Conservation action plan provincial ministry of agriculture, land, irrigation, fisheries



Yüklə 11.24 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
səhifə2/19
tarix13.08.2017
ölçüsü11.24 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   19

LIST OF FIGURES 
 
Figure 2.1 Western Province of Sri Lanka with district boundaries 
   4 
Figure 2.2 Major road network within the Western Province of Sri Lanka 
   5 
Figure 2.3 Land use pattern of the Western Province 
   7 
Figure 2.4 The flag, butterfly and flower of the Western Province 
   8 
Figure 2.5 Rainfall isohytes in the Western Province 
 11 
Figure 2.6 Geology Map of the Western Province 
 12 
Figure 2.7 Soils of the Western Province 
 13 
Figure 2.8 Stream network of the Western Province of Sri Lanka 
 14 
Figure 2.9 River basins represented in Western Province 
 15 
Figure 3.1 Agro-ecological regions in the Western Province of Sri Lanka 
 19 
Figure 3.2 Rainfall patterns of major agro-ecological regions in the Western 
Province 
 
 20 
Figure  4.1  Distribution  of  natural  vegetations,  plantation forests  and  major  water 
bodies in the Western Province 
 
 25 
Figure 7.1 Protected area network in Western Province of Sri Lanka 
 57 
Figure 7.2 Muthurajawela Environmental Protection Area 
 58 
Figure 9.1 Archaeological sites of the Western Province 
 64 
 
 
 

13 
 
LIST OF ANNEXEX 
 
Annex 1: Detailed list of fauna and flora recorded in the three districts of Western 
Province
 
 
   10 
 
 
ACRONYMS 
AIS 
Alien Invasive Species 
BCAP 
Biodiversity Conservation Action Plan 
BDS 
Biodiversity Secretariat 
BMARI 
Bandaranaike Memorial Ayurvedic Research Institute 
BOI 
Board of Investment 
CBC 
Ceylon Bird Club 
CBO 
Community Based Organization 
CCD 
Coast Conservation Department 
CEA 
Central Environmental Authority 
CIDA 
Canadian International Development Agency 
CPC 
Ceylon Petroleum Corporation 
CR 
Critically endangered 
CRI 
Coconut Research Institute 
DBG 
Department of Botanic Gardens 
DC 
Department of Customs 
DCS 
Department of Census and Statistics 
DD 
Data deficient 
DE 
Department of Education 
DOA 
Department of Agriculture 

14 
 
DZG 
Department of Zoological Garden 
DWLC 
Department of Wild Life Conservation 

Endemic species 
EFL 
Environmental Foundation Limited 
ESR 
Environmentally Sensitive Region 
EW 
Extinct wild 
FD 
Forest Department 
FOG 
Field Ornithology Group 
GDP 
Gross Domestic Product 
GSMB 
Geological Survey and Mines Bureau  
GTZ 
The German Organization for Technical Cooperation 
IUCN 
World Conservation Union 
IWMI
 
International Water Management Institute
 
JAICA 
Japan International Cooperation Agency 
UDA 
Urban Development Authority 
ME&RE 
Ministryof Environment and Renewable Energy  
MEPA 
Marine Environment Protection Authority 
MFE 
Ministry of Forestry and Environment 
MPPA 
Marine Pollution Prevention Authority 

Native species 
NAQDA 
National Aquaculture Development Authority 
NARA 
National Aquatic Resources Research and Development Agency 
NCS 
National Conservation Status; 
NGO 
Non Governmental Organizations 
NHS 
The Natural History Society 

15 
 
NPPD 
National Physical Planning Department 
NSF 
National Science Foundation 
NRC 
National Research Council 
PA 
Provincial Authority 
PE 
Possibly extinct 
RDA 
Road Development Authority 
SEA 
Strategic Environment Assessment 
SL 
Sri Lanka 
SLEJF 
Sri Lanka Environmental Journalists Federation  
SLLRDC 
Sri Lanka Land Reclamation and Development Corporation  
SLRC 
Sri Lanka Rupavahini Cooperation 
SLTB 
Sri Lanka Tourist Board 
STC 
State Timber Cooperation 

Total number of species 
TH 
Threatened species 
TS 
Taxonomic status 
UNDP 
United Nations Development Program 
UNEP 
United Nations Environment Program 
WCS 
Sri Lanka Wildlife Conservation Society 
WHT 
Wildlife Heritage Trust 
WNPS 
Wildlife & Nature Protection Society 
WP 
Western Province 
YZA 
Young Zoologists Association 
 
 
 

16 
 
CHAPTER 1 
 
1.1 
THE  NEED  FOR  UPDATING  THE  “BIODIVERSITY  PROFILE  AND  CONSERVATION 
ACTION PLAN” OF THE WESTERN PROVINCE 
 
Sri Lanka is the home for a rich biodiversity, which is a part of its natural wealth. The region 
including the Western Ghats of India and Wet zone of Sri Lanka  is considered as one of 34 
biodiversity hotspots identified in the world (Mittermeier  et al., 2005). These hotspots are 
areas that harbour an exceptionally high concentration of endemic species, but have already 
lost more than 75% of the primary vegetation. Of all the global biodiversity hotspots, those 
in Western Ghats of India and the Wet zone of Sri Lanka have the highest human population 
density  (Cincotta  et  al.,  2000).  The  biodiversity  hotspots  in  Sri  Lanka  cover  four 
administrative provinces, namely, Western, Southern, Central and Sabaragamuwa. Of these, 
the WesternProvince has the highest population density, urbanization and industrialization, 
which  pose  a  great  challenge  for  conservation  and  wise  use  of  biodiversity  within  the 
province.  Hence,  developmental  plans  of  the  province  needs  to  give  due  consideration  to 
existing  information on biodiversity  of the  three  administrative districts  namely,  Colombo, 
Gampaha  and  Kalutara,  that  falls  within  the  Western  Province.  This  is  important  as  the 
National Physical Plan is proposing a metro region and special purpose city covering most of 
the  area  of  the  Western  Province  (NPPD,  2011)  that  will  have  significant  impacts  on  the 
natural habitats of the province and consequently its biodiversity. 
 
The  Biodiversity  Secretariat  of  the  Ministry  of  Environment  and  Natural  Resources  of  Sri 
Lanka initiated a process to prepare the “Provincial Biodiversity Profile and Action Plan” in 
the  year  2006.  Through  this  initiative,  Bambaradeniya  (2008)  prepared  the  Biodiversity 
Profile  and  Conservation  Plan  of  the  Western  Province  in  collaboration  with  the  Western 
Provincial Council, using information from secondary sources such as published papers and 
articles  as  well  as  unpublished  reports.  The  document  has  been  prepared  through  a 
consultative  process,  where  a  total  of  three  workshops  have  been  held  for  provincial 
administrators and other officers representing different provincial departments, who  have 
contributed with information for upgrading the draft Profile and Action Plan. 
 
Since  2008,  a  great  deal  of  new  information  and  knowledge  on  biodiversity  has  been 
generated  through  research  and  thus,  the  need  has  arisen  to  update  the  Provincial 
Biodiversity  Profiles  and  Action  Plans.  As  a  result,  the  Ministry  of  Agriculture,  Agrarian 
Development,  Minor  Irrigation,  Industries,  Environment,  Culture  and  Art  Affairs  of  the 
Western  Province  decided  to  update  the  “Provincial  Biodiversity  Profile  and  Action  Plan” 
using  such  information.  Updating  of  the  biodiversity  profile  and  action  plan  was  done  by 
reviewing  the  previous  version  prepared  (Bambaradeniya,  2008)  by  a  team  comprising  of 
Prof. Gamini Pushpakumara (Team Leader), Prof. Buddhi Marambe, Prof. Pradeepa Silva and 

17 
 
Prof. Devaka Weerakoon. A similar process used by Bambaradeniya (2008) was employed to 
obtain  new  information  on  biodiversity  of  the  Western  Province.The  present  effort  to 
update the biodiversity profile and action plan for the  Western Province was to equip the 
stakeholders  with  the  latest  knowledge  on  biodiversity  conservation,  with  tools  for  its 
management and sustainable utilization within the administrative districts. It is anticipated 
that the updated “Provincial Biodiversity Profile and  Action Plan” of the Western Province 
will guide and promote the conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity in the Province. 
 
 
 
Muthurajawela sanctuary 
Bellanwila - Attidiya sanctuary 

18 
 
CHAPTER 2 
 
2.1 
PHYSICAL FEATURES 
 
The Western Province is located in the South West of Sri Lanka. The province is surrounded 
by  the  Laccadive  Sea  to  the  West,  North  Western  Province  to  the  North,  Sabaragamuwa 
Province to the East and the Southern Province to the South (Figure 2.1). It is the home to 
the  legislative  capital  of  Sri  Lanka,  Sri  Jayawardenapura  Kotte  as  well  as  the  nation’s 
administrative  and  business  centre,  Colombo.  The  Western  Province  encompasses  three 
administrative districts, namely Colombo, Gampaha and Kalutara(Figure 2.1), those together 
forms  a  commercial  hub  linked  with  a  major  airport  and  the  harbour.  The  three 
administrative  districts  are  further  divided  into 40  Divisional  Secretariat  (DS)  Divisions  and 
2,505  Grama  Niladari  (GN)  Divisions.  The  province  also  includes  48  administrative  bodies 
comprising of 6 municipal councils, 13 urban councils and 29 Pradeshiya Sabhas (DCS, 2012; 
2013).  The  entire  province  is  linked  with  a  well  developed  road  network  including  two 
expressways namely, Southern and Colombo-Katunayake (Figure 2.2). 
 
The Province covers an area of 3,684 square kilometers, which represents 5.6% of the total 
land area of the country (Table 2.1). It is the most densely populated province in the country 
and harbours 28.7% of the total population in Sri Lanka (Table 2.2). Colombo (3,438 persons 
per  sq.  km)  is  the  most  densely  inhabited  district  of  the  country  followed  by  Gampaha 
(Table 2.2). It is the most socio-economically developed part in Sri Lanka and contributes to 
43.4% of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) of the country. The GDP is largely contributed 
by  the  services  sector  (62.1%)  followed  by  industry  (35.1%)  and  agriculture  (2.8%).  The 
province is also considered as the heartland of the tourism industry of the island (DCS, 2012; 
2013). 
 
Table 2.1 Land area of Western Province of Sri Lanka 
 
Administrative 
district/province 
Total land area 
(sq. km) 
Land area 
(sq km) 
Inland waters 
(sq km) 
Gampaha 
  1,387 
  1,341 
     46 
Colombo 
    699 
    676 
     23 
Kalutara 
  1,598 
  1,576 
     22 
WesternProvince 
  3,684 
  3,593 
     91 
Sri Lanka 
65,610 
62,705 
2,905 
Sources: DCS (2012); DCS (2013) 

19 
 
Figure 2.1 Western Province of Sri Lanka with district boundaries 
 

20 
 
 
 
Figure 2.2 Major road network within the Western Province of Sri Lanka 
 
 

21 
 
Table 2.2 Population statistics of Western Province of Sri Lanka 
 
Administrative 
district/province 
Population 
(million) 
Population by sectors (%) 
Population density 
(population/sq.km) 
Urban 
Rural 
Estate 
Gampaha 
  2,305 
15.6 
84.3 
0.1 
1,714 
Colombo 
  2,232 
77.6 
22.1 
0.3 
3,438 
Kalutara 
  1,222 
  8.9 
88.0 
3.1 
   771 
WesternProvince 
  5,857 
38.8 
60.4 
0.8 
1,514 
Sri Lanka 
20,359 
18.2 
77.4 
4.4 
323 
Sources: DCS (2012); DCS (2013) 
 
The land use pattern of the Western Province varies among the three districts, but generally 
dominated  by  homegardens  followed  by  rubber  plantations,  paddy  lands,  coconut 
plantations  and  natural  forests  (Table  2.3;  Figure  2.3).  In  the  Gampaha  district, 
homegardening  is  the  dominant  form  of  land  use  followed  by  coconut  plantation,  paddy 
farming  and  rubber  plantation.  The  Gampaha  district  also  represents  the  lowest  extent  of 
natural  forests  in  the  Western  Province.  In  the  Colombo  district,  rubber  plantation  is  the 
dominant  form  of  land  use  followed  by  homegarden,  paddy  farming,  built  up  lands  and 
coconut  plantation.  In  the  Kalutara  district,  land  use  pattern  is  dominated  by  rubber 
plantations followed by homegardens, paddy farming and natural forests. 
 
Table 2.3 Land use pattern of Western Province 
 
Land use system 
Extent (ha) 
Total 
(ha) 
Gampaha 
Colombo 
Kalutara 
Coconut 
48,720 
3,047 
6,682 
58,449 
Tea 
10 
210 
3,964 
4,184 
Rubber 
4,976 
17,647 
56,703 
79,326 
Homegardens 
50,781 
28,617 
30,850 
110,248 
Paddy 
25,349 
10,579 
27,585 
63,513 
Other plantations 
868 
511 
1,136 
2,515 
Marsh 
2,043 
1,311 
208 
3,562 
Natural forests 
945 
1,258 
18,236 
20,439 
Note: Only major crops and vegetations were estimated from the Figure 2.3. 

22 
 
 
Figure 2.3 Land use pattern of the Western Province 
 
 
 

23 
 
The  flag,  butterfly  (blue  glassy  tiger)  and  flower  (white  lotus,  sacred  lotus  –  a  symbol  of 
purity)of the Western Province areshown in Figure 2.4. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Figure 2.4 The flag, butterfly and flower of the Western Province 
 
2.1.1  Climatic Zones 
 
Except  a  small  area  close  to  the  northern  boundary  (which  is  a  part  of  the  Intermediate 
zone),  the  entire  province  belongs  to  the  wet  zone  (Figure  2.5;Note:  the  agro-ecological 
regions of the Western Province is illustrated in Figure 3.1).
 
 
2.1.2   Temperature 
 
The average annual air temperature in the Western Province ranges from 26.2-29.7 °C. The 
average annual minimum and maximum temperatures vary from 22.2-26.7 
°
C and 29.9-32.7 
°C, respectively. According to average mean monthly temperature, November to January  is 
considered as the coolest months and April to June is considered as the hottest months of 
the province. As in the other areas of the country, diurnal variation of temperature (rising to 
a maximum early in the afternoon and fall to a minimum shortly before dawn) is  also well 
marked in the Western Province (DCS, 2012). 
 
2.1.3   Rainfall 
 
The  mean  annual  rainfall  of  the  Western  Province  ranges  from  1,500  to  over  4,500  mm. 
Within the province, the coastal belt and Gampaha district receive  a relatively low rainfall 
whereas the South Eastern areas of the Kalutara district and Southern area of the Colombo 
district receive relatively higher rainfall (over 3,000 mm per year; Figure 2.5). Over 70% of 
rainfall of the Western Province is received from the South-West Monsoon and Second Inter 
Monsoon (Table 2.4). The rainfall in the province, as in the case of Sri Lanka, is seasonal and 
has two distinct rainfall peaks in the year showing bi-modal rainfall pattern. The two peaks 
are  termed  as  Yala  (March  to  August  consisting  first  Inter-monsoon  and  South-West 
monsoon) and Maha (September to February consisting second Inter-monsoon and North-
East  monsoon)  seasons.  A  detailed  analysis  of  rainfall  patterns  of different agro-ecological 
regions of the Western Province is given in section 3.3. The Western Province is usually wet 

24 
 
and  humid,  where  the  mean  monthly  day  time  and  night  time  relative  humidity  varies 
between 68-77% and 83-91%, respectively (DCS, 2012). 
 
Table 2.4 Contribution of rainfall mechanisms to rainfall of the three districts 
 
Place 
Annual 
rainfall 
(mm) 
Time 
Period 
Contribution (%) 
First Inter 
Monsoon 
South 
West 
Monsoon 
Second 
Inter 
Monsoon 
North East 
Monsoon 
Gampaha 
2,354 
1996-2005 
15 
42 
29 
14 
Colombo 
2,310 
1996-2005 
12 
41 
31 
16 
Bombuwela 
2,914 
1996-2005 
11 
46 
26 
17 
Source: Punyawardena(2008) 
Note: First Inter Monsoon Period=Mid-March to third week of May; South West Monsoon 
Period  =Third  week  of  May  to  first  week  of  August;  Second  Inter  Monsoon 
Period=September to November; North East Monsoon Period =Last week of November/first 
week of December to Mid-March. 
 
2.1.4   Topography 
 
The  topography  of  the  landscape  is  generally  flat  in  the  coastal  areas,  with  a  rolling  and 
undulating terrain towards the eastern part of the province, where the altitude increases up 
to about 100 m. 
 
2.1.5  Geology and Soils 
 
The geology of the province is dominated by Precambrian rocks of the Southwestern Group, 
consisting  of  schists,  gneisses,  and  granulites  of  metasedimentary  origin,  as  well  as 
migmatite and granitic gneisses (Figure 2.6). 
 
The Western Province consists of six physiographic regions (Somasiri, 1999). The coastal belt 
is  named  as  coastal  plain/Kotte-Bolgoda  land  system.  The  northern  area  of  the  province 
consists  of  level to  undulating  plantation  surface/Gampaha  land  system and undulating to 
rolling  plantation  surface  with  isolated  hills  and  hillocks/Mirigama  land  system.  Southern 
areas of the province consist of rolling upland plantation surface/Mirigama land system and 
ridge andvalley system with low to moderate relief/Matugama land system. 
 
As  in  other  parts  of  the  Wet  Zone,  red-yellow  podzolic  soils  are  the  main  soil  type  in  the 
Western  Province,  with  sub-groups  (Figure  2.7).  The  soil  in  the  Colombo  and  Gampaha 
districts include the sub-group with soft or hard laterite in the rolling and undulating terrain, 

25 
 
which also occurs to a lesser extent in the Kalutara district. The ill-drained lands in the lower 
coastal  plain  of  the  province  include  bog  and  half-bog  soils  with  flat  terrain  (i.e.  in 
Muthurajawela and Attidiya marshes). The beach areas  from Negombo (Gampaha district) 
to Mount Lavinia (Colombo district) consist of a narrow stretch of latesols and regosols on 
old red and yellow sands. Narrow strips of alluvial soils occur along the floodplains of Kelani 
river, Dandugam Oya and Kalu river. In Kalutara district major soil type is red yellow podzolic 
sub-group with steeply dissected and hilly and rolling terrain (Figure 2.7). 
 
Gampaha district is dominated by Boralu–Gampaha association followed by Minuwangoda–
Gampaha 
association, 
Pallegoda–Dodangoda–Homagama 
association, 
Rathupasa-
Katunayake association and smaller extent of Negombo–Katunayake and Wagura–Palatuwa 
complex.  Colombo  district  also  dominated  by  Boralu–Gampaha  association  followed  by 
Pallegoda–Dodangoda–Homagama 
association, 
Galigamuwa–Homagama 
complex, 
Palatuwa–Wagura–Madabokka  complex,  Rathupasa-Katunayake  association  and  Nigambo–
Katunayake  association.  In  the  Kalutara  district,  the  dominant  map  unit  is  Dodangoda–
Agalawatta–Gampaha  complex  followed  by  Boralu–Gampaha  association,  Boralu–
Madabokka association, Malaboda–Pallegoda association, Malaboda–Weddagala–Pallegoda 
lithosols complex, Palatuwa–Wagura–Madabokka complex, Wagura–Palatuwa complex, and 
Negombo–Katunayake association (Mapa et al., 1999). 
 
2.1.6   Water Bodies and Stream Network 
 
Of the total extent of 3,684 km

in the Western Province, 91 km

(2.5%) is occupied by inland 
water  bodies.  The  floodplains  of  Kalu  ganga,  Kelani  ganga  and  Attanagalu  oya  are  located 
within the Western Province. Kalu ganga, Kelani ganga, Bentota ganga, Attanagalu oya and 
Bolgoda  oya  are the  major  rivers present  in the  Western  Province  (Figure  2.8).  Out  of  the 
103 river basins and 36 major river basins of Sri Lanka, five major river basins, namely Kalu 
and Kelani river basins, Attanagalu oya and Maha oya river basins and Bentota ganga river 
basin are located in the Western Province (Figure 2.9). 
 
Out  of  the  six  aquifers  identified  in  Sri  Lanka,  the  Western  Province  consists  of  three 
aquifers, namely (i) shallow aquifiers on coastal sands, (ii) laterite (cabook) aquifier in inland 
areas and (iii) small fraction of alluvium aquifer. 

26 
 
 
Figure 2.5 Rainfall isohytes in the Western Province 
 
 
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   19


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə