

Eucalyptus brachycorys   

Eucalyptus celastroides subsp. virella 

Eucalyptus clelandii   

Eucalyptus erythronema var. marginata 

Eucalyptus ewartiana   

Eucalyptus horistes   

Eucalyptus kochii subsp. amaryssia 

Eucalyptus kochii subsp. plenissima 

Eucalyptus leptophylla   

Eucalyptus leptopoda subsp. arctata 



Eucalyptus loxophleba subsp. supralaevis 

Eucalyptus moderata   

Eucalyptus petraea   

Eucalyptus salmonophloia   

Eucalyptus salubris   

Eucalyptus stowardii   

Eucalyptus subangusta subsp. pusilla 

Eucalyptus subangusta subsp. subangusta 

Euryomyrtus recurva   

Exocarpos aphyllus   

Frankenia laxiflora   

Gahnia drummondii   

Gastrolobium laytonii   

Gilberta tenuifolia   

Gilruthia osbornei   

Glischrocaryon angustifolium   

Glischrocaryon flavescens   

Gnephosis tenuissima   

Gonocarpus confertifolius var. confertifolius 

Gonocarpus confertifolius var. helmsii 

Goodenia berardiana   

Goodenia perryi   

Goodenia pinifolia   

Grevillea biformis subsp. biformis 

Grevillea extorris   

Grevillea hakeoides subsp. stenophylla 

Grevillea juncifolia subsp. temulenta 

Grevillea levis   

Grevillea nematophylla   



 

20

Grevillea obliquistigma subsp. cullenii 



Grevillea obliquistigma subsp. obliquistigma 

Grevillea paradoxa   

Grevillea pityophylla   

Grevillea pterosperma   

Grevillea subtiliflora   

Grevillea teretifolia   (+) 

Grevillea yorkrakinensis   

Gypsophila tubulosa   

Gyrostemon racemiger   

Hakea francisiana   

Hakea invaginata   



Hakea minyma   

Hakea recurva subsp. arida   (+) 

Hakea recurva subsp. recurva  

Halgania cyanea var. Allambi Stn (B.W. Strong 676) 

Halgania gustafsenii var. Mid West (G. Perry 370) 

Halgania integerrima   

Hannafordia bissillii subsp. latifolia 

Hemigenia botryphylla   

Hemigenia ciliata   

Hemigenia sp. Yuna (A.C. Burns 95)   

Hemigenia tomentosa   

Hibbertia arcuata   

Hibbertia glomerosa var. glomerosa 

Hibbertia stenophylla   

Homalocalyx aureus   

Homalocalyx thryptomenoides   

Hyalosperma glutinosum subsp. glutinosum 

Hyalosperma glutinosum subsp. venustum 

Hyalosperma zacchaeus   

Hybanthus floribundus subsp. floribundus 

Indigofera occidentalis   

Isotoma hypocrateriformis   

Jacksonia rhadinoclada   

Keraudrenia integrifolia   

Keraudrenia velutina subsp. velutina 

Kunzea pulchella   

Lachnostachys verbascifolia var. verbascifolia 



Lechenaultia macrantha   

Lepidosperma costale   

Lepidosperma sp. Blue Hills (A. Markey & S. Dillon 3468)   

Lepidosperma sp. Wolga Rock (S.D. Hopper 6513)   



Leptosema aphyllum   

Leptosema daviesioides   

Leucopogon sp. Clyde Hill (M.A. Burgman 1207)   

Levenhookia leptantha   

Levenhookia stipitata   

Lobelia rarifolia   

Lobelia winfridae   

Lomandra effusa   



 

21

Lysiana murrayi   



Maireana brevifolia   

Maireana diffusa   

Maireana georgei   

Maireana planifolia   

Maireana thesioides   

Maireana trichoptera   

Malleostemon roseus   

Malleostemon tuberculatus   

Marsilea drummondii   

Melaleuca atroviridis   

Melaleuca calyptroides   

Melaleuca conothamnoides   

Melaleuca cordata   

Melaleuca eleuterostachya   

Melaleuca fabri   

Melaleuca fulgens   

Melaleuca hamata   

Melaleuca hamulosa   

Melaleuca lateriflora subsp. acutifolia 

Melaleuca leiocarpa   

Melaleuca longistaminea subsp. longistaminea 

Melaleuca nematophylla   



Melaleuca radula   

Melaleuca stereophloia   

Melaleuca vinnula   

Microcorys sp. Mt Gibson (S. Patrick 2098)   

Micromyrtus acuta   

Micromyrtus clavata   

Micromyrtus racemosa var. racemosa 

Mirbelia bursarioides   

Mirbelia longifolia    (+) 

Mirbelia microphylla   

Mirbelia ramulosa    + 

Mirbelia rhagodioides   

Monachather paradoxus   

Monotaxis bracteata   

Muehlenbeckia adpressa   

Myriocephalus pygmaeus   

Nicotiana rotundifolia   

Olearia dampieri   

Olearia humilis   

Olearia muelleri   

Olearia pimeleoides   

Opercularia vaginata   

Patersonia drummondii   

Persoonia manotricha   



Persoonia pentasticha   

Petalostylis cassioides   

Phebalium canaliculatum   

Phebalium megaphyllum   



 

22

Phebalium tuberculosum   



Philotheca brucei subsp. brucei 

Philotheca deserti subsp. deserti 



Philotheca glabra   

Philotheca nutans   

Philotheca sericea   

Philotheca thryptomenoides   

Philotheca tomentella   

Phlegmatospermum drummondii   

Pimelea aeruginosa   

Pimelea angustifolia   

Pimelea forrestiana   

Pityrodia terminalis   

Podolepis capillaris   

Podolepis lessonii   

Pogonolepis stricta    (+) 

Prasophyllum gracile   

Prostanthera eckersleyana   

Prostanthera patens   

Psammomoya choretroides    + 

Ptilotus drummondii   

Ptilotus eriotrichus   

Ptilotus exaltatus   

Ptilotus gaudichaudii var. gaudichaudii 

Ptilotus gaudichaudii var. parviflorus 

Ptilotus holosericeus   

Ptilotus obovatus   

Ptilotus polystachyus var. polystachyus 

Rhagodia drummondii   

Rhagodia eremaea   

Rhodanthe chlorocephala subsp. rosea 

Rhodanthe chlorocephala subsp. splendida 

Rhodanthe pygmaea   

Rhodanthe spicata   

Ricinocarpos velutinus   

Rulingia kempeana    (+) 

Rulingia luteiflora   

Santalum acuminatum   

Santalum spicatum   

Scaevola hamiltonii   

Scaevola restiacea subsp. restiacea 

Scaevola spinescens   

Schoenia cassiniana   

Schoenus subaphyllus   

Sclerolaena drummondii   

Sclerolaena gardneri   

Senna artemisioides subsp. filifolia 

Senna artemisioides subsp. petiolaris + 

Senna flexuosa   

Senna glutinosa subsp. chatelainiana 

Senna pleurocarpa   



 

23

Senna sp. Austin (A. Strid 20210)   



Senna stowardii   

Sida sp. dark green fruits (S. van Leeuwen 2260)   

Solanum coactiliferum   

Solanum lasiophyllum   

Solanum nummularium   

Solanum oldfieldii   

Stackhousia monogyna   

Stenanthemum poicilum   

Stenopetalum filifolium   

Stylidium limbatum   

Stylidium yilgarnense   

Tecticornia disarticulata   

Tecticornia aff. halocnemoides   

Tetragonia moorei    (+) 



Thelymitra petrophila   

(+) 


Thomasia tremandroides   

Thryptomene costata   

Thryptomene cuspidata   

Thysanotus patersonii   

Thysanotus rectantherus   

Trachymene cyanopetala   

Tricoryne elatior   

Tripogon loliiformis   

Velleia discophora   

Velleia rosea   

Verticordia eriocephala   

Verticordia interioris   

Verticordia rennieana   

Waitzia acuminata var. acuminata 

Westringia cephalantha   

Wrixonia prostantheroides   

Wurmbea densiflora   (+) 

Wurmbea sp. Paynes Find (C.J. French 1237)   

Wurmbea sp. White Wells (T.D. Macfarlane et al. TDM 4345)   

Xerolirion divaricata   + 



Zygophyllum angustifolium   

Zygophyllum eremaeum   

Zygophyllum fruticulosum   

 

 




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə