Conservation Management Zones of Australia Western Australia Temperate Sandplain Woodlands



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Vegetation profiles and management recommendations


Vegetation extent information and species lists contained in the vegetation profiles are based on analysis from the National Vegetation Information System (NVIS), including analysis of Major Vegetation Subgroups and NVIS Level V descriptions. Please see http://www.environment.gov.au/node/18930 for more information.

The management recommendations have been drawn from EPBC Act Recovery Plans, EPBC Act Ecological Communities Listing Advice and other sources. The recommendations are indicative only. Systematic reviews of management literature, consultation processes and improved Natural Resource Management program monitoring and evaluation will support development of a comprehensive set of management recommendations over time.


Other shrublands vegetation profile

43.39% Remaining

Commonly found species within this community


Actinostrobus arenarius; Banksia attenuata; Dryandra bipinnatifida; Acacia rostellifera; Adenanthos stictus; Banksia prionotes; Banksia sceptrum; Banksia burdettii; Nuytsia floribunda; Allocasuarina campestris; Allocasuarina humilis; Calothamnus chrysantherus; Xylomelum angustifolium; Verticordia lepidophylla; Grevillea annulifera; Eremaea pauciflora; Pileanthus peduncularis; Hakea auriculata; Dryandra shuttleworthiana; Burchardia umbellata; Calectasia cyanea; Anigozanthos humilis; Macropidia fuliginosa; Anigozanthos pulcherrima; shrub; forb; sedge; hummock grass.

this column graph compares the pre-1750 extent of other shrublands within the zone with the present day extent. pre-1750 extent is 57.7 percent. present day extent is 25.1 percent.

Management recommendations


Protection

Sustainable
Agricultural
Practice

Rehabilitation

Fire
Management

Wildlife
Management

Weed
Management

Feral
Animal
Management

Disease
Management

Purchase remnants into reservation.

Encourage uptake of conservation agreements and covenants on private land. See: http://www.dpaw.wa.gov.au/management/off-reserve-conservation/nature-conservation-covenant-program

Create buffer zones and fence remnants.

Protect groundwater levels and water quality through maintaining and replanting native vegetation in adjacent lands.



Exclude stock where possible.

Use rotational grazing if sites must be grazed.

Protect soils from wind and water erosion by maintaining native ground cover.


Undertake revegetation where no natural regeneration occurs. Ensure seed and tubestock are locally sourced and attempt to replicate the structure and diversity of local, high quality remnants on similar soils and aspect.

Develop and implement appropriate fire management plans. Please seek advice from your local NRM organisation on appropriate regimes.

Too frequent and/or


intense fires can damage the capacity of vegetation to regenerate and the health of fauna populations.

Manage highly flammable weeds and monitor for weeds after fire disturbance.

Maintain existing fire breaks with a minimum of soil disturbance, using herbicides or mowing wherever possible.


Monitor and manage native herbivores to prevent overgrazing.

Bridal creeper, Mediterranean Turnip, Freesia, Guildford Grass and cape weed can be major environmental weeds in this type of vegetation.

Maintain strict hygiene protocols to avoid weed spread, including when maintaining firebreaks, horse riding, cycling and bush walking.



Actively manage foxes, cats, rabbits and pigs.

Undertake fox and rabbit management simultaneously to avoid foxes switching to predation on native species, or rabbit population increases.



Maintain strict hygiene protocols to avoid spreading Phytophthora by vehicle tyres,
earthmoving
machinery
and boots.

Treat dieback with phosphite in early Summer, and repeat 4–5 weeks later. Sites should be treated for a wide area around


an infected site.

Remove all parts of affected plants, including as much of the root system


as possible.

Manage public access to control the spread of dieback.




Other Acacia tall open shrublands and shrublands vegetation profile

29.95% Remaining

Commonly found species within this community


Acacia rostellifera; Eucalyptus loxophleba; Acacia ramulosa; Acacia neurophylla; Acacia sclerosperma; Banksia menziesii; Acacia longispinea; Melaleuca cardiophylla; Eucalyptus camaldulensis; Allocasuarina huegeliana; Acacia cyclops; Acacia scirpifolia; Acacia acuminata; Melaleuca megacephala; Acacia tetragonophylla; Banksia prionotes; Eucalyptus todtiana; Acacia xanthina; Adenanthos cygnorum; Allocasuarina humilis; shrub; cycad; xanthorrhoea; Banksia candolleana; Beaufortia elegans; Calytrix strigosa; shrub; forb.

this column graph compares the pre-1750 extent of other acacia tall open shrublands and shrublands within the zone with the present day extent. pre-1750 extent is 12.7 percent. present day extent is 3.8 percent.

Management recommendations


Protection

Sustainable
Agricultural
Practice

Rehabilitation

Fire
Management

Wildlife
Management

Weed
Management

Feral
Animal
Management

Disease
Management

Encourage uptake of conservation agreements and covenants on private land.

Protect aquifers and water tables by maintaining and replanting native vegetation.

Protect from soil disturbance and water flow changes caused by livestock trampling and track construction.

Protect remnants


from further
fragmentation.

Lower total grazing pressure and implement strategic grazing regimes.

Avoid fodder over-harvesting.









Identify and mange key refugia and wildlife habitats.

Manage native species (e.g. Kangaroos)



Control weeds including pasture grasses (e.g. Buffel grass).

Manage Rubber Vine (Cryptostegia grandiflora), Mother of Millions (Bryophyllum tubiflorum), and Parkinsonia (Parkinsonia aculeata).

Prevent weeds from establishing in high-value refugia and
wildlife habitat.


Actively manage foxes, cats, rabbits and pigs.

Undertake fox and rabbit management simultaneously to avoid foxes switching to predation on native species, or rabbit population increases.

Manage native herbivores to prevent overgrazing.






Other forests and woodlands vegetation profile

31.3% Remaining

Commonly found species within this community


Actinostrobus arenarius; Banksia attenuata; Grevillea leucopteris; Acacia juncea; Adenanthos stictus; Allocasuarina acutivalvis; shrub; tree mallee; Anigozanthos humilis; Calytrix angulata; Conospermum stoechadis; forb; shrub.

this column graph compares the pre-1750 extent of other forests and woodlands within the zone with the present day extent. pre-1750 extent is 5.5 percent. present day extent is 1.7 percent.

Management recommendations


Protection

Sustainable
Agricultural
Practice

Rehabilitation

Fire
Management

Wildlife
Management

Weed
Management

Feral
Animal
Management

Disease
Management

Fence, and ensure only authorised vehicle access. Otherwise, restrict access to pedestrians only. Ban trail bike and
BMX riding.

Avoid changes to groundwater levels and water quality by maintaining and replanting native vegetation in lands adjacent


to remnants.

Exclude stock.

Minimise spray drift from adjacent agricultural lands. Phosphorus negatively impacts on the regeneration capacity of native vegetation and encourages


proliferation
of weeds.

Minimise ground


and surface
water extraction.

Undertake revegetation where no natural regeneration occurs. Ensure seed and tubestock are locally sourced and attempt to replicate the structure and diversity of local,
high quality
remnants.

Fire intervals should be a minimum of ten years apart. Use mosaic burning techniques, applied in a variety of seasons and intensities. Retain a range of vegetation age classes throughout
the mosaic.

Ensure that fire regimes take account of the lifecycles of obligate seeders with long juvenile periods. Fire should not occur more frequently than twice the juvenile life stage of the slowest maturing species.

Areas that have been recently burnt should be monitored
for weeds.


Manage Phytophthora outbreaks as this affects food sources for wildlife, particularly small marsupials.




Actively manage cats, rabbits and foxes.

Undertake fox and rabbit management simultaneously to avoid foxes switching to predation on native species, or increases in rabbit populations.

Manage native herbivores to prevent overgrazing.


Maintain strict hygiene protocols to avoid spreading Phytophthora by vehicle tyres,
earthmoving
machinery
and boots.

Treat dieback with phosphite in early Summer, and repeat 4–5 weeks later. Sites should be treated for a wide area around an


infected site.

Remove all parts of badly affected plants, including as much of the root system


as possible.

Manage public access to control the spread


of dieback.



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