Coping with Climate Change in the Pacific Island Region’



Yüklə 5.03 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə7/17
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü5.03 Kb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   ...   17

Macroinvertebrate sampling 
Macroinvertebrate samples were collected using both quantitative and qualitative 
survey methods to allow an assessment of macroinvertebrate density at selected 
stations and to compile a list of suitable taxa as potential bioindicators for future 
monitoring. The quantitative and qualitative sampling methods were adapted from 
Stark  et al.  (2001)  and modified to suit the  time  constraints  and objectives of this 
particular survey. They are described as follows: 
Quantitative assessment  –  This  is  a quantitative  method that provides a measure of 
macroinvertebrate density is adapted and modified from  Protocol C3 (Stark et al. 
2001). Two replicate Surber samples (area 0.1m², 0.5 mm mesh) were collected from 
riffle habitats at stony streambed sites. A riffle is a shallow area (water depth ≤0.5m) 
where water flows swiftly over stones, creating surface turbulence. Surber samples 
were collected from the Nasa Creek  and its tributary,  Wainirovurovu  stream in 
Tovatova catchment and Waikarakarawa Creek  in Waikarakarawa catchment. 
Samples were collected by placing the Surber sampler over a defined area of 
streambed in riffle habitat and disturbing the habitat by washing the particles with 
the water flowing through the net to collect dislodged macroinvertebrates. A sample 
was also quantitatively  collected using a kick-net sampler in Wainasoba Creek 
(WSLQT), collecting from same surface area as that of Surber sampler. 
Qualitative assessment  –  a single sample was collected from each sampling station 
either via kick-net or visually inspecting slow flowing edge habitats for taxa that 
prefer these habitats (e.g. snails and damselflies). Typical habitats sampled included 
runs, riffles, chutes, pool edges, trifles, woody debris, leaf litter, stream edges, and 
tree roots along banks, streambank vegetation and sand/silt substrates. 
Macroinvertebrate samples collected from the  Surber sampler, kick-net or hand 
collection  were placed into 250ml specimen jars  with 70% ethanol for sorting and 
identification by the author. New taxa were verified  by Dr. Haynes. The guides 
referenced in the identification process included; Haynes (2009), Haynes (in prep.), 
Haase et al. (2006), Williams (1980) Winterbourn et al. (2006), and Nandlal (unpub). 
Identified macroinvertebrates were placed for preservation in small vials containing 
70% ethanol for long term storage. 

 
73 
Data analysis 
Community composition and structure:  the combined Surber and opportunistic data 
set was used to calculate the relative abundance of the main taxonomic groups. 
Macroinvertebrate density: an assessment was made of macroinvertebrate density in 
riffle habitats at selected stony streambed sites based on quantitative Surber sample 
data by multiplying the mean Surber sample abundance data (per 0.1m
2
) by a factor 
of ten to give abundance/m
2

Status and distribution of taxa: taxa were classified as either endemic to Fiji, native to 
other regions (e.g. Pacific, South Pacific, Indo-Pacific, Fiji-Australia  and  South East 
Asia), introduced tropical species or other (i.e. marine, worldwide). 
Focal species/ taxa of interest: macroinvertebrate taxa of potential interest for being 
key indicators of environmental change in the catchment were selected. 
7.4
 
Results 
Water physiochemistry 
The water physicochemistry parametres measured at the different stations are 
summarised in  Appendix 16.  Waterways sampled ranged from  almost neutral to 
slightly acidic. The freshwater macroinvertebrate communities described in this 
study are unlikely to be significantly affected by pH values within this range. 
Conductivity is a measure of the total ions in water and ranged between 0.084 mS/cm 
in the mid Mavuvu (MLVQT) and 0.047 mS/cm in the upper Nasa (NU1QT).  
Turbidity (NTU) is a measurement of particles in the water column and provides an 
indication of water clarity. Turbidity values ranged between 0 NTU in the 
Wainirovurovu Creek sites (WRD2QT & WRU3QT) and Mavuvu catchment streams 
(WKQT, WSLQT & QB1QL) to 5.8 NTU in the Nasa Creek  (NU1QT). Turbidity in 
Nasa Creek was higher due to heavy rainfall the night prior to surveying. Though 
turbidity above 5 NTU signifies poor water quality; this was a temporary impact and 
water clarity had returned to normal by late afternoon with NTU of less than 5. In 
Wainirovurovu Creek (WRD2QT & WRU3QT), turbidity values were 0 NTU, which 
signifies excellent water quality for macroinvertebrate survival as well as the absence 
of sediment-raising activities in the catchment. 
Dissolved oxygen concentrations ranged between 8.27g/m
3
 in Waikarakarawa Stream 
(WKQT) and 8.99 g/m
3
 in Nasa Stream (NU1QT) All dissolved oxygen concentrations 
were above the level considered sufficient for macroinvertebrate survival (i.e. >5 /m
3
). 
This was due to unaltered waterway hydrology allowing suitable water flow coupled 
with sufficient canopy cover to reduce excess temperature and highly stable bank 
reducing any sedimentation impacts.  Salinity measurements at the  survey  stations 

 
74 
demonstrated levels that are  expected  in the headwaters of any tropical inland 
stream. 
Habitat Characteristics 
The aquatic habitat and riparian characteristics of the stations surveyed are 
summarised and presented in Appendix 17. The streambed of waterways surveyed 
was dominated by cobble/gravel and sand and provided a diverse stable habitat for 
the macroinvertebrate community (Graph 1). 
 
Graph 1. Streambed composition at sampling stations. 
Periphyton  
Thin light/dark brown films (<0.5mm) (i.e., 40-80% cover) was the most common 
form of periphyton recorded at sampling stations with stony streambeds. This 
periphyton type is a source of food directly or indirectly for macroinvertebrates and 
fishes in streams. 
Macroinvertebrate density 
A  summary  of  the  freshwater macroinvertebrates collected and their abundance  is 
presented in  Appendix 18  (Surber sampling) and Appendix 19  (opportunistic 
collections). The abundance is given as numbers of individuals, and is also grouped 
into abundance categories  as follows: very abundant (>100),  abundant (20-99), 
common (5-19), few (2-4) and very few (1). The overall (all taxa) abundance ranged 
from  2049  individuals/m
2
  at Waikarakarawa Creek  downstream (WKQT) to 3686 
individuals/m
2
 in Nasa Creek upstream (NU1QT). 
Insect larvae/nymphs were the most dominant taxa at all three sites (Graph 2). This 
was strongly represented by caddisfly, mayfly and dipteran larvae. This result is 
typical of the  headwaters of tropical inland streams with intact or pristine 
0% 
10% 
20% 
30% 
40% 
50% 
60% 
70% 
80% 
90% 
100% 
S
tr
e
a
m
b
e
d
 c
o
m
p
o
s
ti
o
n
 (%

Stations 
Silt/sand 
Small gravel 
Small-medium gravel 
Medium-large gravel 
Large gravel 
Small cobble 
Large cobble 
Boulder 
Bedrock 

 
75 
catchments. Insect larvae are well adapted to fast flowing waters of stream/river 
headwaters,  compared to crustaceans and molluscs which are found in higher 
numbers in lower reaches of streams/rivers with swifter flows. The small Fluviopupa 
(<4 mm) snails were also recorded as abundant at two sites and very abundant at one 
site. These particular gastropods are usually catchment endemic and found in higher 
densities in headwaters with narrow channels,  swift  flows and very clean water. 
They have been found to be only present in streams undisturbed from cattle/horse 
grazing. Hence they were abundant in the intact waterways surveyed. The moth 
larvae (Nymphula spp.) also ranged from abundant to very abundant at two stations. 
They are known to be found in higher densities in streams with adequate algal film 
covering stream substrata and open-partial canopy shading and good water quality; 
hence there abundance in these streams. 
 
Graph 2. Community composition by major taxonomic group. 
The macroinvertebrate communities documented  were typical of pristine/intact 
inland tropical stream headwaters. The waterways sampled provided suitable 
habitats for diverse taxa composition. The sites surveyed had coarse stony streambed 
substrates and a high proportion of turbulent riffle/chute habitats, which resulted in 
caddisflies (Trichoptera) being the most dominant group at the majority of stations, 
followed by mayflies (Ephemeroptera) and flies (Diptera). These groups combined to 
give 95% (NU1QT), 98% (WRD2QT), 85% (WRU3QT) and 98% (WKQT) of the total 
species recorded (Graph 2). An exception to this pattern is at site MVLQT whereby 
the  Mollusca  group was more abundant than the Diptera, and togther with the 
Trichoptera and Ephemeroptera comprised 80% of species composition.
 
0% 
10% 
20% 
30% 
40% 
50% 
60% 
70% 
80% 
90% 
100% 
NU1QT  WRD2QT  WRU3QT  WKQT  MVLQT 
Co
m
m
uni
ty
  C
om
po
si
tio
n (
%

Sampling stations 
Mollusca 
Annelida 
Arachnida 
Coleoptera 
Hemiptera 
Odonata 
Diptera 
Lepidoptera 
Trichoptera 
Ephemeroptera 

 
76 
 
Graph 3. Community composition by taxa. 
The most abundant caddisfly taxon recorded was the net-spinning filter-feeder 
Abacaria fijiana.  This species  were  most abundant  in riffle habitats at Mid Mavuvu 
tributary, Wainasoba Creek (WSLQT) and Wainirovurovu downstream (WRD3QT) 
where they represented between 40 and 43% of total abundance respectively. Other 
caddisfly larvae such as A. ruficeps, Odontoceridae, Hydroptilidae and Chimarra sp. 
were also common or abundant but represented less than 9% of total abundance. 
Chimarra sp. was recorded in highest proportions in the Nasa Creek (NU1QT) and 
Wainasoba Creek, in the downstream Mavuvu (WSLQT). 
Mayflies were also a  dominant taxonomic group recorded at survey sites and 
represented 69% of the community in the Waikarakawa Creek and 30% in the Nasa 
Creek  (NU1QT). The most abundant mayfly taxon was Pseudocloeon  sp. This is 
because Pseudocloeon sp. has a dorso-ventrally flattened body that allows it to graze 
on thin algal films covering the surfaces of large boulder/cobble substrates in 
turbulent riffle/chute habitats.  In contrast, Cloeon  spp.  mayflies which are mostly 
associated with gentle flowing habitats and are more common along stream margins 
and runs were recorded in much lower proportions across the sites. Therefore many 
Cloeon spp. were part of the opportunistic collection. 
0% 
10% 
20% 
30% 
40% 
50% 
60% 
70% 
80% 
90% 
100% 
NU1QT  WRD2QT  WRU3QT  WKQT 
MVLQT 
Co
m
m
un
ity Co
m
po
sit
io

(%
)  
Sampling stations 
Abacaria fijiana                
Pseudocloeon sp. 
Cloeon sp.                             
Abacaria ruficeps                  
Anisocentropus fijianus      
Goera fijiana                          
Hydrobiosis 
Odontoceridae         
Chimarra sp.         
Rhyacophilidae 
Hydroptilidae 
Nymphula sp. 
Chironominae spp.  
Tanypodinae sp. 
Dixidae 
Simulium spp. 
Tipulidae spp.  
Nesobasis sp. A 
Hydraenidae sp. 
Empididae 
Nemobiinae sp. 
Nematode spp. 
Fluviopupa spp. 
Others 

 
77 
Conservation status and distribution of taxa 
A total of 57 of the macroinvertebrate taxa recorded as part of the survey were 
endemic to Fiji and represented 75% of the total number of taxa recorded (Graph 4). 
 
Graph 4. Status and distribution of taxa across all sites. 
Apart from a  few unique specimens  (~15), many of the endemic taxa recorded are 
common throughout the  headwaters of Fiji Island streams. The remaining 15% of 
taxa were either native to Fiji, the  Pacific  or the  Indo-Pacific region, or introduced 
tropical species or unknown species. 
Graph 5 shows the total number of taxa recorded at each sampling station and their 
status/distribution shown as a proportion of total taxa richness within each 
community.  The number of endemic/native taxa recorded at sampling stations as 
part of quantitative survey ranged between 14 endemic/native taxa at 
Waikarakarawa stream (WKQT) to 27 at Wainirovurovu upstream (WRU3QT). This 
amounted to 88% and 90% of the total taxa per sites respectively; highlighting that 
endemic species are the  dominant taxa at all sites. The majority of endemic/native 
taxa recorded were insects; inclusive of both qualitative and quantitative collection 
(53 taxa in total). Other endemic taxa recorded were the small (<4mm) snail 
Fluviopupa spp. and nereid and nematode worms. A single juvenile specimen of the 
introduced tropical snail Melanoides tuberculata  was also found in riffle habitat at 
Nasa  stream  (NU1QT) of Tovatova catchment, although no adults were observed 
around the edges of streams during the qualitative survey. This could possibly be an 
inadvertent introduction into the stream via footwear worn by villagers/surveyors. 
This tropical snail was however present in adult and juvenile sizes along the sides of 
stream channel at  Waikarakarawa stream and Wainasoba Creek. The common 
introduced mosquitoe larvae (Culicidae) was found at Wainirovurovu stream. These 
species are usually limited to stagnant waters (pools) in streams but due to the 
previous night’s rainfall they might have been washed into the riffles. 
11% 
3% 
9% 
3% 
75% 

20 
40 
60 
80 
Unknown 
Introduced,tropics 
Native, Indo-Pacific 
Native, Pacific 
Endemic/Native 
Percentage of total taxa 
St
at
us
 &
 di
st
ribut
io


 
78 
 
Graph 5. Status and distribution of taxa across individual sites. 
A lower number of endemic taxa were observed as part of the quantitative survey at 
Waikarakarawa Creek (WKQT) (14 taxa) and Wainasoba Creek (WSLQT) (17 taxa). 
The qualitative survey at both stations (WKQL & WSLQL) showed a high increase in 
endemic/native taxa. This is probably due to species becoming habitat specific with 
changing physical parameters such as an increase in flow with increasing elevation 
and steepness coupled with a decrease in channel width. Damselflies, shrimps and 
some  caddisfly species were more abundant on the sides of the streams which 
supported slow flows, compared to riffles with swift flows. The sides of the streams 
also had mass fibrous roots extended into the  channel  that  provided habitats for 
damselflies, shrimps, whirligig beetles and some caddisfly species. 
Focal species / taxa of interest  
Certain macroinvertebrate taxa that were recorded during the surveys and that may 
be of potential ecological interest are shown in Fig. 45 - Fig. 61. These highly sensitive 
species are typical of pristine streams draining intact watersheds. Furthermore, some 
of these taxa,  such as Fluviopupa  spp.,  Nesobasis  “orangish”,  the  unknown moth 
larvae and the nematode worm, have a very high chance of being catchment endemic 
or localised endemic. 
7.5
 
Discussion 
Dense forest cover, intact riparian zone and highly stable banks  along  these  rivers 
and their tributaries  provide  suitable conditions for a thriving freshwater 
macroinvertebrate community. Dense forests ensure enough volume and clear water 
entering the creeks and tributaries; maintaining a  natural  state of waterway 
hydrology  to provide different habitats such as runs, riffles, pools  and chutes 
coupled with appropriate streambed substrates  and good water quality. Intact 
riparian vegetation acted as an excellent buffer zone for any sediment intrusion from 
land, thereby  maintaining water quality. Adequate canopy cover along waterway 
25 
25  27 
14 
17 

13 

22  27  22 
10 



10 
15 
20 
25 
30 
35 
N
um
be
r o
f T
ax

Sampling stations 
Endemic/Native 
Native, Pacific 
Native, Indo-Pacific 
Introduced,tropics 
Unknown 
Quantitative sampling 
Qualitative sampling 

 
79 
edges provide for shade to control water temperature, leaf litter for nutrient cycle, 
sufficient light for algal cover (food for macroinvertebrates) on stream substrata, 
while native tree roots, shrubs, ferns  and  big boulders ensured bank stability.  At 
Waikarakarawa  Creek  a few cases of  natural landslides were observed,  while 
Qalibovitu upstream had more than six cases of landslides. These landslides caused 
large trees to fall in the waterways which altered the waterway hydrology but also 
provided additional habitats via branches, leaf litter and twigs. The landslides also 
caused abrasion of stream banks resulting in the  addition of sediment to the 
streambed. However, this impact is a temporary one. 
The freshwater macroinvertebrate community of Emalu (in total 76 taxa) showed that 
the endemic taxa were the most dominant with insects making up the majority of the 
taxa. This is typical of pristine inland tropical riverine system headwaters. In 
comparison with other studies in pristine headwater catchments (by the author), 27 
taxa were identified from Wainavadu Creek  and  the headwaters of the Waidina 
River  in Namosi and Naitasiri Provinces, and 32 taxa were identified from the 
Wainibuka River headwaters in the Nakauvadra  Range. Waterways in the Emalu 
area therefore supports much higher taxa richness (almost threefold more) than other 
creek/river headwaters that have been surveyed in Viti Levu. 
A total of fourteen macroinvertebrate taxa collected as part of the survey may be of 
potential ecological interest. These include four species of mayfly nymphs 
(Ephemeroptera: two Pseudocloeon  spp.  and two Cloeon  spp.), two species of 
damselfly nymphs (Odonata: Nesobasis  “orangish”  &  Nesobasis  “dark green”), four 
species of caddisfly larvae (Trichoptera: Apsilochorema  “light green”  ,  Hydrobiosis 
“pinkish”  sp.,  Hydrobiosis  sp. “green” and Chimarra  sp.),  one Cranefly larvae 
(Tipulidae:  Tipula  sp.), one snail (Fluviopupa  spp. (< 4mm), one nematode worm 
(Unknown 1 sp.) and one moth larvae (Lepidoptera: Unknown 2 sp.). These highly 
sensitive species are very good bioindicators. They are also typical of pristine streams 
draining intact watersheds. In  addition special taxa such as rissooidean snails 
(Fluviopupa spp.), Nesobasis “orangish, the unknown moth larvae and the nematode 
worm are very likely to be catchment endemic or area endemic species. Fluviopupa 
snails, ten species of which are already known to be endemic to Fiji, have restricted 
distribution and are usually catchment endemic, inhabiting springs and small creeks 
or riffles (Haase et al., 2006). 
The slender red headed (Pseudocloeon  sp. A) and the dark brown (Cloeon  sp. A
mayfly nymphs also have a high chance of being catchment endemic species. The 
nematode worm has only been found in the Wainrovurovu tributary and not in Nasa 
Creek,  possibly due to the  narrower stream channel and the  difference in water 
depth. Since the catchment is unimpacted by cattle grazing, these worms have 
naturally been part of the freshwater macroinvertebrate community or may have 
been  introduced  by  birds etc. The orangish damselfly nymph and the moth larvae 
(Black with orangish spots and prolegs) have been encountered  for the first time. 
These two taxa have not been observed in any streams surveyed prior to this survey. 

 
80 
However, these are only the larval stage and have not been matched with the adult 
stage as yet. Therefore it cannot be confirmed if they are new species or not. In 
addition, the amphipod and the caridean shrimps (Caridina  sp.  B-F) found  in 
Qalibovitu Creek QB1QL and QB2QL have a very great chance of being new species 
as they do not resemble the crustaceans described so far from Fiji or Asia. 

 
81 
CHAPTER 8:   
 
INVASIVE SPECIES  
Isaac Rounds and Sarah Pene  
8.1
 
Summary  
Trapping and opportunistic surveys were used to record the presence and 
abundance of invasive plants and animals in the Nasa, Mavuvu and Waikarakarawa 
catchments of the mataqali Emalu forests, Viti Levu. The checklist of  26 invasive 
plants and eleven invasive animals recorded as present in the area includes thirteen 
species which are listed in the 100 most invasive species in the world, namely;  
Plants:  Spathodea campanulata, Mikania micrantha, Leucaena leucocephala, Lantana 
camara, Imperata cylindrica, Arundo donax and Clidemia hirta
Animals:  Rattus rattus, Sus scrofa, Felis cattus, Pycnonotus cafer, Bufo marinus  and 
Herpestes auropunctatus
In general the occurrence and abundance of invasive species in the Emalu boundary 
was associated with proximity to human habitation and to disturbed areas such as 
tracks, temporary campsites and cultivated areas.  The invasive plant species were 
generally low in abundance, with the exception of Piper aduncum which was locally 
common, and Clidemia hirta and Mikania micrantha which were both widespread. 
The faunal component of the invasive species was comprised primarily of the most 
common (and most serious) global invasives such as rats, mongooses, mynah birds 
and cane toads, as well as feral animals of domesticated species, such as cats, dogs 
and pigs. Some invasive animal species such as the Polynesian rat (Rattus exulans), 
the Norwegian rat (Rattus norvegicus) and the house mouse (Mus musculus) were not 
observed directly in the field but they were reported by the guides to be present in 
and around the villages in the area. 
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   ...   17


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə