Clearing Permit Decision Report Application details



Yüklə 91.02 Kb.
PDF просмотр
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü91.02 Kb.

Page 1  

  

 



Clearing Permit Decision Report  

 

1.  Application details  



 

1.1.  Permit application details 

Permit application No.: 

6902/1 


Permit type: 

Purpose 


1.2.  Proponent details 

Proponent’s name: 

Tronox Management Pty Ltd  

1.3.  Property details 

Property: 

Exploration Licence 70/2345 

Exploration Licence 70/3065 

Exploration Licence 70/4129 

Local Government Area: 

Shire of Dandaragan 

Colloquial name: 

Cooljarloo West Drilling Project 

1.4.  Application 

Clearing Area (ha) 

No. Trees 

Method of Clearing 

For the purpose of: 

0.05 


 

Mechanical Removal 

Mineral Exploration 

1.5.  Decision on application 

Decision on Permit Application: 

Grant 


Decision Date:  

31 March 2016 

2.  Site Information 

2.1.  Existing environment and information 

2.1.1. Description of the native vegetation under application 

 

Vegetation 



Description 

The clearing permit application areas have been broadly mapped as the following Beard vegetation association (GIS 

Database): 

 

1030: Low woodland; Banksia attenuata & B. menziesii 



 

A flora and fauna survey of the Cooljarloo West Project Area was undertaken by Woodman Environmental Consulting 

(2014). Five vegetation communities were identified within the application areas: 

 

VT1: Low Open Heathland to Mid Closed Heathland of Acacia lasiocarpa var. lasiocarpa, Banksia telmatiaea, 



Melaleuca seriata, Hakea obliqua subsp. parviflora, Regelia ciliata and/or Verticordia densiflora var. densiflora, often 

with Mid Isolated Clumps of Shrubs to Mid Sparse Shrubland of Melaleuca rhaphiophylla on white grey to grey brown 

sand, sandy loam or sandy clay in broad damp depressions on flat to gently undulating plains; 

 

VT2: Mid Sparse Shrubland to Mid Closed Shrubland of Melaleuca acutifolia, Melaleuca brevifolia, Melaleuca 



rhaphiophylla and/or Melaleuca viminea subsp. viminea over Low Isolated Clumps of Shrubs to Low Shrubland of 

Calothamnus hirsutus, Calothamnus sanguineus and Grevillea ?thelemanniana subsp. Cooljarloo (B.J. Keighery 28 B) 

on grey to grey brown sand, sandy loam or sandy clay in broad damp to wet depressions and drainage lines on flat to 

gently undulating plains; 

 

VT5: Low Heathland to Mid Closed Heathland of Banksia telmatiaea, Hakea obliqua subsp. parviflora, Melaleuca 



seriata and/or Regelia ciliata on white grey to grey brown sand, sandy loam, sandy clay or clay loam in broad damp 

depressions on flat to gently undulating plains; 

 

VT17: Low Isolated Clumps of Trees to Low Open Forest of Banksia attenuata, Banksia menziesii and Eucalyptus 



todtiana over Mid Isolated Clumps of Shrubs to Mid Shrubland of Adenanthos cygnorum subsp. cygnorum, Eremaea 

pauciflora, Jacksonia floribunda, Jacksonia nutans, Stirlingia latifolia and Xanthorrhoea preissii over Low Isolated 

Clumps of Shrubs to Low Shrubland of Bossiaea eriocarpa, Dasypogon obliquifolius, Eremaea asterocarpa subsp. 

asterocarpa, Eremaea pauciflora, Hibbertia crassifolia, Hibbertia hypericoides, Jacksonia nutans, Melaleuca clavifolia, 

Patersonia occidentalis var. ?occidentalis and Petrophile linearis over Low Isolated Clumps of Sedges to Mid Open 

Sedgeland of Mesomelaena pseudostygia on white or grey sand on undulating plains and low dunes; and 

 

VT18: Low Isolated Clumps of Trees to Low Open Forest of Banksia attenuata and Banksia menziesii over Mid Isolated 



Clumps of Shrubs to Mid Shrubland of Allocasuarina humilis, Conospermum stoechadis subsp. stoechadis, Eremaea 

pauciflora, Hakea costata and/or Xanthorrhoea preissii over Low Isolated Clumps of Shrubs to Low Closed Shrubland of 

Bossiaea eriocarpa, Calothamnus sanguineus, Dasypogon obliquifolius, Eremaea pauciflora, Hibbertia hypericoides, 

Jacksonia nutans and/or Melaleuca clavifolia over Low Isolated Clumps of Sedges to Mid Open Sedgeland of 

Mesomelaena pseudostygia on grey to yellow grey sand on undulating plains and low dunes or white grey to grey 

brown sand, sandy loam or sandy clay loam on simple slopes, open depressions or flats within undulating plains. 



Page 2  

 

 



 

 

Clearing Description 



Cooljarloo West Drilling Project. 

Tronox Management Pty Ltd proposes to clear up to 0.05 hectares of native vegetation within a total boundary of 

approximately  3.3  hectares,  for  the  purpose  of  mineral  exploration.  The  project  is  located  approximately  29 

kilometres east of Dandaragan, in the Shire of Dandaragan.  

 

Vegetation Condition 



Very Good: Vegetation structure altered; obvious signs of disturbance (Keighery, 1994). 

 

 



Comment 

Vegetation condition was based on vegetation descriptions provided by Tronox Management (2015)   

 

 

3.  Assessment of application against clearing principles 



 

Comments 

 

The proposed clearing of 0.05 hectares is part of the 2016 Cooljarloo West Drilling Program. This application is 



to allow for the clearing of three drill lines out of a total of 13 that are currently proposed for the program. The 

application area has been mapped as Beard vegetation association 1030 of which more than 50% is remaining 

at a state, bioregional, and sub-bioregional level (Government of Western Australia, 2014). The vegetation to be 

cleared is not considered to represent a significant remnant within an extensively cleared area. There are no 

known Threatened Ecological Communities (TEC’s) or Priority Ecological Communities (PECs) within the 

application area (GIS Database). The application area is not located within or in close proximity to a 

conservation reserve (GIS Database). 

 

As stated above, five vegetation communities occur within the application area based on a flora and vegetation 



assessment undertaken by Woodman Environmental Consulting (2014). All five of the vegetation communities 

are well represented within the surrounding area (Tronox Management, 2015). Due to the small scale of the 

proposed clearing (0.05 hectares) and abundance of similar vegetation in the surrounding region it is unlikely 

that the clearing will result in a significant impact to any vegetation community.  

 

A flora and vegetation survey was undertaken by Woodman Environmental Consulting (2015). A total of 79 flora 



species of conservation significance were recorded within the Cooljarloo West Project Area (Woodman 

Environmental Consulting, 2015). Of these 79 species, six were recorded within the application area: 

 

 

• 



Andersonia gracilis – Threatened under the WC Act 

• 

Anigozanthos viridis subsp. terraspectans – Threatened under the WC Act 



• 

Babingtonia urbana – Priority 3 as listed by DPaW 

• 

Chordifex chaunocoleus – Priority 4 as listed by DPaW 



• 

Conostephium magnum – Priority 4 as listed by DPaW 

• 

Verticordia lindleyi subsp. lindleyi – Priority 4 as listed by DPaW  



 

Whilst not recorded within the application areas themselves, the following species may be impacted during 

access to the application areas (Tronox Management, 2015): 

 

• 



Grevillea thelemanniana subsp. Cooljarloo – Priority 1 as listed by DPaW 

• 

Isopogon panduratus subsp. palustris – Priority 3 as listed by DPaW 



• 

Onychosepalum nodatum – Priority 3 as listed by DPaW 

 

The proposed clearing is within 50 metres of Declared Rare Flora (DRF) and will involve the removal or 



destruction of DRF (Tronox Management, 2015). DPaW (2016a) advises that a licence to take application has 

been granted for the 2016 Cooljarloo West Drilling Program authorising the taking of up to 159 plants of 

Andersonia gracillis (DRF) and potential damage to up to eight individuals of Anigozanthos viridis subsp. 

terraspectans (DRF). 

 

The flora and vegetation survey undertaken by Woodman Environmental (2015) recorded 42 individuals of 



Grevillea thelmanniana subsp. Cooljarloo within the area targeted by the 2016 Cooljarloo West Drilling 

Program. From previous flora surveys at least 842 individuals are known to occur within the Cooljarloo West 

Project Area. Grevillea thelemanniana subsp. Cooljarloo is thought to be well distributed locally and has a broad 

habitat (Tronox Management, 2015). Identified individuals have been flagged and will be avoided were possible, 

in this case when obtaining access to the clearing permit application area (Tronox Management, 2015).  

 

The remaining species listed above are found outside of the application area within and surrounding the 



Cooljarloo West Project Area.  Due to the small area applied to be cleared (0.05 hectares) and the distribution 

of these species outside of the application area, it is unlikely the proposed clearing will have a significant impact 

on the population of these species. 

 

The weed species Ehrhata calycina was recorded within the application area (Tronox Management, 2015). 



Weeds have the potential to alter the biodiversity of an area, competing with native vegetation for available 

resources and making areas more fire prone. Dieback may also occur within the application area (Tronox 

Management, 2015). Tronox has strict hygiene procedures in place including the requirement for dieback 


Page 3  

interpretation and risk mapping. In addition Tronox operate under an Exploration Environmental Management 

Plan which identifies that where there is a requirement to move soil in wet conditions, additional hygiene 

measures must be implemented (Tronox Management, 2014). Potential impacts to biodiversity as a result of the 

proposed clearing may be minimised by the implementation of a dieback and weed management condiiton.  

 

No significant fauna habitat was identified within the application area (Tronox Management, 2015). Vegetation 



within the area is considered suitable foraging habitat for the Carnaby Cockatoo (Tronox Management, 2015). 

This habitat is widespread in the local area and the proposed clearing is not likely to have an impact on 

availability of foraging habitat in the region. Given the small area to be cleared (0.05 hectares) and the nature of 

the clearing, it is unlikely there will be a significant impact on fauna species.  

 

The application area intersects seasonal wetland areas which were identified during a flora and vegetation 



survey by Woodman Environmental Consulting (2015). These wetlands were not classed as significant by 

Woodman Environmental Consulting (2015). Given the small amount of clearing proposed (0.05 hectares) and 

the nature of clearing (exploration purposes) there is unlikely to be a significant environmental impact on these 

wetland areas. Woodman Environmental Consulting (2015) advises that in order to reduce potential impacts, 

ground conditions within the wetland areas will be assessed prior to drilling, and access will be avoided if the 

ground is wet, as bogging and associated damage to soil and vegetation could occur. The small scale of 

clearing proposed (0.05 hectares) is unlikely to have a significant impact on surface water or groundwater 

quality, or contribute to significant land degradation.  

 

The application has been assessed against the clearing principles, planning instruments and other matters in 



accordance with s.51O of the Environmental Protection Act 1986, and the proposed clearing is at variance to 

Principles (c) and (f), is not likely to be at variance to Principles (a), (b), (d), (g), (h), (i), and (j) and is not at 

variance to Principle (e). 

 

DPaW (2016a) 



DPaW (2016b) 

Government of Western Australia (2014) 

Tronox Management (2014) 

Tronox Management (2015) 

Woodman Environmental Consulting (2014) 

Woodman Environmental Consulting (2015) 

 

GIS Database: 



- DPaW Tenure 

 

 



Planning instrument, Native Title, Previous EPA decision or other matter. 

Comments: 

There is one native title claim (WC 1997/071 ) over the area under application (DAA, 2016). This claim has been 

registered with the Native Title Tribunal on behalf of the claimant group. However, the tenure has been granted 

in accordance with the future act regime of the Native Title Act 1993 and the nature of the act (ie. the proposed 

clearing activity) has been provided for in that process, therefore the granting of a clearing permit is not a future 

act under the Native Title Act 1993. 

 

There are no registered Sites of Aboriginal Significance located in the area applied to clear (DAA, 2016). It is the 



proponent's responsibility to comply with the Aboriginal Heritage Act 1972 and ensure that no Sites of Aboriginal 

Significance are damaged through the clearing process.  

 

It is the proponent's responsibility to liaise with the Department of Environment Regulation, the Department of 



Parks and Wildlife and the Department of Water, to determine whether a Works Approval, Water Licence, Bed 

and Banks Permit, or any other licences or approvals are required for the proposed works. 

 

The clearing permit application was advertised on 1 February 2016 by the Department of Mines and Petroleum 



inviting submissions from the public. No submissions were received. 

 

Advice was requested from the Office of the Environmental Protection Authority (OEPA) as the application area 



falls within the Cooljarloo West Project Development Envelope which is currently under EPA assessment. The 

OEPA advised that the clearing proposed under this permit (CPS 6902/1) could proceed as it was considered a 

minor or preliminary works (OEPA, 2016).  

 

 



Methodology:  

DAA (2016) 

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 


Page 4  

 

 



 

4.  References 

 

DAA (2016) Aboriginal Heritage Inquiry System, Department of Aboriginal Affairs, Perth. http://maps.dia.wa.gov.au/AHIS2/. 



(Accessed 28 January 2016). 

DPaW (2016a) Advice received in relation to Clearing Permit Application CPS 6902/1 – Licence  to take. Department of Parks 

and Wildlfe, Western Australia, March 2016. 

DPaW (2016b) NatureMap. Department of Parks and Wildlife. http://naturemap.dec.wa.gov.au (Accessed 11 March 2016) 

Keighery, B.J. (1994) Bushland Plant Survey: A Guide to Plant Community Survey for the Community. Wildflower Society of 

                 WA (Inc). Nedlands, Western Australia. 

Government of Western Australia (2014) 2014 Statewide Vegetation Statistics Incorporating the CAR reserve analysis (Full 

                 Report). Department of Environment and Conservation, Western Australia, June 2014. 

OEPA (2016) Advice received in relation to Clearing Permit Application CPS 6902/1. Office of the Environmental ,  

              Western Australia, March 2016. 

Tronox Management (2014) Exploration Environmental Management Plan. Tronox Management Pty Ltd, Western Australia,  

                 June 2014.  

Tronox Management (2015) Cooljarloo West 2016 Exploration Drilling. Environmental Screening. Tronox Management Pty Ltd,  

                Western Australia, December 2015. 

Woodman Environmental Consulting (2014) Botanical Survey of 2014/2015 Cooljarloo Drill and Access Lines. Report prepared  

                for Tronox Management Pty Ltd, by Woodman Environmental Consulting Pty Ltd,  March 2014.  

Woodman Environmental Consulting (2015) Exploration Environmental Assessment 2016. Desktop Review and Risk 

               Assessment. Report prepared for Tronox Management Pty Ltd, by Woodman Environmental Consulting Pty Ltd,   

               October 2015. 

 

 



 

5.  Glossary 

 

  Acronyms: 



 

BoM 


Bureau of Meteorology, Australian Government 

DAA 


Department of Aboriginal Affairs, Western Australia 

DAFWA 


Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia 

DEC 


Department of Environment and Conservation, Western Australia  (now DPaW and DER) 

DER 


Department of Environment Regulation, Western Australia 

DMP 


Department of Mines and Petroleum, Western Australia 

DRF 


Declared Rare Flora 

DotE 


Department of the Environment, Australian Government 

DoW 


Department of Water, Western Australia 

DPaW 


Department of Parks and Wildlife, Western Australia 

DSEWPaC 


Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities  (now DotE) 

EPA 


Environmental Protection Authority, Western Australia 

EP Act 


Environmental Protection Act 1986, Western Australia 

EPBC Act 

Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (Federal Act) 

GIS 


Geographical Information System 

ha 


Hectare (10,000 square metres) 

IBRA 


Interim Biogeographic Regionalisation for Australia 

IUCN 


International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources – commonly known as the 

World Conservation Union 

PEC 

Priority Ecological Community, Western Australia 



RIWI Act 

Rights in Water and Irrigation Act 1914, Western Australia 

TEC 

Threatened Ecological Community 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



Page 5  

 

 



 

 

 



Definitions: 

 

{DPaW  (2015)  Conservation  Codes  for  Western  Australian  Flora  and  Fauna.    Department  of  Parks  and  Wildlife,  Western 



Australia}:- 

 



Threatened species: 

Published as Specially Protected under the Wildlife Conservation Act 1950, listed under Schedules 1 

to 4 of the Wildlife Conservation (Specially Protected Fauna) Notice for Threatened Fauna and Wildlife 

Conservation  (Rare  Flora)  Notice  for  Threatened  Flora  (which  may  also  be  referred  to  as  Declared 

Rare Flora).  

 

Threatened  fauna  is  that  subset  of  ‘Specially  Protected  Fauna’  declared  to  be  ‘likely  to  become 



extinct’ pursuant to section 14(4) of the Wildlife Conservation Act.  

 

Threatened flora is flora that has been declared to be ‘likely to become extinct or is rare, or otherwise 



in need of special protection’, pursuant to section 23F(2) of the Wildlife Conservation Act.  

 

The  assessment  of  the  conservation  status  of  these  species  is  based  on  their  national  extent  and 



ranked according to their level of threat using IUCN Red List categories and criteria as detailed below. 

 

CR 



Critically endangered species  

Threatened species considered to be facing an extremely high risk of extinction in the wild. Published 

as  Specially  Protected  under  the  Wildlife  Conservation  Act  1950,  in  Schedule  1  of  the  Wildlife 

Conservation  (Specially  Protected  Fauna)  Notice  for  Threatened  Fauna  and  Wildlife  Conservation 

(Rare Flora) Notice for Threatened Flora.  

 

EN 



Endangered species  

Threatened  species  considered  to  be  facing  a  very  high  risk  of  extinction  in  the  wild.  Published  as 

Specially  Protected  under  the  Wildlife  Conservation  Act  1950,  in  Schedule  2  of  the  Wildlife 

Conservation  (Specially  Protected  Fauna)  Notice  for  Threatened  Fauna  and  Wildlife  Conservation 

(Rare Flora) Notice for Threatened Flora.  

 

VU 



Vulnerable species  

Threatened species considered to be facing a high risk of extinction in the wild. Published as Specially 

Protected  under  the  Wildlife  Conservation  Act  1950,  in  Schedule  3  of  the  Wildlife  Conservation 

(Specially  Protected  Fauna)  Notice  for  Threatened  Fauna  and  Wildlife  Conservation  (Rare  Flora) 

Notice for Threatened Flora. 

 

 



EX 

Presumed extinct species  

Species  which  have  been  adequately  searched  for  and  there  is  no  reasonable  doubt  that  the  last 

individual  has  died.  Published  as  Specially  Protected  under  the  Wildlife  Conservation  Act  1950,  in 

Schedule  4  of  the  Wildlife  Conservation  (Specially  Protected  Fauna)  Notice  for  Presumed  Extinct 

Fauna and Wildlife Conservation (Rare Flora) Notice for Presumed Extinct Flora.  

 

IA 


Migratory birds protected under an international agreement  

Birds that are subject to an agreement between the government of Australia and the governments of 

Japan (JAMBA), China (CAMBA) and The Republic of Korea (ROKAMBA), and the Bonn Convention, 

relating  to  the  protection  of  migratory  birds.  Published  as  Specially  Protected  under  the  Wildlife 

Conservation Act 1950, in Schedule 5 of the Wildlife Conservation (Specially Protected Fauna) Notice. 

 

CD 



Conservation dependent fauna  

Fauna of special conservation need being species dependent on ongoing conservation intervention to 

prevent  it  becoming  eligible  for  listing  as  threatened.  Published  as  Specially  Protected  under  the 

Wildlife Conservation Act 1950, in Schedule 6 of the Wildlife Conservation (Specially Protected Fauna) 

Notice.  

 

OS 



Other specially protected fauna  

Fauna  otherwise  in  need  of  special  protection  to  ensure  their  conservation.  Published  as  Specially 

Protected  under  the  Wildlife  Conservation  Act  1950,  in  Schedule  7  of  the  Wildlife  Conservation 

(Specially Protected Fauna) Notice. 

 

 



Priority species 

Species which are poorly known; or  

Species  that  are  adequately  known,  are  rare  but  not  threatened,  and  require  regular  monitoring. 

Assessment  of  Priority  codes  is  based  on  the Western  Australian  distribution  of  the  species,  unless 

the distribution in WA is part of a contiguous population extending into adjacent States, as defined by 

the known spread of locations. 

 

 

 



Page 6  

 

 



 

 

 



P1 

Priority One  -  Poorly-known species:  

Species that are known from one or a few locations (generally five or less) which are potentially at risk. 

All occurrences are either: very small; or on lands not managed for conservation, e.g. agricultural or 

pastoral  lands,  urban  areas,  road  and  rail  reserves,  gravel  reserves  and  active  mineral  leases;  or 

otherwise  under  threat  of  habitat  destruction  or  degradation.  Species  may  be  included  if  they  are 

comparatively  well  known  from  one  or  more  locations  but  do  not  meet  adequacy  of  survey 

requirements  and  appear  to  be  under  immediate  threat  from  known  threatening  processes.  Such 

species are in urgent need of further survey.  

 

P2 



Priority Two  -  Poorly-known species:  

Species  that  are  known  from  one  or  a  few  locations  (generally  five  or  less),  some  of  which  are  on 

lands  managed  primarily  for  nature  conservation,  e.g.  national  parks,  conservation  parks,  nature 

reserves  and  other  lands  with  secure  tenure  being  managed  for  conservation.  Species  may  be 

included if they are comparatively well known from one or more locations but do not meet adequacy of 

survey requirements and appear to be under threat from known threatening processes. Such species 

are in urgent need of further survey. 

 

P3 



Priority Three  -  Poorly-known species:  

Species that are known from several locations, and the species does not appear to be under imminent 

threat, or from few but widespread locations with either large population size or significant remaining 

areas of apparently suitable habitat, much of it not under imminent threat. Species may be included if 

they  are  comparatively  well  known  from  several  locations  but  do  not  meet  adequacy  of  survey 

requirements and known threatening processes exist that could affect them. Such species are in need 

of further survey.  

 

P4 



Priority Four  -  Rare, Near Threatened and other species in need of monitoring:  

(a)  Rare.  Species  that  are  considered  to  have  been  adequately  surveyed,  or  for  which  sufficient 

knowledge  is  available,  and  that  are  considered  not  currently  threatened  or  in  need  of  special 

protection, but could be if present circumstances change. These species are usually represented on 

conservation lands. 

(b)  Near  Threatened.  Species  that  are  considered  to  have  been  adequately  surveyed  and  that  are 

close to qualifying for Vulnerable, but are not listed as Conservation Dependent. 

(c) Species that have been removed from the list of threatened species during the past five years for 

reasons other than taxonomy.  

 

 



Principles for clearing native vegetation: 

 

(a) 



Native vegetation should not be cleared if it comprises a high level of biological diversity. 

 

(b) 



Native  vegetation  should  not  be  cleared  if  it  comprises  the  whole  or  a  part  of,  or  is  necessary  for  the 

maintenance of, a significant habitat for fauna indigenous to Western Australia. 

 

(c) 


Native  vegetation  should  not  be  cleared  if  it  includes,  or  is  necessary  for  the  continued  existence  of,  rare 

flora. 


 

(d) 


Native  vegetation  should  not  be  cleared  if  it  comprises  the  whole  or  a  part  of,  or  is  necessary  for  the 

maintenance of a threatened ecological community. 

 

(e) 


Native vegetation should not be cleared if it is significant as a remnant of native vegetation in an area that 

has been extensively cleared. 

 

(f) 


Native vegetation should not be cleared if it is growing in, or in association with, an environment associated 

with a watercourse or wetland. 

 

(g) 


Native vegetation should not be cleared if the clearing of the vegetation is likely to cause appreciable land 

degradation. 

 

(h) 


Native  vegetation  should not be  cleared if  the clearing  of  the  vegetation  is likely  to  have  an impact  on  the 

environmental values of any adjacent or nearby conservation area. 

 

(i) 


Native vegetation should not be cleared if the clearing of the vegetation is likely to cause deterioration in the 

quality of surface or underground water. 

 

(j) 


Native  vegetation  should  not  be  cleared  if  clearing  the  vegetation  is  likely  to  cause,  or  exacerbate,  the 

incidence or intensity of flooding. 



 

 


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə