College of Ayurvedic Pharmaceutical Sciences, Jogindernagar, Mandi H. P., India



Yüklə 57.79 Kb.
PDF просмотр
tarix26.07.2017
ölçüsü57.79 Kb.

 

 

 



 

ISSN 2278- 4136

 

Online Available at www.phytojournal.com



 

 

 



Journal of Pharmacognosy and Phytochemistry

 

 



Vol. 1 No. 1 2012                                                 www.phytojournal.com                                                 

 

Page | 1



  

 

Preliminary Phytochemical Analysis of the Extracts of 



Psidium Leaves  

 

Vikrant Arya



1*

, Narender Thakur

2

, C.P. Kashyap



3

 

 



1.

 

College of Ayurvedic Pharmaceutical Sciences, Jogindernagar, Mandi H.P., India. 



[E-mail: arya.vikrant30@gmail.com] 

2.

 



Vinayaka College of Pharmacy, Village Bahuguna P.O. Garsa Distt. Kullu, H.P., India 

3.

 



College of Ayurvedic Pharmaceutical Sciences, Jogindernagar, Mandi H.P., India. 

 

Amritphale (Psidium guajava L.), is a small tree in Myrtaceae family, traditionally used in treatment of several 



diseases (inflammation, diabetes, hypertension, wounds, pain and fever). The present study was carried out to 

investigate the phytochemical profile of leaves of Psidium guajava L. The leaves powder was successively extracted 

with petroleum ether, chloroform, ethanol, water, hydroalcoholic. Phytochemical analysis shows the presence of 

flavonoids, tannins triterpenoids, saponins, sterols, alkaloids and carbohydrates. The result of the study could be 

useful for description and foundation of monograph of the plant. 

Keyword:

 Flavonoids, Psidium, Phytochemical 

 

 

1. Introduction



 

Quality can be defined as the status of a drug that 

is determined by identity, purity, content and 

other chemical, physical, or biological properties, 

or by the manufacturing processes. Quality 

control is a term that refers to processes involved 

in maintaining the quality and validity of a 

manufactured product. For the quality control of a 

traditional medicine, the traditional methods are 

procured and studied, and documents and the 

traditional information about the identity and 

quality assessment are interpreted in terms of 

modern assessment. Psidium guajava is a small 

tree upto 20 feet high, with spreading branches. 

Guava is easy to recognize because of its smooth, 

thin, copper-colored bark that flakes off, showing 

the greenish layer beneath and also because of the 

attractive, "bony" aspect of its trunk which may 

in time attain a diameter of 10 inch 

[1]

.  Psidium 



guajava, which is considered a native to Mexico, 

extends throughout the South America, European, 

Africa and Asia. It is mainly found in tropical and 

subtropical regions. In India, it is distributed in 

Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, Maharashtra, Assam, West 

Bengal, Haryana and Andhra Pradesh 



[2]

. 

The leaves are evergreen, opposite, short-

petioled, oval or oblong-elliptic, somewhat 

irregular in outline; 7-15 cm long to 3-5 cm wide, 

leathery, with conspicuous parallel veins, and 

more or less downy on the underside 

[3]

. Flowers 

are white, borne singly or in small clusters in the 

leaf axils. Flowers are 2-3 cm wide, with 4 or 5 

white petals which are quickly shed, and a 

prominent tuft of perhaps 250 white stamens 

tipped with pale-yellow anthers 

[4]

. The fruit, 

exuding a strong, sweet, musky odor when ripe, 

may be round, ovoid, or pear-shaped, 2.5-10 cm 

long, with 4 or 5 protruding floral remnants 

(sepals) at the apex with thin, light-yellow skin, 

frequently blushed with pink. Next to the skin is a 


Vikrant Arya*, Narender Thakur, C.P. Kashyap

 

Vol. 1 No. 1 2012                                                 www.phytojournal.com                                                 



 

Page | 2


  

 

layer of somewhat granular flesh, 1/8 to 1/2 inch 



thick, white, yellowish, light- or dark-pink, or 

near-red, juicy, acid, subacid, or sweet and 

flavorful. The central pulp, slightly darker in 

tone, is juicy and normally filled with very hard, 

yellowish seeds, 1/8 inch long, though some rare 

types have soft, chewable seeds. Actual seed 

counts have ranged from 112 to 535 but some 

guavas are seedless or nearly so. When immature 

and until a very short time before ripening, the 

fruit is green, hard, gummy within and very 

astringent. Bark is quite smooth, pale pinkish 

brown usually tinged with chlorophyll 



[5]

.  


 

Taxonomic Classification 

 

 



 

More recent ethnopharmacological studies show 

that Psidium guajava is used in many parts of the 

world for the treatment of a number of diseases, 

e.g. as an anti-inflammatory, for diabetes, 

hypertension, caries, wounds, pain relief and 

reducing fever. Some of the countries with a long 

history of traditional  medicinal use of guava 

include Mexico and other Central  American 

countries including the Caribbean, Africa and 

Asia 

[6]



 



2. Materials and method:  

2.1 Collection of Plant Materials and Leaves:  

The leaves were collected from fields of Kangra, 

Himachal Pradesh, India. The collected leaves 

were shade dried for 35 days and finally 

pulverized in to coarse powder. It was stored in a 

well closed container free from environmental 

climatic changes till usage. 

 

2.2 Preparation of Extracts:  

Successive extraction of plant material (Fig.1) 

 

Fig 1: A Schematic Representation of Successive 

extraction 



  

 

2.3 Preparation of Hydroalcoholic Extract 

Hydroalcoholic (8:2) extract was prepared using 

leaves of Psidium guajava. Dried leaves (250 gm) 

were ground. The ground sample was soaked in 

hydroalcoholic solvent (8:2 v/v) and left for 24 h. 

The mixture was filtered and the filtrate 

concentrated by evaporation at 40 

o

C. Then 



extract was dried and weighed.  

 

2.4 Preliminary Phytochemical Screening 

The preliminary phytochemical tests were 

performed for testing different chemical groups 

present in extracts 



[7-8]

. Extract (100 mg) was 

treated with few drops of Dragendorff’s reagent 

[Potassium bismuth iodide solution].  Formation 

of orange brown precipitate indicated the 

presence of alkaloids. To 100 mg of extract small 

quantity of Wagner's reagent [Solution of iodine 

in potassium iodide] was added. Presence of 

reddish brown precipitate if alkaloids are present. 

To 100 mg of extract small quantity of Hager's 



Vikrant Arya*, Narender Thakur, C.P. Kashyap

 

 



Vol. 1 No. 1 2012                                                 www.phytojournal.com                                                 

 

Page | 3



  

 

reagent [saturated solution of Picric acid] was 



added.  Formation of yellow precipitate indicated 

the presence of alkaloids. Powdered drug extract 

on shaking vigorously with water results into 

persistent foam. 200 mg extract was boiled with 3 

mL of dil. H

2

S0



4

 in a test tube for 5 min and 

filtered while hot. Cool and added the equal 

volume of C

6

H

6



 and CHCl

3

, shake well and 



separated the organic solvent and added the NH

3



The ammonical layer turned pink or red. 

Alcoholic extract was treated with 1 mL pyridine 

and 1 mL of sodium nitroprusside. Pink to red 

colour appears. Extract (2 mL) was treated with 

0.4 mL of glacial acetic acid containing a trace 

amount of FeCl

3

 and 0.5 mL of concentrated 



H

2

S0



was also added by the side of the test tube. 

Persistent blue color appeared in the acetic acid 

layer if cardiac glycosides were present. To 5 mL 

of extract few drops of 5% FeCl

3

was added. 



Presence of deep blue black colour indicated the 

presence of tannins. When 5 mL of extract was 

treated with few drops of 5% lead acetate 

solution, white precipitates appeared. To 5 mL of 

extract 5 mL of 95% ethanol was added along 

with dilute HCl from sides of test tube. Few 

fragments (0.5 g) of magnesium turnings were 

also added. Presence of slight pink colour 

indicated the presence of flavonoids. To 5 mL of 

extract few drops of NaOH solution was added. 

Formation of an intense yellow color, which turns 

to colorless on addition of few drops of dil. 

H

2

SO



indicated the presence of flavonoids.  

little extract was taken with 2 mL of water and 

0.5 mL of concentrated HNO

3

 was added to it. 



Yellow colour is obtained if proteins are present.  

To 5 mL of extract 4% NaOH was added along 

with few drops of 5% CuSO

4

 solution. Violet or 



pink colour appeared indicated the presence of 

proteins. Extract (5 mL) was treated with 5 mL 

CHCl

3

 with few drops of conc. H



2

SO

4



, shake well 

and allowed to stand for some time. Formation of 

yellow colored lower layer indicated the presence 

of triterpenoids. Extract (5 mL) was treated with 

few drops of acetic anhydride, boiled and cooled, 

conc. H


2

SO



was added from the sides of the test 

tube showed a brown ring at the junction of two 

layers and the upper layer turns green which 

showed the presence of Steroids and formation of 

deep red color indicated the presence of 

triterpenoids. In a test tube containing 5 mL of 

extract, few drops of freshly prepared 10% 

alcoholic solution of α- naphthol was added and 

shaken/stirred for few min. Then 5 mL of conc. 

H

2



SO

was added from sides of the test tube. 



Violet ring was formed at the junction of two 

liquids, indicated the presence of carbohydrates. 

Small quantity of extract was pressed the between 

two filter papers, the stain on I

st

 filter paper 



indicated the presence of fixed oils. The extract 

was evaporated to get 10 mL of extract. To the 

extract 25 mL of 10% NaOH was added, then it 

was boiled in water bath for 30 min. The extract 

was cooled and excess of sodium sulphate was 

added. Soap was formed at the top and filtered. 

To the filtrate H

2

SO



4

 was added which was 

evaporated. The extract was dissolved in ethanol 

and few drops of CuSO

4

 and NaOH was added. 



Clear blue solution indicated the presence of fats. 

 

 



Observations: 

 

Table 1: Successive and Hydroalcoholic Extraction of 

Powder of Psidium guajava Linn. Leaf 

 

Type of extract 

Amount 

of 

extract 

(gm) 

Yield  (% w/w) Appearance 

Petroleum ether 

2.850 

1.54 


Oily 

yellowish 

black 

Chloroform 10.175 



4.47 

Greenish 

Brown 

Ethanolic 18.013  7.61 



Brownish 

black solid 

mass 

Aqueous 17.650  7.46 



Brown 

Hydroalcoholic 20.425 

8.57 

Brown 


 

 


Vikrant Arya*, Narender Thakur, C.P. Kashyap

 

Vol. 1 No. 1 2012                                                 www.phytojournal.com                                                 



 

Page | 4


  

 

 



Table 2: Phytochemical Screening of Various Extracts of Psidium guajava Linn.

 

(+) Positive Test, (-) Negative test 



 

3. Conclusion 

Phytochemical screening of petroleum ether, 

chloroform, ethanol, aqueous and hydroalcoholic 

extracts revealed the presence flavonoids, tannins 

triterpenoids, saponins, sterols, alkaloids and 

carbohydrates by positive reaction with the 

respective test reagent. Phytochemical screening 

showed that maximum presence of 

phytoconstituents in ethanolic and hydroalcoholic 

extracts. 



 

4. Acknowledgement:  

The authors are grateful to Mr. N.S Thakur, 

Chairman Vinyaka College of Pharmacy and Dr. 

C.P. Kashyap, Principal, College of Ayurvedic 

Pharmaceutical Sciences Jogindernagar, Mandi, 


Vikrant Arya*, Narender Thakur, C.P. Kashyap

 

 



Vol. 1 No. 1 2012                                                 www.phytojournal.com                                                 

 

Page | 5



  

 

H.P. for providing facilities to carrying out 



research on Psidium leaves. 

 

5. Reference



 

1.

 



Morton  JF.  Guava.  In:  Fruits  of  warm  climates. 

Miami FL 1987; 356–363. 

2.

 

Kamath JV, Nair R, Kumar CKA. Psidium guajava 



L: A Review.  Int J Green Pharma 2008; 2(1):0‐

12. 


3.

 

Yusof  SG.  University  Putra  Malaysia,  Selangor, 



Malaysia.  Elsevier  Science  Ltd  2003;  2985‐

2991.  


4.

 

Stone B.  The  flora  of  Guam.  Micronesica  Behav 



1970; 82(2):373‐378. 

5.

 



Morton  JF.  Guava.  In:  Fruits  of  warm  climates. 

Miami FL 1987; 356–363.  

6.

 

Kirtikar KR, Bashu BD. Indian Medicinal Plants. 



Vol.  1,  International  Book  Distributors, 

Dehradun, 1998, 1045‐1048. 

7.

 

Kokate  CK.  Practical  Pharmacognosy.  Vallabh 



prakashan, Delhi, 2005, 107‐111.  

8.

 



Khandelwal  KR.  Practical  Pharmacognosy 

Techniques  and  Experiments.  Edn  9,  Nirali 



Prakashan, Pune, 2003. 

 


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə