Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Warren Region


Division 2 — Pteridophyta (ferns and fern allies)



Yüklə 3.36 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
səhifə21/21
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü3.36 Mb.
1   ...   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   21

 
 
298

Division 2 — Pteridophyta (ferns and fern allies) 
 
361. Asplenium obtusatum subsp. northlandicum 
Division 3 — Bryophyta (mosses and liverworts) 
 
362. Rhacocarpus webbianus 
 
Schedule 2 — Taxa presumed to be extinct 
 
Spermatophyta (flowering plants, conifers and cycads) 
 
Acacia kingiana 
Acacia prismifolia 
Coleanthera virgata 
Frankenia decurrens 
Lepidium drummondii 
Leptomeria dielsiana 
Leucopogon cryptanthus 
Opercularia acolytantha 
Philotheca falcata 
10 Ptilotus caespitulosus 
11 Ptilotus pyramidatus 
12 Taraxacum cygnorum 
13 Tetratheca fasciculata 
14 Thomasia gardneri 
 
 
JUDY EDWARDS, Minister for the 
Environment. 
 
299

APPENDIX III 
 
 
CONSERVATION OF THREATENED FLORA IN THE WILD - DECEMBER 1992
  
 
 
Department of Conservation and Land Management Policy Statement No. 9 
 
 
1. OPERATIONAL OBJECTIVE 
 
To conserve threatened flora in the wild in Western Australia and to comply with Section 23F of the 
Wildlife Conservation Act. 
 
2. DEFINITIONS 
 
The term "threatened flora" is used to mean any plant taxon which is threatened with extinction and 
declared under Section 23F of the Wildlife Conservation Act as "rare flora" (i.e. "is likely to become 
extinct or is rare or otherwise in need of special protection"). 
 
"Interim Wildlife Management Guidelines" means guidelines approved by the Director of Nature 
Conservation for the management and protection of threatened or harvested taxa where no full Wildlife 
Management Program has been prepared. 
 
"Wildlife Management Program" means a publication produced by CALM providing detailed 
information and guidance for the management and protection of threatened or harvested species or 
groups of those species. Programs for threatened taxa are sometimes referred to as "Species Recovery 
Plans". 
 
3. BACKGROUND 
The Department of Conservation and Land Management has statutory responsibilities for endangered 
flora conservation. This is a major concern because: 
 
(i) 
Western Australia has a flora that is exceptionally rich in localised and rare endemic plant 
species. Moreover, areas where rare species are concentrated coincide predominantly with 
the wheatbelt and other areas where there has been extensive clearing or modification of the 
native flora. 
(ii) 
Section 23F of the Wildlife Conservation Act prohibits the taking (injury or destruction) of 
declared threatened (rare) flora by any person on any land throughout the State without the 
consent in writing of the Minister. A breach of this provision may lead to a fine of up to $10 000. 
The flora provisions of the Act are binding on the Crown. 
 
Officers of the Department need to know how to identify declared threatened flora, to know 
where it occurs, and to know how best to manage it. Moreover, the Act prescribes that threatened 
flora be protected on all categories of land throughout the State. Hence, the legislation requires 
officers of the Department to advise and otherwise deal with a broad spectrum of land owners and 
users. Threatened flora conservation is thus an issue of high public profile, and one where the 
Department's activities are subject to intense public scrutiny. 
The Schedule of Declared Rare Flora 
The Schedule of Declared Rare (Threatened Flora) is reviewed annually. 
 
Plants which are protected flora declared under the Wildlife Conservation Act may be recommended for 
gazettal as declared rare (threatened) flora if they satisfy the following criteria 
 
 
300

(i)  The taxon (species, subspecies, variety) is well-defined, readily identified and represented by a 
voucher specimen in a State or National Herbarium. It need not necessarily be formally described 
under conventions in the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature, but such a description is 
preferred and should be undertaken as soon as possible after listing on the schedule. 
 (ii)  Have been searched for thoroughly in the wild by competent botanists during the past five years 
in most likely habitats, according to guidelines approved by the Executive Director (see 
Appendix). 
(iii)   Searches have established that the plant in the wild is either: 
 
(a) rare; 
or 
(b) in danger of extinction; or 
(c) deemed to be threatened and in need of special protection; 
or 
(d) presumed extinct (i.e. the taxon has not been collected from the wild, or 
otherwise verified, over the past 50 years despite thorough searching, or of 
which all known wild populations have been destroyed more recently). 
 
(iv) In the case of hybrids, or suspected hybrids, the following criteria must also be satisfied: 
 
(a) they must be a distinct entity, that is, the progeny are consistent within the agreed taxonomic limits 
for that taxon group; 
(b) they must be self perpetuating, that is, not reliant on the parent stock for replacement; and 
(c) they are the product of a natural event, that is, both parents are naturally occurring and cross 
fertilisation was by natural means. 
 
(Plants which occur on land reserved for nature conservation may be considered less in need of special 
protection than those on land designated for other purposes). 
 
The status of a threatened plant in cultivation has no bearing on this matter. The legislation refers only 
to the status of plants in the wild. 
 
Plants may be deleted from the schedule of declared rare (threatened) flora where: 
 
(a)  recent botanical survey as defined in (ii) above has shown that the taxon is not rare, in danger 
of extinction or otherwise in need of special protection; 
 (b)  the taxon is shown to be a hybrid that does not comply with the inclusion criteria; and 
(c)   the taxon is no longer threatened because it has been adequately protected by reservation of 
land where it occurs, or because its population numbers have increased beyond the danger 
point. 
 
"Taking" Threatened Flora 
 
In the Wildlife Conservation Act (subsection 6 (1)) the following definition is given: 
 
"to take" in relation to any flora includes to gather, pluck, cut, pull up, destroy, dig up, remove or injure the 
flora or to cause or permit the same to be done by any means;" 
 
Thus, taking declared threatened flora would include not only direct injury or destruction by human hand or 
machine but such activities as allowing stock to graze on the flora, introducing pathogens that attack it, 
altering water tables such that the flora is deprived of adequate soil moisture or is inundated, allowing air 
pollutants to harm foliage etc. 
 
In the case of threatened plants which need fire for regeneration, burning at an appropriate time may not 
adversely affect the survival of the population. However, burning would injure existing plants and 
constitutes "taking" under the Act. Therefore, Ministerial approval is required prior to conducting a burn 
which involves any species of endangered flora. 
 
 
301

4. POLICY 
 
The Department will: 
 
4.1 
 Identify, locate and seek to conserve threatened flora. 
 
4.2  
Undertake research into the taxonomy, population biology, ecology, protection and propagation of 
threatened flora. 
 
4.3  
Implement management practices to conserve threatened flora and its habitat. 
 
4.4  
Publicise the need for conservation of threatened flora, and encourage involvement in 
conservation from all sectors of the community. 
 
4.5  
Liaise with other land management and research agencies and private land owners to enhance the 
study and conservation of threatened flora. 
 
4.6  
Develop and manage a geographic data base for threatened flora at its headquarters and at regional 
and district offices. 
 
5. STRATEGIES 
 
To accomplish the Department objective and policies, staff will: 
 
5.1   Establish a consultative committee with the Western Australian Herbarium, Kings Park Board, 
tertiary institutions and other relevant organisations to ensure that research and management of 
declared threatened flora are coordinated. 
5.2 
 Develop Wildlife Management Programs and Interim Wildlife Management Guidelines, for 
threatened plant taxa, and appoint fixed term "recovery teams" for their implementation. 
 
5.3 
 Undertake training in Departmental obligations to conserve and manage threatened flora. 
 
5.4 
 Nominate Threatened Flora Officers (additional to District Wildlife Officers) in each region and 
district who shall be responsible for identifying, locating, mapping, training staff, overseeing 
management programs and providing liaison and advice on threatened flora. 
 
5.5  
Establish and maintain field herbaria, photographic collections, map records and other aids 
concerning threatened flora at each ranger station and district and regional office. 
 
5.6   Arrange an inspection to establish whether declared threatened flora are present before 
undertaking any activity on CALM land that involves permanent destruction (i.e. clearing for 
road-making, building, mining or other purposes) of native flora. 
 
5.7  
Ensure that no known declared threatened flora is destroyed, damaged, or otherwise injured by 
Departmental staff or their contractors without first obtaining a ministerial permit so to do. 
 
5.8  
Ensure that any burning program (for fire protection purposes) will not cause irreparable damage 
to species of threatened flora known to be susceptible to fire. 
 
5.9   Observe other operational guidelines for protection of endangered flora on CALM lands as 
detailed in Administrative Instruction No. 24 "Protection Endangered (Threatened) Flora in 
Departmental Operations". 
 
5.10   Monitor known populations of threatened flora. 
 
5.11   Maintain a geographic and biological data base on threatened flora  
5.12   Develop management programs for species of threatened flora. 
 
302

 
5.13   Collect seed and propagate threatened flora in Departmental nurseries. Replant propagated 
material in the wild under an approved management programs or approved Interim Wildlife 
Management Guidelines. 
 
5.14   Undertake research on the distribution, taxonomy, genetic systems, population biology, ecology, 
protection and propagation of threatened flora. 
 
5.15   Assist private property owners and other land management agencies in the protection and 
conservation of threatened flora. 
 
5.16   Acquire land through donation, exchange or purchase to protect threatened flora where land 
and/or funds are available. 
 
5.17   Maintain a system for listing and delisting flora on the declared threatened schedule. 
 
5.18   Publicise information on threatened flora (without disclosing precise locations) and encourage 
community involvement in the conservation of threatened flora. 
5.19   Maintain, through the Wildlife Branch, central records of all correspondence, discoveries of 
threatened flora populations, basic information on susceptibility to fire or dependence on fire for 
regeneration, applications for ministerial permits and other matters to do with declared threatened 
flora. 
 
5.20   Refer enforcement matters regarding the taking of declared threatened flora to the appropriate 
District Wildlife Officer. 
 
303

APPENDIX IV 
 
GUIDELINES FOR SURVEYS OF PLANTS PROPOSED FOR ADDITION OR 
DELETION TO THE SCHEDULE OF DECLARED THREATENED FLORA 
 
These guidelines were developed in conjunction with new criteria for additions and deletions to the 
Schedule of declared flora. 
 
Criterion (ii) for additions states: 
 
The taxon "has been searched for thoroughly in the wild by competent botanists during the 
past five years in most likely habitats, according to guidelines approved by the Executive 
Director." 
 
The intensity of survey necessary to understand the conservation status of a plant varies according to a 
number of factors.  Important considerations are: 
 
1. 
Geographic range
 
A taxon extending over 10 km of terrain will take less time to survey than one that occurs 
over 100 km. 
 
2. 
Area of available habitat
 
Taxa confined to specific localised habitats (eg. granite outcrops) will require less time to 
survey than those more catholic in habitat preference. 
 
3. 
Plant size
 
Large conspicuous perennial plants (eg. eucalypts) can be identified and counted more 
quickly than small inconspicuous annuals. 
 
4. 
Seasonality and identification
 
Some plants are identifiable and conspicuous on vegetative features at any time of year.  
Others only stand out during flowering or fruiting, which may be confined to just a few 
weeks in the year, and may also be dependent on good seasonal conditions. 
 
5. 
Disturbance opportunism
 
Some plants only germinate and/or flower following disturbance events such as bushfire or 
earthworks, and hence can only be surveyed after such events. 
 
Based on these considerations, and the accumulated survey experience of many botanists and other 
CALM officers who have searched for hundreds of Western Australian plants over the past decade, 
the following matrix provides guidelines as to the duration of search necessary for plants to be 
considered for addition or deletion to the schedule of declared threatened flora. 
Extremes of plant taxa in terms of ease and seasonality of identification are given. 
 
 
304

 
 
 
Recommended period of full time field survey 
 
 
Geographical  
Range 
 
Area of  
available  
habitat 
 
*Taxon easily 
identifiable any time 
 
#Taxon identifiable 
 with difficulty over  
short flowering  
period in certain years 
 
 
<50 km 
 
small 
 
0.5-1 month 
 
1.2 months  
over several years 
 
 
large 
1-2 months 
3-6 months  
over a decade 
 
>50 km 
small 
3-6 months 
6-12 months  
over a decade 
 
 
large 6-12 
months 
not 
possible 
 
 
*e.g. large perennial plants identifiable any time on vegetative characteristics - Eucalyptus crucis
Banksia tricuspis
 
# eg. short-lived small annuals with inconspicuous flowers - Hydrocotyle spp., annual sedges etc. 
 
Having completed surveys according to the above guidelines, the next phase in considering listing on 
the schedule is described under Criterion for additions (iii). 
 
"Such recent botanical survey has shown that the taxon in the wild is either rare, or in danger of 
extinction or in need of special protection". 
 
These three categories of endangered flora are defined below. 
 
Rare
 
Less than a few thousand plants of the taxon exist in the wild. 
 
In danger of extinction
 
The taxon is in serious risk of disappearing from the wild state within one or two decades if present 
land use and other causal factors continue to operate. 
 
In need of special protection
 
The taxon is not presently in danger of extinction but is at risk over a longer period through continued 
depletion, or largely occurs on sites likely to experience changes in land use which would threaten its 
survival in the wild. 
 
Presumed extinct
 
The taxon has not been collected in the wild, or otherwise verified, over the past 50 years (from the 
date of listing) despite thorough searching, or of which all of the known wild populations have been 
destroyed more recently, and is presumed to be extinct. 
 
 
305



Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:
1   ...   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   21


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə