Coping with Climate Change in the Pacific Island Region’



Yüklə 5.03 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə2/17
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü5.03 Kb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   17

Environment Unit 
The Environment Unit of the Institute of Applied Science conducts environmental impact assessments 
and monitoring of terrestrial and aquatic biodiversity and water quality. The Environment Unit also 
works with communities to assist them in the development and implementation of resource 
management plans. 
Environment Unit 
Institute of Applied Sciences, 
University of the South Pacific, 
Private Mail Bag, Suva, Fiji 

 

www.usp.ac.fj/environmentunit 
 
Hans Wendt  
GIS & mapping 
karlwendt.hans@gmail.com 
 
Bindiya Rashni  
Chapter 7: Freshwater Macroinvertebrates 
bindiya.rashni@gmail.com 
 
Fiji Museum  
The Fiji Museum is a statutory body  with the aim of identifying, protecting and conserving 
archaeological and cultural heritage for current and future generations. The Fiji Museum’s collection 
includes archaeological material dating back 3,700 years and cultural objects representing Fiji's 
indigenous inhabitants as well as  other communities that have settled in the island group over the 
past two centuries. 
The Fiji Museum  
Thurston Gardens, Suva, Fiji  
www.fijimuseum.org.fj 
 
Elia Nakoro 
Chapter 9: Archaeological Survey 
elia.nakoro@gmail.com 
 
Sakiusa Kataiwai 
Chapter 9: Archaeological Survey 
sakiusa.kataiwai@gmail.com 
 
NatureFiji-MareqetiViti 
NatureFiji-MareqetiViti is the working arm of the Fiji Nature Conservation Trust, a non-profit, non-
government, non-political charitable trust. NatureFiji-MareqetiViti's mission is to enhance biodiversity 
and habitat conservation, endangered species protection and sustainable use of natural resources of 
the Fiji Islands through the promotion of collaborative conservation action, awareness raising, 
education, research, and biodiversity information exchange. 
NatureFiji-MareqetiViti 
14 Hamilton-Beattie St., Suva, Fiji 
www.naturefiji.org 
 
Conservation International (Fiji) 
Conservation International (Fiji) is an international non-profit environmental organization. Its mission 
is to build  upon a strong foundation of science, partnership and field demonstration, to empower 
societies to responsibly and sustainably care for nature for the well-being of humanity. Conservation 
International operates in Fiji in partnership with The National Trust of Fiji. 
Conservation International, Pacific Islands Program 
3 Ma'afu St., Suva, Fiji 
www.conservation.org 
Nunia Thomas  
Chapter 3: Herpetofauna 
nuniat@naturefiji.org 
 
Isaac Rounds  
Chapter 8: Invasive species 
irounds@conservation.org
 
 

 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 
The survey work described in this report would not have been possible without the 
support and cooperation given by the elders and landowners of Draubuta, Nakoro, 
Navitilevu, Naqarawai, Saliadrau and Naraiyawa villages. 
The authors would also  like to thank the following people for their technical 
expertise in the field: Senivalati Vido, Salaseini Bureni and Panapasa Tubuitamana of 
the Fiji Department of Forestry;   Apaitia Liga, Siteri Tikoca, Mereia Katafono, 
Tokasaya Cakacaka and Manoa Maiwaqa of the SPRH.  
The work of the field  guides; Waisale Lasekula, Kaminieli Tauininukuilau, Lepani 
Kainailega, Jovilisi Mocetabua, Vetaia Mocetabua, Avisai Draunivadra, Avorosa 
Maya,  Aporosa Maya Jnr., Asaeli Navale, Netani Ganitoga, Napolioni Suguvanua, 
Semesa Banuve, Samuela Nasalo, Netani Ganitoga, Sireli Marua, and Lemeki Toutou 
is also gratefully acknowledged. 
Bindiya Rashni would especially like to thank Dr Alison Haynes, Honorary Fellow at 
the Institute of Applied Science, for verifying  the  identifications  from the 
macroinvertebrate survey. 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 
The land encompassed by the mataqali Emalu in the province of Navosa has been 
selected  as  the pilot site for the Fiji REDD+ programme. A survey to assess the 
biodiversity of the area and document its cultural heritage sites was carried out by a 
team of specialists from USP’s Institute of Applied Science (the South Pacific 
Regional Herbarium and the Environment Unit), the Fiji Museum, NatureFiji-
MareqetiViti and Conservation International. The expedition was implemented  in 
two phases; in July 2012 and March 2013. 
Flora, Vegetation and Ecology 
A total of 707  plant  taxa were recorded for Emalu, including 286  bryophytes and 
lichens,  375  angiosperms,  nine  gymnosperms, and 35  ferns and fern allies. 
Altogether, the vascular and non-vascular taxa recorded from the Emalu site 
spanned 182 families and 391 genera. Over a third (39%) of the vascular plant flora 
recorded are endemic to Fiji, including 160 species of flowering plants, two fern and 
fern allies, and two  gymnosperms.  Ten  taxa  were encountered that are  important 
focal species due to their rarity, botanical significance, very recent discovery in Fiji 
and inclusion in the IUCN Red List. Five principal vegetation types were identified; 
lowland rainforest, upland rainforest, cloud forest, dry forest and talasiga. 
Herpetofauna 
Six species of herpetofauna: three endemic, two native and one invasive were 
captured over 22 man-hours of diurnal survey, 63 hours of sticky tape trapping and 
nine man-hours of nocturnal surveys. This survey has documented the first records 
of  herpetofauna in this  area and indicates a  similar  herpetofauna habitat to those 
typically observed in other parts of Viti Levu. The endemic Fiji tree frog (Platymantis 
vitiensis) was encountered in the area and is possibly the western-most record of the 
occurrence of this species in Fiji. 
Avifauna 
A total of 35 species of birds were recorded during the survey, which included 25 
endemic  species  and one  exotic species. Two species of bats were also  recorded 
during the surveys. Ten focal species were identified (eight bird species and two bat 
species). The bird diversity of Emalu is comparable to the four Important Bird Areas 
on Viti Levu and ranks even higher in terms of bird density. 
Terrestrial Insects 
The target taxa Coleoptera (beetles) recorded 26 families in total and there was also a 
high abundance of  the family Formicidae (ants). These taxa provide critical 
ecosystem services in forests systems such as soil processing, decomposition, 
herbivory, pollination and seed dispersal. Insects of conservation value recorded 
from Emalu included: Hypolimnas inopinata (a rare and endemic butterfly), Nysirus 
spinulosus and Cotylosoma dipneusticum (rare and endemic stick insects) and Raiateana 

 

knowlesi (the rare and endemic cicada). These findings suggest that the Emalu area is 
pristine and an important site for rare insects on Viti Levu. 
Freshwater Fish 
A  total of ten species of fish from  six families were recorded from the study area. 
Three species of gobies  (Awaous guamensis, Sicyopus zosterophorum, Sicyopterus 
lagocephalus), two species of eels from the family Anguillidae (Anguilla marmorata and 
Anguilla megastoma), and the freshwater snake eel from the family Opicthidae 
(Lamnostoma kampeni)  were collected in the area.  The  Mavuvu mid reach had an 
exceptionally high abundance and biomass of jungle perch Kuhlia rupestris when 
compared to other streams in Fiji.  No endemic species were  observed or caught 
during this  survey.  Around areas of human habitation there is evidence of the 
removal of riparian buffer zones as well as unrestricted livestock access to waterways 
which,  coupled with uncontrolled slash and burn activities has exacerbated 
environmental degradation in these areas. The use of traditional fish poison (Derris 
roots) is also a common problem seen throughout the survey sites. 
Freshwater Macroinvertebrates 
A total of 76 freshwater macroinvertebrate taxa were identified from the  16,370 
specimens collected in the three catchments of the Emalu region. The highly diverse 
freshwater macroinvertebrate community of Emalu included  a high proportion  of 
endemic taxa (75%), with insects being the most commonly occurring group. A total 
of 14 macroinvertebrate taxa were selected as potential bioindicators. The high rate of 
endemism,  as well as the  large number of species with large populations,  is 
indicative of the intactness of both the stream system and the surrounding forest. 
Invasive Species 
A total of 26 invasive plants and eleven invasive animals were recorded in the study 
area,  thirteen  of which  are listed in the 100 most invasive species in the world. 
Generally, the occurrence and abundance of invasive was associated with proximity 
to human habitation and to disturbed areas such as tracks, temporary campsites and 
cultivated areas. The invasive plant species were generally low in abundance, with 
the exception of Piper aduncum  which was locally common, and Clidemia hirta  and 
Mikania micrantha which were both widespread. 
Archaeological Survey 
The land belonging to the mataqali Emalu is rich in historical and cultural sites that 
have never been documented until this survey. A total of 77 sites of historical and 
cultural significance were documented, including old village sites, hill fortifications, 
pottery sites, agricultural terraces, sacred pools, house mounds and fortification 
trenches.  Generally, the archaeological finds during this survey have considerable 
cultural value to the local community as well as at national level. 

 
 
6
 
MAPS 
 
Map 1: Location of the Emalu study area, Viti Levu. 

 
 
7
 
 
Map 2: Location of certain focal plant species within Emalu 

 
 
8
 
 
Map 3: Principal vegetation types within Emalu 

 
 
9
 
 
Map 4: Principal vegetation types and habitats within Emalu 

 
 
10
 
 
Map 5: Location of herpetofauna survey points within Emalu 

 
 
11
 
 
Map 6: Location of the avifauna survey points and 59 point count stations within Emalu 

 
 
12
 
 
Map 7: Location of the focal avifauna species within Emalu 

 
 
13
 
 
Map 8: Location of the focal terrestrial insect species within Emalu 

 
 
14
 
 
Map 9: Location of freshwater fish sampling sites within Emalu 

 
 
15
 
 
Map 10: Location of macroinvertebrate sampling stations within Emalu 

 
 
16
 
 
Map 11: Location of rodent trapping transects around Tovatova basecamp  

 
 
17
 
 
Map 12: Location of cultural sites within Emalu 

 
 
18
 
 
Map 13: Location of six extensive old settlement sites within the Mavuvu catchment 
M28-0068 
M28-0066 
M28-0065 
M28-0070 
M28-0055 
M28-0071 

 
19 
PHOTOGRAPHS 
Photographers initials are indicated in the captions: AN=Alivereti Naikatini, AL=Apaitia Liga, BR=Bindiya Rashni, EN=Elia 
Nakoro, IR=Isaac Rounds, LC=Lekima Copeland, MT=Marika Tuiwawa, NT=Nunia Thomas, SK=Sakiusa Kataiwai, 
SP=Sarah Pene, SHT=Senilolia H. Tuiwawa, SPRH=South Pacific Regional Herbarium 
Fig.  1  Leafy branches of the  critically endangered 
podocarp, Acmopyle sahniana (SHT)
 
Fig. 2 Fruit of the vulnerable endemic flowering plant, 
Degeneria vitiensis (SHT)
 
Fig.  3  Flower of the relic flowering plant family 
Degeneriaceae, Degeneria vitiensis (SHT) 
Fig. 4 The rare orchid Macodes cf. petola (MT) 
Fig.  5  The rare orchid Nervilia  cf.  punctata,  in  the 
lowland rainforest of Tovatova catchment (SHT) 
Fig. 6 Equisetum ramosissimum subsp. debile on the 
banks of Nasa River (SHT) 

 
20 
Fig. 7 Palm tree Metroxylon vitiense (MT) 
Fig. 8 Palm tree Metroxylon vitiense crown with apical 
infructescence (MT) 
Fig.  9  Habit and infructescence of the threatened 
palm,  Cyphosperma tanga,  found  in  upland slope 
forest of Waikarakarawa catchment (SHT) 
Fig.  10  Close up view of Cyphosperma tanga 
infructescence (SHT) 
Fig. 11 Villagers from Naqarawai and Draubuta assist 
with the processing of bryophytes (SHT) 
Fig.  12  Airing out live specimens of lichens and 
bryophytes in the field (SHT) 

 
21 
Fig. 13 A native bronze-headed skink, Emoia parkerii
locally known as moko sari (NT) 
Fig.  14  Fiji’s endemic tree frog, Platymantis vitiensis
found within the Waikarakarawa catchment (SHT) 
Fig.  15  An endemic skink toed gecko, Nactus 
pelagicus, locally known as moko (NT)   
Fig.  16  The  native  gecko,  Gehyra vorax,  (boliti) 
camouflaged on tree bark (NT) 
Fig. 17 Habitat of the long legged warbler, Trichocichla 
rufa rufa, currently listed on the IUCN Red List as 
Endangered (AN) 
Fig. 18 The long legged warbler, found to be common 
in the upland undisturbed riparian vegetation (AN)  

 
22 
Fig. 19 The collared lorry, Phigys solitarius, found in 
the Emalu forest (SPRH) 
Fig.  20  A  male golden dove, Ptilinopus luteovirens
found in the Emalu forest (SPRH) 
Fig.  21  Samoan flying-fox (beka lulu,  beka ni siga) 
Pteropus samoensis, a Near Threatened species on 
the IUCN Red List, quite common in the general 
vicinity of Emalu (AN) 
Fig. 22 Insular flying fox (beka), Pteropus tonganus a 
species of Least Concern on the IUCN Red List, quite 
common in the upper Mavuvu catchment (AN) 
Fig.  23  Raiateana knowlesi  (nanai), an endemic and 
rare cicada (SPRH) 
Fig.  24  Local guide from Draubuta assisting with the 
sampling of Winkler bags (AL) 

 
23 
Fig. 25 Leaf litter sampling with Winkler bags (AL) 
Fig. 26 Common damselfly, Nesobasis angolicolis, 
endemic to Fiji (AL) 
Fig. 27 The endemic butterfly, Hypolimnas inopinata, 
resting on a fern (AL) 
Fig. 28 Larva of H. inopinata on the leaves of the shrub 
host plant, Elatostema nemorosum (AL) 
Fig. 29 The endemic stick insect, Nisyrus spinulousus
on a bark of a tree (AL) 
Fig. 30 Freshwater eels, Anguilla spp.Nasa stream in 
the Mavuvu catchment (LC) 

 
24 
Fig.  31  Holotype illustration of Lairdina hopletupus 
(Fowler, 1953) 
Fig. 32 Amphidromous goby, Sicyopus zosterophorum
upper Nasa stream (LC) 
Fig.  33  Jungle perch, Kuhlia rupestris, found within 
mid-Mavuvu stream (LC) 
Fig. 34 Sukasuka ni ika droka- a natural barrier to fish 
migration along the mid-Mavuvu stream (LC) 
Fig.  35  Nasa  Creek, upstream from base camp, an 
important habitat for fish sampling (LC) 
Fig.  36  Wainirovurovu Creek, below waterfall, an 
important habitat for fish sampling (LC) 

 
25 
Fig. 37 Upper Wainirovurovu Creek (BR) 
Fig.  38  Snorkeling in mid Mavuvu Creek, below the 
waterfall (BR) 
Fig. 39 Nasa Creek (LC) 
Fig. 40 Wainirovurovu tributary downstream (LC) 
Fig. 41 Wainirovurovu tributary above waterfall (BR) 
Fig. 42 Wainasoba/Mid Mavuvu (BR) 

 
26 
Fig. 43 Waikarakarawa Creek (BR) 
Fig. 44 Qalibovitu Creek (BR) 
Fig.  45  Endemic mayfly 
Pseudocloeon sp.(BR) 
Fig.  46  Endemic mayfly 
Pseudocloeon sp. B (LC) 
Fig. 47 Endemic mayfly Cloeon sp. A 
(BR) 
Fig.  48  Endemic  mayfly  Cloeon 
sp. B (BR) 
Fig.  49  Damselfly nymph 
Nesobasis sp. “orangish” (BR) 
Fig.  50  Damselfly nymph Nesobasis 
sp. “dark green” (BR) 
Fig. 
51 
Caddisfly larva 
Apsilochorema  sp.  “light green” 
(BR) 
Fig.  52  Caddisfly larva 
Hydrobiosis sp. “pinkish” (BR) 
Fig. 53 Caddisfly larva Hydrobiosis sp. 
“green” (BR) 

 
27 
Fig.  54  Caddisfly larvae 
[Trichoptera] Chimarra sp. (BR) 
Fig.  55  Nematode worm, 
unknown species (BR) 
Fig.  56  Cranefly  larvae [Tipulidae], 
Tipula sp. (BR) 
Fig.  57  Rissooidean snails 
Fluviopupa spp., under compound 
microscope (BR) 
Fig.  58  Rissooidean snails 
Fluviopupa spp., actual size (BR) 
Fig.  59  Nematode worm,  under 
compound microscope (BR) 
Fig. 60 Unknown species of moth (larva), actual 
size (BR) 
Fig. 61 Unknown species of moth (larva), under compound 
microscope (BR) 
Fig.  62  Juvenile black rat caught by guide 
Aporosa Maya Jnr, at about 650m altitude (IR) 
Fig. 63 Horses and guides crossing the Waitotolu Creek in 
the Waikarakarawa catchment (SP) 

 
28 
Fig.  64  Cane toad (Bufo  marinus) found in the 
upper Mavuvu River catchment (SK) 
Fig.  65  Piper aduncum,  Mikania micrantha  and  Dissotis 
rotundifolia on the bank of a small creek (SP) 
Fig. 66 Illustration of a burekalou in the highlands 
of Viti Levu (Williams and Calvert, 1858). 
Fig. 67 Sketch of a nanaga, or sacred stone enclosure of 
Wainimala by Leslie J. Walker (Fison, 1885) 
Fig.  68  Preserved stone alignment visible on 
mount at site M28-0004 (SK) 
Fig. 69 Possible temple mound at site M28-0008 (SK) 

 
29 
Fig.  70  Pottery vessel or Saqaniwai  discovered 
on mound at site M28-0014 (SK) 
Fig. 71 Pottery vessel discovered upon house mound at site 
M28-0014 (SK) 
Fig.  72  Pottery sherds found at site M28-0026 
(SK) 
Fig. 73 Ancestral passageway that leads to main stream at 
site M28-0026 (SK) 
Fig. 74 Stone alignment visible on mound at site 
M28-0028 (SK) 
Fig.  75  View of agricultural terrace platforms at site M28-
0013 (SK) 

 
30 
Fig. 76 Ditch causeway at site M28-0017 (SK) 
Fig.  77  Raised mound with stone alignment at site M28-
0026 (SK) 
Fig.  78 Local guide pointing towards settlement 
platform at site M28-0017 (SK) 
Fig.  79  View of settlement platform with terrace platform 
along the base at site M28-0017 (SK) 
Fig. 80 Pottery sherds at site M28-0018 (SK) 
Fig. 81 Ditch feature situated at site M28-0018 (SK) 
Fig.  82  Complete traditional pottery vessel with 
earthen rim cover at site M28-0023 (SK) 
Fig. 83 Tobu ni nanai - sacred pool (SK) 

 
31 
Fig.  84  Degraded terrace due to erosion 
processes at site M28-0010 (SK) 
 
Fig. 85 Metallic pot at site M28-0012 (SK) 
Fig. 86 Raised earthen mound at site M28-0011 
(SK) 
Fig. 87 Stone alignment of a house mound at site M28-0009 
(SK) 
Fig.  88  Rim sherd discovered at site M28-0020 
(SK) 
Fig.  89  Displaced stones of house mounds  generated  by 
wild pig inhabitation and erosion processess at site M28-
0022 (SK) 

 
32 
Fig.  90  Displaced stones of house mounds 
generated by wild pig inhabitation and erosion 
processess at site M28-0022 (SK) 
Fig. 91 Visible stone alignment of house mound at site M28-
0024 (SK) 
Fig. 92 Tobu ni sili - sacred pool (SK) 
Fig. 93 Vatu ni veiyalayala – land boundary (SK) 
Fig.  94  Raised mound with stone alignment at 
site M28-0019 (SK) 
Fig. 95 Sakiusa Kataiwai and guide in front of a fortification 
structure at site M28-0066 (SK) 

 
33 
Fig. 96 Ruins of the stone wall at site M28-0059 
(SK) 
Fig.  97  Rock shelter and camp site  for the Archaeology 
team at site M28-0069 (SK) 
 

 
34 
CHAPTER 1:   
 
INTRODUCTION 
The Fiji REDD+ 
REDD+  is an international programme so named for countries’ efforts to reduce 
emissions from deforestation and forest degradation,  and  foster conservation, 
sustainable management of forests, and enhancement of forest carbon stocks (Forest 
Carbon Partnership Facility, 2013) 
Fiji’s participation in the programme was formalised through the Fiji REDD+ Policy 
which the Fiji Government endorsed in December 2010  (Fiji Forestry Department
2011).  REDD+ in Fiji is  supported and funded by the Secretariat of the Pacific 
Community (SPC),  the Federal Ministry of Economic Co-operation and 
Development, Germany (GIZ) through the Programme Coping with Climate Change in 
the Pacific Island Region and the Fiji Department of Forestry. 
One  of  the REDD+ policy activities is the  establishment of a pilot site for Fiji, for 
which the mataqali Emalu of the yavusa Emalu in Navosa Province, Viti Levu was 
selected. This programme focused on four key objectives: 

 
To conduct a forest inventory and carbon  pool measurement of the  Emalu 
pilot  site. The intended outcomes are  to test the carbon pool measurement 
methodology recommended  for Fiji, to contribute to the development of a 
national protocol for forest carbon measurements and monitoring, and to have 
a Tier 3 level carbon stock calculation. 

 
To conduct rapid biodiversity surveys  and develop instruments to monitor 
biodiversity  changes  in the pilot site. This will contribute to a national 
biodiversity monitoring protocol for REDD+ projects. 

 
To undertake a socio-economic survey of the people of the Emalu forest using 
participatory appraisal  tools,  establish social and economic baselines and 
assess the social and economic  implication of the REDD+ project following 
relevant international guidelines and standards. Indicators will be developed 
as part of the monitoring procedure. An assessment of drivers of deforestation 
and forest degradation of the Emalu REDD+ pilot site and the surrounding 
area will also be undertaken. 

 
To carry out a cultural and archaeological mapping of the pilot site. 
To protect Fiji’s terrestrial biodiversity it is critically important that protected areas 
have  sufficient connectivity to meet the area requirements of wide-ranging 
threatened species and ecological processes,  and that these protected areas  are 
managed as a coordinated system for effective conservation.  

 
35 
It is also vital to create awareness and appreciation of the importance of biodiversity 
amongst local communities. Equally important is a forward defence against 
emerging threats  to biodiversity, by providing information to decision-makers, 
establishing  support  and incentives for biodiversity conservation,  and building 
capacity to manage biodiversity resources. 
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   17


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə