Coping with Climate Change in the Pacific Island Region’



Yüklə 5.03 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə5/17
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü5.03 Kb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   17

3.6
 
Recommendations 
Considering that baseline survey within the Emalu forest has now been conducted, 
the best option available will be to build on this by conducting subsequent surveys 
and standardising the survey techniques especially for the sticky traps and frog 
surveys, carrying them out  over different seasons and assessing  species densities. 
Any changes  in terms of presence/absence and density over time will indicate the 
status of the forest.  It is recommended that these intensive and dedicated surveys 
focus on a particular area or along standard transects. It is also recommended that 
tree climbing techniques be used to enable better capture rates of cryptic skinks and 
gecko species. 

 
54 
CHAPTER 4:   
 
AVIFAUNA 
Alivereti Naikatini  
4.1
 
Summary  
The main objectives of the study were to compile a checklist of the birds and bats 
species present and observed, and determine  the  presence of species of high 
conservation importance (focal species) for monitoring in the future. The assessment 
methods used during the survey were the Point Count Method with a fixed radius of 
50m; evening (dusk) bat counts using a Bat Detector device to detect presence of 
micro-bats; interviewing  of local guides,  and opportunistic surveys. About 4000 
minutes of avifauna studies were conducted during the two surveys where 59 points 
were assessed in 2012 and an additional 37 points in 2013. A total of 35 species of 
birds were recorded during the two surveys which included 25 endemic and one 
exotic species. Two species of bats were also recorded during the surveys. Ten focal 
species were identified (eight bird species and two bat species). The bird diversity of 
Emalu is comparable to the four largest Important Bird Areas (IBAs FJ07, FJ08, FJ09, 
and FJ10) on Viti Levu and ranks even higher in terms of bird density. 
4.2
 
Introduction  
Fiji’s bats play an essential role as seed dispersing agents, major pollinators, and 
insect control agents in the rainforest and other terrestrial ecosystems (Palmeirim et 
al., 2007). However, bats are understudied in Fiji in terms of ecological research and 
there is little public awareness of their role and importance. Bats are the only native 
terrestrial mammals of Fiji and six species occur in Fiji, four of which are native and 
two endemic (Flannery, 1995,  Palmeirim et al., 2007).  Four  bat  species are listed as 
threatened (Palmeirim et al., 2007). 
Like bats, birds are also  very important indicators of the forest health. They are 
important seed dispersers, pollinators and insect control agents. In a pristine forest 
system, one would expect to find more native and endemic species. There are 68 
species of land birds found in Fiji, eleven of which are introduced species.  
No  previous  bird or bat surveys  have  been carried out in the Emalu area. A few 
recent studies were carried to areas close to Emalu,  including  a bat survey of the 
Tatuba caves in the vicinity of Saweni in the Namataku District (Palmeirim  et al., 
2007). The most recent bird survey close to the study area was carried out by Birdlife 
International (Fiji) in the Southern Viti Levu Highlands (IBA FJ10), which is to the 
south of Emalu, Sovi Basin (IBA FJ08) to the east and the Rairaimatuku Plateau (IBA 
FJ09) to the north (Masibalavu and Dutson, 2006). 

 
55 
The main objectives of this survey were to:  

 
Provide a checklist of all avifauna species (birds and bats) present in the site,  

 
Highlight species that are of conservation importance (focal species), 

 
Provide preliminary abundances of species present, and to  

 
Develop a methodology for avifauna monitoring work in the future. 
4.3
 
Methodology  
The survey methods used in the survey were the: 

 
Point count method (for both bats and birds), 

 
Evening counts for bats, 

 
Bat detector surveys in the evenings, 

 
Opportunistic surveys, 

 
Interviews with local communities. 
The point count method was the most commonly used method to survey for the bats 
and birds. It was only carried out in the morning and afternoons when birds are 
more active. Counts in a point were restricted within a 50m radius for a period of ten 
minutes according to an established methodology (Naikatini, 2009). Stations were not 
randomly located, due to the rugged terrain of the area, but were placed along tracks 
and accessible areas. To maximise the size of the area covered, points were placed at 
least 200 –  400m apart.  This was also done to minimise the likelihood of double 
counts. Each morning or afternoon session would last two to four hours depending 
on the weather. All birds detected within  the 50m radius area were recorded and 
GPS locations noted. The inclusion of as many sub-habitats as possible –  riparian, 
flat, slope, ridge and ridge top - in disturbed and undisturbed areas was attempted. 
The total number of points, birds and species recorded were tabulated to give the 
relative abundance or density of each species. 
Bat surveys were also carried out by conducting bat counts in the early evenings 
(from about one hour before sunset – 17:00 to 18:00) from a good lookout or open 
area to determine what bat species were flying over and their direction of flight. The 
total number of bats counted in an hour would give an idea of the bat activity and 
abundance in the study area. Bat detectors were also used in the evenings near the 
camp site by walking along the trail and stopping at various points where there was 
an opening or gap in the canopy and pointing the bat detector into the direction of 
the sky. The bat detector enabled us to tune to the frequencies at which the two 
micro-bat species (present in Fiji) would be detected if they flew over or were feeding 

 
56 
nearby. These surveys were only carried out for about an hour between 1900 and 
2200 hours, and also when weather conditions were favorable for such surveys. 
Opportunistic surveys were also conducted whilst travelling from one point station 
to another, or whilst travelling within the area from one base camp to another. 
Interviews with the local guides were carried out on some evenings. Local  guides 
knew the area well, including where the main bat roosts are located, as well as the 
species of birds they may have encountered in the area previously. 
4.4
 
Results and discussion 
In total approximately  4000 minutes were spent actively  conducting bat and bird 
surveys, and over 70 hectares were covered using the point count method. A total of 
35 species of land birds and two species of bats were recorded in the study site, and 
these are listed in Appendix 7. Identifications were verified using a published field 
guide (Watling, 2001). A total of 96 point stations were surveyed during the 20 days 
of survey. These point stations (shown on Map 6) were located in the different sub-
habitat types found with the main  vegetation systems; lowland rainforest (<600m 
elevation),  upland rainforest  (600-800m elevation) and cloud forest (>800m 
elevation). A table of the location and habitat of each station and a summary of the 
species diversity and bird abundance is provided in Appendix 8 
Of the 35 species of land birds recorded, one is an exotic species and 25 are endemic 
to Fiji. The exotic species, commonly known as the red-vented bulbul (Pycnotus cafer
on the IUCN Red List as being a species of Least Concern  (Birdlife International, 
2012a) and is more common on the western edges of the Emalu site. Eight species of 
birds recorded are listed as focal bird species for conservation in Fiji because of their 
status (Appendix 9). Stations where bird and bat focal species were recorded are 
marked on (Map 7). 
The long-leggd warbler (Fig.  18), classified as Endangered on the IUCN Red List 
(Birdlife International, 2012b)  was found to be common in the upland and 
undisturbed riparian vegetation; an example of this habit is shown in Fig.  17. 
Sightings of the collared lorry, Phigys solitarius  (Fig.  19), and the golden dove, 
Ptilinopus luteovirens (Fig. 20), were also made during the survey. 
Only two species of bats were recorded throughout the  survey;  Pteropus samoensis, 
the Samoan flying-fox and P. tonganus the Pacific flying-fox. Pteropus samoensis (Fig. 
21) is listed in the IUCN Red List as Near Threatened (Brooke and Wiles, 2008). P. 
tonganus (Fig. 22) was not commonly encountered in the study area in 2012 however 
it was common in the areas surveyed in 2013 and seemed to be more common in the 
upper Mavuvu catchment. Here, two of the guides were able to catch seven bats one 
evening in just one hour, with sticks. The guides also mentioned that the upper 
Mavuvu area was well known for bats. No bat roost for P. tonganus was sighted in 
the Emalu REDD+ site. The closest roost was  located outside the study area, and 

 
57 
consisted of over 1000 bats. There could be roosts located in the forested areas on the 
Namosi side of Emalu however time constraints did not allow for a confirmation of 
this. No micro-bats were detected using the bat detectors. However this should not 
imply that there are no micro-bats foraging for food in Emalu as there needs to be 
more follow up studies to confirm this. 
Table 1. Comparison of Emalu to the four largest Important Bird Areas (IBAs) of Viti 
Levu. 
Emalu & IBAs 
Area 
Native species 
Endemic 
Emalu 
57km² 
34 
25 
Greater Tomaniivi 
175km² 
34 
24 
Rairaimatuku 
287km² 
34 
24 
Sovi Basin 
407km² 
34 
24 
Viti Levu Southern Highlands 
670km² 
34 
24 
Table 1 shows that native bird species diversity in Emalu is comparable to Viti Levu’s 
four largest Important Bird Areas (IBAs), and has a slightly higher number of 
endemic species.  In terms of species density it is the highest ever recorded  for 
anywhere in Fiji to date. 
4.5
 
Recommendations 
To better understand the ecology and abundance of the avifauna of Emalu there is a 
need to carry out further  monitoring work. To monitor the bird and Pteropus 
samoensis populations, we recommend the use of the point count method with a fixed 
50m radius and 8-10 minute counts per station. For best practice, future monitoring 
surveys should include approximately  70 point count stations spread out over the 
various vegetation systems present; cloud forest (10 stations), upland rainforest (20 
stations), lowland rainforest (20 stations), grassland (10 stations), secondary forest(10 
stations), and ensuring within these that there is coverage across the different sub-
habitats (riparian, flat, slope, ridge, and ridge-top). 
To monitor for the other bat species a further survey of the area is needed to locate 
the roosts, both in the area and the surrounding forest systems as it is most likely that 
bats roosting outside the Emalu site will be flying in to forage for food, e.g. from the 
P. tonganus  roost at Vurunamasima near Navitilevu Village and the Notopteris 
macdonaldi roost in Saweni (Navosa) and Nabukelevu (Serua). These roosts are both 
about 10 km from the edge of the Emalu site. When the roosts are located, population 
counts will be performed for monitoring purposes.  

 
58 
The Emalu REDD+ site should be an area of conservation priority for the 
Government of Fiji. As yet Fiji has no dedicated bird reserve and it is recommended 
that, given the species diversity and high endemism levels as well as its ideal 
location, the Emalu area be designated an established protected bird area. 
Conservation should be a priority and logging should not be permitted in this area if 
you take into account the true value of the site ecosystem function, rich biodiversity, 
cultural and spiritual importance, all of which are invaluable monetarily. 

 
59 
CHAPTER 5:   
 
TERRESTRIAL INSECTS 
Hilda Waqa-Sakiti 
5.1
 
Summary 
A total of 26  families of the  target taxa Coleoptera (beetles) was  recorded  in the 
Emalu areas, as well as a high abundance of the family Formicidae (ants). These taxa 
provide critical ecosystem services in forests systems such as soil processing, 
decomposition, herbivory, pollination and seed dispersal. Insects of conservation 
value recorded from Emalu included: Hypolimnas inopinata (a rare and endemic 
butterfly),  Nysirus spinulosus  and  Cotylosoma dipneusticum  (rare and endemic stick 
insects) and Raiateana knowlesi (the rare and endemic cicada). These findings suggest 
that the Emalu area is pristine and an important site for rare insects on Viti Levu.  
5.2
 
Introduction  
This was the first entomological survey to be conducted within the Emalu forest. A 
baseline survey was carried out with the primary aim of determining the general 
diversity of insects in the area. The survey targeted a diversity  of  habitats  (slopes, 
flats, ridges and riparian  areas)  and vegetation types  (grassland,  lowland, upland 
and cloud forest). A variety of collection techniques (light traps, leaf litter sampling, 
pitfall trapping, 1km transect counts, active and opportunistic surveys)  was 
employed. The general diversity of insects and those species of higher conservation 
value (i.e. focal species) were sampled as an indicator of the status or health of the 
forest in Emalu. 
5.3
 
Methodology  
Site selection and habitat considerations 
A number of key habitat types (shown on Map  3  and  Map  4)  were surveyed to 
maximise the chance of encountering individuals of focal  species  as well as to 
adequately sample the diversity of insects; 

 
Lowland forest areas: targeted  specifically to find  Fiji’s rare endemic 
butterflies Papilio schmeltzi and Hypolimnas inopinata

 
Upland forest areas: leaf litter sampling, pitfall traps and light traps on slopes 
mainly targeted  the general  diversity of insects within this specific habitat. 
Active searches for the endemic phasmids (stick insects) were also conducted. 

 
Ridges: leaf litter sampling and light traps on ridges targeting  the general 
diversity of insects found  within this specific habitat. A high diversity of 

 
60 
insects (and in particular the focal order  Coleoptera) is indicative of intact 
forest systems. 

 
Riparian  surveys in all vegetation types: These sruveys specifically targeted 
butterflies (namely Fiji’s rare endemic butterfly, H. inopinata) and damselflies 
(namely  those of the  endemic genus Nesobasis). These often fly out to open 
areas on a fine day in search for sunlight and food, and usually aggregate 
along the streams in forested areas. Their presence, abundance and richness 
are excellent indicators of forest and stream systems in good health.  
Survey methods and sites 
Nocturnal surveys   
Nocturnal surveys were conducted using ultra violet (UV) light traps. These were set 
up and left to run for 12hour periods from 6pm-6am. Insect specimens were sorted to 
Order and then to Family level. Specimens are currently being curated, catalogued 
and stored at the South Pacific Regional Herbarium, USP. 
Leaf Litter surveys 
Leaf litter surveys were conducted targeting different habitat types (i.e. river flats, 
slopes and ridges) in the lowland and upland vegetation types. 1m
2
 quadrats were 
laid at 5m intervals along a 50m transect. Leaf litter from each quadrat was sieved 
through 12mm mesh sieves and transferred into Winkler bags (Fig. 24 and Fig. 25). 
The Winkler bags were hung out for at least 48 hours to allow drying of the leaf litter. 
Insect specimens were stored in ethanol for further sorting and identification. 
Pitfall Traps 
Pitfall traps were set in varous habitat types (i.e. river flats, slopes and ridges) in the 
lowland and upland forest areas. Pitfall traps were placed at 5m intervals along a 
50m transect within the vegetation plots used by the botany team. Specimens were 
collected and transferred into ethanol after 48 hours. 
Active sampling- Lepidoptera (butterflies) and Odonates (damselflies) 
Butterflies and damselflies were also actively sampled in open grassland and 
riparian areas along creeks and streams using handheld nets.  Voucher  specimens 
were taken for identification. 
1km Transect Count Method 
1 km transect counts were conducted for the indicator taxa Hypolimnas inopinata (for 
abundance) and Odonata (damselfly) diversity along streams within the Mavuvu 
and Waikarakarawa catchments.  

 
61 
Opportunistic Encounters 
In addition to the survey methods described above, collections were made during the 
course of the survey period in response to opportunistic encounters of interesting 
taxa. 
Identification and curation 
Identification of specimens was carried out with the aid of available taxonomic 
references for each of the main groups; butterflies and moths (Waterhouse, 1920, 
Robinson, 1975,  Prasad and Waqa-Sakiti, 2007), dragonflies and damselflies 
(Donnelly, 1990,  Van Gossum et al., 2006), ants (Folgarait, 1998), beetles (Lawrence 
and Britton, 1994) and spiders (McGavin, 2000). The specimens are currently being 
curated and catalogued at the South Pacific Regional Herbarium. 
5.4
 
Results and discussion  
Insect Diversity 
The results of the insect survey of each catchment are provided in Appendix 10, 
Appendix 11  and  Appendix 12. A total of 26 Coleopteran (beetle) families were 
sampled from within the entire study area. The most abundant taxa sampled 
included the beetle families Curculionidae (weevils) and Scolytidae (bark beetles) 
and from the Order Hymenoptera, Family Formicidae (ants). Rare beetle families: 
Cerambycidae (long-horn beetles), Eucnemidae, Cantharidae, Lathrididae and 
Passalidae were also encountered in the surveys.  The great diversity of the target 
taxa Coleoptera and the Hymenopteran family Formicidae are a good indication that 
ecosystem services such as soil processing, decomposition, herbivory, pollination 
and seed dispersal within the study area of the lowland, upland and cloud forests in 
Emalu are well intact. 
Another interesting find was in the order Odonata (i.e. damselflies). The endemic 
genus Nesobasis were abundantly found along tributaries, creeks, stream and rivers 
especially for the species Nesobasis angolicolis (Fig. 26), N. erythrops and N. heteroneura
Their diversity along streams is an excellent indicator of good water quality and 
intact status of neighbouring ecosystems. Moths sampled from light traps (nocturnal 
surveys) were also significant especially for a few species which are native and 
known to be restricted to primary forested areas i.e. Cleora  diversa,  Agathia pisina
Pyrrhorachis pyrrhogona, Thallasodes figurate and Mecodina variata. 
Focal Species  
Hypolimnas inopinata (Order Lepidoptera) 
Hypolimnas  inopinata  (Fig.  27  and  Fig.  28)  is  a  rare  butterfly,  endemic  to the Fiji 
Islands. It is a montane species and lives in rainforests. It is often found in or near 

 
62 
pristine mountain areas, usually in semi-open areas along streams leading up to the 
mountains. Its presence and abundance has also proven to be a very good indicator 
of the pristine nature of the rainforest system. H. inopinata was sampled along the 
Nasa Creek, adjacent tributaries including the Wairovurovu stream (Tovatova 
catchment), Waikutukutu stream (Waikarakarawa catchment) and the Wainasiga 
stream and Wainasoba Creek (Mavuvu catchment) suggesting that these catchment 
areas in Emalu are intact and pristine (i.e. sites P4, P7, P11 & P16, P26, P30, P31, P32, 
P33, P39 & P40 on Map 8). Extent populations have only been located on Viti Levu in 
the forests of Navai and Nasoqo (Ra Province) and Waisoi, Wainavadu and Saliadrau 
(Namosi Province) and Naikorokoro (Rewa Province). This find is a first record for 
the Navosa Province and the study area has a healthy population of this species.  
Nysirus (syn. Cotylosoma) spinulosus and Cotylosoma dipneusticum (Order Phasmida) 
Nysirus  spinulosus  (Fig.  29),  a  rare  endemic  stick insect was first described in 1877, 
and previously recorded from Viti Levu, Fiji and only recently (i.e. 2008 & 2009) from 
Nakauvadra and Nakorotubu ranges in the Ra Province. Cotylosoma dipneusticum is 
another rare endemic stick insect and has been previously recorded from Taveuni 
and Viti Levu (Nakorotubu range and Savura Forest Reserve).  Both were sampled 
from intact upland rainforests near Tovatova Creek, a tributary of the Nasa Creek 
and upland forest within the Waikarakarawa catchment. From previous 
observations, these two species of stick insects have been known to be closely 
associated with such pristine forest systems (P13, 14, 15, 20, 21 on Map 8). 
Raiateana knowlesi (Order Hemiptera: Family Cicadidae) 
Raiateana knowlesi (Fig. 23) is an endemic and rare cicada with a unique life cycle in 
which adults emerge every eight years (periodic emergence). The last appearance of 
the adults was in 2009 from within this vicinity. It is locally known as nanai and has 
been previously recorded from parts of the Serua and Navosa provinces. It is of great 
cultural significance to the mataqali Emalu, being one of their ‘totem’ species.  The 
chiefly daughters of the mataqali are usually accorded the title Rokonai
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   17


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə