By Malin Rivers, Kirsty Shaw, Emily Beech and Meirion Jones



Yüklə 3.26 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
səhifə1/32
tarix01.08.2017
ölçüsü3.26 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   32

Conserving the World’s Most

Threatened Trees

A global survey of ex situ collections


By Malin Rivers, Kirsty Shaw, Emily Beech and Meirion Jones

October 2015

Recommended citation: Rivers, M., Shaw, K., Beech, E. and Jones, M. (2015). Conserving the World’s Most

Threatened Trees: A global survey of ex situ collections. BGCI. Richmond, UK. 

ISBN-10: 1-905164-61-0

ISBN-13: 978-1-905164-61-5

Published by Botanic Gardens Conservation International.

Descanso House, 199 Kew Road, Richmond, Surrey, TW9 3BW, UK.

Authors: Malin Rivers is Red List Manager at BGCI. Kirsty Shaw is Conservation Manager at BGCI. 

Emily Beech is Conservation Assistant at BGCI. Meirion Jones is Head of Information Management at BGCI.

Printed on 100% Post-Consumer Recycled Paper.

Design: John Morgan www.seascapedesign.co.uk

Conserving the World’s Most

Threatened Trees

A global survey of ex situ collections


Conserving the World’s Most Threatened Trees  A global survey of ex situ collections

2

BGCI gratefully acknowledges the support of botanical experts

from around the world, who helped provide and review

information to compile our list of the world’s most threatened

trees. Particular thanks go to members of the IUCN/SSC Global

Tree Specialist Group who kindly reviewed the list at various

stages of development. BGCI would also like to thank the

following organisations for contributing their regionally or

taxonomically focused expertise to support development of 

the threatened tree list: SANBI, NatureServe, National Red List,

Centro Nacional de Conservação de Flora Brazil, the East

African Plant Red List Authority, the Centro de Ecologia

Functional, University of Coimbra, Portugal and the Namibian

Botanical Research Insitute. 

We are also thankful to the many botanic gardens around the

world that contributed collection data to this survey by uploading

their collection lists to BGCI’s PlantSearch database. A full list of

contributing gardens is provided in Annex 3. We would also like

to thank the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, for cross-checking our

compiled list of threatened trees with collection records held in

the Millennium Seed Bank (MSB) Data Warehouse. 

Finally, BGCI would like to thank the Garfield Weston Foundation

and the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, for their support to the

Global Trees Campaign team to undertake this survey. We hope

this survey guides and supports decision-making for future seed

collecting and conservation programmes in botanic gardens and

other conservation institutions internationally.

Finally, the authors of this report would like to thank BGCI

colleagues for their support in producing this report.   

Photo Credits

Front cover: Middle left (Andreas Kay, Flickr), 

Bottom right: (Frank Mbago, University of Dar es Salaam).

Back cover: Middle left (George Schatz, Missouri Botanical

Garden). Unless otherwise credited, photos are by BGCI.

BOTANIC GARDENS

CONSERVATION INTERNATIONAL

(BGCI) is a membership organization

linking botanic gardens in over 100

countries in a shared commitment

to biodiversity conservation,

sustainable use and environmental education. BGCI aims to

mobilize botanic gardens and work with partners to secure

plant diversity for the well-being of people and the planet. BGCI

provides the Secretariat for the IUCN/SSC Global Tree

Specialist Group.



FAUNA & FLORA INTERNATIONAL

(FFI), founded in 1903 and the

world’s oldest international

conservation organization, acts to

conserve threatened species and

ecosystems worldwide, choosing

solutions that are sustainable, are based on sound science 

and take account of human needs.



THE GLOBAL TREES CAMPAIGN

(GTC) is undertaken through a

partnership between BGCI and FFI.

Our mission is to prevent all tree

species extinctions in the wild,

ensuring their benefits for people,

wildlife and the wider environment. We do this through

provision of information, delivery of conservation action and

support of sustainable use, working with partner organizations

around the world. 

          BGCI    Botanic Gardens Conservation International

           CBD    Convention on Biological Diversity

              FFI    Fauna & Flora International

         GSPC    Global Strategy for Plant Conservation

           GTC    Global Trees Campaign

          IUCN    International Union for Conservation of Nature

 IUCN/SSC    International Union for Conservation of Nature/Species

Survival Commission 

          EX    Extinct 

         EW    Extinct in the Wild 

          CR    Critically Endangered 

          EN    Endangered 

          VU    Vulnerable 

          DD    Data Deficient 

          NT    Near Threatened 

          LC    Least Concern 

Acronyms

IUCN Red List categories

Acknowledgements


Conserving the World’s Most Threatened Trees  A global survey of ex situ collections

3

Summary 

...................................................................................4



1. Introduction 

...........................................................................6

       1.1 Tree red listing ..............................................................6

       1.2 Conservation of trees ..................................................7

       1.3 Ex situ conservation of threatened trees...................9

       1.4 Policy context.............................................................10

       1.5 Aims and objectives...................................................10

2. Methodology 

.......................................................................12

       2.1 Global list of threatened trees  .................................12

              Scope ..........................................................................12

              Conservation ratings ...................................................12

              Tree definition ..............................................................12

              Taxonomy ....................................................................13

       2.2 Ex situ collections of threatened trees ....................14



3. Results and Analysis 

..........................................................15

       3.1 Global list of threatened trees ..................................15

       3.2 Ex situ collections of threatened trees ....................16

4. Conclusions and Recommendations

................................19



       4.1 Conclusions ................................................................19

       4.2 Recommendations.....................................................19

              Red listing....................................................................19

              Ex situ collections ........................................................19

              Integrated conservation...............................................21

       4.3 Next steps...................................................................22

              Future work..................................................................22

              Taking action................................................................22

       


Useful Links 

.............................................................................26

       

References 

..............................................................................28



Annexes 

...................................................................................29

       Annex I Critically Endangered and Endangered 

taxa with number of reported ex situ collections ...............29 



       Annex II Red list publications consulted ...........................80

       

Annex III Participating institutions.....................................82

Boxes 


    

1.  Global Trees Campaign................................................ 5

2.  Global Tree Assessment ...............................................7

3.  Tree values ....................................................................8

4.  PlantSearch.................................................................11

5.  Trees with a large number of ex situ collections............23

6.  Trees that are under-represented 

    in ex situ collections....................................................24



7.  GlobalTreeSearch – a world list of trees .....................25

Betulaceae collections at Wakehurst Place

Betula chichibuensis (CR) reported in 27 ex situ collections

Contents

Case studies 



1.  In situ action: Monitoring, protecting and 

reinforcing threatened apples and pears in 

Central Asia...................................................................9

2.  Seed banking to save threatened trees ......................11

3.  Conservation strategies for exceptional 

    tree species.................................................................13



4.  Living collections of threatened trees: 

an opportunity for education and research.................14



5.  Improving the genetic diversity of ex situ

collections of the Vietnamese Golden Cypress 

to support reintroduction programmes.......................17

6.  Forest restoration for species conservation 

in East Africa ...............................................................20



Conserving the World’s Most Threatened Trees  A global survey of ex situ collections

4

Trees are of immense economic, cultural and ecological

importance. Efforts are urgently required to prevent the loss of

tree species and the associated ecosystem services that they

support. Botanic gardens have a crucial role to play. 

This report presents the results of a survey of ex situ collections

of the world’s most threatened trees undertaken by Botanic

Gardens Conservation International (BGCI) as part of our

ongoing contributions to the Global Trees Campaign (GTC). 

The report provides an overview of the current status of ex situ

collections of threatened trees. Target 8 of the Global Strategy

for Plant Conservation (GSPC), of the Convention on Biological

Diversity (CBD), calls for:

‘At least 75% of threatened plant species in ex situ collections,

preferably within the country of origin, and at least 20% available

for recovery and restoration programmes’

by 2020.


To undertake this survey, a global list of threatened trees was

compiled as a first step. Conservation assessments were

gathered from the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species,

regional, national and taxonomically focused red lists. This is

the first time a comprehensive global list of threatened trees has

been developed from such a wide range of sources, and

reviewed by regional and taxonomic experts.

The compiled list of threatened trees includes 9,641 taxa,

1,894 of which are Critically Endangered, 3,436 of which 

are Endangered and 4,311 are Vulnerable. 

The list of the world’s most threatened trees, assessed as

Critically Endangered and Endangered (referred to as CR and

EN trees), was then compared to ex situ collection records held

in BGCI’s PlantSearch database, to provide the first global

measurement of progress in ex situ conservation of the world’s

most threatened trees. 

The results show that only 26% of CR and EN trees are



represented in ex situ collections (1,389 out of 5,330), falling

far short of the 75% called for in Target 8 of the GSPC and

highlighting a huge gap in current collections. 

Trees reported as absent from collections should be brought

into ex situ collections as a matter of urgency. A full list of CR

and EN trees and their representation in ex situ collections is

available in Annex 1.

This report calls for a much greater global effort in tree red

listing and conservation, to identify and protect CR and EN

trees. The report enables botanic gardens, arboreta and seed

banks to plan and prioritise future collecting efforts.

Recommendations are provided for maximising conservation

value of ex situ collections and adopting an integrated approach

to conservation of threatened trees. 

It is anticipated that this report will mobilize increased support

from policy makers and funders to save the world’s most

threatened trees, ensuring their unique values continue to

provide benefit to humans and the wider environment. 

Summary

Gigasiphon macrosiphon (CR) reported in 7 ex situ collections



Conserving the World’s Most Threatened Trees  A global survey of ex situ collections

5

Eligmocarpus cynometroides (CR) reported in 1 ex situ collection

Box 1: Global Trees Campaign 

The Global Trees Campaign (GTC) is a joint initiative

between Botanic Gardens Conservation International

(BGCI) and Fauna & Flora International (FFI) launched in

1999.  Since its initiation, the GTC has expanded

significantly, running projects that directly support the

conservation of threatened tree species with partners in

over 25 countries, leading training programmes to build

capacity for tree conservation, and campaigning to scale

up the use of threatened trees in planting schemes and

conservation programmes.

The GTC recognises that saving forests will not necessarily

save the immense variety of tree species. Individual species

play a myriad of economic, ecological, and cultural roles

highly valued by today’s society. We depend on trees in our

everyday lives – they provide us with food, timber and

medicine. Furthermore, millions of species of plants and

animals are intrinsically linked to tree species, depending

on them for their survival. The GTC therefore adopts a

species-focused approach to drive and guide tree

conservation efforts worldwide, through four main

approaches:

1. Prioritisation of tree species of greatest conservation

concern


2. Empowering partners and practitioners to undertake 

tree conservation

3. Taking direct action to secure priority tree species

4. Mobilizing other groups to act for threatened trees

The GTC provides a vehicle for guiding conservation action

for the world’s most threatened trees, for promoting the tree

conservation work of our international network of partners,

and for sharing best practice.

To find out more about the Global Trees Campaign please

visit our website www.globaltrees.org



Conserving the World’s Most Threatened Trees  A global survey of ex situ collections

6

This survey has been undertaken by Botanic Gardens

Conservation International (BGCI) as part of our ongoing

contributions to the Global Trees Campaign (GTC, Box 1), a joint

initiative between BGCI and Fauna & Flora International (FFI) to

prevent all tree species extinctions in the wild, ensuring their

continued benefits for humans, wildlife and the wider environment. 

This report presents a comprehensive list of the world’s most

threatened trees, and their representation in ex situ collections.

It is the result of a collaborative international effort, with

contributions from tree experts and collections of botanic

gardens, arboreta and seed banks from around the world. 

It is intended that this report is used by these institutions to

support collection planning of threatened trees. 

In addition to the results of this ex situ survey of the world’s most

threatened trees, we also highlight case studies of Global Trees

Campaign projects to demonstrate best practice conservation

action from around the world, and recommendations for

improving the conservation value of ex situ collections.

1.1 Tree red listing

Red lists are widely used to list taxa at risk of extinction. 

The process of red listing assigns a conservation assessment

category, based on parameters such as population size and

structure, distribution and rate of decline. The most

comprehensive database of conservation assessments is the

IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (IUCN, 2015).

The first analysis of threatened trees was published in the book

The World List of Threatened Trees (Oldfield et al., 1998). From

this publication over 7,000 conservation assessments of trees

were added to the IUCN Red List. Since then approximately

3,000 trees have been added, taking the total to 10,082 (IUCN v.

2015.2). Of the trees on the IUCN Red List about two thirds

have been identified as threatened with extinction.

However, the IUCN Red List is by no means the only

compilation of conservation assessment data. Governments

and other organizations monitor threat status, including

national, regional, and taxonomically focused red list initiatives.

Important geographic contributions to tree red listing include

national and regional red lists from South Africa, China and

Brazil, as well as contributions from other IUCN/SSC Specialist

Groups. The National Red List website provides a centralised

hub to bring existing national red list information together, to

promote and publicise the information within them, and enable

further development, use and analysis (National Red List, 2014).

Other important contributions include taxonomically 

focused red list reports for Magnoliaceae, Maples, Oaks,

Rhododendrons and Betulaceae produced by BGCI and the

IUCN/SSC Global Tree Specialist Group (see Useful links

section on page 26). Other IUCN/SSC Specialist Groups have 

also contributed tree assessments, for example the Conifer

Specialist Group has assessed all of the world’s conifers 

(all included in the IUCN Red List), and the Palm Specialist

Group has assessed all palms in Madagascar (Rakotoarinivo 

et al., 2014). 

1. Introduction

Latania loddigesii (EN) reported in 47 ex situ collections

Key threats impacting trees in the wild

Land clearance & habitat degradation

Unsustainable exploitation of species

Low genetic diversity

Slow or poor natural regeneration

Tree predators

Invasive species

Pests & diseases

Changing climate

Key ecological relationships lost



Table 1: Key threats impacting trees in the wild

Conserving the World’s Most Threatened Trees  A global survey of ex situ collections

7

1.2 Conservation of trees

Humans, biodiversity and healthy ecosystem functioning depend

on maintenance of plant diversity. A large number of unique

properties and values contributing to the above are offered by

individual trees (see Box 3 for more information on values and

example species). Some trees provide direct and tangible

benefits to humans, whereas others offer indirect benefits that

are harder to quantify. Some tree species offer food or livelihood

benefits that help sustain human populations. Others act as

keystone species in an ecosystem, or serve as flagships to 

drive larger conservation programmes. Conservation of each

individual tree species is therefore of great importance. 

A variety of conservation actions can be undertaken for

threatened trees, each approach offering different merits. 

Not all approaches will be possible for all trees, and the

Tree diversity managed and monitored in natural habitats. This may include establishment of protected

areas, monitoring and patrolling of individual species or populations, sustainable harvesting from wild

populations and mechanisms to prevent illegal logging.

Tree diversity curated outside of natural habitats. Ex situ collections are held in the form of germplasm

(seed banks, cryopreservation, micropropagation) or living plants (conservation collections, reference

collections or display specimens). 

Actions to improve the status of in situ populations and their habitats. Well managed ex situ collections

consisting of genetically diverse material can provide material for reintroduction, recovery and restoration

programmes. 

Research into the reproductive biology, genetics and ecology of tree species informs conservation actions.



In situ

Ex situ

Reintroduction, 

recovery and restoration

programmes

Research 

Table 2: Conservation options for threatened trees

Box 2: Global Tree Assessment

Despite the importance of trees, many are threatened by

over-exploitation and habitat destruction, as well as by

pests, diseases, drought and their interaction with global

climate change (Table 1). In order to estimate the impact

of such threats to trees there is an urgent need to conduct

a complete assessment of the conservation status of the

world’s tree species – the Global Tree Assessment.

The Global Tree Assessment aims to provide conservation

assessments of the world’s tree species by 2020 using

the IUCN Red List Categories and Criteria. The

assessment will highlight the true scale of extinction faced

by trees, will identify those tree species that are at

greatest risk of extinction and will provide information that

is essential to the development of conservation plans. 

To achieve this we need to first generate a complete

global list of tree species, in order to do a gap analysis

where the conservation assessment information (both

taxonomically and geographically) is missing. 

The work of the Global Tree Assessment is coordinated by

the IUCN/SSC Global Tree Specialist Group (GTSG);

however, for the Global Tree Assessment to succeed, it

will need participative, open-access approaches to data

sharing and evaluation, and the development of an even

more extensive global collaborative partnership, involving

the coordinated effort of many institutions and individuals

(Newton et al., 2015).

appropriate action will be dependent on the specific tree 

taxon in question. An integrated conservation approach is

recommended, involving a combination of the approaches

outlined in Table 2. Box 1 provides information on the work 

of the Global Trees Campaign, an international initiative to

safeguard the world’s threatened trees from extinction. 

The Global Tree Specialist Group (GTSG) has a target to ensure

there are conservation assessments for every tree species by

2020 – the Global Tree Assessment (Box 2). With an estimated

50,000-80,000 tree species worldwide (BGCI, unpublished list),

there is still considerable tree red listing to be done.

Prior to this survey there was no single list of globally

threatened trees.

Zelkova abelicea (EN) reported in 21 ex situ collections





Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   32


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə