Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Warren Region


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback



Yüklə 3.36 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
səhifə13/21
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü3.36 Mb.
1   ...   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   ...   21

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
Unknown. 
Management Requirements 
Relocate the Boggy Lake population. 
Monitor populations every three years. 
Search areas of suitable habitat for further populations. 
Assess all populations to confirm their conservation status. 
Research Requirements 
205 

Determine response to disturbance. 
Determine susceptibility to Phytophthora spp. 
References 
Bentham (1864); Crisp (1996); Chandler et al. (2002) 
 
 

Gastrolobium formosum  
 
 
206 

Gonocarpus pusillus (Benth.) Orch. 
 HALORAGACEAE 
 
               WAR F4/165 
Gonocarpus pusillus was named as a species of Haloragis by Bentham in 1864, from a Robert Brown 
collection made “to the E of King George Sound”. Two varieties were described at that time - pusilla 
and  subaphylla with the latter raised to species status and named Haloragis  simplex by Britten in 
1907. In 1975 Tony Orchard moved pusilla  back into  the genus Gonocarpus.  G. pusillus is an 
inconspicuous species that has in the past been poorly collected with few populations known until the 
1970’s.  
Description 
Gonocarpus pusillus is a prostrate perennial herb with entire, linear to narrowly elliptic leaves 7-8 mm 
long by 1 mm wide that are opposite at the base, becoming alternate up the stems. Flowers are yellow 
to red, one per axil, four merous with sepals about 0.3 mm long and petals about 1 mm long. The 
stamens are eight in number with anthers 0.5-0.6 mm long. The fruit is silver grey, ovoid to globular, 
0.8 by 0.8 mm, eight-ribbed, scabrous basally and on ribs.  
The leaves often tend to be caducous giving the appearance of Gonocarpus simplex but G. pusillus is 
distinguished by its prostrate habit and branching nature. It differs from G. paniculatus (dune form) in 
its smaller size and G. paniculatus (swamp form) in its smaller size and prostrate habit. 
Flowering period: November-December 
Distribution and Habitat 
Gonocarpus pusillus is found between Busselton and Albany, growing in heath and low woodland in 
seasonally wet swamps, being most noticeable in areas of recent disturbance. 
Conservation Status 
As it occurs in seasonal wetlands it may be susceptible to climate change. 
Current: Priority 3 
Recommended: Priority 4 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
 
 
 Last survey 
 
Comments/condition 
WAR 100 
Styx River 
FRA 
 
na 

 
WAR 101 
Romance Rd 
FRA 
 
na 
28/11/1994 
 
WAR 102 
Thompson Rd 1 
FRA 
 
na 

 
WAR 103 
Chesapeake Rd 
DON 
 
na 
23/02/1998 
 
WAR 104 
Nuyts Wilderness 
FRA 
 
na 
26/11/1997 
 
WAR 105 
Suez Rd 
FRA 
 
na 

 
WAR 106 
Thompson Rd 2 
FRA 
 
na 
11/12/1974 
Orchard collection 
WAR 107 
Scott Rd 1 
DON 
 
1000+ 
5/11/1995 
 
WAR 108 
SheepWash 
FRA 
 
50 
7/11/1998 
 
WAR 109 
Watershed Rd 
FRA 
 
100 
6/12/1994 
 
WAR 110 
Scott Rd 2 
DON 
 
na 

 
WAR 111 
Pt D'Entrecasteaux 
DON 
 
na 
18/11/1999 
 
WAR 112 
Roe Rd 
FRA 
 
na 
30/11/1999 
 
WAR 113 
Lake William  
FRA 
NP 
na 
24/11/1988 
Keighery collection 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Response to Disturbance 
Following fire the species reshoots from rootstock and regenerates from seed. 
Gonocarpus pusillus readily occupies disturbed sites where it grows into a relatively large tufted plant 
in the absence of other competition. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
207 

Unknown. 
Management Requirements 
Liaise with South West Region and South Coast Region to assess the threatened status of all recorded 
populations. 
Search areas of suitable habitat for further populations. 
Research Requirements 
Determine susceptibility to Phytophthora spp. 
Determine the long term viability of soil stored seed. 
References 
Bentham (1864); Orchard (1990) 
 
 
Gonocarpus pusillus  
  
 
208 

Gonocarpus simplex (Britten) Orch. 
 HALORAGACEAE 
 
              WAR F4/10 
Gonocarpus simplex was named Haloragis pusilla var.  subaphylla by Bentham in 1864, from a 
Robert Brown collection from the “S. Coast”. It was later raised to species level by Britten and named 
H. simplex. In 1975 Tony Orchard placed the species back into Gonocarpus
Description 
Gonocarpus simplex is a multi-stemmed, filiform, tufted perennial herb 8-40 cm tall which, when not 
in flower, has a sedge-like appearance. In areas of dense understorey the species develops a tangling 
form. The deciduous leaves are few, alternate, linear, glabrous and 5-10 mm long. The red bracts are 
also deciduous, deltoid in shape and 1.7 mm long. Flowers are greenish red, male or bisexual and 
apparently on separate plants. The bisexual flowers are sessile, while male flowers are on pedicles to 2 
mm long. The four sepals are about 0.4 mm long and the four petals about 1.7 mm long. There are 
eight stamens. The ovary is eight ribbed. 
Flowering period: November-December 
Distribution and Habitat 
Gonocarpus simplex is known from Cape Le Grande NP and in the Warren Region it is recorded 
between Denmark and Lake Jasper, growing in grey peaty sands in mixed 
restionaceous/cyperaceous/myrtaceous flats that are subject to periodic inundation. It is often found in 
disturbed areas such as are found in table drains and culverts. It is a relatively common though 
inconspicuous species (even when in flower) and probably occurs in other areas of suitable habitat 
east and west of its known range in the region. 
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 3 
Recommended: Priority 4 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
 
 
 Last 
survey 
 
Comments/condition 
CLM 1 
Northcliffe 
DON 
VCL 
na 
11/12/1987 
 
CLM 2 
Collis Rd 
FRA 
SF 
500+ 
30/11/1994 
 
CLM 3 
Gum Link Rd 
FRA 
SF (5g) 
500+ 
9/11/1994 
 
CLM 4 
Break Rd 
FRA 
SF (5g) 
10 000+ 
28/11/1994 
 
CLM 5 
Watershed Rd 
FRA SF 
(5g) 
100+ 
6/12/1994 
 
CLM 7 
Deeside Coast Rd 
DON 
NP 
500+ 
15/12/1994 
 
CLM 8  
Pingerup Rd 
FRA/DON 
NP 
1000+ 
15/12/1994 
 
CLM 9 
Inlet Rd 1 
FRA 
NP 
1000+ 
19/12/1994 
 
CLM 10 
Beardmore Rd 
FRA 
NP 
10 000+ 
19/12/1994 
 
CLM 11 
Crystal Springs 
FRA 
NP 
1000+ 
19/12/1994 
 
CLM 12 
Inlet Rd 2 
FRA 
NP 
1000+ 
19/12/1995 
 
CLM 13 
Boronia Rd 
FRA 
SF (5g) 
1000+ 
9/12/1995 
 
CLM 14 
Nicol Rd 
FRA 
NP/SF 
100+ 
9/12/1995 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Response to Disturbance 
Following fire the species reshoots rapidly from rootstock. 
Gonocarpus simplex occupies disturbed sites where it grows into a large tufted plant. 
Grows in areas subject to extended periods of inundation and summer drying. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
Unknown. 
Management Requirements 
209 

Resurvey and assess all populations. 
Research Requirements 
Determine susceptibility to Phytophthora spp. 
References 
Bentham (1864); Orchard (1990) 
 
Gonocarpus simplex  
 
 
 
 
210 

Gonocarpus trichostachyus (Benth.) Orch. 
 
 
HALORAGACEAE 
 
               WAR F4/45 
Gonocarpus trichostachyus was described by Bentham in 1864 as a species of Haloragis  from 
material collected by Drummond and was placed in Gonocarpus by Tony Orchard in 1975. The Mt. 
Lindesay population appears to be at the western limit of the species’ known distribution. 
Description 
Gonocarpus trichostachyus is an erect perennial herb to 17 cm high with smooth, strigose stems and 
decussate, sessile, oblanceolate, glabrous to sparsely strigose leaves to 10 mm long, the margins 
thickened, crenulate and hyaline. Bracts are alternate, 1-1.3 mm long, entire and reddish in colour. 
The red-purple to brown bracteoles are under 0.5 mm long and have a short mucro. Flowers are four-
merous and pendulous on a pedicel 0.5 mm long. The sepals are about 0.5 mm long and reddish green, 
while the petals are about 1.0 mm long and reddish purple. There are eight stamens. The ovary is 
weakly eight ribbed, densely appressed-pilose and black. 
Flowering period: September-October 
Distribution and Habitat 
Gonocarpus trichostachyus is known from collections made at Wagin, Fitzgerald NP, Cheyne Beach, 
and Mt Lindesay and is also reported from an area north of Bow River where it has not been relocated. 
The species occurs in gravely loam to sandy-clay soil in areas of relatively open forest and woodland 
or on shallow soils on granite. 
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 3 
 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
 
 
 Last survey 
 
Comments/condition 
CLM 1 
Mt. Lindesay 
Frankland SF 
200 
5/11/1995 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Response to Disturbance 
Gonocarpus trichostachyus regenerates from soil stored seed following fire after which it has been 
observed to be a short lived ephemeral (Brenda Hammersley, personal communication).  
Response to soil disturbance is unknown. 
Response to change in soil moisture is unknown. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
Unknown. 
Management Requirements 
Monitor population every few years. 
Search areas of suitable habitat for further populations. 
Research Requirements 
Determine susceptibility to Phytophthora spp. 
Determine response to disturbance. 
References 
Robinson and Coates (1995); Orchard (1990) 
211 

 
Gonocarpus trichostachyus  
 
212 

Grevillea papillosa (McGillivray) P. Olde & N. Marriott 
 PROTEACEAE 
 
                     WAR F4/85 
Grevillea papillosa was named as a subspecies of G. manglesioides  by McGillivray in 1986 and 
raised to species status by Olde and Marriot in 1995. Its distribution is centred between Augusta and 
Lake Jasper with reputed outliers near Collie and in Denbarker. Its community type requires 
monitoring for possible impacts from Phytophthora and watertable draw down due to horticulture and 
mining. 
Description 
Grevillea papillosa is a spreading shrub to 1.2 m tall and wide with angular, sparsely silky to glabrous 
branchlets and linear to narrowly elliptic, entire, pungent, sometimes deeply trifid leaves 20-50 mm 
long by 1-5 mm wide. The leaf lobes are 0.5-20 mm long by 1-2 mm wide, pungent and glabrous, the 
surfaces with prominent veins and the margins recurved to revolute. Flowers are both terminal and 
axillary in short simple or branched racemes with a glabrous to sparsely hairy axis. The perianth is 
about 3 mm long, white with pinkish markings or pale yellow, papillose inside, glabrous (or almost 
so) outside. The style is red and the style end ‘plate like’. 
Grevillea papillosa is similar to some forms of G. manglesioides but differs in its glabrous leaves and 
papillose (vs. hairy) inside of the perianth. It differs from G. diversifolia  in  its glabrous or almost 
glabrous outer perianth surface. 
Flowering period: September-April 
Distribution and Habitat 
Grevillea papillosa is recorded mainly from Scott River National Park where it grows in winter-wet 
swamps. The species is known from three populations in the Warren Region, all in D'Entrecasteux 
National Park. 
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 3 
 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
 
 
 Last survey 
 
Comments/condition 
CLM 5 
Black Point Rd 1 
DON 
RR/NP 
10 000+ 
10/8/1995 
 
CLM 4 
Black Point Rd 3 
DON 
NP 
1000+ 
10/8/1995 
 
CLM 14 
Black Point Rd 4 
DON 
NP 
na 
11/3/1997 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Response to Disturbance 
Response to fire is unknown. 
Response to soil disturbance is unknown. 
Response to change in soil moisture is unknown but given that the major occurrence of this species is 
in seasonally inundated swamps where it is often the dominant species and it is not found on adjacent 
higher ground (areas only 0.3-1 m higher in local relief), any dropping the water table could result in 
plant deaths. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
Unknown, but should be treated as if moderately susceptible. 
Management Requirements 
Monitor populations every two to three years. 
Research Requirements 
213 

Determine response to disturbance. 
Determine susceptibility to Phytophthora spp. 
Collect seed for seed store 
References 
McGillivray and Makinson (1993); Olde and Marriott (1995) 
 
 
Grevillea papillosa  
   
 
 
214 

Lambertia rariflora Meisn. in Lelm. subsp. lutea Hnatiuk 
 PROTEACEAE
 
 
                      WAR F4/196 
Lambertia rariflora was described by Meissner in 1848 from a Drummond collection, presumably 
from the Blackwood Plateaux. The subspecies lutea was described in “Flora of Australia (Vol. 16)” by 
Hnatiuk, in 1995 from limited collection material. At that time, specimens contained in the WA 
Herbarium had not been seen by him and questions of rank were raised when the 1990 Tony Annels 
and 1994 Brenda Hammersley collections were viewed as they appeared to be a distinct species. 
Current molecular studies are being conducted on the genus and may assist in resolving the placement 
of this taxon. 
Description 
Lambertia rariflora is a shrub or small tree to 7 m high with densely pubescent young branches and 
narrow obovate to narrowly oblanceolate, acute, often shortly mucronate leaves 10-26 mm long by 
2.5-6 mm wide, each tapering into a petiole 2-4 mm long. Leaves are pubescent when young, the 
margins entire to slightly irregular. Conflorescences are axillary with the inner bracts 2-4 mm long. 
The perianth is sparsely pubescent, zygomorphic and 18-35 mm long, yellow in colour and dilated 
about the middle. The fruit is slender, cuneate, erect, beaked and 10-15 mm long (including the 3-5 
mm beak) by 4-5 mm wide. There are two seeds that are asymmetrically cuneate and about 6 mm long 
by 2 mm wide. 
Flowering period: December-April 
Distribution and Habitat 
Lambertia rariflora subsp. lutea is endemic to the Warren Region where it has a restricted distribution 
between the Kent River and Deep River, usually growing on grey or yellow sands over laterite in 
moisture gaining sites above areas of periodic saturation and inundation. 
Conservation Status 
This subspecies is vulnerable to local extinction from the combined effects of frequent fire and 
Phytophthora.  
Current: Priority 3 
 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
 
 
 Last survey 
 
Comments/condition 
CLM 2 
Nicol Rd 1 
FRA 
NP/SF 
140 
24/1/1996 
 
CLM 3 
Mt Frankland 
FRA 
NP 
na 
10/1/1990 
 
CLM 4 
Peak Block 
FRA 
SF 

22/2/1996 
 
CLM 5 
Renzo Rd 
FRA 
SF (5g) 
<200 
5/12/1995 
 
CLM 6 
Nornalup Rd 1 
FRA 
SF (5g) 
<100 
1/2/1995 
 
CLM 7 
Nornalup Rd 2 
FRA 
SF (5g) 
107 
31/1/1997 
 
CLM 8 
Nicol Rd 2 
FRA 
NP/SF 
<20 
20/3/1997 
 
WAR 100 a 
Thompson Rd 1 
FRA 
NP/SF 
<20 
5/12/1995 
Plants unhealthy dieback 
affected 
WAR 100 b 
Thompson Rd 2 
FRA 
NP/SF 
<20 
5/12/1995 
Plants unhealthy and 
dieback affected 
WAR 101  
Bidwell Rd 
FRA 
RR/PPI na 
27/2/2001 
Misidentified 

Lambertia uniflora  
WAR 102 
Middle Rd 
FRA 
SF 
na 
1/12/1999 
Herbarium record  
WAR 103 
Boronia Rd  
FRA 
SF 
na 
18/12/1997 
Herbarium record  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Response to Disturbance 
Observations of the Renzo Road population indicate that the subspecies is highly fire sensitive with 
even large plants killed by mild fire. It appears to be a seed obligate regenerator rather than a 
resprouter and would be susceptible to local extinction if fire occurs before there has been sufficient 
seed production.  
215 

Occurrence on track verges may indicate the subspecies is able to utilise soil disturbance. 
Response to change in soil moisture is unknown. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
Response to change in canopy is unknown. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
Susceptible. Most populations of this taxon are affected by Phytophthora and are under threat.  
Management Requirements 
Search areas of suitable habitat for further populations. 
Manage populations to minimise impacts of Phytophthora spp. 
Monitor populations every two years and following disturbance events. 
Spray populations affected by Phytophthora with phosphite. 
Research Requirements 
Determine response to disturbance. 
Determine susceptibility to Phytophthora spp. 
Clarify taxonomic rank. 
References 
Hnatiuk (1995); Macfarlane et al. (1996) 
 
 
Lambertia rariflora 
subsp. lutea  
 
216 

Lasiopetalum cordifolium Endl. subsp. acuminatum E. Bennett. & K. 
Shepherd ms 
 STERCULIACEAE 
 
               WAR F4/189 
Lasiopetalum cordifolium subsp. acuminatum was discovered on Mt. Lindesay by Eileen Croxford in 
1982 and then collected several more times through the 1980’s by various other people. It is a 
distinctive taxon that was first recognised during an ongoing revision of the Sterculiaceae. Its 
restricted distribution makes it particularly vulnerable to climate change. 
Description 
Lasiopetalum cordifolium subsp. acuminatum is an open, slender, often multi-stemmed shrub to 1.5 m 
tall with petiolate, broadly cordate leaves to 5 cm long. These are tomentose underneath and each has 
an extended apex that tapers to a long point. The inflorescence is a cyme with about ten densely 
crowded, shortly pedunculate flowers. The calyx is tomentose on the outside and five lobed, with each 
lobe to 7 mm long. Petals are absent. 
The subspecies has an overlapping range with Lasiopetalum cordifolium subsp. cordifolium but differs 
in its long tapering leaf apex (total leaf length being over two times its width versus about the same 
width and length in subsp. cordifolium), and its lack of a tuft of white hairs in the join between the 
calyx lobes. 
Flowering period: September-December 
Distribution and Habitat 
Lasiopetalum cordifolium subsp. acuminatum is known from populations between the Frankland and 
Mitchell Rivers, with the largest found in the Western Road and Mt. Lindesay/Mitchell River area. 
The subspecies is found growing on gravely soils in Jarrah-Marri forest or in open heath.  


Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:
1   ...   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   ...   21


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə