Coping with Climate Change in the Pacific Island Region’



Yüklə 5.03 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə9/17
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü5.03 Kb.
1   ...   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   ...   17

M28-0059 – Nanaga  
This site has been designated for site monitoring due to cultural material remains in 
the form of stone alignment which are quite intact.  The site is bordered by the 
Mavuvu Creek which borders the east and south of the unique study area. The site is 
elevated from the banks of the Mavuvu Creek and is quite extensive covering an area 
of about 70m in a north to south orientation and a width of 65m along an east to west 
orientation however, areas beyond may be included but could not be surveyed as 
dense vegetation and thickets limited access to these areas.  
The site consisted of well-preserved cultural features that may define traditions that 
were once practiced in the past. Upon inspection, the team identified rock walls or 
baivatu, which were constructed elaborately around the site area. These rock walls 
were measured at 1.2m wide and constructed in a circular manner with a portion of 
the rock wall redirected from its key route to form another parallel formation along 
the east side of the rock wall system. This parallel formation of the outer rock wall 
extended to about 15m in a north-east orientation, ending at the eastern edge of the 
elevated platform which the site is situated upon. The rock wall system encircles 
until it ends as a three-quarter circle formation as a portion of the remainder has 
undergone disturbance. A protruding rock wall formation projects southwards from 
the main system extending to about 10m. At the centre of the surrounding rock wall 
is a hollow area with the surface dipping gradually. The vegetation of the area  is 
predominately covered with bamboo and some moli kana  (Citrus grandis), yasiyasi 
(Syzygium  fijiense),  makita  (Parinari  glaberrima),  sawira  (Dysoxylum richii) and sago 
palm shoots, locally known as soga. 

 
91 
Several researchers have conducted thorough studies on the ceremonial use of the 
remarkable stone enclosure known as nanaga  sites. The extent of these sites is 
confined to a small area- less than a third of Viti LevuThese are the provinces of 
Serua  and  Navosa  with two  sites in the upper Wainimala  River, Narokorokoyawa 
area, Naitasiri and appear to have been used up until 1876 during the end of the Colo 
(highland) rebellion and the acceptance of Christianity caused them to fall into disuse 
(Palmer, 1971).  According to Palmer  (1971), the nanaga  sites are an archaeological 
manifestation pertaining to certain Fijian ceremonials marking their New Year about 
the end of October or the beginning of November. Palmer’s research sufficiently 
connects the use of the nanaga  sites with initiation, circumcision, pig worship and 
perhaps preparations for warfare. 
Considered a cult or a secret religious society bound together by the common link of 
initiation resembling certain Australian and Melanesian rites, the nanaga  was the 
“bed” of the ancestors, that is where their descendants might hold communion with 
them; the baki were the rites celebrated in the nanaga, from the initiation of youths or 
presenting the first fruits, recovering the sick, or winning charms against wounds in 
battle (Thomson, 1908).  
M28-0065 
This is the most extensive old village site  that was recorded within the mataqali 
Emalu  boundary. The site is known as Nasaqaruku  and was documented by 
Brewster (1921) in his records of the migration of the mataqali Emalu.  
The site begins on a stretch of flat land and includes a nearby ridge. Nasaqaruku 
contains 30 identified house mounds and more would have been uncovered if the 
lush vegetation cover was cleared. The level of erosion in the area is high and could 
also contribute to the loss of several house mound features at the foot of the ridge. 
Most of the house mounds are aligned with stones and have been displaced over 
time by surface runoff. Similarly, wild pig trails and human harvesting of wild yams 
are widely evident. On the south-western side of the settlement and along the ridge 
stands a house mound 3m high and has a diameter of 6m. The structure is typical of 
a traditional temple or burekalou and constructed on a platform so that it is higher 
above all the other house mounds. The structure is raised earthen material and has 
withstood the devastating forces of natural elements.  Apart from the evidence of 
house mounds, other cultural remains include plain pottery sherds found scattered 
in some parts of the area, and the culturally introduced plant indicators such as moli 
kanavasilisaqiwa and kavika
M28-0066 
This is a fortified settlement strategically constructed on a hill east-southeast of the 
rock shelter  site M28-00071. The hill fortification is immense and contains several 
exceptional features that are well preserved. Outlined in a north-northwest to south-

 
92 
southeast direction,  the site runs along a ridge. Habitational platforms are carved 
onto the surface and accommodated four house mounds. Each house mound is 
embedded with stone lining some of which have been displaced due to natural 
causes. 
As the ridge line drops on the south-southeast end of the site, rocks are piled in a 
heap up to 2.5m high. The stones are piled as if to await adversaries and probably 
were never used, as the stones are stacked in a dome like structure. Further down the 
slope two defensive pits are dug deep into the floor of the ground separated by a 1m 
wide causeway. The pits are about 2.5m long and about 1.5m wide and dug 
following the direction of the ridge line. As the relief  begins to ascend to the next 
ridge level another set of stones piled up to form a defensive wall that is about 2.5m 
high, half a meter wide and about 4m long. At the end of the stone wall are two huge 
rock outcrops to strengthen the western corner of the wall aided with a steep slope
leaving no room for safe passage through.  The vegetation of the area is that of 
scattered secondary vegetation cover of huge trees like dakua makadre  (Agathis 
macrophylla), baka (Ficus obliqua), and marasa (Elattostachys falcata). The stone features 
are cloaked with thickets of vines that have held the stones in place over the years. 
M28-0068  
Similar to Nasaqaruku old village site (M28-0065), the footprint of this cultural relic 
is extensive and stretches approximately 530m along a ridgeline southwest of the site 
described above. A total of 26 house remains were surveyed with sizes that vary all 
throughout the site. The average size of the house mounds is 6.8m to 8.6m. 
In different parts of the site there are massive platforms upon which several house 
mounds are constructed. The eastern corner contains an oval platform that is 5m 
high, 30m long, 16m wide and holds three house mounds. The foot of the platform is 
enclosed with a 15m flat area where four house mounds can be found on the east of 
the platform. This is the only portion of the site where the mounds and the platform 
are symmetrical. The mid-section of the site contains three platforms each more than 
30m long and highly raised well above 3m. The first platform is separated from the 
next by a ditch that is 2.5m deep and 4m wide. Several obvious house mounds of 
raised earthen materials are constructed on these platforms. The house mounds are 
well intact with slow erosion seen on the edges. The thick canopy cover and floor 
vegetation preserved the cultural remains from heavy downpour. 
Towards the west of the settlement, the ridge runs southwest and the cultural 
remains continues for another 121m consisting of a platform that is almost 30m long, 
9m  wide and raised 5m from the ground surface. The platform holds four  house 
mounds while several more were constructed on the lower elevation. A 5m  wide 
ditch seals off the end of the settlement as the ridge begins to slope downward to the 
lower reaches of the hill. 

 
93 
9.4.2
 
Monitoring sites 
The increasingly intensive use and modification of the landscape resulting from 
modern demands for efficient infrastructure and land use (agricultural production, 
mining, energy sources, logging, etc.) exerts growing pressure on cultural heritage in 
the landscape.  A summary of the threats and disturbances  affecting the sites is 
provided in Table 2. 
Table 2. Site disturbance factors and threats within Emalu. 
Type of 
disturbance/threat 
Disturbance/threat 
description 
Sites affected 
Nature 
These threats occur 
naturally and cause 
irreversible damage - 
tropical cyclones, 
earthquakes, heavy rain 
and erosion processes 
contribute to changing 
and shaping the natural 
and cultural landscape. 
All the sites documented the effects of 
natural events on the remains of cultural 
heritage site features. The dominant natural 
element affecting the structures is heavy rain 
which leads to the erosion of the edges of the 
house mounds, infilling of fortification 
ditches and causeways. Heavy rain also 
results in fluvial formation of rills and gullies 
thus displacing stone alignment and washing 
away the material remains.  
Human 
These are threats that 
are caused or related to 
human inhabitance & 
activities in and around 
the area of study. 
About 95% of the sites identified contained 
human trails either travelling between 
provinces but mostly from hunting and 
gathering. 
Animal 
These are threats that 
are caused or related to 
animals-grazing, 
breeding and 
inhabitation activities 
specifically wild pigs 
Pig hooves and snout trails covered about 60-
70% of the sites surveyed. Dog trails were 
also encountered but pose little threat to the 
sites.  
The 77 culturally significant sites encountered and documented during this survey 
are widely distributed across the study area. Since the Emalu land boundary is vast 
and accessibility is hindered by rugged terrain, the Archaeology team recommends 
that two sites, M28-0059 and M28-0046,  be used for monitoring  purposes.  A 
summary of the framework within which this monitoring could occur is presented in 
Table 3.  
Site M28-0059 can be easily accessed from either Navitilevu  Village or Draubuta 
Village, both in the province of Navosa and located on the valley flats along Mavuvu 
Creek. However, site M28-0046 is located upland and results from the assessment 
will be used for comparison of threats that affect cultural heritage sites. These sites 
are most suitable for such a study given the outstanding cultural remains found here. 
The degradation of the site will be examined every two years  by using traditional 
methods of site visitation and capturing still images of the area during the period of 

 
94 
the REDD+ program. Data from other teams such as aerial/satellite images of the 
forest cover can also be a tool used for the process depending on data availability.  
Table 3. Indicators and monitoring plan for cultural sites in Emalu. 
Theme 
Indicators  
Monitoring Tool 
Reporting  
Cultural 
heritage sites 
State of the sites 
Assessing the current state of the 
sites and monitor the changes 
through time 
Assessment 
report every 
two years 
Threats to the sites  Identifying the threats that affect 
the state of the sites 
Access to the sites 
Choosing two sites for the 
assessment of the above variables 
with access to the site as 
comparison  
Cultural valuation 
of the sites 
The two sites differ in cultural 
value 
Remote sensing even though costly, could also be a useful tool to map out the 
changes in the monitoring site by using laser-based sensors and radar in particular 
Synthetic Aperture Radar to see the ground or surface changes or even identify 
subsurface remains. 
9.5
 
Conclusion 
The land belonging to the mataqali  Emalu  is rich in historical cultural material 
remains that have never been documented. The historical remains are scattered all 
throughout the mataqali  land, a widespread distribution of elaborate hilltop and 
lowland settlement and fortifications some of which are associated with the 
sophisticated irrigation systems for terrace agriculture. 
The cultural footprints indicate the vast number of activities at one stage in history 
occurring in the remote highlands of Navosa. It also demonstrates the dense 
populations of the area where the sites occur close to each other and are mostly 
constructed along the ridgeline. The general physical setup of settlements depicts 
various forms of insecurity at that time-a time of great rivalry and competition. 
Supporting evidence can be found in some of the structures of the hill fortifications 
that were encountered. Constructing on high elevation is a survival strategy whereby 
communities used their natural environment and rugged terrain to provide security. 
Further evidence to support the notion that the area was densely populated was 
given by the series of large intricate irrigation systems discovered during this survey. 
The discovery of these elaborate channels suggests larger populations to implement 
and maintain this agricultural system. However the drive and intentions of the local 
people related to the social structure and hierarchy in Fijian communities still remain 
undefined. 

 
95 
The study of the cultural footprints within the Emalu  study area is vital in 
understanding the patterns and motivational factors related to inland migration: why 
the people of Emalu  chose to live in such remoteness and rugged terrain, socio-
cultural relations and their responses to altering natural and climatic conditions. 
Generally, the archaeological finds during this survey have considerable cultural 
value to the local community and at national level. The significance of these sites can 
be determined and derived by deconstructing the value of the individual sites into 
the following components; aesthetic, symbolic, social, historic, authenticity and 
spiritual values. All the sites identified include one of these values while some may 
incorporate all, however an absent values does not lessen the significance of a site as 
it holds the ancestral history of the hill tribes of Fiji. 
9.6
 
Conservation recommendations 
Fiji has an ancient, complex and unique cultural heritage preserved in its 
archaeological sites. Unfortunately much of this record has been carelessly destroyed 
through human activity. The large scale of current and planned land development 
activity in Fiji poses a great threat to remaining sites, thus preservation activities are 
crucial to saving Fiji’s archaeological heritage.  Fiji’s archaeological environment 
represents a valuable and irreplaceable record of the nation’s cultural and social 
development. For this reason alone it is important that these sites be maintained well. 
In addition to its historical, cultural and archaeological merits the historic heritage 
also forms a readily available resource of considerable amenity, education, scientific, 
recreational and tourism value to the people of Fiji and visitors alike. 
The archaeological assessment revealed valuable information pertaining to the 
mataqali Emalu  and neighbouring communities historically linked to the land. 
Various findings of cultural assets were able to ascertain that these ancestral sites 
conveyed immeasurable knowledge and understanding of the history pertaining to 
traditional and cultural developments, linked closely to the identity of its people. It 
depicts the movement and settlement patterns of their  ancestors and the forms of 
survival which defined their everyday lives. 
Such history must be preserved  whether tangible or intangible, however, various 
threats and disturbances of these cultural sites have, to an extent, altered important 
aspects of material history of the vanua of Emalu.  All the sites identified are 
protected in Fiji under the Preservation of Objects of Archaeological and 
Palaeontological Interest Act (1940). 
Recommendations are: 

 
that proper documentation of the assessment and oral history be undertaken 
to avoid the loss of traditional knowledge and history of the study area, 

 
96 

 
the Fiji Museum Archaeology department is included in any future surveys to 
allow for completion of assessments of areas that have been overlooked, 
namely, the area on the southwest of the land boundary, 

 
a presentation of significant findings be done to raise awareness in the region
an activity for which the Fiji Museum is available. 

 
97 
APPENDICES 
Appendix 1. Species checklist of the non-vascular flora and lichens 
Family  
Species 
Hornworts 
Anthocerotaceae 
Folioceros amboinensis (Schiffn.) Piippo 
Anthocerotaceae 
Folioceros fuciformis (Mont.) D.C.Bharadwaj 
Anthocerotaceae 
Folioceros gladulosus
 
(Lehm. et Lindenb.) D.C.Bharadwaj 
Anthocerotaceae 
Folioceros pinnilobus (Steph.) D.C.Bharadwaj  
Dendrocerotaceae 
Dendroceros cavernosus J.Haseg. 
Dendrocerotaceae 
Dendroceros granulatus Mitt. 
Dendrocerotaceae 
Dendroceros javanicus (Nees) Nees 
Dendrocerotaceae 
Megaceros flagellaris (Mitt.) Steph. 
Notothyladaceae 
Phaeoceros carolinianus (Michx.) Prosk. 
Liverworts 
Anastrophyllaceae 
Plicanthus birmensis (Steph.) R.M.Schust. 
Anastrophyllaceae 
Plicanthus hirtellus (F.Weber) R.M.Schust. 
Aneuraceae 
Aneura maxima (Schiffn.) Steph. 
Aneuraceae 
Lobatiriccardia coronopus (De Not. Ex Steph.) Furuki 
Aneuraceae 
Riccardia alba (Colenso) E.A.Br. 
Aneuraceae 
Riccardia graeffei (Steph.) Hewson 
Dumortieraceae 
Dumortiera hirsuta (Sw.) Nees 
Geocalycaceae 
Heteroscyphus argutus (Reinw., Blume et Nees) Schiffn 
Geocalycaceae 
Heteroscyphus aselliformis (Reinw., Blume et Nees) Schiffn 
Geocalycaceae 
Heteroscyphus coalitus (Hook.) Schiffn. 
Geocalycaceae 
Heteroscyphus succulentus (Gottsche) Schiffn. 
Geocalycaceae 
Notoscyphus lutescens (Lehm. et Lindenb.) Mitt. 
Hymenophytaceae 
Hymentophyton flabellatum (Labill.) Dumort. ex. Trevis. 
Jamesoniellaceae 
Cuspidatula contracta (Reinw., Blume et Nees) Steph. 
Jamesoniellaceae 
Denotarisia linguifolia (De Not.) Grolle 
Jubulaceae 
Frullania apiculata (Reinw., Blume et Nees) Nees 
Jubulaceae 
Frullania arecae (Spreng.) Gottsche var. arecae 
Jubulaceae 
Frullania cf. capillaris 
Jubulaceae 
Frullania chevalieri (R.M.Schust.) R.M.Schust. 
Jubulaceae 
Frullania cordistipula (Reinw., Blume et Nees) Dumort. 
Jubulaceae 
Frullania ericoides (Nees) Mont.  
Jubulaceae 
Frullania f. intermedia 
Jubulaceae 
Frullania f. intesmed 
Jubulaceae 
Frullania gaudichaudii (Nees et Mont.) Nees et Mont. 
Jubulaceae 
Frullania gracilis (Reinw., Blume et Nees) Gottsche, Lindenb. et Nees 
Jubulaceae 
Frullania intermedia (Reinw., Blume et Nees) Gottsche, Lindenb. et Nees Dumort. 
Jubulaceae 
Frullania meyeniana Lindenb. 
Jubulaceae 
Frullania neurota Taylor 
Jubulaceae 
Frullania nodulosa (Reinw., Blume et Nees) Nees 
Jubulaceae 
Frullania ramuligera (Nees) Mont.  
Jubulaceae 
Frullania ternatensis Gottsche 
Jungermanniaceae 
Conoscyphus trapezioides (Sande Lac.) Schiffn. 
Jungermanniaceae 
Jamesoniella flexicaulis (Nees) Schiffn. 
Lejeuneaceae 
Acrolejeunea pycnoclada (Taylor) Schiffn. 
Lejeuneaceae 
Archilejeunea planiuscula (Mitt.) Steph. 
Lejeuneaceae 
Caudalejeunea reniloba (Gottsche) Steph. 

 
98 
Family  
Species 
Lejeuneaceae 
Ceratolejeunea belangeriana (Gottsche) Steph. 
Lejeuneaceae 
Ceratolejeunea vitiensis Steph. 
Lejeuneaceae 
Cheilolejeunea decursiva Steph. 
Lejeuneaceae 
Cheilolejeunea falsinervis (Sande Lac.) R.M.Schust. et Kachroo 
Lejeuneaceae 
Cheilolejeunea intertexta (Lindenb.) Steph. 
Lejeuneaceae 
Cheilolejeunea lindenbergii (Gottsche) Mizut. 
Lejeuneaceae 
Cheilolejeunea trapezia (Nees, Lindenb. Et. Gottsche) R.M.Schutst et Kachroo 
Lejeuneaceae 
Cheilolejeunea trifaria (Reinw., Blume et Nees) Mizut. 
Lejeuneaceae 
Cololejeunea aequabilis (Sande Lac.) Schiffn. 
Lejeuneaceae 
Cololejeunea amphibola B. Thiers 
Lejeuneaceae 
Cololejeunea augustiflora (Steph.) Mizut. 
Lejeuneaceae 
Cololejeunea cardiocarpa (Mont.) A.Evans 
Lejeuneaceae 
Cololejeunea cocoscola (Angstr.) Steph. 
Lejeuneaceae 
Cololejeunea diaphana A.Evans 
Lejeuneaceae 
Cololejeunea equialbi Tixier 
Lejeuneaceae 
Cololejeunea falcata (Horik.) Benedix 
Lejeuneaceae 
Cololejeunea floccosa (Lehm.et Lindenb.) Schiffn. 
Lejeuneaceae 
Cololejeunea huerlimannii (Austin) Steph. 
Lejeuneaceae 
Cololejeunea inflectens Tixier 
Lejeuneaceae 
Cololejeunea kulenensis (Mitt.) Benedix 
Lejeuneaceae 
Cololejeunea longifolia (Mitt.) Benedix ex Mizut. 
Lejeuneaceae 
Cololejeunea metzgeriopsis (K.I.Goebel) Gradst., R.Wilson, Ilk.-Borg. et Heinrichs 
Lejeuneaceae 
Cololejeunea minutissima (Sm.) Schiffn. 
Lejeuneaceae 
Cololejeunea obliqua (Nees et Mont.) Schiffn. 
Lejeuneaceae 
Cololejeunea peraffinis (Schiffn.) Schiffn. 
Lejeuneaceae 
Cololejeunea pseudoserrata Tixier 
Lejeuneaceae 
Cololejeunea raduliloba Steph. 
Lejeuneaceae 
Cololejeunea schmidtii Steph. 
Lejeuneaceae 
Cololejeunea sintenisii (Steph.) Pocs 
Lejeuneaceae 
Cololejeunea societatis Tixier 
Lejeuneaceae 
Cololejeunea stylosa (Steph.) Steph.ex Mizut. 
Lejeuneaceae 
Cololejeunea wightii Steph. 
Lejeuneaceae 
Colura acroloba (Mont. ex Steph.) Ast 
Lejeuneaceae 
Colura ari (Steph.) Steph. 
Lejeuneaceae 
Colura brevistyla Herzog 
Lejeuneaceae 
Colura conica (Sande Lac.) K.I.Goebel  
Lejeuneaceae 
Colura corynophora (Nees, Lindeb. Et.Gottsche) Trevis. 
Lejeuneaceae 
Colura crispiloba Ast 
Lejeuneaceae 
Colura cristata Ast 
Lejeuneaceae 
Colura leratii Ast 
Lejeuneaceae 
Colura pluridentata Ast 
Lejeuneaceae 
Colura queenslandica B.M.Thiers 
Lejeuneaceae 
Colura superba (Mont.) Steph. 
Lejeuneaceae 
Colura tenuicornis (A.Evans) Steph.  
Lejeuneaceae 
Colura vitiensis Pocs et J.Eggers 
Lejeuneaceae 
Dendrolejeunea fruticosa (Lindenb. Et Gottsche) Lacout. 
Lejeuneaceae 
Diplasiolejeunea cavifolia Steph. 
Lejeuneaceae 
Drepanolejeunea angustifolia (Mitt.) Grolle 
Lejeuneaceae 
Drepanolejeunea dactylophora (Nees, Lindend. et Gottsche) Schiffn. 
Lejeuneaceae 
Drepanolejeunea ternatensis (Gottsche) Spruce ex Schiffn. 
Lejeuneaceae 
Drepanolejeunea vesiculosa (Mitt.) Steph. 
Lejeuneaceae 
Harpalejeunea filicuspis (Steph.) Mizut. 
Lejeuneaceae 
Lejeunea alata Gottsche 

 
99 
1   ...   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   ...   17


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə