Comprehensive inventories of selected biological resources within targeted watersheds and ecological corridors of



Yüklə 5.01 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə1/27
tarix11.08.2017
ölçüsü5.01 Kb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   27

Biodiversity field inventories in selected watersheds 

 
 
 
COMPREHENSIVE INVENTORIES OF SELECTED  
BIOLOGICAL RESOURCES WITHIN TARGETED  
WATERSHEDS AND ECOLOGICAL CORRIDORS OF 
SOUTHWESTERN EL SALVADOR 
 
IMPROVED MANAGEMENT AND CONSERVATION OF CRITICAL 
WATERSHEDS PROJECT 
SEPTEMBER 2009 
THIS PUBLICATION HAS BEEN PRODUCED FOR REVIEW BY THE UNITED STATES AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT. IT WAS 
PREPARED BY DEVELOPMENT ALTERNATIVES INC. (DAI) AND SALVANATURA. 

Biodiversity field inventories in selected watersheds 

 
COMPREHENSIVE INVENTORIES OF SELECTED 
BIOLOGICAL RESOURCES WITHIN TARGETED 
WATERSHEDS AND ECOLOGICAL CORRIDORS OF 
SOUTHWESTERN EL SALVADOR 
 
 
IMPROVED MANAGEMENT AND CONSERVATION OF  
CRITICAL WATERSHEDS (IMCW) PROJECT 
Contract No. EPP-I-00-04-00023-00 
Strategic Objective No. 519-022 
Contractor Name: DAI 
Date: September 2009 
 
 
Oliver Komar, editor. 
Research Supervisor, Improved Management and Conservation of Critical Watersheds 
Project, and Director, Conservation Science Department, SalvaNATURA, San Salvador,  
El Salvador 
 
Chapter authors are Oliver Komar, José L. Linares, Francisco Chicas Batres, José Alberto 
González Leiva, Vladlen Henríquez, Xiomara Henríquez, Luis E. Girón, Melissa Rodríguez, 
and James G. Owen. 
 
Recommended citation: 
 
Komar, O. (Editor). 2009. Comprehensive Inventories of Selected Biological Resources within 
Targeted Watersheds and Ecological Corridors of Southwestern El Salvador. USAID El 
Salvador, Improved Management and Conservation of Critical Watersheds Project. 
 
 
Or for individual chapters, following this example: 
 
Linares, J. L. 2009. Flora inventory in Southwestern El Salvador.
 
in Komar, O. (editor). 
Comprehensive Inventories of Selected Biological Resources within Targeted Watersheds 
and Ecological Corridors of Southwestern El Salvador.  USAID El Salvador, Improved 
Management and Conservation of Critical Watersheds Project.
 
 
The opinions expressed by the authors in this document do not necessarily reflect the 
opinions of the United States Agency for International Development or the Government of the 
United States. 
 
Cover: 
Cuscatlania vulcanicola
, a species rediscovered in the Coatepeque watershed. Photo 
by Frank Sullyvan Cardoza.
 

Biodiversity field inventories in selected watersheds 

 
TABLE OF CONTENTS 
 
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS ............................................................................................................... 7 
 
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY .............................................................................................................. 9 
 
1. SYNTHESIS AND SUMMARY OF THE BIODIVERSITY FIELD INVENTORIES ................ 14 
 
2. FLORA INVENTORY ............................................................................................................. 32 
 
3. PRELIMINARY INVENTORY OF FISH SPECIES IN ELEVEN WATERSHEDS ................. 76 
 
4. INVENTORY OF AMPHIBIANS AND REPTILES ............................................................... 107 
 
5. INVENTORY OF BIRDS ...................................................................................................... 133 
 
6. INVENTORY OF TERRESTRIAL MAMMALS ..................................................................... 203 
 
REFERENCES ......................................................................................................................... 234 
 
TABLES AND FIGURES 
 
TABLES 
 
1. Geographic distribution of field days for the biodiversity surveys carried out during  
2007 in the IMCW project area .................................................................................................. 18  
 
2. Historical and new records of flora and fauna in the project area, through 2007 ................. 19  
 
3. Species recorded in the IMCW project area, through 2007 .................................................. 21 
 
4. Level of inventory completeness recorded by watershed ..................................................... 22 
 
5. Level of inventory completeness in the municipalities ........................................................... 23 
 
6. Level of inventory completeness recorded by ecosystem ..................................................... 24  
 
7. Importance rankings by ecosystem ....................................................................................... 27 
 
8. Summary of recommendations for conservation, organized by taxonomic group ................ 29 
 
9. Sampling sites for trees and total botanical sampling effort .................................................. 34 
 

Biodiversity field inventories in selected watersheds 

10. Indicator species for inventory completeness of trees in the study area ............................ 38 
 
11. Tree species recorded in the study area ............................................................................. 46 
 
12. Flora of conservation importance in the project area .......................................................... 64 
 
13. Inventory completeness for tree species and relative importance of ecosystems .............. 65 
 
14. Plants endemic to the IMCW project area, with collection locations from the present  
study ........................................................................................................................................... 66 
 
15. Botanical species of interest collected in the study area ..................................................... 67 
 
16. Inventory completeness for tree species and relative importance of watersheds .............. 73 
 
17. Inventory completeness for tree species and relative importance of municipalities ........... 74 
 
18. Watersheds, municipalities, and ecosystems considered in the evaluation of the fish 
inventory ..................................................................................................................................... 80 
 
19. List of fish species considered to be indicators of complete site inventories in 
southwestern El Salvador, but not yet recorded ........................................................................ 82 
 
20. Fish recorded in southwestern El Salvador, by ecosystem, through 2008 ......................... 92 
 
21. Level of fish inventory completeness by watershed in southwestern El Salvador .............. 99 
 
22. Level of fish inventory completeness by municipality in southwestern El Salvador ......... 100 
 
23. Level of fish inventory completeness by habitat in southwestern El Salvador.................. 101 
 
24. Conservation-important fish in southwestern El Salvador ................................................. 102 
 
25. Description of the sampling sites and effort for the herpetofauna study ........................... 109 
 
26. Indicator species for inventory completeness .................................................................... 113 
 
27. List of indicator species for conservation important sites .................................................. 116 
 
28. Herpetofauna species recorded in the study area ............................................................. 118 
 
29. Inventory completeness for amphibians and reptiles and relative importance of 
watersheds ............................................................................................................................... 125 
 
30. Inventory completeness for amphibians and reptiles and relative importance of 
municipalities ............................................................................................................................ 126 
 
31. Inventory completeness for amphibians and reptiles and relative importance of 
ecosystems ............................................................................................................................... 127 
 

Biodiversity field inventories in selected watersheds 

32. Inventory completeness for amphibians and reptiles and relative importance of  
protected natural areas ............................................................................................................ 128 
 
33. Estimators of herpetofauna species richness in each protected natural area  
studied ...................................................................................................................................... 129 
 
34. Estimators of herpetofauna species richness in each ecosystem studied ........................ 131 
 
35. Localities where bird inventory field work was carried out by the IMCW project .............. 136 
 
36. The 74 resident bird species, expected in any municipality or watershed of the study  
area, that serve as indicators of inventory completeness (―
test‖ species) at the site level ..... 138 
 
37. Bird species used as ―
test species‖ to indicate relative levels of inventory  
completeness at the ecosystem level, in southwestern El Salvador ....................................... 142 
 
38. Birds of national conservation concern (188 species), useful as indicators for site 
prioritization in the study area .................................................................................................. 152 
 
39. Types of avian locality records available for the present analysis .................................... 163  
 
40. Sampling effort for birds at each study site during 2007 field work ................................... 163 
 
41. List of 431 bird species recorded in the project area ......................................................... 169 
 
42. Inventory completeness for birds and relative importance of watersheds ........................ 198  
 
43. Inventory completeness for birds and relative importance of municipalities ..................... 199  
 
44. Inventory completeness for birds and relative importance of ecosystems........................ 200 
 
45. Sites and sampling efforts for mammals ............................................................................ 205 
 
46. Indicator species (mammals) of inventory completeness .................................................. 207 
 
47. Mammals that are indicators of important sites for conservation ...................................... 209 
 
48. Individual mammals counted during the study................................................................... 211  
 
49. List of terrestrial mammal species recorded in southwestern El Salvador through 2007 . 221 
 
50. Level of mammal inventory completeness in the protected natural areas ........................ 228 
 
51. Inventory completeness for mammals and relative importance of watersheds ................ 228 
 
52. Inventory completeness for mammals and relative importance of municipalities ............. 229 
 
53. Inventory completeness for mammals and relative importance of ecosystems ................ 229 
 
54. Estimators of terrestrial mammal species richness in the study area and in each 
ecosystem ................................................................................................................................. 231 

Biodiversity field inventories in selected watersheds 

 
FIGURES 
 
1. The IMCW project area contains 11 watersheds and 25 municipalities, as well as  
several adjoining protected natural areas .................................................................................. 16 
 
2. Ecoregions, natural ecosystems, and anthropogenic land uses in the study area ............... 17  
 
3. improvements in the inventory of birds during 2007, for watersheds and municipalities ..... 25 
 
4. Study area, watersheds, and sampling sites for flora ............................................................ 37  
 
5. Selected photographs of flora taken during the study ..................................................... 60–63  
 
6. Ichthyogeographic provinces of Central America .................................................................. 77  
 
7. The Tropical Eastern Pacific biogeographic region ............................................................... 78  
 
8. Study area in southwestern El Salvador, with watersheds and municipalities labeled ......... 81  
 
9. Map of the sampling sites of the study of amphibians and reptiles during 2007 ................ 109  
 
10. Selected photographs of amphibians and reptiles taken during the study ............... 120–123  
 
11. Accumulation curve of herpetofauna species from each protected natural area  
studied ...................................................................................................................................... 129  
 
12. Accumulation curve for herpetofauna species from southwestern El Salvador ................ 130  
 
13. Accumulation curve for herpetofauna species from each ecosystem studied .................. 131  
 
14. Map of bird inventory field sites during 2007 ..................................................................... 135  
 
15. Selected photographs of birds taken during the field study....................................... 165–168 
 
16. Increment in inventory completeness index for birds in watersheds, resulting  
from the field study ................................................................................................................... 197  
 
17. Map of sites sampled for mammals in 2007 ...................................................................... 204 
 
18. Mammal photographs taken during the study............................................................ 217–220  
 
19. Species accumulation curve for terrestrial mammals in southwestern El Salvador ......... 230 
  
20. Accumulation curves for terrestrial mammal species by ecosystem ................................. 231  
 
 
 

Biodiversity field inventories in selected watersheds 

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 
 
This  study  was  funded  by  a  contract  from  USAID  to  DAI,  Inc.  and  a  subcontract  to 
SalvaNATURA. This study was made possible by the support of the land managers who gave 
their permissions to carry out field work, including managers of the  Protected Natural Areas 
System at the Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources, in particular Zulma Ricord de 
Mendoza, Walter Rojas, Alfonso Sermeño, and Patricia Quintana.   
 
In  the  natural  areas  visited,  we  thank  the  following  for  their  collaboration:  Carlos  Batres  of 
Finca Monte Carlo Estate at Laguna de Las Ninfas; Nidia Lara of AGAPE at Plan de Amayo; 
the Instituto Salvadoreño de Turismo for work at Cerro Verde; Martha Huezo de Sandoval for 
lodging  at  Playa  Los  Cóbanos;  FUNDARRECIFE,  especially  Luis  Pineda,  at  Los  Cóbanos; 
Walter  Martínez  of  Asociación  de  Desarrollo  Comunal  Nueva  Esperanza  (ADESCONE)  at 
Bosque  Santa  Rita;  COEX  and  Finca  El  Pireo  at  Laguna  de  Las  Ranas;  Cooperativa  San 
Rafael Los Naranjos at Cerro El Aguila; María Isabel Morales of Asociación Salvadoreña para 
la  Conservación  del  Medio  Ambiente  (ASACMA)  at  Complejo  San  Marcelino;  staff  of  the 
Natural  Areas  Department  of 
Salva
NATURA  (Francisco  Soto  and  Enrique  Fuentes  in 
particular) at Los Volcanes National Park and at El Imposible National Park. Also personnel of 
CATIE  and  Cooperativa  María  Auxiliadora  for  assistance  at  Los  Volcanes  National  Park. 
Personnel  of  the  Santo  Domingo  de  Guzmán  mayor’s  office  assisted  with  visits  to  the 
municipality.  The National Civil Police provided lodging at Barra Salada. 
 
Botanical field trips and reports were assisted by Frank Sullyvan Cardoza, Vladlen Henríquez, 
Xiomara  Henríquez,  and  Manuel  Méndez.  Herpetology  field  trips  were  accompanied  by 
student  volunteers  Diana  Quijano,  Eder  Caceros,  Esmeralda  Martínez,  Jorge  Herrera,  and 
Vanessa Amaya. Karla Lara collected herpetofaunal data at Los Cóbanos. Mammalogy field 
trips  were  assisted  by  Arnulfo  Morán,  Elias  Delgado,  Alexandro  Molina,  and  volunteer 
students  Karla  Lara,  Stefany  Henríquez,  Verónica  Guzmán,  Jonathan  Hernández,  Enrique 
Fajardo, and Jorge García. Ornithology field trips technicians included  Jesse Fagan, Carlos 
Funes, Jorge Jiménez, Sofia Trujillo, Iselda Vega, and Carlos Zaldaña and several volunteers. 
 
All  of  the  field  trips  were  greatly  assisted  by  numerous  park  wardens,  for  whom  we  are 
grateful, and apologize for not listing all  of their names.  Similarly, numerous officers of the 
National Civil Police, Environment division, provided security and assistance at several field 
sites.  
 
The  data  in  the  SalvaNATURA  flora  and  fauna  database  comes  from  many  sources,  both 
published and unpublished. Of particular note are extensive unpublished observations of birds 
contributed by Néstor Herrera, Ricardo Ibarra, Tom Jenner, Oliver Komar, Alvaro Moises, and 
Walter Thurber. The data base contains thousands of banding and observation records from 
the  SalvaNATURA  bird  monitoring  program,  collected  mostly  by  Lety  Andino,  Vicky  Galán, 
Roselvy Juárez, Jennifer Smith, and their assistants.  
 

Biodiversity field inventories in selected watersheds 

Gerrit Davidse of the Missouri Botanical Garden graciously provided all the records from that 
institution that were requested. Frank Sullyvan Cardoza assisted with the flora database of the 
Escuela Agrícola Panamericana.  
 
Héctor  Manuel  Quezada,  Karen  Xiomara  García,  and  German  Bladimir  Sánchez  provided 
valuable collaboration in the compilation of información in the fish database. Authorities and 
technical  staff  of  the  Natural  History  Museum  of  El  Salvador  and  Miriam  Cortez  de  Galán, 
coordinator of the zoology collections at the School of Biology of the University of El Salvador, 
facilitated the review of preserved fish collections.  
 
Maps  were  prepared by  Vladlen  Henríquez,  Juan Felipe  Gutiérrez,  and  Luis  Girón.  For  the 
many contributors, we extend sincere thanks and apologize for not listing everyone’s name.   
 
All  chapters  were  reviewed  by  Oliver  Komar.  Selected  chapters  were  reviewed  by  Néstor 
Herrera,  Ricardo  Ibarra  Portillo,  and  Enrique  Barraza.  Marta  Lilian  Quezada  and  Melissa 
Rodríguez  assisted  with  formatting.  The  director  of  the  Improved  Management  and 
Conservation of Critical Watersheds Project during the implementation of this study was Steve 
Romanoff. 
 

Biodiversity field inventories in selected watersheds 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 
 
Comprehensive biological inventories were carried out during the second half of 2007 as part 
of  the  Improved  Management  and  Conservation  of  Critical  Watersheds  (IMCW)  Project,  in 
southwestern  El  Salvador.  This  field  work  focused  on  trees,  herpetofauna  (amphibians  and 
reptiles), mammals, and birds in the principal natural areas, such as at Los Volcanes and El 
Imposible National Parks, and in targeted watersheds and ecological corridors. Specific field 
trips were designed to fill gaps in the biological inventory. Also, bibliographical and museum 
data on fishes were collected and reviewed.  
 
The  objective  of  this  work  was  to  develop  more  complete  information  on  the  status  of 
biological  resources,  and  effectively  complete  baseline  information  on  distribution  of  key 
indicator  species.  Widely-distributed  species  that  are  habitat  generalists  were  used  as 
indicators  of  inventory  progress,  permitting  the  estimation  of  relative  levels  of  inventory 
completeness  for  the  entire  project  area  and  also  at  the  finer  scales  of  watersheds  and 
municipalities, and in some cases, protected natural areas. Globally and nationally threatened 
(red-listed) species were used as indicators for conservation importance of sites. 
 
Field surveys were carried out in  six or  more priority watersheds for each of the taxonomic 
groups studied, but not all taxonomic groups were studied in every watershed visited. In all, 
field studies of flora and/or fauna were carried out in 10 of the Project area’s 11 watersheds 
during the study period. The studies increased the completeness of the biological inventory in 
10 different ecosystems, and in 11 municipalities.  
 
The  study  area  contains  the  country’s  two  largest  national  parks,  El  Imposible  and  Los 
Volcanes, and other important natural areas such as the Los Cóbanos coral reef, with many 
species  of  conservation  importance.  The  Barra  de  Santiago  mangrove  estuary  is  also  well 
known for important natural resources, including some unique aquatic species found nowhere 
else  in  the  country.  Field  work  was  carried  out  at  Los  Volcanes  National  Park  (plants, 
herpetofauna, mammals, birds), El Imposible National Park (plants, herpetofauna, mammals), 
and numerous corridor sites, such as within the Barra de Santiago—Garita Palmera estuaries 
(reptiles,  mammals,  birds),  the  El  Imposible—Los  Volcanes  corridor  (all  taxonomic  groups), 
and  Barra  de  Santiago—El  Imposible  (birds).    Fish  resources  were  evaluated,  via  a  desk 
study, in all of these areas.  
 
The biodiversity inventory in the study area is probably the most complete of any area in El 
Salvador. We have identified 2719 species, including 584 trees and 1287 other plants, 220 
fishes,  96  amphibians  and  reptiles,  101  mammals,  and  431  birds,  based  on  a  cumulative 
database of nearly 40,000 modern and historical locality records. More than 1% of the species 
(37) are globally threatened (red-listed), and 15% (401) are nationally threatened. Some of the 
country’s  rarest  species  exist  only  in  the  project  area.  Of  special  note  are  at  least  22 
vertebrate species (without considering fishes) that are restricted in El Salvador to the area’s 
natural habitats. One fish, described for science in 2007, is considered restricted (in the world) 
to Lake Coatepeque (Schmitter-Soto 2007). Even more impressive, at least 14 plant species 

Biodiversity field inventories in selected watersheds 
10 
(10  trees  and  four  herbs)  are  unique  to  the  study  area,  including  6  new  plant  species 
discovered for science during the field work; these are natural resources found nowhere else 
in the world.  
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   27


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə