Cardenica Woodlot At a glance l ast updated



Yüklə 153.35 Kb.
PDF просмотр
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü153.35 Kb.

 

 

Cardenica Woodlot



 

 

At a glance



 

(l

ast updated: April 2016)

 

TRC reference:  

BD/9561 


Ecological district:           

Egmont  


Other reference:   

LENZ environment:          

F5.2b 


 

Land tenure:  

Private 


Protection status:  

A, B, C 


GPS:  

E1703611 N5673407 



Area:  

2.1 ha 

 

Location  

The Cardenica Woodlot KNE is located on privately owned land on Clearview 

Road near Lepperton, 7 km North of Inglewood. The site is in the Egmont 

ecological district and located within the Waiongana catchment. 

 

General description

  

The KNE area is made up of a 2.1 ha remnant of semi costal forest adjacent 



to the Te Wairoa KNE. The remnant is fenced, but in some areas the fence is 

no longer stock proof. The site lies in close proximity to other Key Native 

Ecosystems in the area, including Lepperton bush and Tarurutangi swamp. 

Ecological features 

Flora 

A mix of forest types is present including semi-coastal/lowland 

tawa/pukatea/kohekohe forest and lowland swamp forest containing pukatea 

(Laurelia nova-zelandiae) and swamp maire (Syzygium maire). Other 

canopy trees include titoki (Alectryon excelsus), and rewarewa (Knightia 

excelsa).  

 

A number of other plant species are also present in the canopy and sub-



canopy. These include kahikatea (Dacrycarpus dacrydioides), puriri (Vitex 

lucens), karaka (Corynocarpus laevigatus), mamaku (Cyathea medullaris), 

kawakawa (Piper excelsum), pigeonwood (Hedycarya arborea), various 

Coprosmas (Coprosma spp.), silver fern (Cyathea dealbata), mahoe 

(Melicytus ramiflorus), nikau (Rhopalostylis sapida), and supplejack 

(Ripogonum scandens). 

 

The regionally distinctive plants swamp maire, tawhirikaro (Pittosporum 



cornifolium) and the fern Deparia petersenii subsp. congrua are present at 

the site. 

 

Fauna 

 

Native birdlife recorded in and around the KNE include the New Zealand 

pigeon (Hemiphaga novaeseelandiae), Tui (Prosthemadera 

novaeseelandiae), grey warbler (Gerygone igata) and fantail (Rhipidura 

fuliginosa). Good habitat exists for notable freshwater fish, reptiles and 

invertebrates. 



Ecological values 

Ecological values 

Rank 

Comment 

Rarity and 

distinctiveness 

High 


Contains the ‘Regionally Distinctive’ swamp maire (Syzygium maire), 

Tawhirikaro (Pittosporum cornifolium) and Deparia petersenii subsp. 



Congrua 

Representativeness 

High 

Contains indigenous vegetation that is poorly represented in Taranaki and 



classified as F5.2b - an 'acutely threatened' LENZ environment. 

Ecological context 

Medium 

The site provides connectivity to other Key Native Ecosystems nearby 



including Te Wairoa, Lepperton bush and Tarurutangi swamp. 

Sustainability 

Positive 

Key ecological processes still influence the site. Under appropriate 

management it will remain resilient to existing and potential threats. 

 

Management threats and response 

Potential and actual threats to the sustainability of the Cardenica Woodlot 

site’s ecological values are as follows: 

 

 

Threats to ecological 



values 

Potential 

threat 

Comment 

Pest animals 

High  

Possums, cats, rats, hedgehogs and mustelids. 



Weeds 

Medium 


Woolly nightshade, blackberry, selaginella, Aroid lily and Tradescantia.  

Habitat modification 

High 

The remnant is fenced but the fence is no longer stock proof in some 



areas. Stock grazing is modifying the habitat in places. 

 

 

 


 

 

Site protection measures addressing potential and actual threats are as follows: 



 

 

Site protection 



Yes/No 

Description 

Public ownership or 

formal agreement 

Yes 


The site is legally protected by a consent condition under the 

RMA section 221. 



Regulatory protection by 

local government 

Yes 


General regional or district rules might apply. 

Active protection 

Yes 

Site is within the self help possum control area and receives 



regular pest animal control for possums. 

 

 



 

 


 

 

Forest & Bees Takou Bush   

 

At a glance

 

(last updated: April 2016)

 

TRC reference:  

BD/9563 


Ecological district:  

Matemateaonga  



Other reference:  

 

LENZ environment:  

F1.1d   (481.3 ha) 

 

F7.2a   (0.3 ha) 



 

Land tenure:  

Private 


Protection status:  

A, B, C 


GPS:  

1739591E – 5640092N 



Area:  

481.6 ha 

 

Location 

The Forest & Bees Takou Bush KNE is located on privately owned land near 

Omoana in eastern Taranaki. The site is within the Matemateaonga 

Ecological District. 

 

General description 

The KNE covers 481.6 ha and is a mix of original and cut over lowland forest 

with small areas of modified regenerating native forest in places.  The forest 

is typical of original and regenerating forest found in the eastern Taranaki 

area.  The KNE is surrounded by adjacent native forest including a 6.5km 

boundary with the Waitotara Conservation Area. Other nearby protected 

areas includes the Tahunamaere Scenic Reserve, Rawhitiroa Road 

Conservation Area, Waitiri Scenic Reserve and Omoana Bush QEII. The site 

is located within the Whenuakura River catchment.  

 

 



Ecological features 

Vegetation 

Canopy vegetation primarily consists of mixed tawa/hardwood/broadleaf 

with areas of manuka (Leptospermum scoparium) and kanuka (Kunzea 

robusta) present in some areas. Notable species are likely to be present 

including Tawhirikaro (Pittosporum cornifolium). 

 

 

 



Fauna 

Birdlife recorded in the area includes the New Zealand falcon (Falco 



novaeseelandiae) and the North Island brown kiwi (Apteryx australis 

mantelli), which are both identified as ‘Threatened, Nationally Vulnerable’. 

Common native birds in the area include the North Island robin (Petroica 



longipes), fantail (Rhipidura fuliginosa), bellbird (Anthornis melanura), grey 

warbler (Gerygone igata), pied tomtit (Petroica macrocephala), tui 



(Prosthemadera novaeseelandiae novaeseelandiae) and New Zealand pigeon 

(Hemiphaga novaeseelandiae). 

 

Other notable native fauna will be present including bats, reptiles and 

invertebrates.  

 

Ecological values 

Ecological values 

Rank 

Comment 

Rarity and 

distinctiveness 

High 


Contains the ‘Threatened’ New Zealand falcon and North Island 

brown kiwi. Likely to contain other notable species including bats, 

reptiles and invertebrates.   

Representativeness 

High 

Contains indigenous vegetation on F7.2a – an ‘At Risk’ LENZ 



environment.  The greater area contains indigenous vegetation on 

F1.1d (‘Less reduced, better protected’) LENZ environment.

 

Ecological context 



High 

Close to and provides connectivity to Tahunamaere Scenic Reserve, 

Rawhitiroa Road Conservation Area, Waitiri Scenic Reserve, 

Waitotara Conservation Area and Omoana Bush KNE. Also provides 

core habitat for the threatened New Zealand falcon and North Island 

brown kiwi. 

Sustainability 

Positive 

In good vegetative condition and large in area. Key ecological 

processes still influence the site. Under appropriate management, it 

can remain resilient to existing or potential threats. 

 


 

 

Management threats and response 

Potential and actual threats to the sustainability of Forest & Bees Takou 

Bush site’s ecological values are as follows: 

 

Threats to ecological 

values 

Level of 

risk 

Comment 

Pest animals 

Medium to 

high 


Possums, goats, cats, mustelids, and rats. 

Weeds 


Low 

Unknown although likely to be insignificant. 

Habitat modification 

Low  


Low threat from low scale sustainable timber harvest. 

 

Site protection measures addressing potential threats and actual threats are 



as follows: 

 

Site protection 



Yes/No 

Description 

Public ownership or 

formal agreement 

Yes 


Landowner in discussion with QEII regarding a covenant for 

the whole site. 



Regulatory protection by 

local government 

Yes 


General regional or district rules might apply. 

Active protection 

Yes 

The landowner currently undertakes some pest animal 



control. 

 

 



  

 

 

Korito Heights 

 

At a glance

 

(l

ast updated: April 2016)

 

TRC reference: BD/9554 

Ecological district:        Egmont 

Other reference:  1622447 (this inventory sheet) 

LENZ environment:  

                                                 F5.3b (20.ha)  

 

Land tenure:  

Private 


Protection status:  

A, B, C 


GPS:    E1693562 N5660440 

Area:  

20ha 

 

Location  

The Korito Heights KNE is located on private land approximately 13km south 

of New Plymouth in the Egmont Ecological District. 

 

General description 

The Korito Heights KNE area consists of a moderately sized (20ha) 

modified/regenerating lowland forest remnant on the gully margins of a 

major tributary of the Mangawarawara Stream.  The canopy is dominated 

mainly by kamahi (Weinmannia racemosa) although miro (Prumnopitys 



ferruginea) and hinau (Elaeocarpus dentatus)are present in places. The KNE 

area is long and narrow and covers the length of the whole property from 

Egmont National Park to the lower property boundary (almost 2kms of 

stream margin). The area provides very good connectivity and compliments 

other KNEs and habitats in the area such as Egmont National Park, Alfred 

Road wetland and Carrington Road A. 

 

 

Ecological features 



Flora 

Although the canopy is dominated by kamahi other species such as miro, 

toro (Myrsine salicina), hinau, northern rata (Metrosideros robusta) tawa 

(Beilschmiedia tawa) and rewarewa (Knightia excelsa) are present and are 

in good condition.  A good sub canopy and understorey is also present and 

includes mahoe (Melicytus ramiflorus subsp. ramiflorus), wineberry 

(Aristotelia serrata), raukawa (Raukaua edgerleyi), rangiora (Brachyglottis 

repanda), pigeonwood (Hedycarya arborea), mountain cabbage tree 

(Cordyline indivisa) and hangehange (Geniostoma ligustrifolium var. 

ligustrifolium). Tree ferns and ground ferns are common in places and 

seedlings and saplings are also common.  The area falls within the ‘Less 

reduced, better protected’ LENZ environment F5.3b.  

 

Fauna 

Native birdlife recorded in and around the Korito Heights KNE area include 

the New Zealand pigeon (Hemiphaga novaeseelandiae), grey warbler 

(Gerygone igata), fantail (Rhipidura fuliginosa), tui (Prosthemadera 

novaeseelandiae), and silvereye (Zosterops lateralis). Very good habitat 

exists for notable freshwater fish such as shortjaw kokopu (Galaxias 



postvectis) and koaro (Galaxias brevipinnis). The ‘At Risk’ longfin eel 

(Anguilla dieffenbachii) is present along with the native freshwater crayfish 

(Paranephrops planifrons). 

 

 



Ecological values 

Ecological values 

Rank 

Comment 

Rarity and 

distinctiveness 

Medium 


Contains good habitat for the ‘At Risk’ 

longfin eel (Anguilla dieffenbachii) 

and other notable fauna species. 

Representativeness 

Low 

Contains vegetation associated with (F5.3b) ‘Less reduced, better 



protected’ LENZ environment. 

Ecological context 

High 

Provides additional habitat and greater connectivity with other Key Native 



Ecosystems in this area such as the Egmont National Park, Alfred Road 

and Carrington Road A.    

Sustainability 

Positive 

Key ecological processes still influence the site and with appropriate 

management, it can remain resilient to existing or potential threats.  The 

site will have the additional benefit of being formally protected. 

 

 



Threats to ecological 

values 

Potential 

threat 

Comment 

Pest animals 

High 

Goats, possums, cats, mustelids, hedgehogs and rodents.  



Weeds 

Medium 


Scattered areas of barberry, blackberry, gorse, and Himalayan 

honeysuckle. 

Habitat modification 

Low 


The covenanted areas will be securely fenced. 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

Site protection measures addressing potential and actual threats are as follows: 



 

 

Site protection 



Yes/No 

Description 

Public ownership or 

formal agreement 

Yes 


The landowner is currently working with QEII towards a 

covenant for the habitat. 



Regulatory protection by 

local government 

Yes 


General regional or district rules might apply. 

Active protection 

Yes 

The landowner undertakes occasional pest animal control as 



part of the possum self help programme. 

 

 



 

 

 

Mangapuni 

 

At a glance

 

(last updated: April 2016)

 

TRC reference:  

BD/9564 


Ecological district:  

Matemateaonga  



Other reference:  

 

LENZ environment:  

F1.3b   (749.0 ha) 

 

 



Land tenure:  

Private 


Protection status:  

A, B, C 


GPS:  

1760319E – 5600293N 



Area:  

749.0 ha 

 

Location 

The Mangapuni KNE is located on privately owned land 12kms southeast of 

Waitotara in south Taranaki. The site is within the Matemateaonga Ecological 

District. 

 

General description 

The Mangapuni KNE covers 749ha and is made up of a mix of original 

lowland forest (over sixty percent) and modified regenerating native forest 

typical of the south Taranaki area.  The whole site is protected with a QEII 

covenant. Other nearby KNE’s include Skilton’s Bush, Lake Waikato, Lake 

Waikare and the Waitotara Wharangi Block.  The site is located within the 

Waitotara River catchment.  

 

 



Ecological features 

Vegetation 

Canopy vegetation of the original forest area primarily consists of a mix of 

beech, hardwood, broadleaf and podocarp.  The modified areas are 

dominated by manuka (Leptospermum scoparium), kanuka (Kunzea 



robusta) with mahoe (Melicytus ramiflorus subsp. ramiflorus), rewarewa 

(Knightia excelsa), hinau (Elaeocarpus dentatus) and young emergent black 

beech (Fuscospora solandri) present in places. Black beech is a notable 

species for this site and other notable species may be present including 

Tawhirikaro (Pittosporum cornifolium). 

 

Fauna 

Birdlife recorded in the area includes the New Zealand falcon (Falco 



novaeseelandiae) and the North Island brown kiwi (Apteryx australis 

mantelli), which are both identified as ‘Threatened, Nationally Vulnerable’. 

Common native birds in the area include the fantail (Rhipidura fuliginosa), 

bellbird (Anthornis melanura), grey warbler (Gerygone igata), pied tomtit 

(Petroica macrocephala toitoi), tui (Prosthemadera novaeseelandiae 

novaeseelandiae) and New Zealand pigeon (Hemiphaga novaeseelandiae). 

 

Other notable native fauna will be present including bats, reptiles and 

invertebrates.  

 

 



Ecological values 

Ecological values 

Rank 

Comment 

Rarity and 

distinctiveness 

High 


Contains the ‘Threatened’ New Zealand falcon and North Island 

brown kiwi.  Contains the Regionally Distinctive black beech. Other 

threatened and notable species are likely to be present. 

Representativeness 

Low 

Contains indigenous vegetation on F1.3b (‘Less reduced, better 



protected’) LENZ environment. 

 

Ecological context 



High 

Close to and provides connectivity with Skilton’s Bush, Lake Waikato, 

Lake Waikare and the Waitotara Wharangi Block KNE’s. Also 

provides core habitat for the threatened New Zealand falcon and 

North Island brown kiwi. 

Sustainability 

Positive 

In good vegetative condition and large in area. Key ecological 

processes still influence the site. Under appropriate management, it 

can remain resilient to existing or potential threats. 

 


 

 

Management threats and response 

Potential and actual threats to the sustainability of Mangapuni site’s 

ecological values are as follows: 

 

Threats to ecological 

values 

Level of 

risk 

Comment 

Pest animals 

Medium to 

high 


Possums, goats, cats, mustelids, and rats. 

Weeds 


Low 

Localised areas of gorse. 

Habitat modification 

Low  


Covenant conditions apply. 

 

Site protection measures addressing potential threats and actual threats are 



as follows: 

 

Site protection 



Yes/No 

Description 

Public ownership or 

formal agreement 

Yes 


Covered by a QEII covenant. 

Regulatory protection by 

local government 

Yes 


General regional or district rules might apply. 

Active protection 

Yes 

The landowner undertakes some pest animal control. 



 

  


 

 

NRGE Farms Limited Bush Block and 



Wetlands

 

 

At a glance



 

(l

ast updated: April 2016)

 

TRC reference:  

BD/9562 


Ecological district:           

Egmont  


Other reference:   

LENZ environment:          

F5.2b 


 

Land tenure:  

Private 


Protection status:  

A, B, C 


GPS:  

E 1672627 , N 5653877 



Area:  

7.3 ha 

 

Location  

The NRGE Farms Limited Bush Block and Wetlands KNE is located on 

privately owned land on Kekeua road, 3.5km northwest of Pungarehu in 

west Taranaki. The site is in the Egmont Ecological District and located 

within the Whanganui stream catchment.  

General description

  

The KNE area is made up of three small forest remnants in close proximity 



to each other in rough lahar mounds and depressions on the west Taranaki 

ring plain.  One remnant is a wetland and the other two contain a mix of wet 

and dry areas.  A mix of forest types is present including semi-

coastal/lowland tawa/pukatea/kohekohe forest and lowland swamp forest 

containing pukatea and swamp maire. The remnant lies in close proximity to 

other Key Native Ecosystems in the area, including Donald’s Bush and Stent 

Road Bush. 

Ecological features 

Flora 

The forest remnants are good examples of semi-coastal tawa forest and are 

located in an ‘Acutely Threatened’ LENZ environment (F5.2b, less than 10% 

indigenous forest remains in this environment type). The main canopy is a 

mix of tawa (Beilschmiedia tawa), kohekohe (Dysoxylum spectabile), rimu 

(Dacrydium cupressinum), pukatea (Laurelia novae-zelandiae), rewarewa 

(Knightia excelsa) and is generally in good condition. The understorey and 

ground cover is in good condition in the wetland area although sparser in the 

drier areas due to stock browse.  The understory present consists of a 

number of shrub species including kawakawa (Piper excelsum) and 



Coprosma areolata along with a wide range of ferns. Of note is a small area 

containing swamp maire (Syzygium maire) (rated Regionally Distinctive). 



 

 

Fauna 

 

Native birdlife recorded in and around the KNE include the New Zealand 

pigeon (Hemiphaga novaeseelandiae), grey warbler (Gerygone igata)fantail 

(Rhipidura fuliginosa) and sacred kingfisher (Todiramphus sanctus vagans). 

Notable native freshwater fish are present including banded kokopu 

(Galaxias fasciatus) and brown mudfish (Neochanna apoda). Good habitat 

exists for notable reptiles and invertebrates. 

Ecological values 

Ecological values 

Rank 

Comment 

Rarity and 

distinctiveness 

High 


Contains the ‘Regionally Distinctive’ swamp maire (Syzygium maire), 

banded kokopu (Galaxias fasciatus) and brown mudfish (Neochanna 

apoda). 

Representativeness 

High 

Contains indigenous vegetation that is poorly represented in Taranaki and 



classified as F5.2b - an 'acutely threatened' LENZ environment. 

Ecological context 

Medium 

The remnant provides connectivity to other Key Native Ecosystems 



nearby including Donald’s Bush and Stent Road Bush. 

Sustainability 

Positive 

Key ecological processes still influence the site. Under appropriate 

management it will remain resilient to existing and potential threats. 

 

Management threats and response 

Potential and actual threats to the sustainability of NRGE Farms Limited 

Bush Block and Wetlands site’s ecological values are as follows: 

 

 

Threats to ecological 



values 

Potential 

threat 

Comment 

Pest animals 

High  

Possums, cats, rats, hedgehogs and mustelids. 



Weeds 

Medium 


Woolly nightshade, blackberry, selaginella and inkweed. 

Habitat modification 

High 

The remnants are currently unfenced and grazing is extensive in some 



areas. 

 

 

 


 

 

Site protection measures addressing potential and actual threats are as follows: 



 

 

Site protection 



Yes/No 

Description 

Public ownership or 

formal agreement 

Yes 


Landowners are willing to enter into a MOE for this area. 

Regulatory protection by 

local government 

Yes 


General regional or district rules might apply. 

Active protection 

Yes 

Site is within the self help possum control area and receives 



regular pest animal control for possums.  

 

 



 

 


 

 

QEII 5/06/282



 

 

At a glance



 

(l

ast updated: April 2016)

 

TRC reference:  

BD/9565 


Ecological district:           

Egmont  


Other reference:   

LENZ environment:          

F5.2b 


 

Land tenure:  

Private 


Protection status:  

A, B, C 


GPS:  

E1705022 N5676192 



Area:  

1.9 ha 

 

Location  

The QEII 5/06/282 KNE is located on privately owned land on Richmond 

Road near Lepperton, 7 km North of Inglewood. The site is in the Egmont 

Ecological District and located within the Waiongana catchment. 

 

General description

  

The KNE area is made up of a 1.9 ha remnant of semi costal forest adjacent 



to the Mangarewa stream very near Lepperton. The remnant is protected 

with a QEII covenant and securely fenced. The site lies in close proximity to 

other Key Native Ecosystems in the area, including Lepperton bush and Te 

Wairoa. 



Ecological features 

Flora 

The forest type is a mix of semi-coastal/lowland tawa/pukatea/kohekohe 

forest.  Other canopy trees include titoki (Alectryon excelsus), rewarewa 

(Knightia excelsa) and puriri (Vitex lucens). A number of other plant species 

are also present in the sub canopy including karaka (Corynocarpus 

laevigatus), mamaku (Cyathea medullaris), kawakawa (Piper excelsum), 

pigeonwood (Hedycarya arborea), various Coprosmas (Coprosma spp.), 

silver fern (Cyathea dealbata) and mahoe (Melicytus ramiflorus). 

 

Fauna 



 

Native birdlife recorded in and around the KNE include the New Zealand 

pigeon (Hemiphaga novaeseelandiae), Tui (Prosthemadera 

novaeseelandiae), grey warbler (Gerygone igata), fantail (Rhipidura 

fuliginosa), silvereye (Zosterops lateralis lateralis) and sacred kingfisher 

(Todiramphus sanctus vagans).  Fish life in the Mangarewa stream includes 

the ‘At Risk’ longfin eel (Anguilla dieffenbachii) and redfin bully 



(Gobiomorphus huttoni).

  

Other aquatic life includes the shortfin eel 



(Anguilla australis), freshwater crayfish (Paranephrops planifrons), 

freshwater shrimp (Paratya) and the introduced brown trout (Salmo trutta).

  

Good habitat exists for notable reptiles and invertebrates. 



Ecological values 

Ecological values 

Rank 

Comment 

Rarity and 

distinctiveness 

Medium 


Contains the ‘At Risk’ longfin eel (Anguilla dieffenbachii) and redfin bully 

(Gobiomorphus huttoni).  

Representativeness 

High 

Contains indigenous vegetation that is poorly represented in Taranaki and 



classified as F5.2b - an 'acutely threatened' LENZ environment. 

Ecological context 

Medium 

The site provides connectivity to other Key Native Ecosystems nearby 



including Te Wairoa and Lepperton bush. 

Sustainability 

Positive 

Key ecological processes still influence the site. Under appropriate 

management it will remain resilient to existing and potential threats. 

 

 



Management threats and response 

Potential and actual threats to the sustainability of the QEII 5/06/282 site’s 

ecological values are as follows: 

 

 



Threats to ecological 

values 

Potential 

threat 

Comment 

Pest animals 

High  

Possums, cats, rats, hedgehogs and mustelids. 



Weeds 

Medium 


Woolly nightshade, old mans beard, barberry, inkweed, hydrangea, holly, 

cherry tree, Jerusalem cherry, sycamore, African clubmoss, Aroid lily and 



Tradescantia.  

Habitat modification 

High 

The remnant is fenced but the fence is no longer stock proof in some 



areas. Stock grazing is modifying the habitat in places. 

 

 

 


 

 

Site protection measures addressing potential and actual threats are as follows: 



 

 

Site protection 



Yes/No 

Description 

Public ownership or 

formal agreement 

Yes 


The site is legally protected with a QEII covenant. 

Regulatory protection by 

local government 

Yes 


General regional or district rules might apply. 

Active protection 

Yes 

Site is within the self help possum control area and receives 



regular pest animal control for possums. 

 

 



 

 


 

 

Redpath Bush



 

 

At a glance



 

(l

ast updated: April 2016)

 

TRC reference:  

BD/9540 


Ecological district:           

Egmont  


Other reference:   

LENZ environment:          

F5.2b 


 

Land tenure:  

Private 


Protection status:  

A, B, C 


GPS:  

1706301 N 5665601 E 



Area:  

6.2 ha 

 

Location  

The Redpath Bush KNE is located on privately owned land on Tarata Road 

approximately 2 km East of Inglewood. The site is in the Egmont Ecological 

District and located within the Waitara catchment. 

 

General description

  

The KNE area is made up of two remnants of lowland forest with a total size 



of 6.2 ha. The larger remnant is bordered by large sycamore trees and has a 

mostly tawa dominated canopy with some regenerating native vegetation 

surrounding a small creek. The smaller remnant lies along the Kurapete 

stream. Both remnants are fenced, but the smaller remnant has some stock 

invasion from the other side of the Kurapete stream. The site lies in close 

proximity to other Key Native Ecosystems in the area, including Maketawa 

stream forests and the Norfolk road KNE.  

Ecological features 

Flora 

The main canopy of the site is dominated by tawa (Beilschmiedia tawa), with 

other canopy trees including pukatea (Laurelia nova-zelandiae), kahikatea 

(Dacrycarpus dacrydioides), rimu (Dacrydium cupressinum) and rewarewa 

(Knightia excelsa).  A number of other plant species are also present in the 

canopy and sub-canopy. These include, kohekohe (Dysoxylum spectabile), 

kamahi (Weinmannia racemosa), toropapa (Alseuosmia macrophylla), 

mamaku (Cyathea medullaris), kawakawa (Piper excelsum), pigeonwood 

(Hedycarya arborea), round leaved coprosma (Coprosma rotundifolia), silver 

tree fern (Cyathea dealbata), mahoe (Melicytus ramiflorus), kanono 

(Coprosma grandifolia), and supplejack (Ripogonum scandens). 

 

 

Fauna 

 

Native birdlife recorded in and around the KNE include the New Zealand 

pigeon (Hemiphaga novaeseelandiae), Tui (Prosthemadera 

novaeseelandiae), grey warbler (Gerygone igata) and fantail (Rhipidura 

fuliginosa). Notable freshwater fish species recorded from the Kurapete 

stream nearby include giant kokopu(Galaxias argenteus) and lamprey 

(Geotria australis). Good habitat exists for notable reptiles and 

invertebrates. 



Ecological values 

Ecological values 

Rank 

Comment 

Rarity and 

distinctiveness 

High 


Contains the “At Risk’ giant kokopu (Galaxias argenteus) and ‘Threatened’ 

lamprey (Geotria australis). Both species are also ‘Regionally Distinctive’. 

Representativeness 

High 


Contains indigenous vegetation that is poorly represented in Taranaki and 

classified as F5.2b - an 'acutely threatened' LENZ environment. 

Ecological context 

Medium 


The site provides connectivity to other Key Native Ecosystems nearby 

including Maketawa stream forests and the Norfolk road KNE. 

Sustainability 

Positive 

Key ecological processes still influence the site. Under appropriate 

management it will remain resilient to existing and potential threats. 

 

Management threats and response 

Potential and actual threats to the sustainability of the Redpath Bush site’s 

ecological values are as follows: 

 

 



Threats to ecological 

values 

Potential 

threat 

Comment 

Pest animals 

High  

Possums, cats, rats, hedgehogs and mustelids. 



Weeds 

Medium 


Old mans beard, blackberry, African clubmoss, ivy, cherry, and 

Tradescantia.  

Habitat modification 

High 

The remnants are fenced but there is stock invasion from across the 



Kurapete stream. Stock grazing is modifying the habitat in places. 

 

 

 


 

 

Site protection measures addressing potential and actual threats are as follows: 



 

 

Site protection 



Yes/No 

Description 

Public ownership or 

formal agreement 

Yes 


The owners are working with QEII to legally protect the site. 

Regulatory protection by 

local government 

Yes 


General regional or district rules might apply. 

Active protection 

Yes 

Site is within the self help possum control area and receives 



regular pest animal control for possums. 

 

 



 

 


 

 

Waimoku Wetland 



 

 

At a glance



 

(l

ast updated: April 2016)

 

TRC reference:  

BD/7154 


Ecological district:           

Egmont  


Other reference:   

LENZ environment:          

F5.2b 


 

Land tenure:  

Private 


Protection status:  

A, B, C 


GPS:  

E 1681675 , N 5669637 



Area:  

0.6 ha 

 

Location  

The Waimoku Wetland KNE is located on privately owned land on Shearer 

Drive in Oakura. The site is in the Egmont Ecological District and located 

within the Waimoku stream catchment. 

 

General description

  

The KNE area is made up of a regenerating wetland area with the Waimoku 



stream running along the western edge. Little original vegetation remains 

but the wetland has been planted in native species and is regenerating. The 

wetland contains a considerable number of pest plant species which will 

require significant effort to bring under control. The site lies in close 

proximity to other Key Native Ecosystems in the area, including Matekai 

Park and Mckie QEII Covenant. 



Ecological features 

Flora 

The wetland is dominated by planted flax (Phormium tenax) and cabbage 

trees (Cordyline australis) with natural regeneration of cutty grass (Carex 

geminata). Of note is the presence of the regionally distinctive tree whau 

(Entelea arborescens). The flora of the site will continue to regenerate into a 

more natural state if pest plant issues can be managed. 

 

 

Fauna 

 

Native birdlife recorded in and around the KNE include tui (Prosthemadera 



novaeseelandiae), grey warbler (Gerygone igata)fantail (Rhipidura 

fuliginosa) and sacred kingfisher (Todiramphus sanctus vagans).         

Notable native freshwater fish are present including giant kokopu (Galaxias 



argenteus). Good habitat exists for notable reptiles and invertebrates. 

Ecological values 

Ecological values 

Rank 

Comment 

Rarity and 

distinctiveness 

High 


Contains the ‘Regionally Distinctive’ Whau (Entelea arborescens) and 

giant kokopu (Galaxias argenteus) 

Representativeness 

High 


Contains indigenous vegetation that is poorly represented in Taranaki and 

classified as F5.2b - an 'acutely threatened' LENZ environment. 

Ecological context 

Medium 


The site provides connectivity to other Key Native Ecosystems nearby 

including Matekai Park and Mckie QEII Covenant. 

Sustainability 

Positive 

Key ecological processes influence the site. Under appropriate 

management it will remain resilient to existing and potential threats. 

 

 

Management threats and response 

Potential and actual threats to the sustainability of the Waimoku Wetland 

site’s ecological values are as follows: 

 

 



Threats to ecological 

values 

Potential 

threat 

Comment 

Pest animals 

High  

Possums, cats, rats, hedgehogs and mustelids. 



Weeds 

High 


Woolly nightshade, blackberry, selaginella, bamboo, Kahili ginger, Crack 

willow, and Tradescantia. With the threat of mignonette vine invading from 

adjacent property. 

Habitat modification 

High 

The wetland has been significantly modified in the past but is regenerating 



to a near natural state. 

 

 

 


 

 

Site protection measures addressing potential and actual threats are as follows: 



 

 

Site protection 



Yes/No 

Description 

Public ownership or 

formal agreement 

Yes 


Site is protected by an existing QEII covenant. 

Regulatory protection by 

local government 

Yes 


General regional or district rules might apply. 

Active protection 

Yes 

The landowner is actively managing pest plants at the site and is 



motivated to also manage pest animals.   

 

 



 

 

Document Outline

  • Cardenica Woodlot
  • Forest & Bees Takou Bush
  • Korito Heights
  • Mangapuni
  • NRGE Farms Ltd Bush Block & Wetlands
  • QEII 5/06/282
  • Redpath Bush
  • Waimoku Wetland


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə