Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Warren Region



Yüklə 3.36 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
səhifə11/21
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü3.36 Mb.
1   ...   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   ...   21

Response to Disturbance 
Response to fire is unknown. 
Response to soil disturbance is unknown. 
Response to change in soil moisture is unknown. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
Presumed susceptible. 
Management Requirements 
Resurvey and and monitor populations. 
Monitor for response to disturbance. 
Search areas of suitable habitat for further populations. 
172 

Protect known populations from exposure to Phytophthora spp. 
Research Requirements 
Determine susceptibility to Phytophthora spp. 
Determine response to disturbance. 
References 
George (1991) 
 
Verticordia endlicheriana 
var. 
angustifolia 
 
 
 
173 

Wurmbea sp. Cranbrook (A.R. Annels 3819) 
COLCHICACEAE
 
  
WAR 
F4/157 
Wurmbea sp. Cranbrook was first collected by Tony Annels in 1993 but has yet to be formally 
described. Recorded populations occur in naturally fresh to brackish habitats but these areas are 
becoming more saline as a result of land clearing. The Wamballup and Kulunilup populations occurs 
with two other priority taxa, Apodasmia ceramophila ms (P2) and Villarsia submersa (P4). 
Description 
Wurmbea sp. Cranbrook is a glabrous herb to 30 cm tall with an unbranched stem and three leaves, 
the lowest basal (to 16 cm long), the second on the stem, and the third subtending an inflorescence of 
two to four flowers. Flowers are bisexual or the uppermost flower male. There are six to eight tepals 
to 11 mm long with one nectary per tepal. Each tepal has a white to yellowish band across its lower 
third. There are six stamens, three styles and three ovary cells. 
The species differs from Wurmbea dioica in its larger size, more cup shaped flowers with larger tepals 
and more thickened nectaries. It differs from W. monantha in its larger flowers and white rather than 
pink nectaries which differ in shape. Its swamp habitat is also different from both other taxa. 
Flowering period: October-November 
Distribution and Habitat 
The species is known from winter inundated swamps west of Cranbrook, growing in heavy grey saline 
clay soils and flowering while its lower parts are still under water. 
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 2 
Recommended: Priority 3 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
 
 
Last survey 
 
Comments/condition 
CLM 2 
Wamballup NR  
FRA 
NR 
500+ 
11/10/1994 
 
WAR 100 
Perup NR 
DON 
NR 
10000+ 
1999 
 
WAR 101 
Byenup Lagoon 
DON 
NR 
1000+ 
10/2004 
 
WAR 102 
Kululinup NR 
North 
DON NR  10000+  11/2003 
 
WAR 103 
Kululinup NR 
South 
DON NR  10000+  11/2003 
 
WAR 104 
Muir Hwy 
 
DON NR  10000+  11/2003 
 
Response to Disturbance 
Response to fire is unknown. 
Response to soil disturbance is unknown. 
The species fails to shoot from corms or flower in the absence of inundation and is therefore 
vulnerable to change in hydrology and climate. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
Unknown. 
Management Requirements 
Search areas of suitable habitat for further populations. 
Monitor populations annually. 
Limit future drainage in the area until impacts on the species can be assessed. 
174 

Include as an issue for the Lake Muir Recovery Plan. 
Research Requirements 
Describe the species. 
Investigate critical salt tolerance levels for the species. 
Investigate response to disturbance. 
Investigate mechanisms responsible for triggering flowering. 
References 
None. 
 
Wurmbea sp. Cranbrook  
 
 
 
175 

3. 
 
P
RIORITY 
T
HREE 
S
PECIES
 
Species which are known from several populations or collections, and the taxa are not believed to be 
under immediate threat (i.e. not currently endangered), either due to the number of known populations 
(generally greater than five), or known populations being large, and either widespread or protected.  
Such taxa are under consideration for declaration as 'rare flora' but are in need of further survey 
 
 
 
Photograph of Priority three species, Lomandra ordii by Roger Hearn 
 
176 

Actinotus sp. Walpole (J.R. Wheeler 3786) 
 
APIACEAE 
 
                          WAR F4/164 
The first collection of Actinotus sp. Walpole was made from near Granite Peak by Alex George in 
1971, with further collections made near Walpole by Judy Wheeler and Sue Patrick in 1993. Searches 
since have failed to relocate these populations. 
Description 
Actinotus sp. Walpole is a softly hairy, prostrate perennial herb with lobed, alternate, broadly ovate, 
leaves 2-15 mm long by 2-12 mm wide, each with 5-13 marginal teeth and on petioles 2-12 mm long. 
The inflorescence is in a simple umbel surrounded by an involucre of woolly bracts. Flowers are 
white, about 4 mm across and on short pedicels. Floral bracts are glabrous and narrowly elliptic, about 
2 mm long. 
Actinotus laxus  ms  is similar in general appearance to Actinotus sp. Walpole but has a obovate to 
cuneate leaf blade 8-25 mm long by 3-12 mm wide and less marginal teeth. 
Flowering period: December-March (occasionally October) 
Distribution and Habitat 
Actinotus sp. Walpole has a restricted distribution between Walpole and Margaret River, occurring on 
low terrain on the edges of creeks and on swamp margins in forest.  
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 3 
 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
 
 
 Last survey 
 
Comments/condition 
CLM 6 
Delta Rd 1 
FRA 
NP 
Unknown 
26/2/1997 
Not relocated 
CLM 7 
Delta Rd 2 
FRA 
NP 
Unknown 
26/2/1997 
Not relocated 
CLM 8 
Northcliffe 
DON 
SF 
500+ 
12/3/1997 
 
CLM 2 
South West Hwy 
FRA 
NP/RR Unknown  26/2/1997 
Not 
relocated 
CLM 1 
Granite Peak 
FRA 
NP 
Unknown 
27/2/1997 
Not relocated 
WAR 100 
Cederman Rd 
DON 
SF 
na  
28/4/2004 
 
WAR 101 
Dog Rd 
FRA 
NP 
na  
26/2/1997 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Response to Disturbance 
Field observations indicate that the species recruits in high numbers from seed post fire. 
Response to soil disturbance is unknown. 
Response to change in soil moisture is unknown but, given its habitat, the species may be adversely 
affected by drier regimes or rising water tables. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
Response to change in canopy is unknown. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
Unknown. 
Management Requirements 
Relocate vouchered populations and assess them. 
Search areas of suitable habitat for new populations. 
Research Requirements 
Determine susceptibility to Phytophthora spp. 
177 

Assess the affects of disturbance on the species. 
Assist those conducting taxonomic studies at the University of Sydney. 
References 
Wheeler et al. (2002): Jenny Hart (personal communication) 
 
 
 
Actinotus sp. Walpole  
 
 
 
178 

Alexgeorgea ganopoda B. Briggs & L. Johnson  
 
RESTIONACEAE 
 
                 WAR F4/21 
Alexgeorgea ganopoda is a recently described species that was first collected at Bow River by S.W. 
Jackson in 1913 but was then not seen again until found north of Mt. Frankland by Barbara Briggs in 
1977 and near Bow Bridge by Greg Keighery in 1986.  
Description 
Alexgeorgea ganopoda is a clonal herb with interlaced rhizomes 10-15 cm below ground and aerially 
branched culms. Clones are normally dioecious with female flowers geophilous (10-20 cm below the 
surface), the styles emerging from the soil at the time of flowering. Seeds are borne on rhizomes, 
germinating in situ. Culms are 20-80 cm long with yellow green young growth and deeper green old 
growth, covered with brown, glossy, more or less glabrous scale leaves. 
Flowering period: December-February 
Distribution and Habitat 
Alexgeorgea ganopoda is known from several locations between the Pingerup Plains west of Walpole 
and the Styx River west of Denmark, growing on sand plain heaths and extending into shallow sand 
over gravel on the fringes of adjacent open jarrah forest. 
Conservation Status 
Currently: Priority 3 
 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
 
 
 Last survey 
 
Comments/condition 
CLM 1 
Thomson Rd 
FRA 
NP/SF 
10 000+ 
5/12/1997 
 
CLM 2 
Bow Bridge 
FRA 
RR 
100+ 
5/12/1994 
Unlikely to persist due to 
weed invasion 
CLM 3 
Mountain Rd. 
FRA 
NP/(5g) 
500+ 
30/11/1994 
 
CLM 4 
Break Rd 1 
FRA 
SF (5g) 
1 000+ 
28/11/1994 
 
CLM 5 
Break Rd 2 
FRA 
SF/(5g) 
1 000+ 
28/11/1994 
 
CLM 6 
Break Rd 3 
FRA 
SF/(5g) 
10 000+ 
28/11/1994 
 
CLM 7 
Boronia Rd. 
FRA 
NP/SF 
10 000+ 
30/11/1994 
 
CLM 8 
Owingup 
FRA 
RR 
na 
14/7/1995 
 
CLM 9 
Timberjack Rd 
FRA 
NP 
na 
12/2/1997 
 
WAR 101 
Pingerup Plains 
FRA 
NP 
5 000+ 
16/4/1997 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Response to Disturbance 
Plants are killed by fire, with regeneration occurring through the germination of soil-stored seed. Male 
culms have been seen in the second season after regeneration with seed retrieved from rhizomes in the 
third season (observations on Boronia Road population). 
Response to soil disturbance appears to be the same as fire. 
The species is partially xeromorphic and is able to withstand inundation. 
Based on observations at the Bow River population it appears that the species is able to persist in the 
presence of annual grasses, even following mowing (south side of road) but has been displaced by 
perennial grasses (north side of road). 
Increased canopy cover results in reduced vegetative spread of rhizomes. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
Unknown. 
Management Requirements 
Monitor each population periodically and also prior to and post burning. 
179 

Search areas of suitable habitat for further populations. 
Research Requirements 
Determine susceptibility to Phytophthora spp. 
References 
Briggs et al. (1990); Meney (1990); Meney and Pate (1999) 
 
 
Alexgeorgea ganopoda  
 
 
180 

Amperea protensa Nees 
 
EUPHORBIACEAE 
 
              WAR F4/22 
Although the type of Amperea protensa was reputedly collected at ‘Mongers Lake’ [Perth] by Preiss 
in 1840, the species appears to now be restricted to the south coastal plain. It is noted that Preiss spent 
time in late 1839 and again in 1840 in the Albany/Plantagenet and Augusta areas and it is possible, 
given the sometimes random numbering of his collections, that an error has occurred and the actual 
collection originated in the south. The species poorly collected. However, while not common, it would 
seem to be secure within the conservation estate with little threat to most populations. A number of 
subspecies have been named in the past but none are currently accepted. 
Many localities of early collections were not surveyed during recent fieldwork and future assessment 
may justify the removal of this species from the list.  
The species has been confused with A. volubilis in the past and  has an overlapping but wider 
distribution to the east and north.  
Description 
Amperea protensa is a small glabrous, dioecious, bushy perennial about 20 cm high by 30 cm across 
with a woody rootstock. Stems are smooth, slender, decumbent with widely spaced, sessile or shortly 
petiolate leaves. The leaf blade is broadly obovate to linear, 1-3 cm long by 2-8 mm wide. Stipules are 
broadly deltoid to narrowly ovate, entire or with lobed margins and often fused with the adjacent 
stipule to form a cup behind the petiole. Flowers are clustered in the leaf axils, the male flowers three 
(-four) merous, in clusters of several flowers, each with 3-6 stamens. There are one or two female 
flowers per axil. 
The closely related Amperea  volubilis can be distinguished from A. protensa, by its 
tangling/climbing/twining habit and entire stipules. 
Flowering period: October-January. 
Distribution and Habitat 
Amperea protensa has a south coastal plain distribution between Albany and Scott River, growing in 
swampy flats (grey sands) and drainage lines in tussock sedgelands and in dense tall scrub/low 
woodland with Banksia littoralis
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 3 
 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
 
 
 Last survey 
 
Comments/condition 
CLM 1 
Peaceful Bay Rd 
FRA 
NP 
na 
20/1/1979 
 
CLM 3 
Pingerup Rd 1 
DON 
NP 
10 
18/12/190 
 
CLM 4 
Inlet Rd 
FRA 
NP 
na 
19/12/1994 
 
CLM 6 
Beardmore Rd 
FRA 
SF 

14/1/2004 
 
CLM 7 
Angrove Rd 
FRA 
SF 
na 
1/12/1988 
 
CLM 8 
Conspicuous 1 
FRA 
NP 
na 
1/12/1988 
 
CLM 9 
Conspicuous Beach Rd 
FRA 
NP 
na 
12/12/1988 
 
CLM 10 
Ficifolia Rd 
FRA 
NP 
na 
2/12/1988 
 
CLM 11 
Conspicuous 2 
FRA 
NP 
na 
20/2/1989 
 
CLM 12 
Middle Rd 
FRA 
SF 
na 
20/9/1994 
 
CLM 13 
Bow Bridge 
FRA 
RR 
na 
5/12/1994 
 
CLM 14 
Pingerup Rd. 2 
FRA 
NP 
na 
15/12/1994 
 
CLM 15 
Deeside Coast Rd 
DON 
NP 
na 
15/12/1994 
 
CLM 16 
Mt. Hallowell 
FRA SHRes 
na 
4/6/1995   
CLM 17 
William Bay  
FRA 
NP 
na 
25/10/1996 
 
WAR 101 
Lower Gardner Rd 
DON 
NP 
13 
13/2/2004 
 
WAR 102 
Hill Rd 
FRA 
SF 

14/1/2004 
 
WAR 103 
Sheepwash FB 
FRA 
SF 

16/10/1998 
 
181 

WAR 104 
Nelson Rd 
FRA 
NP 

19/12/1996 
 
WAR 105 
Ficifolia Rd 2 
FRA 
NP 

2/10/1995 
 
WAR 106 
Mt. Burnside 
FRA 
SF 
na 
25/2/1998 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Response to Disturbance 
Plants in the Pingerup Road population were observed to resprout from rootstock following fire. 
Response to soil disturbance is unknown. 
The species is persisting in a grass invaded road verge at Bow River but would appear to be readily 
displaced. 
Response to changes in soil moisture is unknown, but given its habitat, the species is probably 
vulnerable to any significant changes in site moisture. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
Unknown. 
Management Requirements 
Relocate and survey locations of early records. 
Search areas of suitable habitat for further populations. 
Research Requirements 
Determine susceptibility to Phytophthora spp. 
References. 
Henderson (1992) 
 
 
Amperea protensa  
 
 
 
 
 
 
182 

Andersonia amabile K. Lemson ms 
 
EPACRIDACEAE 
 
                 WAR F4/175 
Andersonia amabile ms is a recently recognised species that was first collected near Peaceful Bay, 
Walpole and Black Point by Neil Gibson in 1990 and is now known from about a dozen populations. 
Description 
Andersonia amabile ms is a shrub to 0.4 m, varying from small and compact to straggling. Leaves are 
spreading, ovate, 1.5-5 mm long, 0.5-3 mm wide, abruptly tapering into a pungent triquetrous upper 
part. Flowers are white or pale pink in very short ovoid to cylindric terminal spikes, each flower 
subtended by a bract and two bracteoles. The five sepals are free and 2-4 mm long. The corolla is 
tubular, 2-3 mm long with five spreading lobes that strongly push back through the sepals. Flowers 
are glabrous and open widely. Stamens are usually free and usually five in number with the Pingerup 
Road population having six. Staminal filaments are usually filiform, glabrous, dilated at base. The 
Pingerup Road population varies with a mix of filiform, wide (petal like) and intermediate filaments. 
The style is glabrous, straight and not exserted beyond corolla. 
Andersonia amabile ms is sometimes similar in appearance to small flowered, small leaved forms of 
A. sprengelioides
Flowering period: October-December (January) 
Distribution and Habitat 
Andersonia amabile ms is recorded from near Warner Glen, Black Point, D'Entrecasteaux National 
Park, Lake Muir and Denmark. Found growing in heath communities in black and grey sand in 
seasonally wet swamps. 
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 3 
 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
 
 
 Last survey 
 
Comments/condition 
CLM 3 
Black Point 
DON 
NP 
<100 
18/1/1996 
 
CLM 4 
Pingerup Rd 
DON/FRA 
NP 
2000+ 
1/12/1995 
 
CLM 1 
Peaceful Bay 
FRA 
NP 
<100 
13/10/1994 
 
CLM 6 
Watershed Rd 
FRA 
SF 
(5g) 
<20 16/12/1994 
 
CLM 7 
Broke Inlet 1 
FRA 
NP 
<50 
19/12/1994 
 
CLM 8 
Broke Inlet 2 
FRA 
NP 
200+ 
19/12/1994 
 
CLM 2 
Kangaroo Rd 1 
FRA 
SF 
<20 
30/11/1994 
 
CLM 5 
Kangaroo Rd 2 
FRA 
SF 
200+ 
30/11/1994 
 
CLM 9 
Break Rd 
FRA 
SF(5g) 
<20 
2/11/1996 
 
WAR 100 
Collis FB 
FRA 
SF 
na 
13/4/2000 
 
WAR 102 
Parry Rd 
FRA 
SHRes 
na 
26/11/1990 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Response to Disturbance 
Plants are killed by fire and recruit from seed with the first flowering in the second spring following 
germination. 
Plants have been observed to recruit from seed on a disturbed road verge. 
As the species grows in periodically inundated wetlands it is likely to be vulnerable to significant 
long-term changes in water relations. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
183 

Unknown, but given the susceptibility of other members of the genus, should be presumed 
susceptible. 
Management Requirements 
Monitor populations every three years and both before and after fire. 
Collect seed for storage at CALM’s Threatened Flora Seed Centre. 
Search areas of suitable habitat for further populations. 
Research Requirements 
Determine susceptibility to Phytophthora spp. 
Assist Kristina Lemson in her taxonomic review of Andersonia
References 
Kristina Lemson (personal communication); Wheeler et al. (2002) 
 
 
 
 
Andersonia amabile  
 
 
184 

Astartea spMt. Johnston (ARA 4577)  
 MYRTACEAE 
 
                       WAR F4/176 
Astartea sp. Mt. Johnston is a recently discovered member of the Astartea fascicularis complex that is 
closely related to Astartea sp. Pingerup Rock. It was first collected on Mt. Johnston while conducting 
survey work in 1994 and was recollected from the same site a year later. It has since been found at 
several other localities. Despite searching many granite outcrops across the Region, Astartea sp. Mt. 
Johnston has only been recorded on eleven occasions and would appear to be naturally rare rather than 
poorly collected. The majority of populations are affected by Phytophthora.  
Description 
Astartea sp. Mt. Johnston is an open spreading shrub to 3.5 m high with shortly petiolate, linear to 
channelled, glandular, terete leaves 6-14 mm long by 0.4-0.5 mm wide that are opposite or in opposite 
leaf bundles (condensed branchlets arising in the axils of leaves). These bundles are generally twisted 
upward and arranged as if along one side of a branch, each with numerous individual leaves (often 12-
18) in opposite pairs. The leaf bundles are closely arranged on the stem giving a soft, densely foliose 
character to branchlets and the plant as a whole. Leaves are normally light green but turn red during 
summer. Flowers are axillary, solitary with peduncles 6-10 mm long. Each flower has two bracteoles 
that are about 1.5 mm below calyx and persistent into flowering. The calyx is 3-5 mm long and deeply 
pouched, fully enclosing the developing bud. Flowers are 8-12 mm wide with five white to pale pink 
petals 3-5 mm long by 2.5-4 mm wide. There are twenty to thirty stamens with each bundle containing 
four to six stamens. Capsules are 3-4 mm across with the sepal horns persistent as marginal 
appendages. 
Other members of the Astartea fascicularis complex found in the Warren region have smaller (2-8 
mm long) darker leaves giving them a more sparse appearance, shorter peduncles (2-6 mm long), and 
generally smaller flowers (to 8 mm wide). A similarly long peduncled species from between Walpole 
and Denmark lacks horns on the sepals and another long horned, wide membraned bracteolate species 
from the region has small flowers and shorter peduncles and leaves. 
Flowering period: October-December 
Distribution and Habitat 
Astartea sp. Mt. Johnston is recorded from an area about 30 km north of Walpole, west of the 
Frankland River and east of the South West Highway, growing in pockets of sandy loam on large 
granite outcrops in a heath community of Acacia triptychaVerticordia plumosaAgonis linearifolia 
and Andersonia sprengelioides
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 2* 
*Species is of the highest priority for further survey and consideration for gazettal as DRF. 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
 
 
 Last survey 
 
Comments/condition 
CLM 1 
Peak Block 1 
FRA 
SF 
3000 
27/2/1997 
 
CLM 2 
Mount Johnston   FRA 
NP 
1000 
10/1/1997 
 Was WAR 100 
WAR 101 
Wattle FB 
FRA 
SF 
2000 
7/11/1997 
 
WAR 102 
Claude Rd 
FRA 
SF 
1000 
12/11/1999 
 
WAR 103 
Roe Block 1 
FRA 
SF 
1000 
15/6/1997 
 
WAR 104 
O'Donnell FB 
FRA 
NP 
21 
13/10/1999 
 
WAR 106 
Ordnance FB 
FRA 
SF 
300 
15/4/1998 
 
WAR 107 
Sharpe FB 2 
FRA 
SF 
na 
Na 
 
WAR 108 
Sharpe FB 1 
FRA 
SF 
1000 
24/11/1997 
 
WAR 109 
Roe Block 2 
FRA 
SF 
1000 
27/10/1997 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Response to Disturbance 
185 

Plants are killed by fire and regenerate from seed with the first substantial seed set occurring in the 
third year after germination. Germination rates are extremely low in the absence of fire.  
The species is a shallow rooting plant that lacks a tap root and is vulnerable to removal of organic 
layers on the granites in which it grows. 
Astartea sp. Mt. Johnston is a moisture loving plant that is apparently unable to compete with granite 
Agonis (Agonis sp. Last Bottle Rock) on sites where the two species occur together. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
Dead plants in two populations have returned positive results for Phytophthora, as have plants in the 
CALM grounds at Manjimup. Treatment with Phosphite has proved successful in treating infected 
plants. 
Management Requirements 
Search areas of suitable habitat for further populations. 
Monitor populations for the presence of Phytophthora species and treat accordingly. 
Research Requirements 
Monitor populations post fire and record germination rates, survival, rates and time to first flowering.  
Determine response to disturbance. 
References 
Hutchinson (1997); Barbara Rye (personal communication); Malcolm Trudgen (personal 
communication) 
 
Astartea sp. Mt. Johnston  
 
186 

Boronia anceps Paul G. Wilson 
 RUTACEAE 
 
                           WAR F4/221 
Athough not formally described by Paul Wilson until 1998, Boronia anceps was first collected from 
the Boggy Lake area in the Warren Region by Churchill in 1957. Elsewhere it is mainly recorded from 
the Scott River area. The species is closely related to Boronia fastigiata and B. spathulata. 
Description 
Boronia anceps is a perennial glabrous herb to 60 cm without a lignotuber. Stems are flattened when 
young becoming two-edged when mature. Leaves are opposite, simple, sessile, narrowly obovate to 
narrowly elliptic or oblong to obovate, flat, to 45 mm long by 13 mm wide, the tip rounded with small 
point. Flowers have four petals and four sepals and are pink or mauve, 15-18 mm across, in long-
pedunculate terminal clusters or occasionally solitary. The peduncles are slender to 60 mm long. 
Pedicels are slender, smooth, to 10 mm long. Sepals are dark red purple, ovate, 2-4 mm long, glabrous 
or woolly ciliate. Petals are pink, ovate to elliptic, 7-10 mm long, acuminate and glabrous. Stamens 
are all fertile with filaments about. 3 mm long, warty, with sparse hairs towards the base. The ovary is 
woolly. The style and stigma are 1 to 1.5 mm long, the tip small. Fruit consists of four fruitlets. 
Boronia anceps is distinguished by its flattened, two edged stems. 
Flowering period: September to January with a record for April. 
Distribution and Habitat 
Boronia anceps is found in sandy swamps and also on laterite in seasonally wet woodland areas 
between the Scott River and Cape Naturaliste with one collection made near Walpole in the Warren 
Region. Since its discovery, it has not been relocated in this latter area.  
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 3 
 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
 
 
 Last survey 
 
Comments/condition 
WAR 100 
Boggy Lake 
FRA 
NP 
na 
na 
Relocate 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Response to Disturbance 
Response to fire is unknown. 
Response to soil disturbance is unknown. 
Response to change in soil moisture is unknown. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
Response to change in canopy cover is unknown. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
Unknown 
Management Requirements 
Relocate and survey the population at Boggy Lake. 
Research Requirements 
Determine response to Phytophthora.  
Determine response to disturbance. 
References 
Wilson (1998); Wheeler et al. (2002) 
187 

 
Boronia anceps  
 
188 

Boronia virgata Paul G. Wilson 
 RUTACEAE 
 
 
                  WAR F4/57 
This regional endemic was described by Paul Wilson in 1971. However, the first collections were 
made by Charles Gardner in 1921, 1922 and 1936 and variously placed in Boronia viminea  and 
B. lanuginosa. Following this, no further collections were made until the 1960’s, with the greatest 
number being made in the 1990’s following its listing as a priority taxon.  
Description 
Boronia virgata is an erect shrub to 2 m high with long slender minutely pubescent to glabrous stems 
that are often supported by and emergent above associated vegetation. Leaves are glabrous, to 10 mm 
long and pinnate with three to seven linear acute leaflets. Flowers are solitary, axillary. Pedicles are 
slender, 4-16 mm long and glabrous with two minute bracts about halfway along their length. The 
four sepals are glabrous, 2-3 mm long, red and narrowly triangular. The four petals are ovate, acute to 
obtuse, often mucronate, puberulous within and towards the margins outside. Stamens are erect, 
sparsely hairy with semi-terete filaments to 3 mm long. 
Boronia virgata is similar to and often occurs with B. stricta. However B. stricta differs in having 
pilose stems and hirsute leaves. 
Flowering period: September-February 
Distribution and Habitat 
Boronia virgata has a restricted distribution between Denmark, Walpole and Granite Peak, growing in 
winter wet heathlands, swamps and drainage lines on peaty sands. Although locally uncommon it 
often occurs over large areas.  
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 3 
Recommended: Priority 4 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
 
 
 Last survey 
 
Comments/condition 
CLM 1 
South Coast Hwy 1 
FRA 
RR 
na 
20/9/1992 
 
CLM 2 
South Coast Hwy 2 
FRA 
RR 
na 
7/10/1970 
Not located 
CLM 3 
Cemetary Rd 
FRA 
NP 
na 
18/12/1985 
 
CLM 4 
Boronia Rd 1 
FRA 
NP 
na 
18/10/2001 
 
CLM 5 
Kordabup Rd 1 
FRA 
RR/SHRes 
500+ 
26/9/1992 
 
CLM 6 
Watershed Rd 
FRA 
NP 
20 
10/12/1997 
 
CLM 7 
Nut Rd 
FRA 
NP 
na 
5/2/1992 
 
CLM 8 
Proctor Rd 
FRA 
RR 
100 
16/10/1992 
 
CLM 9 
Mehinup Hill 
FRA 
NR 

3/11/1998 
 
CLM 10 
William Bay 
FRA 
NP 
na 
11/11/2000 
 
CLM 11 
Mitchell Rd 1 
FRA 
NP 
 
9/10/2000 
 
CLM 12 a 
Boronia Rd 2 
FRA 
 
12 
17/12/1997 
 
CLM 12 b 
Mitchell Rd 2 
FRA NP/SF  na  20/9/1994   
CLM 13 
Bandit Rd 
FRA 
 
500 
20/11/1995 
 
CLM 14 
Nicol Rd 
FRA 
NP 
100 
29/11/1995 
 
CLM 15 
Middle Rd 
FRA 
NP 

9/11/1998 
 
CLM 16 
Angove Rd 
FRA 
WRC 
45 
18/11/1998 
 
CLM 17 
Mount Lindsey Rd 
FRA 
SF 
100 
17/10/2001 
 
CLM 18 
Kordabup Rd 2 
FRA 
NR 
50+ 
11/12/2000 
 
CLM 19 
Beardmore Rd 
FRA 
SF 
na 
11/10/1999 
Herbarium record only 
WAR 100 
Boronia Rd. 3 
FRA 
NP 
na 
12/10/2002 
Herbarium record only 
WAR 101 
Rest Point Rd 
FRA 
SHR 
na 
1/11/2001 
Herbarium record only 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Response to Disturbance 
The species appears to be killed by fire and is dependant on the soil seed bank for recruitment. 
However, the longevity of the soil seed bank is unknown.  
189 

Response to soil disturbance is unknown. 
The species is a wetland or wetland ecotonal taxon and is vulnerable to long-term changes in soil 
moisture. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
Unknown. 
Management Requirements 
Monitor known populations very 4-5 years and immediately prior to and post disturbance. 
Make opportunistic collections from any new populations found. 
Locate populations known only from herbarium records. 
Monitor populations affected by the construction of dams, drainage and climate change. 
All populations need to be resurveyed and mapped correctly. 
Research Requirements 
Determine susceptibility to Phytophthora spp. 
Research seed bank longevity. 
Determine if the species is an annual or perennial. 
Determine response to disturbance. 
References 
Robinson and Coates (1995); Wilson (1971) 
 
 
Boronia virgata 
 
190 

Calytrix pulchella (Turcz.) B.D. Jackson 
 MYRTACEAE
 
 
                       WAR F4/118 
Calytrix pulchella is a poorly known plant that was described as a species of Calycothrix  by 
Turczaninow in 1852. The name Calycothrix was changed to Calytrix by Jackson in 1895. The species 
occurs in disjunct populations, and future molecular studies may show that it consists of more than 
one taxon. Despite extensive field work no further populations have been found in the Warren Region. 
Description 
Calytrix pulchella is a glabrous, perennial shrub to 60 cm with appressed to spreading-ascending, 
usually closely spaced leaves, the leaf blade linear to very narrow elliptic, 3-10 mm long by 0.6-1 mm 
wide, the margins entire, the base gradually tapering to the petiole and the apex acute to acuminate. 
Stipules are to 0.4 mm long. The petiole is 0.5-1.5 mm long. Flowers are few to many and scattered or 
sometimes clustered. The peduncle and bracteoles are partly united into a 7-10 mm long, narrowly 
funnel shaped cheiridium. The hypanthium is ten ribbed and 7-12 mm long. Calyx segments are 
connate at the base (to 0.4mm), orbicular to obovate, 1.5-2 mm long by 1.3-2 mm wide, the margins 
lobed to erose, apex truncate to acute and produced into an awn to 10 mm long. Petals are pink to deep 
pink, yellow at base, lanceolate to elliptic, 6-10 mm long by 3-4 mm wide, the apex acute. Stamens 
25-40 with deep pink filaments 1.5-6 mm long. The style is deciduous and 4-4.5 mm long. 
In the Warren Region the range of Calytrix pulchella abuts that of the closely related C. tenuiramea 
from which it is distinguished by its longer cheiridium (7-10 mm vs. 4-8 mm) and longer hypanthium 
(7-12 mm vs. 6-7.5 mm). 
Flowering period: August-November (in the Warren Region it is recorded from mid October to the 
first week of November) 
Distribution and Habitat 
Calytrix pulchella is recorded from about eight or nine disjunct populations between Jerramungup, 
Mundaring and Manjimup. In the Warren Region it grows in grey sand over laterite in an open heath 
area of about three hectares that is surrounded by jarrah/marri forest. 
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 3 
 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
 
 
 Last survey 
 
Comments/condition 
CLM 3 
Walcott 1 (Kent Rd) 
DON 
SF 
10 000+ 
10/11/1994 
Some evidence of rabbit 
activity 
WAR 100 
Walcott 2 (Fred Rd) 
DON 
SF 
na 
 
 
WAR 101 
Walcott 3 
DON 
SF 
na 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Response to Disturbance 
Response to fire is unknown. 
Response to soil disturbance is unknown. 
Response to change in soil moisture is unknown. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
Response to change in canopy is unknown. 
Response to rabbit activity is unknown. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
Unknown, but given the susceptibility of other members of the family it should be managed as if 
vulnerable. 
191 

Management Requirements 
Monitor population annually. 
Search for further populations, particularly in the Perup area. 
Research Requirements 
Determine response to disturbance. 
Determine susceptibility to Phytophthora spp. 
Research the relationship between Warren and Wheatbelt populations 
References 
Craven (1987) 
 
 
Calytrix pulchella  
 
 
 
192 

Chamelaucium floriferum N.G. Marchant & Keighery subsp. floriferum ms 
 MYRTACEAE 
Walpole Wax
 
                       WAR F4/183 
Chamelaucium floriferum ms is a relic species that is currently split into two subspecies, both of 
which are endemic to the Warren Region and listed as priority taxa. A population of C. floriferum is 
recorded near Northcliffe that does not fit comfortably into either subspecies and population genetic 
studies are required to resolve its taxonomy. Chamelaucium floriferum subsp. floriferum  ms  is  a 
particularly attractive subspecies that has significant scope for horticultural development. 
Description 
Chamelaucium floriferum subsp. floriferum ms is a compact shrub to 3 m with opposite, decussate, 
shortly petiolate, crowded, linear, acute leaves 6-20 mm long by 0.5-1 mm wide. Flowers are axillary, 
usually solitary, exceeding the leaves and forming a leafy raceme. Pedicels are 2-5 mm long, 
subtended by a pair of hooded scarious bracteoles 2-3.5 mm long. The floral tube is 2.5-5 mm long 
and shallowly or obscurely ten ribbed. The five entire to shallowly crenate, white or pink sepals and 
petals are free, 0.3-0.8 mm and 2.5-3.5 mm long respectively. There are ten stamens alternating with 
ten staminodes which are together fused basally in a ring. Anthers open by longitudinal slits. 
Staminodes are narrowly triangular to linear, the style glabrous. The ovary is one celled with about 
eight ovules. The fruit is an indehiscent nut with persistent sepals and petals. 
Chamelaucium. floriferum subsp. diffusum ms differs from C. floriferum subsp. floriferum ms in being 
a diffuse shrub with flowers on longer pedicels and usually exceeding leaves. 
Flowering period: October-December 
Distribution and Habitat 
Chamelaucium. floriferum subsp. floriferum ms is found over a small area west of Walpole where it 
grows in heath, on or associated with granite outcrops. 
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 3 
 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
 
 
 Last survey 
 
Comments/condition 
CLM 1 
Aldridge Cove Track 
FRA 
NP 
na 
22/1/1992 
 
CLM 2 
Meredith Rd/Delta Rd? 
FRA 
NP na  2/10/1967 Relocate 
population 
CLM 3 
Thompson Cove/Mt 
Hopkins Track 
FRA NP  na  22/9/1992   
CLM 4 
Mt. Hopkins 
FRA 
NP 
na 
22/9/1992 
 
CLM 5 
Little Chudalup 
DON 
NP 
1000+ 
1/11/1994 
 
CLM 6 
Poison Hill 
FRA 
NP 
na 
1/1/1991 
 
WAR 100 
Woolbales 1 
FRA 
NP 
500+ 
 
 
WAR 101 
Woolbales 2 
FRA 
NP 
na 
 
 
WAR 102 
Wilderness Track 
 
NP 
 
29/11/1997 
Herbarium record only 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Response to Disturbance 
Plants are probably killed by fire with no evidence of resprouting noted.  
The taxon appears to be a seed obligate with a significant annual investment in seed production. 
Habitat is restricted to sites where plants would escape the effects of frequent fire. 
Response to soil disturbance is unknown. 
Response to a change in soil moisture is unknown. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
193 

Unknown, but given the susceptibility of several other members of the genus, Chamelaucium 
floriferum subsp. floriferum ms should be managed as if highly susceptible. 
Management Requirements 
Monitor populations periodically. 
Search for further populations in areas of suitable habitat. 
Research Requirements 
Determine susceptibility to Phytophthora spp. 
Determine the reproductive biology of the taxon, particularly in relation to fire. 
Consider the introduction of this taxon into horticulture. 
References 
Wheeler et al. (2002); Neville Marchant (personal communication) 
 
 
 
Chamelaucium floriferum 
subsp. floriferum  
 
194 

Chorizema reticulatum Meissner 
 PAPILIONACEAE 
 
               WAR F4/137 
Chorizema reticulatum is an inconspicuous species that was described by Meissner in 1844 from a 
collection Preiss made in 1840. It has since been sporadically collected and appears to be subject to 
significant grazing effects, possibly by rabbits, with populations all but disappearing when in bud and 
early flower. It is possibly relatively common, but should be assessed across its geographic range to 
confirm its conservation status prior to being considered for de-listing. Some populations are being 
grazed by either kangaroos or rabbits. Special attention needs to be made of these impacts. 
Description 
Chorizema reticulatum is a small shrub to 40 cm high with erect stems and a few branches that are 
silky pubescent when young, tending to glabrescent later. Leaves are usually crowded on the lower 



Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:
1   ...   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   ...   21


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə