Country report to the fao international technical conference



Yüklə 357.48 Kb.
Pdf просмотр
səhifə1/3
tarix11.08.2017
ölçüsü357.48 Kb.
  1   2   3

MAURITIUS:

COUNTRY REPORT

TO THE FAO INTERNATIONAL

TECHNICAL CONFERENCE

ON PLANT GENETIC RESOURCES

(Leipzig,1996)

Prepared by:

Ministry of Agriculture and Natural Resources

Collaborators:

Ministry of Economic Planning and Development

Ministry of Environment and Quality of Life

Ministry of Education and Science

Mauritius Sugar Industry Research Institute

Food and Agricultural Research Council

Agricultural Marketing Board

University of Mauritius

Mauritius Institute of Education

Port Louis, April 1995



M A U R I T I U S   c o u n t r y   r e p o r t

2

Note by FAO



This Country Report has been prepared by the national authorities in the

context of the preparatory process for the FAO International Technical

Conference on Plant Genetic Resources, Leipzig, Germany, June 17-23 1996.

The Report is being made available by FAO as requested by the International

Technical Conference. However, the report is solely the responsibility of the

national authorities. The information in this report has not been verified by

FAO, and the opinions expressed do not necessarily represent the views or

policy of FAO.

The designations employed and the presentation of the material and maps in

this document do not imply the expression of any option whatsoever on the

part of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations

concerning the legal status of any country, city or area or of its authorities, or

concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries.


M A U R I T I U S   c o u n t r y   r e p o r t

3

Table of contents



CHAPTER 1

INTRODUCTION

5

CHAPTER 2



INDIGENOUS PLANT GENETIC RESOURCES

9

2.1 FOREST GENETIC RESOURCES



9

2.2 WILD SPECIES AND WILD RELATIVES OF CROP PLANTS

11

2.3 LAND RACES AND OLD CULTIVARS



15

CHAPTER 3

NATIONAL CONSERVATION ACTIVITIES

17

3.1 



IN SITU CONSERVATION ACTIONS

18

3.2 



EX SITU COLLECTIONS

19

3.2.1 Sugarcane collection



19

3.2.2 Other field collections

20

3.2.3 Seed bank



21

3.2.4 


In vitro conservation

22

3.2.5 Herbarium



22

3.2.6 Botanical gardens and arboreta

23

3.2.7 Crop museum



24

3.3 DOCUMENTATION

24

CHAPTER 4



IN-COUNTRY USES OF PLANT GENETIC RESOURCES

25

4.1 USE OF PGR COLLECTION



25

4.2 USE OF FOREST GENETIC RESOURCES

25

4.3 IMPROVING PGR UTILISATION



26

CHAPTER 5

NATIONAL GOALS, POLICIES, PROGRAMMES AND LEGISLATION

27

5.1 CONSERVATION AND ENVIRONMENT POLICY



27

5.2 FOREST POLICY

28

5.3 NATIONAL LEGISLATION



29

5.3.1 Quarantine laws

29

5.3.2 Forest and wildlife laws



30

5.4 OTHER POLICIES

31

5.5 TRAINING NEEDS AND OPPORTUNITIES



31

M A U R I T I U S   c o u n t r y   r e p o r t

4

CHAPTER 6



INTERNATIONAL COLLABORATION

32

6.1 EXCHANGE OF GERMPLASM



33

6.2 INTERNATIONAL AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTRES

33

6.3 BILATERAL RELATIONS AND REGIONAL COOPERATION



33

6.4 BENEFITS

34

CHAPTER 7



NATIONAL NEEDS AND OPPORTUNITIES

35

CHAPTER 8



PROPOSALS FOR A GLOBAL PLAN OF ACTION

37

APPENDIX 1



38

APPENDIX 2

LIST OF THE MOST THREATENED NATIVE PLANTS

40

APPENDIX 3



LIST OF ENDEMIC MEDICINAL PLANTS OF MAURITIUS

AND RODRIGUES

42

APPENDIX 4



46

APPENDIX 5

LIST OF OLD CULTIVARS OF SWEET POTATO, CASSAVA

AND BANANA

47

APPENDIX 6



TERMS OF REFERENCE FOR A NATIONAL COORDINATING

COMMITTEE ON PLANT GENETIC RESOURCES

48

Acknowledgment



49

References

50

Abbreviations



53

M A U R I T I U S   c o u n t r y   r e p o r t

5

CHAPTER 1

Introduction

The Republic of Mauritius is composed of the islands of Mauritius,

Rodrigues, Agalega, St. Brandon and a number of outlying smaller islands, all

located in the south of the Indian Ocean between latitudes 10° S and 20° S

and longitude 55° E and 65° E. Mauritius is the principal island and is

located at latitude 20° South and longitude 58° East, some 800 km from the

south east of Madagascar and has a land area of 1,865 km

2  


(Fig. 1). The

population of the Republic of Mauritius was estimated at 1,106,000 at the

end of December 1993 and the rate of population growth was 1.3 percent.

About half of the population is concentrated in the urban areas which lie

along the axis from the capital Port-Louis to the city of Curepipe. The

standards of health, nutrition and education are high compared to other

countries in Africa. The adult literacy rate is 83 % and the life expectancy at

birth is about 66 for males and 73 for females (MEPD, 1993).

Mauritius has a tropical maritime climate generally dominated by the south

east trade winds and enjoys a warm moist summer during the months of

December to May and a cool dry winter from June to November. Mauritius

was formed by volcanic activity starting some 8-9 million years ago. The soils

belong to the latosolic group. In function of altitudes and climates, the soils

are classified according to various sub groups starting from humid latosol to

ferruginous latosol. According to USDA classification (7th approximation),

the soil can be grouped as: the Podsol Order on the high plateau and Oxisol

on the dry low lying region.

In isolation the island has evolved a unique flora and fauna with high levels of

endemism. On the discovery of the island in 1598, the land was covered with

a thick green vegetation with a variety of palm trees and wood trees. These

began to decline under the three successive colonisation by the Dutch (1638-

1710), French (1715-1810) and British (1810-1968). The Dutch started the

process of clearing the forest to exploit ebony and palm in the lowland regions

and coastal plains. Indeed, ebony, the finest indigenous wood, was the first

exported agricultural commodity of the island and at one time Mauritius

supplied most of the ebony used in Europe. The clearing process was later

accelerated markedly during the French and British administrations to make

room primarily for agriculture and also infrastructure like roads, and

settlements. The Dutch Governor Van der Stel introduced various seeds and

fruits to the island. Thus, vegetables, rice, indigo, tobacco and sugar cane

were cultivated to feed the population and for export.


M A U R I T I U S   c o u n t r y   r e p o r t

6


M A U R I T I U S   c o u n t r y   r e p o r t

7

Cleared native forest areas in Mauritius have already been converted to



monoculture of exotics crops and trees such as

 sugar cane, tea, Pinus spp.,

Eucalyptus spp., and Cryptomeria japonica with a resulting loss of important

biodiversity. Today there is no commercial exploitation of native timber.

Nowadays the native forests are restricted to the south west escarpments which

comprise some of the most inaccessible parts of the country and which

contain some of the most scenic landscapes. Currently, the total protected

area (National Parks and Nature Reserves) amounts to 7,363 ha or about

3.7% of the total land area.

There are about 12,400 hectares of state-owned production forests mostly

under pine and about 34,500 ha of privately owned forests in Mauritius.

Some of the other introduced species that are raised in plantations are

Eucalyptus tereticornis, E. robusta, Casuarina equisetifolia, Cryptomeria

japonica,  Araucaria cunninghamii, Swietenia mahagoni and Tabebuia

pallida. Eucalyptus and Casuarina make up 20% while the remaining species

constitute about 10% of the forest plantation. All the above mentioned

species, with the exception of 

Cryptomeria japonica, grow in the lowlands

where there is hardly any land available for the creation of forest plantation.

Most of the private forests are under scrub vegetation. The forestry sector is

able to produce only about 15,000 m

3

 of timber and poles. The timber



production figure represent only 30 % of the local demand for utility timber

and the rest has to be imported.

Up to the 70's, Mauritius was a predominantly agricultural economic system,

based on a mono-crop-sugar cane. With the advent of industrialisation in the

80's and diversification of agriculture, the Mauritian economy rested on a

broader base. However, sugar cane remains the most important agricultural

export followed by flowers and vegetables. Recent statistics (1993) show that

sugar cane covered about 88% of the cultivable land, 7.5% was under

vegetable, fruits and flowers, 3.6% under tea and 0.6% under tobacco. With

the implementation of the agricultural diversification policy, sugar cane is

intercropped with bean, potato, groundnut, tomato and maize. The result is

encouraging; the country has produced 67% of its needs in potato, 40% in

onion, 17% in garlic and 5% in maize. The food balance sheet for the year

1992 gives a picture of the food situation in the country (Appendix 1).

However, the contribution of agriculture to the national economy has

registered a significant decline with a reduction of the GDP from 23 percent

in 1970 to 9 percent in 1994, mainly as a result of the rapid expansion of the


M A U R I T I U S   c o u n t r y   r e p o r t

8

manufacturing, tourism and services sectors. Nevertheless, the sugar industry



is the second most important net foreign-exchange earner because of the low

import content of sugar production. The manufacturing sector, principally

textile and garment, has grown to become the largest single sector in the

economy. Its share of the GDP has risen from 15 percent in 1970 to

23 percent in 1994. In addition, an Export Processing Zone (EPZ) has been

set up to attract foreign capital through a combination of tax incentives and

facilities. In Mauritius tourism is another fast expanding industry. It

comprises 24 percent of the total export earnings and 11.4 percent of the

GDP in 1994. The number of tourists has increased significantly in the past

years and it passed the mark of 400,500 tourist arrivals in 1994.



M A U R I T I U S   c o u n t r y   r e p o r t

9

CHAPTER 2

Indigenous Plant Genetic Resources

Mauritius as an oceanic island far from the large land masses, has evolved a

unique flora ever since it was formed 7.8 million years ago. Nevertheless the

origin of this flora comes from several sources. It is believed that 70% of the

phanerogams are derived from the Madagascar and African continent,

8% from  Asia,  12%  are  of  pan-indopacific  origin  and  8%  are  endemic.

(Cadet, 1977; Guého, 1988).

2.1


FOREST GENETIC RESOURCES

The extent of native forest area in Mauritius is very limited due to the large

scale forest clearing which occurred during the colonisation period of the

island. Fig. 2 shows the decline in native forests area since 1773. Nowadays,

the bulk of the native forests are located in the south west of the island and on

the upper reaches of mountains and make up between one and two percent of

the land area of Mauritius. These areas still harbour a great diversity of

important indigenous forest trees which the early colonisers had been

harvesting. The black ebony (

Diospyros tesselaria), Bois d'Olive

(

Elaeodendron orientale),  Bois  de  fer  (Stadtmannia oppositifolia), Makaks



(

Mimusops spp.), and many others were highly prized for their valuable

timber. With the decline in native forest area, the population level of these

species has become too low to allow any sustainable utilisation. However, the

remnant areas of native vegetation still hold a great diversity of plant species

and are of great conservation value. About 700 native flowering plants, of

which some 250 are endemic, are known to occur in Mauritius (World

Conservation Monitoring Centre, 1992; Strahm, 1994). Many of these have

become highly endangered, with about 50 taxa being reduced to less than

10†individuals (Appendix  2). The island of Rodrigues has 36-38 taxa of

endemic flowering plants, the majority of which are also highly threatened

(Strahm, 1989).



M A U R I T I U S   c o u n t r y   r e p o r t

1 0


M A U R I T I U S   c o u n t r y   r e p o r t

1 1


With human settlements, many plants have been introduced intentionally as

food crops, ornamentals, forest species and as medicines from many parts of

the world. Others have been introduced inadvertently to the country and have

become weeds. Some have been introduced to control previously imported

pests, only to become pests themselves; for instance the privet

 Ligustrum

robustum var. walkerii is believed to have been introduced to out compete the

thorny bramble 

Rubus alceifolius in forest plantations. (Rouillard & Guého,

1994).


Many of the introduced exotic plants, such as chinese guava (

Psidium


cattleianum), privet (Ligustrum robustum var walkerii), poivre marron

(

Schinus terebinthifolius) among others, have become naturalised in the



native forests. Over the years they have displaced the native plants from their

habitat through intense competition. Also the regeneration of native species

are compromised by exotic seed predators such as rats, monkeys and birds.

Other vertebrates deer and pigs browse their seedlings. Because of these

factors, the indigenous vegetation is becoming impoverished, both in

numbers and genetically. Many species are now threatened with extinction.

Loss of this biodiversity would represent a significant loss to the global

community.

For reasons stated above, the Mauritian Government has taken steps to

protect its native genetic resources through the creation of a number of

protected areas. Under the Environment Investment Program, the World

Bank funded a US$ 2.42 million project to establish the first National Park

in Mauritius - the Black River Gorges National Park  (World Bank, 1990). A

new legislation, The 

Wildlife and National Parks Act has been proclaimed

and the Black River Gorges National Park has been established since June 15,

1994. The park is managed by the National Parks and Conservation Service,

a department of the Ministry of Agriculture and Natural Resources. A

Wildlife and National Parks Advisory Council and a National Parks and

Conservation Fund, have been established to advise and provide necessary

funds respectively for the development of the park. Other areas of

conservation value have been declared as Nature Reserve ever since the 1950's.

Fig. 3 shows the distribution of protected areas in Mauritius.

2.2 WILD SPECIES AND WILD RELATIVES OF CROP PLANTS

Many of the wild native plants from Mauritius could be of economic value.

Several species may have great ornamental value (e.g. 

Trochetia boutoniana,

Hibiscus liliiflorus).



M A U R I T I U S   c o u n t r y   r e p o r t

1 2


M A U R I T I U S   c o u n t r y   r e p o r t

1 3


Others may have economic potential as herbal remedies (

Bakerella hoyifolia in

case of dyspepsia and flatulence

Erythroxylum laurifolium for nephritic spasm

and lithiasis, 

Toddalia asiatica for cough and influenza and many others)

(Adjanohoun 

et al., 1983). A high number of endemic plants are also noted

for their use in traditional pharmacopoeia and unfortunately many are highly

endangered (Appendix 3). The Faculty of Science, University of Mauritius is

carrying out a project on medicinal and aromatic plants of Mauritius and

Rodrigues, as part of a regional project under the aegis of the Indian Ocean

Commission. Over and above the computerised database, including

ethnobotanical, botanical, phytochemical and to some extent pharmacological

data that are currently available for over 600 plants, anti-fungal and anti-

microbial; screens of some endemic medicinal and aromatic plants are being

studied. The phytochemical contents as well as the composition of the

essential oils of some of the rare endemic as well as exotic species have been

studied (Gurib-Fakim, 1991). The work on Regional IOC project has led to

the publication of a book on the medicinal plants of Rodrigues (Gurib-Fakim

et al., 1994) and a three volume pharmacopoeia of Mauritius is currently

being produced. Data are also available on the medicinal plants growing in

the Indian island States, i.e. Comoros, Seychelles and Madagascar. It must be

stressed that many of these plants are common in other countries and are not

unique to Mauritius. Many other medicinal and aromatic plants (e.g.

Eucalyptus spp., Vetiver etc.) exist but their full potential can only be realised

once a proper market study has been carried out.

Other species can provide active ingredients for drugs and pesticides. Some

preliminary phytochemical investigations carried out on a number of native

plants from Mauritius have revealed the presence of useful active ingredients.

For example, extract of the leaves of 

Aphloia theiformis, a native species of

Mauritius was found to be active within 24 hours against 

Biomphalaria

glabrata snails, the intermediate hosts of Schistosoma mansoni (Gopalsamy et

al., 1988). Similarly the endemic species Polycias dichroostachya was shown to

have strong molluscicidal activity. There also exists a score of aromatic plants

which are being exploited for commercial purposes and they include the Ylang

ylang (

Cananga odorata), the Vanilla (Vanilla fragans), Baies roses or the



Brazilian pepper tree (

Schinus terebinthifolius).

Other plants have more obvious economic importance because they are close

relatives of major crops. In Mauritius the only truly indigenous genus which

is a wild relative of an economic crop is 

Coffea. There are three species of

native 

Coffea growing in the native forest of the island. Two of them namely



Coffea macrocarpa and C. myrtifolia are endemic to Mauritius and the other

C. mauritiana is endemic to Mauritius and Réunion. These species are known

to be naturally caffeine-free and could thus be of great importance in

developing coffee cultivars with low caffeine (Dulloo and Owadally, 1991).

Wild coffee species might provide new genes for improving this globally


M A U R I T I U S   c o u n t r y   r e p o r t

1 4


important crop. Other native species which are used as a food crop is the

native palm 

Dictyosperma album var album. This species is cultivated to

provide palm hearts for the making of palm heart salad principally in the

hotels and restaurants.

Among agricultural crops, the Lentil Creole (

Phaseolus glabreceus/Vigna

glabreceus Roxburg) is another species believed to be unique in its kind

although some species were reported in Bengal, India. It was found in the

Pamplemousses Botanical Garden and seeds are stored in the 

Vigna collection

at Gembloux, Université Agricole, Belgium. This wild species is extensively

used in the breeding of cowpea (

Vigna unguiculata).

Apart from the above two species, which are used for breeding of two

important food crops, there are few important ones which have been

maintained and characterised. Others need to be studied to establish their

potential for improving the existing cultivars.

In tomato (

Lycopersicon esculentum), one species L. esculentum var. tallerelli

has been located in the wild but no serious work has been done although it

shows some interesting characters. Two wild species of broad bean (

Phaseolus

lunatus) were identified - one in Mauritius (sieva type) and a second one

(indeterminate type) in Rodrigues. The Rodrigues one bears big pods with

few big seeds, which are highly toxic. It is believed that the species originates

from the Malagasy Republic. The Mauritian type, locally known as "antac" is

a small seeded one, which was previously used as food.

Wild species of pigeon pea 

Cajanus cajan are also known to exist in

Mauritius. They are believed to have been cultivated in the past 150 years and

to have been introduced by Indian Immigrants.

One wild species of potato has been found and is yet to be identified and

characterised. In the same family, two species of egg plants (

Solanum spp) are

found in the wild - 

Solanum torvum having white flowers and S. indicum

having violet flowers. These wild species of solanum are used sometimes for

grafting cultivars of 

S. melongenea as the latter is susceptible to bacterial wilt.

Tabac marron (

S. auriculatum ) can be found in the wild.

In the fruit section wild guava 

P. cattleianum commonly known as "Goyave

de Chine" can be found on the plateau and rain catchment areas. A wild

species of pine apple (

Ananas bracteatus)and banana called "banane la grain"

can be encountered in the wild.

There is a form of sugar cane, 

Saccharum spontaneum (Spontaneum

Mauritius), which is known to occur in the wild in Mauritius (Ramdoyal and

Domaingue, 1995), but it is believed to be close to the Coimbatore local from



M A U R I T I U S   c o u n t r y   r e p o r t

1 5


India (Stevenson, 1940). It is found growing in water courses near Hindu

temples in Mauritius and is used in Hindu ceremonies. It is believed to have

been introduced by Indian immigrants.

In the MSIRI, the sugar cane collection amounts to 1,841 entries. They are

grouped as:

- Basic species and allied genera - 

S. officinarum, S. barberi, S. sinense, S.

spontaneum, S. Robustum

, the genus 

Erianthus Sect. Ripidium and the genus Miscanthus

- F1 interspecific and intergeneric hybrids

- BC1 derived interspecific and intergeneric hybrids

- BC2 derived interspecific and intergeneric hybrids

- Commercial hybrids

Details of this collection are given in Appendix 4.

2.3 LAND RACES AND OLD CULTIVARS

With the introduction of new and improved cultivars of food crops to

maximise commercial production, old varieties and land races are fast

disappearing. In Rodrigues and in remote places, some land races still persist.

Two landraces of bean (

P. vulgaris), local red and navy bean, are still

cultivated in Rodrigues, while in Mauritius, there is an old cultivar known as

"Long Tom". Similarly, there is one old cultivar of cowpea (

Vigna


unguiculata cv sesquipedalis) "Long yard bean". There is also a local variety of

onion, the "local Red" which is characterised by a very strong pungent smell

and very good keeping quality, but it is low yielding. This germplasm is

rapidly eroding due to its replacement by other high yielding imported

varieties.

For other crops, few old cultivars are still planted for commercial production.

They are tomato (var. quatre carrés), groundnut (var. cabri), garlic (var.

local), cucumber (var. local white) and pumpkin. It should be noted that the

seeds of the above mentioned crops are produced and conserved by the

farmers themselves, although the Ministry of Agriculture is making attempts

to produce and conserve the varieties.


M A U R I T I U S   c o u n t r y   r e p o r t

1 6


In maize (

Zea mays) several ecotypes had been collected by the MSIRI in an

attempt to preserve the germplasm and to use them in the breeding

programmes. Local ecotypes have been replaced by new hybrids, but in

Rodrigues the farmers are still growing their ecotypes. The collection is still

difficultly maintained at the MSIRI and the viability of seeds is threatened

with the existing storing facilities (Govinden & Rummun, 1995).

In the root crops sector, especially sweet potato (

Ipomoea batatas) and cassava

(

Manihot esculenta), many old cultivars still exist as they were used as starchy



food during the Second World War. Appendix 5 gives a list of local and

foreign accessions from Taiwan of sweet potato and maintained 

in situ at the

University of Mauritius and some at the Ministry of Agricultural experimental

farms separately.

In fruit crops, many old cultivars are still grown, some for commercial

exploitation and some just form part of the local landscape, e.g. Jack fruit,

Bread fruit etc. Among the commercially exploited crops, mangoes

(

Mangifera indica), litchis (Litchis chinensis, pine apple (Ananas comosus)



and banana (

Musa spp.) could be cited. Six new lines of litchis were

introduced to the island from China to broaden the narrow existing genetic

base. There are 3†existing old cultivar of litchis - Culcutta late, Toi Tso local,

Kwan Mi Pink. A list of the local cultivars of banana is given in Appendix 5.

In Mauritius there is quite a large diversity of landraces and old cultivar of

mangoes. These are: Agnes, Agnes Labourdonnais, Alphonse, Alphonse

Indian, Ambin, Amini, Aristide, Auguste, badami, Baissac, Begum Khsh of

Muldeb, Bibi Gazli, Champo, Cheribon, Chitoor-Amloot, Christian,

Dauphine, Divisne, Dodhol, D'Arifat, Early Gold, Elise, Eugenie, Ferdinand,

Figet, Gebert, Geneve, Goa, Goa, Alphonso, Haphus Pasind, Henriette,

Irwin, Jagat Mani, Jansheedi, Jaune, Josee, Julie, Katha Mitah,

Labourdonnais, Madras, Maison rouge, Mamood, Miel, mulguava, Neelam,

Normand, Orphee, Overseer, Pairi, Petite Josee, Pignon d'Inde, Pope

Hennessy, Raspuri, Rosat, Rupee, Society No. 3, Soondarshah, Torse,

Victoria and Yone, Sabre, Lacorde, Petrole, Begumkhash of Mursidabad.

These old cultivars are planted at Richelieu and Bois Marchand experimental

stations.



M A U R I T I U S   c o u n t r y   r e p o r t

1 7


Каталог: fileadmin -> templates -> agphome -> documents -> PGR -> SoW1
fileadmin -> Giresun Üniversitesi TÖmer türkiye Türkçesi Muafiyet Sınavı Öğrenci Listesi
fileadmin -> Azərbaycanın murdar ət bazarı Mehriban Əliyeva, "Şəki Region" qəzeti
documents -> Effect of Guava Fruit Colour and Size on Fruit Fly Incidence in Khartoum State Esam Eldin B. M. Kabbashi1 and Osman E. Nasr2
templates -> Chapter The State of Forest Genetic Resources Conservation and Management
SoW1 -> Country report to the fao international technical conference
templates -> Forestry practices that maintain genetic diversity over the longer term will be required as an integral component of sustainable forest management
templates -> Annex 4: alphabetic list of crops with botanical name and crop code (icc and cpc)


Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:
  1   2   3


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə