Biological control of Melaleuca quinquenervia: goal-based assessment of success



Yüklə 0.85 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
tarix03.09.2017
ölçüsü0.85 Mb.

655

Biological control of Melaleuca  

quinquenervia: goal-based assessment  

of success

T.D. Center,

1

 P.D. Pratt,

1

 P.W. Tipping,

1

 M.B. Rayamajhi,

1

 

S.A. Wineriter

2

 and M.F. Purcell

3

Summary

Success means different things to different people. Unfortunately, the success or failure of weed bio-

logical control projects is often evaluated by nonparticipants lacking knowledge of the original goals 

set by project architects. Criteria for success should match objectives and goals clearly articulated so 

that success can be properly archived for future synthesis. The Australian tree Melaleuca quinque-

nervia (Cav.) S.T. Blake, an aggressive invader of the Florida Everglades, may be the largest plant 

ever targeted for biological control. We realized early on that biological control agents would not 

remove the many tons of woody biomass that comprised these infestations and so would be unlikely 

to reduce the infested acreage. Control of this plant by other means, however, was complicated by the 

billions of canopy-held seeds that are released following injury to the tree. A plan was developed in 

coordination with land management agencies wherein the goal of biological control was to curtail me-

laleuca expansion and suppress regeneration while using other means to remove mature trees. Three 

insect species have been released and others are under consideration. These agents, supplemented by 

the impacts of an adventive rust fungus and a scale insect, have met established goals and this project 

shows signs of an emerging success based on the established goals.



Keywords:  Everglades, invasive plants, habitat restoration.

Introduction

‘Success  has  many  fathers  while  failure  dies  an  or-

phan’. This oft-quoted aphorism illustrates the political 

necessity of highlighting successes when they occur so 

that  one’s  endeavors  continue  to  be  supported  in  the 

future.  Unfortunately,  weed  biological  control  proj-

ects are rarely undertaken based on the likelihood of a 

successful outcome (Peschken and McClay, 1995). In-

stead, biological control is often the method of last re-

sort after other methods against recalcitrant weeds have 

failed. This is not conducive to improving the overall 

statistical success rate but is often the most responsible 

or economic option. Biological control of many seri-

ous weed problems would likely never be attempted if 

target choice was based primarily on maximizing the 

probability of success as advocated by Peschken and 

McClay (1995).

Many  investigators  have  focused  on  the  perfor-

mance of individual agents to gauge success, primarily 

with an aim toward predicting which taxonomic groups 

make the best biological control agents. Such post-hoc 

analyses suggest a low success rate for weed biologi-

cal  control,  with  only  a  small  proportion  of  success-

fully  established  agents  producing  effective  control 

(Crawley, 1989a,b). Critics have used these statistics to 

advise against the use of biological control as a weed 

management  tool  (Louda  and  Stiling,  2004).  McFa-

dyen (1998, 2000), however, strongly disagreed with 

this advice and emphasized the need for project-based 

assessments.

US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Invasive 



Plant  Research  Laboratory,  3225  College  Avenue,  Fort  Lauderdale,  

FL 33312, USA.

US  Department  of Agriculture, Agricultural  Research  Service,  Inva-



sive  Plant  Research  Laboratory,  1911  SW  34th  Street,  Gainesville,  

FL 32608, USA.

US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Austral-



ian Biological Control Laboratory, and Commonwealth Scientific and 

Industrial Research Organization, Entomology, Long Pocket Labora-

tories, 120 Meiers Road, Indooroopilly, QLD 4068, Australia.

  Corresponding author: T.D. Center 

pratt@ars.usda.gov, philip.tipping@ars.usda.gov, min.rayamajhi@ars.

usda.gov, tmozart@nersp.nerdc.ufl.edu, matthew.purcell@csiro.au>.

© CAB International 2008


656

XII International Symposium on Biological Control of Weeds

Most  authors  use  the  term  ‘success’  to  refer  only 

to ‘complete success’, wherein no other measures are 

needed to reduce the weed populations to acceptable lev-

els. However, this neglects the importance of partially  

successful  projects  that  have  value  when  less  effort 

is subsequently required to control the weed, because 

the density or extent of weed populations is reduced, 

or the weed is less able to reinvade cleared areas or 

is slower to disperse (Hoffmann, 1995). Success and 

failure are at the extreme ends of a continuum of many 

possible  outcomes  and  even  moderate  amounts  of 

stress can reduce the competitive ability of a weed and 

render it less invasive (Center et al., 2005; Coetzee et 

al., 2005).

Successful  biological  control  agents  often  act  by 

preventing continued expansion of a weed population, 

rather than by reducing population densities (Hoffmann, 

these proceedings). Hoffmann also noted that it may be 

necessary to model weed outbreaks that never happen 

to perceive biological control effects. Documentation 

of such effects is difficult, at best, which explains why 

so many projects are incompletely evaluated and even 

successful projects may be undervalued or forgotten. 

Thus,  statistical  success  rates  should  be  viewed  with 

circumspection,  inasmuch  as  only  obvious  successes 

are reported. Furthermore, weed declines may occur in-

crementally over many years or even decades and may 

not be easily observed, especially when observational 

baselines shift over time, project funding terminates, or 

personnel changes interrupt collection of critical data.

Success of projects should be assessed in terms of 

the  project’s  original  goals  and  objectives.  Hence,  a 

project can and should be deemed successful whether 

or not the density of the weed is reduced so long as the 

goals set out by the project architects are met. In this 

sense, it is possible to have complete success without 

complete control so long as the project goals are clearly  

stated,  understood  and  documented.  A  recent  proj-

ect  aimed  at  the  control  of  Melaleuca  quinquenervia 

(Cav.) S.T. Blake (melaleuca) in South Florida as part 

of a broader Everglades restoration effort is used herein 

to illustrate this concept.

The target

Melaleuca is a large tree (up to 30 m tall) of Australian 

origin that was introduced into southern Florida during 

the latter part of the 19th century (Dray et al., 2006). It 

has invaded wetland habitats, especially fire-maintained 

Everglades ecosystems, where the burning regime now 

favours melaleuca over less fire-tolerant native species. 

As a result, vast areas of these heterogeneous marshes 

have been transformed into swamp forests consisting of 

melaleuca monocultures. Melaleuca rapidly dominates 

infested areas after its initial colonization (Laroche and 

Ferriter, 1992) and at its peak was estimated to occupy 

at least 607,000 ha of conservation lands in the south-

ern part of Florida (Bodle et al., 1994).

Control of melaleuca is complicated by the fact that 

it grows in areas that are hazardous and strenuous to 

work in and where access is difficult. These difficul-

ties are exacerbated by the tree’s reproductive biology. 

Melaleuca  flowers  numerous  times  each  year,  often 

several times on the same stem axis due to indetermi-

nant growth, forming spike-like clusters composed of 

multiple, dichasial groups of three flowers each (Tom-

linson, 1980). Each cluster contains up to 75 individual 

flowers. Fruits arising from these flowers are persistent 

serotinous capsules that each contains 200–350 minute 

seeds (Meskimen, 1962). These generally remain in the 

fruits until disruption of the vascular connection causes 

the  capsules  to  desiccate  and  open,  often  en  masse

after  a  fire,  freeze,  drought,  or  herbicide  treatment 

(Meskimen, 1962). A few (about 12% per year) open 

continuously, as radial growth of the stem separates the 

vascular connection, producing a light, perpetual seed 

rain  of  about  3  billion  seeds/ha/year

 

(M.  Rayamajhi 



et al., unpublished data). Seeds that fall to the ground 

form a rather short-lived soil seed bank with a half-life 

of less than 1 year (Van et al., 2005). A single large 

tree located within a dense stand retains about 50 mil-

lion seeds in its canopy with stands holding as many 

as  25  billion  seeds/ha  (M.  Rayamajhi,  unpublished 

data). An isolated tree may hold twice as many seeds 

as one of similar size in a dense stand. Surprisingly, a 

large proportion (85–90%) of these are actually hollow 

seed coats (Rayachhetry et al., 1998; Rayamajhi et al.

2002). Nonetheless, the remaining 10–15% of embry-

onic  seeds  create  an  enormous  regenerative  capacity 

capable of producing seedling densities of up to 2256 

seedlings/m

2

 (Franks et al., 2006) following a massive 



simultaneous  seed  shed  induced  by  fire,  drought,  or 

herbicide application. These may grow into thickets of 

up to 130,000 small trees/ha (Van et al., 2000). As the 

stand matures, it thins to about 8000–15,000 trees/ha 

comprised mostly of mature trees with an understory 

of suppressed saplings (Rayachhetry et al., 2001). The 

standing biomass in these forests has been estimated at 

129–263 metric tonnes (t)/ha (Van et al., 2000).

Isolated individual trees constitute a seed source for 

further encroachment. The seeds, when released, gener-

ally fall within 15 m of the parent tree (Meskimen, 1962). 

They often grow into dome-shaped clumps or ‘heads’ 

with  the  parent  trees  in  the  centre  and  progressively  

younger trees toward the periphery. These eventually 

coalesce with others blanketing vast acreages of wet-

lands with dense swamp forests. The isolated ‘outliers’  

therefore  are  regarded  as  potential  new  infesta-

tions  and,  as  part  of  a  quarantine  strategy,  are  first  

priority for control operations (Woodall, 1981).

The trees within these stands produce multiple ad-

ventitious  roots  that  form  an  intertwined  skirt  at  the 

waterline or on saturated soil (Meskimen, 1962). These 

contribute  biomass  to  the  forest  floor  and  trap  large 

amounts of litterfall as well as organic debris causing 

soil accretion (White, 1994), thus increasing the local 


657

Biological control of Melaleuca quinquenervia: goal-based assessment of success

elevation  (T.  Center,  personal  observation).  Altering 

the elevation of the Everglades even by a few centime-

ters dramatically shifts plant community composition 

(Ogden, 2005), thus these newly created melaleuca is-

lands forever change the physiography and ecology of 

the  area. There  is  also  evidence  that  essential  oils  in 

melaleuca  litter  may  be  allelopathic  (Di  Stefano  and 

Fisher, 1983). These changes render infested habitats 

unsuitable for many native species making restoration 

difficult if not impossible.



The melaleuca management plan

The South Florida Water Management District in con-

junction with the Exotic Pest Plant Council convened 

a meeting of the major agencies that were managing 

the melaleuca problem. They developed a ‘Melaleuca 

Management Plan for Florida’, published during 1990 

and revised in 1994 and 1999.

Two points were evident during the development of 

this plan. First, biological control could not eliminate 

the huge amounts of woody biomass present; herbicidal  

and mechanical control would therefore be needed to 

reduce the infestations to a maintenance level. Second, 

public agencies could not expend public funds to con-

trol melaleuca infestations on private lands that often 

abutted cleared tracts of public lands. These unassail-

able stands provided an invasion front and a potential 

seed reservoir to support reinvasion of cleared sites. The 

role of biological control in this plan was to neutralize 

the reproductive potential of these remaining stands by 

reducing seed production, seedling recruitment and re-

generation; thereby inhibiting spread, reducing reinva-

sion of cleared areas and facilitating traditional control 

measures. However, implementation of biological con-

trol would take time, whereas chemical and mechanical 

control could be employed rapidly. So the plan relied 

on an early deployment of traditional control measures 

that would gradually be supplanted by biological con-

trol as agents became available (Figure 1).



The biological control agents

Insects associated with melaleuca were enumerated in 

Australia during the late 1980s and early 1990s (Bal-

ciunas, 1990). These inventories revealed an entomo-

fauna of over 400 species (Balciunas, 1990; Balciunas 

et al., 1993a,b, 1994, 1995a,b,c; Burrows et al., 1994, 

1996). The most promising species were studied fur-

ther and three have now been released.

The first insect evaluated was the weevil Oxyops vi-



tiosa Pascoe (Purcell and Balciunas, 1994). This insect, 

being a flush feeder on growing stem tips, was desir-

able because of its ability to disrupt flower production, 

which depends on continual growth of the stem axis. 

It  proved  to  be  host-specific  (Balciunas  et  al.,  1994; 

G. Buckingham, unpublished report) and was released 

during 1997 (Center et al., 2000). Its need to pupate 

in dry soil (Purcell and Balciunas, 1994; Center et al.

2000), however, limited it to habitats that were not per-

manently under water. Field and laboratory assessments 

of a mirid, Eucerocoris suspectus Distant, in Austra-

lia  (Burrows  and  Balciunas,  1999)  suggested  that  its 

host range was limited to melaleuca and a few close 

relatives. Follow-up studies in US quarantine facilities 

failed to confirm this so it was dropped from consider-

ation. The host range of the pergid sawfly Lophyrotoma 



zonalis (Rohwer) proved sufficiently narrow (Burrows 

and  Balciunas,  1997;  Buckingham,  2001),  but  after 

discovering  that  larvae  synthesize  toxic  octapeptides 

Figure 1. 

The strategy employed to control melaleuca in south Florida 

involved early use of traditional control methods to reduce 

biomass while biological controls were being developed and 

implemented.


658

XII International Symposium on Biological Control of Weeds

(Oelrichs et al., 1999), we elected not to release it out 

of concern over potential negative effects to insectivo-

rous wildlife.

The  melaleuca  psyllid  Boreioglycaspis  melaleucae 

Moore  was  found  to  be  host-specific  (Purcell  et  al.

1997; Wineriter et al., 2003), and was released during 

2002 (Center et al., 2006, 2007). It feeds mainly on the 

new  growth  but  will  also  utilize  older  leaves  and  the 

green stems. Furthermore, it completes its life cycle en-

tirely on the plant so it is less restricted by habitat. The 

tube-dwelling pyralid Poliopaschia lithochlora (Lower) 

was highly rated because of its ability to damage mela-

leuca and its preference for low-lying, humid habitats 

(Galway and Purcell, 2005), but its use of an ornamental 

species, Melaleuca viminalis (Sol. ex Gaertner) Byrnes, 

during testing diminished its prospects (M. Purcell, un-

published  data).  A  fergusoninid  gall  fly,  Fergusonina 

turneri Taylor, and its mutualistic nematode Fergusobia 

melaleucae Davies and Giblin-Davis, also proved to be 

highly specific (Giblin-Davis et al., 2001) and were first 

released during 2005 (Blackwood et al., 2006). It has 

proven difficult to establish but efforts are continuing. 

Most recently a stem-galling cecidomyiid, Lophodiplo-

sis trifida Gagné, has proven to be host-specific (S. Win-

eriter et al., unpublished data) and should gain approval 

for release. A bud-feeding weevil Haplonyx multicolor 

Lea  and  a  leaf-galling  cecidomyiid  Lophodiplosis  in-



dentata Gagné are currently under consideration.

Two adventive organisms have also recently infested 

melaleuca trees in Florida. A pestiferous, undescribed 

scale insect (Pemberton, personal communication) was 

detected in Florida during 1999. It attacks melaleuca 

trees  as  well  as  some  300  other  plant  species  (Pem-

berton,  2003;  R.  Pemberton,  unpublished  data).  The 

guava rust Puccinia psidii G. Winter (Basidiomycetes: 

Uredinales),  which  infects  mainly  young  foliage,  ap-

peared during 1997 (Rayachhetry et al., 1997) and is 

now widespread.

The effects of the biological  

control agents

Numerous studies aimed at determining the impacts 

of O. vitiosa and B. melaleucae have been conducted or 

are ongoing. However, determinations of the individual 

effects of one have been confounded by the presence of 

the other, as well as by the presence of the adventive rust 

fungus  and  scale  insect. These  studies  have  included 

comparisons of melaleuca stands with and without the 

agents, caging studies, defoliation experiments, insec-

ticide and fungicide exclusion experiments, and before 

and after comparisons of stand dynamics.

Flower and seed production

The effects of herbivory by O. vitiosa on melaleuca 

performance  were  possible  early  during  the  release 

program when none of the other organisms were pres-

ent. Pratt et al. (2005) compared flowering frequency in 

melaleuca stands where the weevil had been released to 

stands without them. They found that the likelihood of 

flowering increased with tree size but that undamaged 

trees were 36 times more likely to reproduce than dam-

aged trees in similar habitats (Figure 2). Overall, about 

45% of the weevil-free trees were flowering compared 

to about 2% of infested trees.***

In  another  study,  Pratt  et  al.  (2005)  enclosed  the 

canopies of small (2.9 cm diameter at breast height or 

Diameter at Breast Height (cm)

0

1



2

3

4



5

6

P



ro

po

rti



on

 o

f T



re

es

 F



lo

w

er



in

g

0.0



0.2

0.4


0.6

0.8


1.0

Damaged trees 

Undamaged trees 

Figure 2. 

Release of the weevil Oxyops vitiosa profoundly affected flowering of mela-

leuca trees. The proportion of the trees that produced flowers was much lower 

after being damaged by the weevils regardless of size.



659

Biological control of Melaleuca quinquenervia: goal-based assessment of success

dbh) trees with sleeve cages and introduced weevil lar-

vae into the enclosures, either once or twice, to produce 

one or two defoliations of the young foliage. The sec-

ond defoliation was done about 10 weeks after the first. 

These  treatments  were  compared  to  controls  with  no 

defoliation or to trees artificially defoliated by manually  

removing  all  foliage.  Flower  production  on  all  trees 

was  monitored  monthly  for  1  year. The  control  trees 

flowered normally during this period, whereas trees ar-

tificially defoliated failed to produce any flowers. Trees 

defoliated once or twice by the weevil larvae produced 

a  few  flowers  but  numbers  were  not  statistically  dif-

ferent from each other or from the artificial defoliation 

treatment (Figure 3).

Interestingly,  in  a  comparison  of  ten  herbivore-

impacted  trees  with  ten  non-impacted  trees  at  simi-

lar,  nearby  sites  at  Estero,  Florida,  Rayamajhi  et  al.  

(unpublished data) found that herbivory by O. vitiosa 

resulted in higher rates of capsule abortion when com-

pared to sites without natural enemies. Mean number of 

capsules in herbivore-impacted infructescences was re-

duced by nearly 50% compared to the herbivore-absent 

site. This decreased density of capsules was apparent as 

gaps in the capsule clusters caused by abortion of the 

undeveloped fruits. The herbivore-impacted trees were 

very similar to those near Brisbane, Australia where the 

average infructescence was 5.7 cm long but contained 

only 18 capsules (Rayamajhi et al., 2002). The average 

numbers of seeds per capsule were similar in both the 

Florida and Australian sites.

Rayamajhi et al. (unpublished data) have also found 

that when the trees were subjected to attack by O. vi-



tiosa, the percentage of embryonic seeds decreased, as 

did seed viability and germination ability. Seed viabili-

ty and germination tests (Van et al., 2005) also revealed 

reductions in both measures of seeds from herbivore-

attacked trees compared to controls.

Seedling survival

Franks et al. (2006) described the effects of the wee-

vil larvae and the psyllids, alone and in combination, 

on growth and survival of melaleuca seedlings by cag-

ing the insects on 26 cm-tall seedlings in field plots. 

They compared these results to a natural infestation of 

the insects on nearby seedlings. O. vitiosa larvae had 

no effect on seedling height, leaf number, or survival, 

whereas  psyllids  caused  all  of  these  measures  to  de-

crease by about 55–60% over the 5-month term of the 

study. About 95% of seedlings survived when protected 

from psyllids as compared to only 40% when exposed 

to herbivory (Center et al., 2007).

In another study, Tipping et al. (unpublished data) 

found that after becoming infested by both the psyllid 

and the weevil, melaleuca trees recruited a much lower 

density  of  seedlings  than  trees  without  either  herbi-

vore. They also compared densities of saplings in plots 

9 m

2

 that were periodically treated with insecticide to 



exclude herbivory to saplings in untreated plots. The 

plots were located in an area that had burned during 

June 1998, resulting in a massive seed rain and thick-

ets of about 1000 seedlings/m

2

. By the time the study 



was initiated during 2002, these had become saplings 

and had grown to about 70 cm in height. Densities in 

Damage Treatment

In

flo



re

sc

enc



es

 p

er



 T

re



(n

o.

)



0

2

4



6

8

10



12

14

Control



Herbivory 1 Herbivory 2

Mechanical

A

B

B



B

Figure 3. 

Small trees were caged then subjected to herbivory by Oxyops vitiosa either 

once (Herbivory 1) or twice (Herbivory 2) or to mechanical defoliation and 

compared to undefoliated controls. Defoliated trees, regardless of the manner 

of defoliation, produced very few flowers relative to the controls.


660

XII International Symposium on Biological Control of Weeds

the protected plots were virtually unchanged during the 

5-year period of the study as compared to those in the 

unprotected plots which declined by almost half.

Sapling growth

Tipping et al. (unpublished data) conducted two in-

secticide exclusion studies on the growth of melaleuca 

saplings  in  common  garden  experiments  over  about 

a 3-year period. The first experiment investigated the  

effect of the melaleuca weevil, O. vitiosa, and supple-

mental irrigation on the growth of small trees. The second  

examined  the  effects  of  herbivorous  insects  (both 

the  psyllids  and  the  weevils)  and  plant  chemotype 

(nerolidol or viridifloral). In both cases, plants treated 

with insecticide more than doubled in stature, where-

as those not treated grew very little. In the first study, 

plants  attacked  by  O.  vitiosa  grew  at  a  much  slower 

rate compared to the protected plants (Figure 4). The 

unprotected plants produced more stem tips per unit of 

height, creating a shorter, bushier habit, which provided 

more resource for the tip-feeding insects. Supplemental 

irrigation  improved  the  growth  of  insecticide-treated 

trees but had no effect on trees that were not treated 

with insecticide. Chemotype had no apparent effect on 

the impact of the insects. Seed capsule production was 

much lower among unprotected plants in both studies.



Stand dynamics

Rayamajhi et al. (2007) studied the dynamics of me-

laleuca stands before and after the widespread impacts 

of  the  biological  control  agents. They  found  that  the 

average density of the trees in mature stands declined 

by  72%  overall  from  15,800  trees/ha  during  1996  to 

4400 trees/ha during 2003. Interestingly, the standing 

biomass based on harvesting studies increased some-

what  from  an  initial  average  of  263  t/ha  to  274  t/ha 

during the latter harvest. This was because most of the 

mortality  was  among  the  smaller  suppressed  trees  in 

the understory that represented a small proportion of 

the biomass. The density of small trees, those with a 

dbh of less than 10 cm, decreased 83% from 12,600 to 

2200 trees/ha; density of intermediate-sized trees with 

a dbh of 10–20 cm decreased 46% from 2600 to 1400 

trees/ha; density of large trees >20 cm increased from 

600 to 800 trees/ha.

Another study (Rayamajhi et al., 2007) showed that 

densities decreased between 1997 and 2006, in part due 

to  self-thinning. The  decline  accelerated after  the  ef-

fects of biological control became apparent and the rate 

of decline was inversely related to the position of the 

trees within the stands. Densities of trees at the periph-

ery, which consisted mostly of small individuals, de-

creased by about 6076 individuals/ha/year before 2001 

Sample Date

29

-N



ov

-01


18

-D

ec



-01

15

-Ja



n-0

2

19



-Fe

b-0


2

13

-M



ar-

02

17



-Ap

r-0


2

21

-May



-02

25

-Ju



n-0

2

30



-Ju

l-0


2

27

-Au



g-0

2

1-O



ct-02

15

-N



ov

-02


17-D

ec

-02



15

-Ja


n-0

3

26



-Fe

b-0


3

25

-M



ar-

03

30



-Ap

r-0


3

19

-Ju



n-0

3

31



-Ju

l-0


3

4-S


ep

-03


10

-O

ct-



03

C

ha



ng

in



 H

ei

gh



t (

%

)



20

40

60



80

100


120

140


Insecticide, Rainfall Only

Insecticide, Rainfall + Irrigation

No insecticide, Rainfall Only

No insecticide, Rainfall + Irrigation



Figure 4. 

Small trees grown in a common garden plot were treated with insecticide to exclude herbiv-

orous insects and given supplemental irrigation and compared to unprotected and unwatered 

trees. Protected trees grew vigorously and those receiving supplemental irrigation grew the 

most. Unprotected trees grew very little and the supplemental irrigation seemed to have lit-

tle effect.



661

Biological control of Melaleuca quinquenervia: goal-based assessment of success

as compared to 16,725 individuals/ha/year after 2001. 

Densities in the inner portions of the stands, which con-

tained higher proportions of larger trees, decreased at 

relatively constant rates. This further demonstrated the 

greater effect of herbivory on smaller trees. The average 

diameter of the trees increased, not because they grew 

but because of selective mortality of smaller individu-

als. This was corroborated by a decrease in or leveling 

off of total basal area coverage during the post-release 

period in contrast to a prior increasing trend.

Despite the finding that the surviving larger domi-

nant trees accounted for most of the biomass, biomass 

allocation changed due to extensive defoliation of all 

of the trees. The foliage of large trees growing in dense 

stands was limited to the upper branches at the treetops 

and this accounted for only 5.1% of the total biomass 

during 1996, before insect-induced defoliation. This de-

creased from 17 to 8 t/ha to represent only 1.5% of the 

total biomass during 2003 (Figure 5). The biomass allo-

cated to seed capsules decreased by 85% from 6.7 t/ha, 

or 0.46% of the total biomass to 1.0 t/ha, or 0.29% of 

the total biomass.

Litter-traps  were  placed  under  mature  melaleuca 

stands to collect leaf litter in an attempt to measure the 

activity of the biological control agents in the canopy of 

taller trees. The proportion of fallen leaves that exhib-

ited weevil damage symptoms was analysed. Though 

the weevil releases began in 1997, the first weevil-dam-

aged leaves did not appear in the traps until 1999 (rep-

resented by 5% of the trapped leaves) and by 2005, the 

proportion of damaged leaves reached approximately 

45% (Rayamajhi et al., 2007). This increased percent-

age of damaged leaves reflected the decreasing propor-

tions of leaf biomass (stem to leaf biomass), increasing 

tree mortality, and decreasing tree densities.

Stump regrowth

The ability of melaleuca to sprout from cut stumps 

complicates control. This requires follow-up herbicide 

treatment to prevent coppicing and stand regeneration. 

Several studies have indicated that the flush of foliage 

associated with this regrowth is highly attractive to both 

psyllids and weevils, as well as to the rust fungus. Pratt 

et al. (unpublished data) found that insecticide exclu-

sion of biological control agents led to an increase in 

leaf and stem biomass compared to unprotected stumps 

(Figure 6). Chronic attack over an 18-month period led 

to mortality of almost half the unprotected plants. In 

a  similar  insecticide-  and  fungicide-exclusion  study, 

Rayamajhi et al. (unpublished data) found that the rust 

fungus,  P.  psidii,  played  an  important  additive  role. 

Proportion of photosynthetic tissues and the mortality 

of stems were higher in treatments involving both in-

sects (O. vitiosa and B. melaleucae) and rust (P. psidii

together than in treatments using either alone. Death of 

the regrowth often led to the death of the stump itself 

(M.  Rayamajhi  et  al.,  unpublished  data).  These  data 

indicate  that  biological  control  can  compliment,  and 

in some cases replace, the use of herbicides for stump 

treatment.

Discussion

Clearly,  many  melaleuca  stands  have  undergone  sig-

nificant declines and remaining trees are now in poor 

condition. However, vast stands of melaleuca still exist 

that overtly appear unchanged. Yet after closer scrutiny,  

we  have  revealed  that  the  dynamics  of  these  stands 

have  changed  in  very  significant  ways.  Fewer  trees 

now  produce  flowers,  those  that  do  flower  produce 



Figure 5. 

The proportion of the total tree biomass allocated to foliage declined dramati-

cally due to defoliation primarily by Oxyops vitiosa and the psyllid Boreiogly-

caspis melaleucae

.


662

XII International Symposium on Biological Control of Weeds

fewer  inflorescences and  the inflorescences produced 

contain fewer individual blossoms. Many of the fruits 

abort and those that do manage to set seed produce a 

smaller proportion of viable seeds. The constant defo-

liation of the stem tips causes the capsules to desiccate 

and release seeds during drier periods when conditions 

are unfavourable for germination. Those that do fall, 

lodge in a favourable site and manage to germinate are 

infested by psyllids that kill a large proportion before 

they attain a significant size. If they survive, they grow 

slowly  due  to  constant  defoliation  and  produce  few 

flowers. Meanwhile, existing stands have nearly been 

removed from publicly held lands and those on private 

lands are less invasive. Hence, the goals of the project, 

as stated above, have been met so the project should 

be considered a success. It is not yet a ‘complete’ suc-

cess in that biological control is more effective in some 

habitats and during some periods than others but addi-

tional agents that are currently under development may 

fill these gaps.



Acknowledgements

The research reported herein was supported by funding 

from  the  South  Florida  Water  Management  District, 

the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, 

the  US  Army  Corps  of  Engineers,  the  Miami-Dade 

County Department of Environmental Resource Man-

agement,  and  Lee  County  as  well  as  by  the  USDA-

Agricultural Research Service Areawide Projects. We 

thank all past and present staff of the USDA–ARS Aus-

tralian Biological Control Laboratory and the Invasive 

Plant  Research  Laboratory.  We  are  also  indebted  to 

the Student Conservation Service and the AmeriCorps 

program for the tremendous support provided by the 

many conservation interns that have been involved in 

this program.

References

Balciunas, J.K. (1990) Australian insects to control melaleuca.  



Aquatics 12, 15–19.

Balciunas, J.K.,  Bowman, G.J.  and Edwards, E.D.  (1993a) 

Herbivorous insects associated with paperbark Melaleuca 

quinquenervia and its allies: I. Noctuoidea (Lepidoptera). 

Australian Entomologist 20, 13–24.

Balciunas, J.K., Burrows, D.W. and Edwards, E.D. (1993b) 

Herbivorous  insects  associated  with  the  paperbark  tree 

Melaleuca quinquenervia and its allies: II. Geometridae 

(Lepidoptera). Australian Entomologist 20, 91–98.

Balciunas, J.K., Burrows, D.W. and Purcell, M.F. (1994) In-

sects to control melaleuca I: Status of research in Austra-

lia. Aquatics 16, 10–13.

Balciunas,  J.K.,  Burrows,  D.W.  and  Horak,  M.  (1995a) 

Herbivorous  insects  associated  with  the  paperbark  tree  

Melaleuca  quinquenervia  and  its  allies:  IV.  Tortricidae 

(Lepidoptera). Australian Entomologist 22, 125–135.

Balciunas,  J.K.,  Burrows,  D.W.  and  Purcell,  M.F.  (1995b) 

Insects to control melaleuca II: Prospects for additional 

agents from Australia. Aquatics 17, 16 and 18–21.

Balciunas,  J.K.,  Burrows,  D.W.  and  Purcell,  M.F.  (1995c) 

Australian  insects  for  the  biological  control  of  the  pa-

perbark tree, Melaleuca quinquenervia, a serious pest of 

Florida,  USA,  wetlands.  In:  Delfossee,  E.S.  and  Scott, 

R.R. (eds) Proceedings of the Eighth International Sym-



posium  on  Biological  Control  of  Weeds.  DSIR/CSIRO, 

Melbourne, Australia, pp. 247–267.

Blackwood, S., Pratt, P.D. and Giblin-Davis, R. (2006) Bud-

gall  fly  release  for  biocontrol  of  Melaleuca  in  Florida. 



Biocontrol News and Information 26(2), 48N.

Figure 6. 

Regrowth  from  stumps,  reflected  by  the  biomass  of  stems  and  leaves 

produced after felling of the original trees, was substantially more when 

regrowth was treated with insecticide thus reducing the effects of the wee-

vils and the psyllids.


663

Biological control of Melaleuca quinquenervia: goal-based assessment of success

Bodle, M.J., Ferriter, A.P. and Thayer, D.D. (1994) The bio-

logy, distribution, and ecological consequences of Mela-



leuca  quinquenervia  in  the  Everglades.  In:  Davis,  S.M 

and  Ogden,  J.C.  (eds)  Everglades—The  Ecosystem  and 



its Restoration. St. Lucie Press, Delray Beach, FL, USA,  

pp. 341–355.

Buckingham, G.R. (2001) Quarantine host range studies with 

Lophyrotoma zonalis, an Australian sawfly of interest for 

biological control of melaleuca, Melaleuca quinquenervia,  

in Florida. BioControl 46, 363–386.

Burrows, D.W. and Balciunas, J.K. (1997) Biology, distribu-

tion  and  host  range  of  the  sawfly,  Lophyrotoma  zonalis 

(Hym., Pergidae), a potential biological control agent for 

the paperbark tree, Melaleuca quinquenerviaEntomoph-

aga 42, 299–313.

Burrows,  D.W.  and  Balciunas,  J.K.  (1999)  Host-range  and 

distribution  of  Eucerocoris  suspectus  (Hemiptera:  Miri-

dae), a potential biological control agents for the paper-

bark tree Melaleuca quinquenervia (Myrtaceae). Environ-

mental Entomology 28, 290–299.

Burrows,  D.W.,  Balciunas,  J.K.  and  Edwards,  E.D.  (1994) 

Herbivorous  insects  associated  with  the  paperbark  tree 

Melaleuca quinquenervia and its allies: III. Gelechioidea 

(Lepidoptera). Australian Entomologist 21, 137–142.

Burrows,  D.W.,  Balciunas,  J.K.  and  Edwards,  E.D.  (1996) 

Herbivorous  insects  associated  with  the  paperbark  tree 



Melaleuca quinquenervia and its allies: V. Pyralidae (Lep-

idoptera). Australian Entomologist 23, 7–16.

Center, T.D., Van, T.K., Rayachhetry, M., Buckingham, G.R., 

Dray, F.A., Wineriter, S.A., Purcell, M.F. and Pratt, P.D. 

(2000)  Field  colonization of  the  melaleuca snout  beetle 

(Oxyops vitiosa) in south Florida. Biological Control 19, 

112–123.

Center, T.D., Van, T.K., Dray, F.A., Franks, S.J., Rebelo, M.T., 

Pratt, P.D. and Rayamajhi, M.B. (2005) Herbivory alters 

competitive  interactions  between  two  invasive  aquatic 

plants. Biological Control 33, 173–185.

Center, T.D., Pratt, P.D., Tipping, P.W., Rayamajhi, M.B., 

Van, T.K., Wineriter, S.A., Dray, F.A., Jr. and Purcell, 

M.  (2006)  Field  colonization,  population  growth,  and 

dispersal of Boreioglycaspis melaleucae Moore, a bio-

logical  control  agent  of  the  invasive  tree  Melaleuca 



quinquenervia  (Cav.)  Blake.  Biological  Control  39, 

363–374.


Center, T.D., Pratt, P.D., Tipping, P.W., Rayamajhi, M.B., 

Van, T.K., Wineriter, S.A. and Dray, F.A., Jr. (2007) Ini-

tial impacts and field validation of host range for Boreio-

glycaspis  melaleucae  Moore  (Hemiptera:  Psyllidae),  a 

biological control agent of the invasive tree Melaleuca 



quinquenervia (Cav.) Blake (Myrtales: Myrtaceae: Lep-

tospermoideae).  Environmental  Entomology  36,  569–

576.

Coetzee, J.A., Center, T.D., Byrne, M.J. and Hill, M.P. (2005) 



Impact of the biocontrol agent Eccritotarsus catarinensis

a sap-feeding mirid, on the competitive performance of 

waterhyacinth, Eichhornia crassipesBiological Control 

32, 90–96.

Crawley, M.J. (1989a) Plant life-history and the success of 

weed biological control projects. In: Delfosse, E.S. (ed.) 



Proceedings of the VII International Symposium on Bio-

logical  Control  of  Weeds.  Instituto  Sperimentale  per  la 

Patologia Vegetale, Ministero dell’ Agricoltura e delle Fo-

reste, Rome, Italy, pp. 17–26.

Crawley,  M.J.  (1989b) The  successes  and  failures  of  weed 

biocontrol using insects. Biocontrol News and Informa-

tion 10, 213–223.

Di Stefano, J.F. and Fisher, R.F. (1983) Invasion potential of 



Melaleuca quinquenervia in Southern Florida, USA. For-

est Ecology and Management 7, 133–141.

Dray, F.A., Bennett, B.C. and Center, T.D. (2006) Invasion 

history of Melaleuca quinquenervia (Cav.) S.T. Blake in 

Florida. Castanea 71, 210–225.

Franks, S.J., Kral, A.M. and Pratt, P.D. (2006) Herbivory by in-

troduced insects reduces growth and survival of Melaleuca 



quinquenervia  seedlings.  Environmental  Entomology  35, 

366–372.


Galway, K.E. and Purcell, M.F. (2005) Laboratory life his-

tory  and  field  observations  of  Poliopaschia  lithochlora 

(Lower)  (Lepidoptera:  Pyralidae),  a  potential  biological 

control agent for Melaleuca quinquenervia (Myrtaceae). 



Australian Journal of Entomology 44, 77–82.

Giblin-Davis, R.M., Makinson, J., Center, B.J., Davies, K.A., 

Purcell, M., Taylor, G.S., Scheffer, S.J., Goolsby, J. and 

Center,  T.D.  (2001)  Fergusobia/Fergusonina-induced 

shoot bud gall development on Melaleuca quinquenervia

Journal of Nematology 33, 239–247.

Hoffmann, J.H. (1995) Biological control of weeds: the way 

forward, a South African perspective. In: British Crop Pro-

tection Council Proceedings No. 64: Weeds in a Changing 

World. BCPC, Farnham, Surrey, UK, pp. 77–89.

Laroche, F. and Ferriter, A.P. (1992) The rate of expansion 

of melaleuca in south Florida. Journal of Aquatic Plant 

Management 30, 62–65.

Louda, S. M. and Stiling, P. (2004) The double-edged sword 

of biological control in conservation and restoration. Con-

servation Biology 18, 50–53.

Meskimen,  G.F.  (1962) A  Silvical  Study  of  the  Melaleuca 

Tree in South Florida. MS thesis. University of Florida, 

Gainesville, FL, USA, 177 pp.

McFadyen, R.E.C. (1998) Biological control of weeds. An-

nual Review of Entomology 43, 369–393.

McFadyen,  R.E.C.  (2000)  Successes  in  biological  control 

of  weeds.  In:  Spencer,  N.R.  (ed.)  Proceedings  of  the 

X  International  Symposium  on  Biological  Control  of 

Weeds. Montana State University, Bozeman, MT, USA.,  

pp. 3–14.

Oelrichs,  P.B.,  MacLeod,  J.K.,  Seawright,  A.A.,  Moore, 

M.R., Ng, J.C., Dutra, F., Riet-Correa, F., Mendez, M.C. 

and Thamsborg, S.M. (1999) Unique toxic peptides iso-

lated from sawfly larvae in three continents. Toxicon 37, 

537–544.

Ogden, J.C. (2005) Everglades ridge and slough conceptual 

ecological model. Wetlands 25, 810–820.

Pemberton, R.W. (2003) Potential for the biological control 

of the lobate lac scale, Paratachardina lobata lobata (He-

miptera: Kerridae). Florida Entomologist 86, 353–360.

Peschken, D.P. and McClay, A.S. (1995) Picking the target: 

A revision of McClay’s scoring system to determine the 

suitability of a weed for classical biological control. In: 

Delfosse, E.S. and Scott, R.R. (eds) Proceedings of the 



Eighth International Symposium on Biological Control of 

Weeds. CSIRO, Melbourne, Australia, pp. 137–143.

Pratt, P.D., Rayamajhi, M.B., Van, T.K., Center, T.D. and Tip-

ping, P.W. (2005) Herbivory alters resource allocation and 

compensation  in  the  invasive  tree  Melaleuca  quinque-



nerviaEcological Entomology 30, 316–326.

664

XII International Symposium on Biological Control of Weeds

Purcell, M.F. and Balciunas, J.K. (1994) Life history and dis-

tribution of the Australian weevil Oxyops vitiosa (Coleop-

tera: Curculionidae), a potential biological control agent 

for Melaleuca quinquenervia (Myrtaceae). Annals of the 



Entomological Society of America 86, 867–873.

Purcell, M.F., Balciunas, J.K. and Jones, P. (1997) Biology 

and  host-range  of  Boreioglycaspis  melaleucae  (Hemip-

tera:  Psyllidae),  a  potential  biological  control  agent  for 



Melaleuca  quinquenervia  (Myrtaceae).  Environmental 

Entomology 26, 366–372.

Rayachhetry, M.B., Elliott, M.L. and Van, T.K. (1997) Natu-

ral epiphytotic of the rust Puccinia psidii on Melaleuca 

quinquenervia in Florida. Plant Disease. 81, 831.

Rayachhetry, M.B., Elliott, M.L. and Van, T.K. (1998) Re-

generation potential of the canopy-held seeds of Melaleu-

ca quinquenervia in south Florida. International Journal 

of Plant Science 159, 648–654.

Rayachhetry, M.B., Van, T.K., Center, T.D. and Laroche, F. 

(2001) Dry weight estimation of the aboveground com-

ponents  of  Melaleuca  quinquenervia  trees  in  southern 

Florida. Forest Ecology and Management 142, 281–290.

Rayamajhi,  M.B.,  Van,  T.K.,  Center,  T.D.,  Goolsby,  J.A., 

Pratt, P.D. and Racelis, A. (2002) Biological attributes of 

the canopy held melaleuca seeds in Australia and Florida, 

US. Journal of Aquatic Plant Management 40, 87–91.

Rayamajhi, M.B., Van, T.K., Pratt, P.D., Center T.D. and Tip-

ping,  P.W.  (2007).  Melaleuca  quinquenervia  dominated 

forests in Florida: analyses of natural-enemy impacts on 

stand dynamics. Plant Ecology 192, 119–132.

Tomlinson, P.B. (1980) The Biology of Trees Native to Tropi-



cal Florida. Harvard University Printing Office, Allston, 

MA, USA, 480 pp.

Van, T.K., Rayachhetry, M.B. and Center, T.D. (2000). Esti-

mating above-ground biomass of Melaleuca quinquenervia  

in Florida, USA. Journal of Aquatic Plant Management 

38, 62–67.

Van,  T.K.,  Rayamajhi,  M.B.  and  Center,  T.D.  (2005)  Seed 

longevity  of  Melaleuca  quinquenervia:  a  burial  experi-

ment in south Florida. Journal of Aquatic Plant Manage-

ment 43, 39–42.

White, P. (1994) Synthesis: vegetation pattern and process in 

the Everglades ecosystems. In: Davis, S.M. and Ogden, 

J.C. (eds) Everglades, The Ecosystem and Its Restoration

St. Lucie Press, Florida, USA, pp. 445–458.

Wineriter,  S.A.,  Buckingham,  G.R.  and  Frank,  J.H.  (2003) 

Host  range  of  Boreioglycaspis  melaleucae  Moore  (He-

miptera: Psyllidae), a potential biological control agent of 



Melaleuca quinquenervia (Cav.) S.T. Blake (Myrtaceae), 

under quarantine. Biological Control 27, 273–292.

Woodall, S.L. (1981) Integrated methods for melaleuca con-

trol.  In:  Geiger,  R.K.  (ed.)  Proceedings  of  Melaleuca 



Symposium,  Sept.  23–24  1980.  Florida  Department  of 

Agriculture and Consumer Services, Division of Forestry, 



Gainesville, FL, USA, pp. 135–140.



Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə