Coping with Climate Change in the Pacific Island Region’



Yüklə 5.03 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə1/17
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü5.03 Kb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   17

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Editors: Marika V. Tuiwawa, Sarah Pene, Senilolia H. Tuiwawa 
Compiled by the Institute of Applied Sciences, University of the South Pacific, for the Forestry 
Department of the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry, Republic of the Fiji Islands; and 
SPC/GIZ ‘Coping with Climate Change in the Pacific Island Region’ Programme 
August 2013
A Rapid Biodiversity 
Assessment & Archaeological 
Survey of the Fiji REDD+ 
Pilot Site:  
 
Emalu Forest, Viti Levu 
 

 
 

 

Table of Contents 
Organisational Profiles & Authors ..................................................................................... 1 
Acknowledgements .......................................................................................................... 3 
Executive Summary .......................................................................................................... 4 
Maps ................................................................................................................................ 6 
Photographs ................................................................................................................... 19 
CHAPTER 1: Introduction ................................................................................................. 34 
CHAPTER 2: Flora, Vegetation & Ecology .......................................................................... 37 
CHAPTER 3: Herpetofauna ............................................................................................... 49 
CHAPTER 4: Avifauna ...................................................................................................... 54 
CHAPTER 5: Terrestrial Insects ......................................................................................... 59 
CHAPTER 6: Freshwater Fishes ........................................................................................ 64 
CHAPTER 7: Freshwater Macroinvertebrates ................................................................... 69 
CHAPTER 8: Invasive Species ........................................................................................... 81 
CHAPTER 9: Archaeological Survey .................................................................................. 87 
APPENDICES ................................................................................................................... 97 
REFERENCES .................................................................................................................. 159 

 
ii 
List of Maps 
Map 1: Location of the Emalu study area, Viti Levu. ............................................................................. 6 
Map 2: Location of certain focal plant species within Emalu ................................................................. 7 
Map 3: Principal vegetation types within Emalu .................................................................................... 8 
Map 4: Principal vegetation types and habitats within Emalu ................................................................ 9 
Map 5: Location of herpetofauna survey points within Emalu ............................................................. 10 
Map 6: Location of the avifauna survey points and 59 point count stations within Emalu .................. 11 
Map 7: Location of the focal avifauna species within Emalu ............................................................... 12 
Map 8: Location of the focal terrestrial insect species within Emalu ................................................... 13 
Map 9: Location of freshwater fish sampling sites within Emalu ......................................................... 14 
Map 10: Location of macroinvertebrate sampling stations within Emalu ............................................. 15 
Map 11: Location of rodent trapping transects around Tovatova basecamp ......................................... 16 
Map 12: Location of cultural sites within Emalu .................................................................................. 17 
Map 13: Location of six extensive old settlement sites within the Mavuvu catchment ........................ 18 

 
iii 
List of Photographs 
Fig. 1 Leafy branches of the critically endangered podocarp, Acmopyle sahniana (SHT) .................... 19 
Fig. 2 Fruit of the vulnerable endemic flowering plant, Degeneria vitiensis (SHT) ............................... 19 
Fig. 3 Flower of the relic flowering plant family Degeneriaceae, Degeneria vitiensis (SHT) ................. 19 
Fig. 4 The rare orchid Macodes cf. petola (MT) .................................................................................... 19 
Fig. 5 The rare orchid Nervilia cf. punctata, in the lowland rainforest of Tovatova catchment (SHT) . 19 
Fig. 6 Equisetum ramosissimum subsp. debile on the banks of Nasa River (SHT) ................................. 19 
Fig. 7 Palm tree Metroxylon vitiense (MT) ............................................................................................ 20 
Fig. 8 Palm tree Metroxylon vitiense crown with apical infructescence (MT) ...................................... 20 
Fig. 9 Habit and infructescence of the threatened palmCyphosperma tanga, found in upland slope 
forest of Waikarakarawa catchment (SHT) ........................................................................................... 20 
Fig. 10 Close up view of Cyphosperma tanga infructescence (SHT) ..................................................... 20 
Fig. 11 Villagers from Naqarawai and Draubuta assist with the processing of bryophytes (SHT) ........ 20 
Fig. 12 Airing out live specimens of lichens and bryophytes in the field (SHT) ..................................... 20 
Fig. 13 A native bronze-headed skink, Emoia parkerii, locally known as moko sari (NT) ..................... 21 
Fig. 14 Fiji’s endemic tree frog, Platymantis vitiensis, found within the Waikarakarawa catchment 
(SHT) ...................................................................................................................................................... 21 
Fig. 15 An endemic skink toed gecko, Nactus pelagicus, locally known as moko (NT) ......................... 21 
Fig. 16 The native gecko, Gehyra vorax, (boliti) camouflaged on tree bark (NT).................................. 21 
Fig. 17 Habitat of the long legged warblerTrichocichla rufa rufa, currently listed on the IUCN Red List 
as Endangered (AN) ............................................................................................................................... 21 
Fig. 18 The long legged warbler, found to be common in the upland undisturbed riparian vegetation 
(AN)........................................................................................................................................................ 21 
Fig. 19 The collared lorry, Phigys solitarius, found in the Emalu forest (SPRH) .................................... 22 
Fig. 20 A male golden dove, Ptilinopus luteovirens, found in the Emalu forest (SPRH) ........................ 22 
Fig. 21 Samoan flying-fox (beka lulu, beka ni siga) Pteropus samoensis, a Near Threatened species on 
the IUCN Red List, quite common in the general vicinity of Emalu (AN) .............................................. 22 
Fig. 22 Insular flying fox (beka), Pteropus tonganus a species of Least Concern on the IUCN Red List, 
quite common in the upper Mavuvu catchment (AN) .......................................................................... 22 

 
iv 
Fig. 23 Raiateana knowlesi (nanai), an endemic and rare cicada (SPRH) ............................................. 22 
Fig. 24 Local guide from Draubuta assisting with the sampling of Winkler bags (AL) .......................... 22 
Fig. 25 Leaf litter sampling with Winkler bags (AL) ............................................................................... 23 
Fig. 26 Common damselfly, Nesobasis angolicolis, endemic to Fiji (AL) ............................................... 23 
Fig. 27 The endemic butterflyHypolimnas inopinata, resting on a fern (AL) ...................................... 23 
Fig. 28 Larva of H. inopinata on the leaves of the shrub host plant, Elatostema nemorosum (AL) ...... 23 
Fig. 29 The endemic stick insect, Nisyrus spinulousus, on a bark of a tree (AL) .................................... 23 
Fig. 30 Freshwater eels, Anguilla spp.Nasa stream in the Mavuvu catchment (LC) ........................... 23 
Fig. 31 Holotype illustration of Lairdina hopletupus (Fowler, 1953) ..................................................... 24 
Fig. 32 Amphidromous goby, Sicyopus zosterophorum, upper Nasa stream (LC) ................................ 24 
Fig. 33 Jungle perch, Kuhlia rupestris, found within mid-Mavuvu stream (LC) ..................................... 24 
Fig. 34 Sukasuka ni ika droka- a natural barrier to fish migration along the mid-Mavuvu stream (LC) 24 
Fig. 35 Nasa Creek, upstream from base camp, an important habitat for fish sampling (LC) .............. 24 
Fig. 36 Wainirovurovu Creek, below waterfall, an important habitat for fish sampling (LC) ............... 24 
Fig. 37 Upper Wainirovurovu Creek (BR) .............................................................................................. 25 
Fig. 38 Snorkeling in mid Mavuvu Creek, below the waterfall (BR) ...................................................... 25 
Fig. 39 Nasa Creek (LC) .......................................................................................................................... 25 
Fig. 40 Wainirovurovu tributary downstream (LC)................................................................................ 25 
Fig. 41 Wainirovurovu tributary above waterfall (BR) .......................................................................... 25 
Fig. 42 Wainasoba/Mid Mavuvu (BR) .................................................................................................... 25 
Fig. 43 Waikarakarawa Creek (BR) ........................................................................................................ 26 
Fig. 44 Qalibovitu Creek (BR) ................................................................................................................. 26 
Fig. 45 Endemic mayfly Pseudocloeon sp. (BR) .................................................................................. 26 
Fig. 46 Endemic mayfly Pseudocloeon sp. B (LC) ................................................................................... 26 
Fig. 47 Endemic mayfly Cloeon sp. A (BR) ............................................................................................. 26 
Fig. 48 Endemic mayfly Cloeon sp. B (BR).............................................................................................. 26 
Fig. 49 Damselfly nymph Nesobasis sp. “orangish” (BR) ....................................................................... 26 

 

Fig. 50 Damselfly nymph Nesobasis sp. “dark green” (BR) ................................................................... 26 
Fig. 51 Caddisfly larva Apsilochorema sp. “light green” (BR) ................................................................ 26 
Fig. 52 Caddisfly larva Hydrobiosis sp. “pinkish” (BR) ........................................................................... 26 
Fig. 53 Caddisfly larva Hydrobiosis sp. “green” (BR) ............................................................................. 26 
Fig. 54 Caddisfly larvae [Trichoptera] Chimarra sp. (BR) ....................................................................... 27 
Fig. 55 Nematode worm, unknown species (BR) .................................................................................. 27 
Fig. 56 Cranefly larvae [Tipulidae], Tipula sp. (BR) ................................................................................ 27 
Fig. 57 Rissooidean snails Fluviopupa spp., under compound microscope (BR) ................................... 27 
Fig. 58 Rissooidean snails Fluviopupa spp., actual size (BR).................................................................. 27 
Fig. 59 Nematode worm, under compound microscope (BR) ............................................................... 27 
Fig. 60 Unknown species of moth (larva), actual size (BR) .................................................................... 27 
Fig. 61 Unknown species of moth (larva), under compound microscope (BR) ..................................... 27 
Fig. 62 Juvenile black rat caught by guide Aporosa Maya Jnr, at about 650m altitude (IR) ................. 27 
Fig. 63 Horses and guides crossing the Waitotolu Creek in the Waikarakarawa catchment (SP) ........ 27 
Fig. 64 Cane toad (Bufo marinus) found in the upper Mavuvu River catchment (SK) .......................... 28 
Fig. 65 Piper aduncumMikania micrantha and Dissotis rotundifolia on the bank of a small creek (SP)
 ............................................................................................................................................................... 28 
Fig. 66 Illustration of a burekalou in the highlands of Viti Levu (Williams and Calvert, 1858). ............ 28 
Fig. 67 Sketch of a nanaga, or sacred stone enclosure of Wainimala by Leslie J. Walker (Fison, 1885)28 
Fig. 68 Preserved stone alignment visible on mount at site M28-0004 (SK) ........................................ 28 
Fig. 69 Possible temple mound at site M28-0008 (SK) .......................................................................... 28 
Fig. 70 Pottery vessel or Saqaniwai discovered on mound at site M28-0014 (SK) ............................... 29 
Fig. 71 Pottery vessel discovered upon house mound at site M28-0014 (SK) ...................................... 29 
Fig. 72 Pottery sherds found at site M28-0026 (SK) .............................................................................. 29 
Fig. 73 Ancestral passageway that leads to main stream at site M28-0026 (SK).................................. 29 
Fig. 74 Stone alignment visible on mound at site M28-0028 (SK) ........................................................ 29 
Fig. 75 View of agricultural terrace platforms at site M28-0013 (SK) ................................................... 29 

 
vi 
Fig. 76 Ditch causeway at site M28-0017 (SK) ...................................................................................... 30 
Fig. 77 Raised mound with stone alignment at site M28-0026 (SK) ..................................................... 30 
Fig. 78 Local guide pointing towards settlement platform at site M28-0017 (SK) ............................... 30 
Fig. 79 View of settlement platform with terrace platform along the base at site M28-0017 (SK)...... 30 
Fig. 80 Pottery sherds at site M28-0018 (SK) ........................................................................................ 30 
Fig. 81 Ditch feature situated at site M28-0018 (SK) ............................................................................ 30 
Fig. 82 Complete traditional pottery vessel with earthen rim cover at site M28-0023 (SK) ................ 30 
Fig. 83 Tobu ni nanai - sacred pool (SK) ................................................................................................ 30 
Fig. 84 Degraded terrace due to erosion processes at site M28-0010 (SK) .......................................... 31 
Fig. 85 Metallic pot at site M28-0012 (SK) ............................................................................................ 31 
Fig. 86 Raised earthen mound at site M28-0011 (SK) ........................................................................... 31 
Fig. 87 Stone alignment of a house mound at site M28-0009 (SK) ....................................................... 31 
Fig. 88 Rim sherd discovered at site M28-0020 (SK) ............................................................................. 31 
Fig. 89 Displaced stones of house mounds generated by wild pig inhabitation and erosion processess 
at site M28-0022 (SK) ............................................................................................................................ 31 
Fig. 90 Displaced stones of house mounds generated by wild pig inhabitation and erosion processess 
at site M28-0022 (SK) ............................................................................................................................ 32 
Fig. 91 Visible stone alignment of house mound at site M28-0024 (SK) .............................................. 32 
Fig. 92 Tobu ni sili - sacred pool (SK) ..................................................................................................... 32 
Fig. 93 Vatu ni veiyalayala –Land boundary (SK) ................................................................................... 32 
Fig. 94 Raised mound with stone alignment at site M28-0019 (SK) ..................................................... 32 
Fig. 95 Sakiusa Kataiwai and guide in front of a fortification structure at site M28-0066 (SK) ............ 32 
Fig. 96 Ruins of the stone wall at site M28-0059 (SK) ........................................................................... 33 
Fig. 97 Rock shelter and camp site for the Archaeology team at site M28-0069 (SK) .......................... 33 

 
vii 
List of Appendices 
Appendix 1.  Species checklist of the non-vascular flora and lichens .............................................. 97 
Appendix 2.  Annotated checklist of the vascular flora of Emalu..................................................103 
Appendix 3.  Summary statistics of vegetation community structure assessment plots .............. 116 
Appendix 4.  Description of forest and non-forest habitat types .................................................. 123 
Appendix 5.  Herpetofauna suvey sites locations and sampling methods..................................... 125 
Appendix 6.  Conservation status of herpetofauna species known from Viti Levu ....................... 127 
Appendix 7.  Avifauna species checklist, distribution and abundance .......................................... 128 
Appendix 8.  Location of point count stations, habitat and birds recorded .................................. 130 
Appendix 9.  Focal avifauna species recorded within Emalu ......................................................... 133 
Appendix 10.  Species checklist of insects and arachnids in the Tovatova catchment ............... 134 
Appendix 11.  Species checklist of insects and arachnids in the Waikarakarawa catchment ..... 137 
Appendix 12.  Species checklist of insects and arachnids in the Mavuvu catchment ................. 140 
Appendix 13.  Species checklist of freshwater fish in the upper Sigatoka River tributaries ........ 141 
Appendix 14.  Water quality parametres at freshwater fish sampling stations .......................... 143 
Appendix 15.  Location and descriptions of macroinvertebrate sampling stations .................... 144 
Appendix 16.  Physicochemical parameters of macroinvertebrate sampling stations ............... 145 
Appendix 17.  Habitat and riparian characteristics of macroinvertebrate sampling stations ..... 146 
Appendix 18.  Abundance of freshwater macroinvertebrates collected with Surber sampling . 147 
Appendix 19.  Abundance of freshwater macroinvertebrates collected opportunistically......... 149 
Appendix 20.  Checklist of invasive and potentially invasive animals ......................................... 152 
Appendix 21.  Locations of rodent transects in Tovatova catchment ......................................... 153 
Appendix 22.  Record of pigs (Sus scrofa) caught ........................................................................ 153 
Appendix 23.  Checklist of invasive and potentially invasive plants ............................................ 154 
Appendix 24.  Summary descriptions and locations of cultural heritage sites ............................ 156 

 

ORGANISATIONAL PROFILES & AUTHORS 
Institute of Applied Sciences (University of the South Pacific) 
The Institute of Applied Sciences (IAS) was established in 1977 as part of the University of the South 
Pacific. The Institute operates as a consulting body within the university, applying the professional 
and academic expertise of its staff as required by government, NGO or private projects in Fiji and the 
Pacific region.  IAS operates through six  thematic  units;  the  South Pacific Regional Herbarium,  the 
Environment Unit, the Quality Control Unit, the  Drug Discovery Unit, the Analytical Unit and the 
Food Unit. This survey was coordinated and headed by the South Pacific Regional Herbarium. 
South Pacific Regional Herbarium  
The South Pacific Regional Herbarium (SPRH) is the focal point  for  the study of  taxonomy, 
conservation and ecology of plants in the Pacific.  The collection of the SPRH includes over  50, 000 
vascular plant specimens from Fiji and around the Pacific, as well as a wet collection of plant parts
bryophytes and algae. As a member of an international network of herbaria, the SPRH participates in 
programs to maintain collections of botanical plants specimens for study by local and international 
botanists. More recently it has extended its collection to include those of other taxa to include insects, 
freshwater invertebrates and vertebrates, reptiles and amphibians, birds and native mammals. 
South Pacific Regional Herbarium 
Institute of Applied Sciences
University of the South Pacific, 
Private Mail Bag, Suva, Fiji 
www.usp.ac.fj/herbarium 
 
Marika V. Tuiwawa  
Herbarium Curator & Survey Leader 
tuiwawa_m@usp.ac.fj 
 
Alivereti Naikatini  
Chapter 4: Avifauna 
naikatini_a@usp.ac.fj 
 
Senilolia H. Tuiwawa  
Chapter 2: Flora, Vegetation & Ecology 
tuiwawa_s@usp.ac.fj 
 
Sarah Pene  
Chapter 8: Invasive Species 
sarah.pene@usp.ac.fj 
 
Hilda Waqa-Sakiti  
Chapter 5: Entomology 
hilda.sakitiwaqa@usp.ac.fj 
Lekima Copeland  
Chapter 6: Freshwater Fishes 
lekima.copeland@gmail.com 
 
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   17


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə