Deden mudiana



Yüklə 150.68 Kb.
PDF просмотр
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü150.68 Kb.

B IO DIV E RSIT A S

ISSN: 1412-033X

Volume 17, Number 2, October 2016

E-ISSN: 2085-4722

Pages: 733-740

DOI: 10.13057/biodiv/d170248



Syzygium diversity in Gunung Baung, East Java, Indonesia

DEDEN MUDIANA

Purwodadi Botanical Gardens, Indonesian Institute of Sciences. Jl. Raya Surabaya-Malang Km 65, Purwodadi, Pasuruan 67163, East Java, Indonesia.

Tel.: +62-343-615033, Fax.: +62-343-615033,

email: dmudiana@yahoo.com



Manuscript received: 15 July 2016. Revision accepted: 5 September 2016.

Abstract. Mudiana  D.  2016. Syzygium  diversity  in  Gunung  Baung,  East  Java,  Indonesia.  Biodiversitas  17: 733-740. Syzygium

(Myrtaceae) consists of a lot of species which are widely distributed. One of the distribution areas is the Natural Park of Gunung Baung

(TWA Gunung Baung) in Pasuruan, East Java. The results of exploration and characterization of known species show that there are six

species of Syzygium known to grow in this region namely S. cumini, S. littorale, S. pycnanthum, S. polyanthum, S. racemosum, and S.



samarangense. S. pycnanthum is the most frequently found in Gunung Baung. S. polyanthum and S. samarangense are the only species

that are known to be cultivated. Four other species are wild and have not been explored for their potential utilization.



Keywords: Diversity, East Java, Gunung Baung, Pasuruan, Syzygium

INTRODUCTION

Syzygium is  widespread  in  a  variety  of  habitat  types.

There are approximately 1,200 recorded species of Syzygium,

which  are  widely  spread  in  South  Asia,  Southeast  Asia,

Australia, and New Caledonia. Some species are also found

in Africa, Malagasy and southwestern region of the Pacific

Islands,  Hawaii  and  New  Zealand.  Species  spread  across

Asia  are  in  several  areas  as  follows:  the  Indo-China (70

species), Thailand (80 sp.), the Malay Peninsula (190 sp.),

Java  (50  sp.),  Borneo  (165  sp.),  the  Philippines  (180  sp.),

and  New Guinea  (140  sp.). The  Malay  Peninsula  and

Borneo are the two main areas of endemicity of this group

(Haron  et  al.  1995). Syzygium  generally  grows  in  the  rain

forest, but grows well in nearly all types of vegetation, such

as coastal forest, swamp forest, resembled monsoons, bamboo

forests,  peat  swamp,  lowland  heath  forest,  savanna,

montane  forest  and  shrub  vegetation  in  the  sub-alpine

region (Parnell et al. 2007). Some species are able to grow

in  conditions  of  extreme  habitats  such  as  limestone  and

ultramafic (Partomihardjo and Ismail 2008; Mustain 2009).

The  large  amount  of  genus Syzygium makes  species

classification  become  complicated;  therefore 

many


taxonomists  have  done  some  studies  to  classify  these

species  and  the  most  recent  study  was  done  by  using  a

phylogenetic  approach  (Lucas et  al. 2005;  Craven et  al.

2006;  Craven  and  Biffin  2010). Although  the  number  of

species is quite high, still very few species of this genus are

known by the public. Species that are known by the public

at large are species that have been cultivated for their benefits

and  uses,  such  as Syzygium  aqueumS. samarangenseS.



malaccensisS.  aromaticum,  and S. polyanthum.  The

mainly usages of this genus are raw material for medicine,

fruit-bearing,  ornamental  plants  as  well  as  a  source  of

lumber  and  carpentry  (Coronel  1992;  Panggabean  1992;

van  Lingen  1992;  Haron  et  al.  1995;  Sardjono  1999;

Verheij and Snijders 1999).

As for  wild  species that  grow naturally  in the  forest or

non-cultivated  areas,  not  much  is  known  of  the Syzygium

existence.  If  information  about  species  diversity  and  its

existence is  unknown, it  is  feared that  wild species can be

neglected  even  become  scarce  before  functions  and  uses

can  be understood. Flora  expedition  occasionally  reveals

important information  about  floristic  diversity  of  certain

area.  Shenoy  (2015)  stated  that S.  kanarense  was re-

discovered after 67 years of its last existence’s record.

Environmental conditions of habitat and human activity

can  affect  the  existence  of  a  plant  species.  Ultimately  this

will affect the level of threat and the conservation status in

the  wild.  Raju  (2014),  suggested that  the  reproductive

capacity of Syzygium alternifolium was limited by a variety

of  environmental  conditions. The  factors  that  inhibit  them

are: low ability to produce  fruit from  the  fertilization

process, short viability of seeds, high mortality of seedling

due  to  water  stress,  the  pressure  of  dry  climate  in  the  dry

season and fruit utilization by the community.

Some  studies  suggest  that  in  addition  to  having  the

functions  and  benefits  of  direct  usefulness  to  humans,

Syzygium  species  have  ecological  functions  for  the

sustainability  of  an  ecosystem. Hasanbahri  et  al. (1996)

suggest  that  there  are  at  least  33  species  of  plants  that

become  food  for  the Macaca  fascicularis  in  hardwood

forest regions. The most general type is of the genus Ficus

and Syzygium. Alikodra  (1997)  recorded  species  of



Syzygium  lineatum  and Syzygium  sp.  as  species  of  plants

that  grow  on  the  banks  of  the  river  of  Kuala  Samboja,

which  became  fodder  for  proboscis  (Nasalis  larvatus).

Besides  this,  they also  used  them  to  perform  daily

activities, such as exploring, sleeping, and more.

Syzygium plays an important role in the forest ecosystem

to  maintain  the  balance  of  the  components  inside.  This

could  mean  the  relationship  complementary  and  mutually

beneficial among components in ecosystem. Crome (1985)

stated  that  one  form  of  this  relationship  is  the  system  of

pollination  and  fertilization of Syzygium  cormiflorum  with

bats, birds, and insects as pollinator agents.


B IO DIVE RSIT A S 17 (2): 733-740, October 2016

734


In  addition,  some  species  of Syzygium  have  an

important  role  in  the  stabilization  of  the  region  along  the

banks  of  the  river. This  is  mainly  due  to  the  nature  and

character of roots that can withstand the river flow, as well

as  hold  up  or  slows  down  the  rate  of  river  flow. Root

systems  jon  strong pedestal  stems,  making  it  an  excellent

plant  to  prevent  erosion  of  the  banks  of  the  river

(Wiriadinata  and  Setyowati  2003).  Riswan  et  al  (2004),

revealed that along the banks of the Ciliwung and Cisadane

rivers, there are five species of Syzygium, namely: S. aqueum,



S.  aromaticum,  S. malaccensis,  S.  polycephalum,  and S.

pycnanthum.  Only S.  pycnanthum  was  intended  to  grow

naturally,  while  the  other  four  species  were  intentionally

grown  for  various  purposes.  This  species  has  the  potential

of plants as barriers to erosion by the river flow. In another

study,  Waryono  (2001),  states  that S.  polyanthum  is  quite

often  found  in  the  Jakarta  area.  This  species  has  a

considerable  number  of  individuals  encountered,  both  at

tree level and seedling, along the banks of the river. One of

its roles in the riparian ecosystem is as a source of food for

various species of birds that live in that area.

In  general,  the  region  of  Natural  Recreation  Park  of

Gunung  Baung  (TWA  Gunung  Baung) has  the  ecosystem

characteristics  of  a  lowland  monsoon  forest.  Flora  species

that  are  quite  often  found  in  these  areas  include: Ficus



benjaminaF.  variegataSterculia  foetidaArtocarpus

elastica  and  bamboo  (Bambusoideae).  Some  parts  of  the

region  are  dominated  by  bamboo  forest.  Chess  (2008)

mentions  as  many  as  9  species  from  4  genera  of  bamboo

grow in the area of TW A Gunun g B aung, namely:



Bambusa  arundinacea,  B.  blumeana,  B.  spinosa,  B.

vulgaris,  Dendrocalamus  asper,  D.  blumei,  Gigantochloa

lear, G. atter, and Schizostachyum blumei. Mudiana (2009)

argues  that  there  are  four Syzygium  species  that  found

growing  along  the  Welang  river  in  this  area,  namely: S.

samarangense  (fruit  greenish  white), S.  javanicum,  S.

pycnanthum,  and Syzygium  sp. This  study  aims  to

determine Syzygium  species  diversity,  field  character  and

distribution in the area of TWA Gunung Baung, East Java,

Indonesia.



MATERIALS AND METHODS

Study area

Natural  Recreation  Park  of  Gunung  Baung  (TWA

Gunung  Baung) was  established  by  decree  of  Minister  of

Agriculture  657/Kpts/Um/12/1981,  dated  January  1,  1981,

covering an area of 195.50 hectares. TWA Gunung Baung

regional  government  is  administratively  located  in  the

Village of Cowek, Purwosari, Pasuruan District, East Java,

Indonesia. Located  about  68  km  from  the  city  of

Surabaya  towards Malang  city.  Geographically,  TWA

Gunung Baung is located at 07 ° 46 '09'-07°47 '23" South

and  112°16'  23"-112°17'17"  East.  This  region  has  the

following  boundaries:  North  side  is  adjacent  to  the

Kertosari Village, Purwosari District, bordering the East is

Lebakrejo  Village,  Purwodadi  District,  southern  border  is

Cowek  Village,  Purwosari  District,  and  western  border  is

Purwodadi Botanical Gardens (Figure 1) (BBKSDA 2008).



TWA GUNUNG BAUNG

PASURAN, EAST JAVA

Figure 1. Regions of Gunung Baung Nature Park in Pasuruan, East Java. No. 1-5 indicate five explorative route to encounter Syzygium

1

2

3

4

5

MUDIANA – Syzygium diversity in Mount Baung, Indonesia

735


The  topography  is  generally  undulating  with  steep

slopes. Few  have  flat  topography. The  highest  peak  is

around  501  m  above  sea  level.  The  soil  is  made  up  of

yellow  and  red  mediterranean  component  of  latosols

quarter  rocks  formed  from  old  metamorphic  sediments.

Climatic conditions of the area including the TWA Gunung

Baung  belong  into  type  D,  with  a  value  of  Q  =  76.47%.

There is an average rainfall of 2571.5 mm with the annual

number  of  rainy  days  per  year  of  144.20.

Daily


temperatures  range  from  20

o

C  to  23



o

C.  The rainy  season

with  rainfall ≥  100  mm/month,  generally  occurs  between

November to April, while the dry season (with rainfall ≤ 60

mm/month) occurs between May and October.

Procedures

The  method  used  in  this  study  was a  survey  method,

which  explores  the  research  areas,  and  records  the

encountered Syzygium.  Explorative  exploration  was  done

wherever  possible  to  examine  most  of  the  area.  A  total  of

five trails were conducted in this research (Figure 1).

Data  collection  was  mainly  carried  out  in  the  core  of

TWA  Gunung  Baung  region.  Data  collected  includes:

morphological  characters  of Syzygium,  location  coordinates,

general  vegetation  conditions, altitude,  temperature  and

humidity. Voucher of herbarium  specimens  were collected

for  identification  and  determination  of  species.  Identification

of  herbarium  specimens  was  done  in  the  Herbarium

Bogoriense (BO) and the Hortus Botanicus Purwodadiensis

Herbarium.  The  data  were  analyzed  descriptively  by  an

identifier of Syzygium morphological characters that can be

easily recognized in the field and that can be made using a

simple  identification  key.  The  characters  include:  habit,

bark, leaves, flowers and fruits.

Then,  based  on  the  data  obtained  by  morphological

characters,  we  made  dendogram  to  figure  out  the  close

relationship  between  species Syzygium  in  Gunung  Baung.

Present method is absent on some morphological characters

which  is  used  for  species  grouping.  Data  analysis  was

performed  using  the  method  of  cluster  analysis  using

Minitab 14 software.



RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

As  many  as  347  individuals  of Syzygium  from  six

species  are  recorded  in  this  study.  These  six  species  are:

Syzygium  cumini (duwet), S.  littorale (kopo  laut),  S.

polyanthum (salam),  S.  pycnanthum (klampok, jambu

hutan), S. racemosum (kopo mangut), and S. samarangense

(jambu  semarang). S.  pycnanthum is  the  species  mostly

found  in  the  area  of TWA Gunung  Baung  followed  by S.



racemosum (Mudiana 2012) (Figure 2).

Of  the  six  species  of Syzygium  encountered, S.



samarangense  and  S. polyanthum  are  species  that  have

been  commonly  recognized  and  cultivated/planted  by  the

community.  Although S. cumini  has  been  known  by  the

public,  it  is  not  commonly  grown  as  a  cultivated  plant. S.



littorale,  S.  pycnanthum,  and S. racemosum  are Syzygium

species  that  still  grow  wild  and  are  not  cultivated  by  the

community yet.

Figure  2.  The  number  of  individuals  of Syzygium  in  TWA

Gunung Baung, East Java



Syzygium cumini (L.) Skeels.

Syn.: Calyptranthes  capitellata  Buch.-Ham. ex  Wall,



Calyptranthes 

caryophyllifolia 

Willd,


Calyptranthes

cumini (L.) Pers, Calyptranthes  cuminodora Stokes,

Calyptranthes  jambolana (Lam.) Willd, Calyptranthes

jambolifera  Stokes,

Calyptranthes  oneillii  Lundell,

Caryophyllus  corticosus  Stokes, Caryophyllus  jambos

Stokes, Eugenia  calyptrata  Roxb. ex  Wight & Arn,



Eugenia caryophyllifolia Lam, Eugenia cumini (L.) Druce,

Eugenia  jambolana  Lam, Eugenia  jambolifera  Roxb. ex

Wight & Arn, Eugenia  obovata  Poir, Eugenia  obtusifolia

Roxb, Eugenia  tsoi  Merr. & Chun, Jambolifera  chinensis

Spreng, Jambolifera  coromandelica  Houtt, Jambolifera



pedunculata  Houtt, Myrtus  corticosa  Spreng, Myrtus

cumini  L, Myrtus  obovata (Poir.) Spreng, Syzygium

caryophyllifolium

(Lam.)


DC,

Syzygium  jambolanum

(Lam.) DC, Syzygium  obovatum (Poir.) DC, Syzygium



obtusifolium (Roxb.) Kostel.

A  short-truncate tree that can reach 20  m  high and has

no buttresses. Branching is grey or yellowish brown. It has

single  leaves  arranged  opposite,  oval  to  oval,  green-dark

green, and has flat leaf edges. Size of leaves is about 7-15

cm x 5-9 cm and has a long apetiole 1 to 3.5 cm. Flowers

are  small  (4-7  mm  diameter)  and  are  arranged  in  a  single

inflorescence. It has white to yellowish flowers, arranged in

inflorescences that appear in axillary panicles at the ends of

twigs and branches. Berry fruit of the seed is oval-shaped,

dark  red  and  purple  when  ripe,  with  a  sweet  taste  of  kelat

(Figure  3.A,  B,  C).  According  to  Backer  and  Bakhuizen

van den Brink (1963), in Java, in teak  forests, this  species

grows  at  altitude  of  below  500  m  asl.  and  is  widely

cultivated for its fruit. This species is found in open places;

a  location  with  no  bamboo  and  with  relatively  flat

topography.  A  total  of  6  individual  observations  are

recorded  in  plots  consisting  of  individual  levels  of  pole  1

and 5 individual tree levels.

Syzygium littorale (Bl.) Amshoff

Syn.: Eugenia  littoralis (Bl.) Meijer  Drees; Eugenia



subglauca Koord. & Valeton; Jambosa littoralis Bl.

Tall  stature  of  trees  can  reach  10-20  m.  Single  leaves

are  arranged  opposite  and  are lanceolate-oblong-shaped

S.

 cu

m

in

i

S.

 p

ol

ya

nt

hu

m

S.

 ra

ce

m

os

um

S.

 p

yc

na

nt

hu

m

S.

 li

tt

or

al

e

S.

 sa

m

ar

an

ge

ns

e


B IO DIVE RSIT A S 17 (2): 733-740, October 2016

736


with a pointed tip. Leaf length is three times the size of its

width.  The inflorescence  terminal  appears  on  the  petiole

twigs  as  the  former  falls.  Some  flowers  are  arranged  in  a

single inflorescence. There are white flowers with a size of

about  1.5  to  2  cm  (Figure  3.D,  E,  F).  Fruit  is  round,

campanulate  (bell-shaped),  green  and  yellow  with  a

diameter  of  about  2.5-3.5  cm.  Backer  and  Bakhuizen  van

den Brink (1963) states that this species is a native species

in Java. They grow in forests, especially along the river bank.

In  the  area  of TWA  Gunung  Baung,  they  are  found

growing in places where there is no bamboo, in bush areas

with  trees  that  are  not  too  tight.  There  were  a  total  of  18

individuals recorded in the observation plots, consisting of

8 individual poles and 10 individual trees.



Syzygium polyanthum (Wight.) Walp.

Syn.:


Eugenia 

atropunctata 

C.B.Rob.,



Eugenia

holmanii  Elmer, Eugenia  junghuhniana  Miq., Eugenia

lambii Elmer, Eugenia lucidula Miq., Eugenia microbotrya

Miq., Eugenia  nitida  Duthie, Eugenia  pamatensis  Miq.,



Eugenia  polyantha  Wight, Eugenia  resinosa  Gagnep.,

Myrtus  cymosa Bl., Syzygium  cymosum  Korth., Syzygium

micranthum Bl.  ex  Miq., Syzygium  microbotryum (Miq.)

Masam., Syzygium pamatense (Miq.) Masam.

A  tree  with  a  single  trunk  and  clear,  dense  canopy

shape,  and  can  reach  25  meters  high.  It  has  dark  brown,

rough  grooved  bark. Single  leaves  are  arranged  opposite

elliptic-round  shaped  or  obovate  (obovate)  with  a  pointed

tip.  Leaf  size  is  5-15  x  3.5  to  6.5  cm  with  petiole  length

between 5-12 mm. Meeting at the end of the inflorescence

branches or armpit. Compact white flowers are fragrant and

reddish. Sweet  fruit  is  round  with  a  diameter  of  8-9  mm

and red to dark red (Figure 3.G, H, I). Its natural habitat is

the forest area at an altitude of 5-1000 m asl. This species

is  often  planted  in  home  gardens  for  the  leaves  and  fruit

(Backer and Bakhuizen van den Brink 1963).

Seven individuals are recorded in the observation plots

consisting  of:  3  individual  seedlings,  saplings  and  1

individual,  3  pole  individual  levels.  They  grow  in  places

that  are  not  dominated  by  bamboo  and  not  too  dense

thickets of trees, in hillside areas.

Syzygium pycnanthum Merr. & L.M. Perry

Syn.: Eugenia  corymbosa Roxb.Eugenia  densiflora

(Bl.) DC., Eugenia  densiflora  (Bl.)  Duthie,  E. Axillary

Auct.  Non  Willd., Jambosa  densiflora (Bl.) DC., Myrtus



densiflora Bl.

Syzygium pycnanthum is a small tree, up to 15 m high.

Trunk diameter can reach 30 cm with no buttresses. Single

leaves  are  oppositely  arranged,  dark  green  on  the  upper

surface and pale green on the lower surface. Leaf shape is

ovate-oblong-lanceolate  (elongate-ovate-oblong),  average

leaf  edge,  acute-acuminate  leaf  tip  (pointy-tapered).  Leaf

size  ranges  from  12.5  to  37  cm  x  3-10  cm,  has  an

intramarginal vein at a distance of 8-10 mm from the edge

of  the  leaf.  Inflorescence  appears  at  the  end  of  twigs.

Compact  flowers  with short flower stalks 3-4  mm, crown-

purplish  white  flowers,  white-colored  greenish-purple

petals,  have  many  stamens.  The  fruit  is  berry  which  is

round, light green, dark purplish red or reddish-green with

a diameter of 2.5-3.5 cm (Figure 3.J, K, L).

Two  variants  of S. pycnanthum are  found  in  Gunung

Baung  TWA,  which  have  purplish-red  and  green  fruit.

Stature and other characteristics are relatively the same, the

only difference is the color of the fruit. Comparison of the

amount  between  the  two  is  unknown.  This  is  because  the

time  of  the  study  does  not  coincide  with  the  time  of

flowering or bearing fruit.

This  species  has  a  wide  range  of  habitats.  It  can  grow

from  lowlands  to  highlands  with  various  types  of

environmental  conditions.  According  to  Backer  and

Bakhuizen  van  den  Brink  (1963),  in  Java,  this  species

grows naturally in the underbrush, open woods or edges of

rivers, at an altitude of 5-1500 m asl. Mustian (2009) found

S.  pycnanthum  along  with  several  other Syzygium  species

in a nickel mining region in Sorowako, South Sulawesi, on

ultramafic  soils.  This  type  is  found  growing  naturally  on

the banks of the river flow (Mudiana 2009; 2011). Sunarti

et  al.  (2008)  recorded  this  species  habitat  at  an  altitude  of

750-850  m  asl.  in  the  Polara  forests  of  Waworete

Mountains, Wawonii Island, Southeast Sulawesi.

This  species  of Syzygium  is  the  most  often  found

species in TWA Gunung Baung. A total of 235 individuals

were  recorded  in  the observation  plots,  consisting  of  42

individual  seedlings,  75  saplings,  49  individual  levels  and

69 depressed pole level tree individuals. This species grows

in  a  variety  of  conditions,  such  as  the  location  of  the

dominance  of  bamboo  groves B.  blumeana,  in an  open

space,  where there is dominance of shrubs and trees, or in

the hillsides.



Syzygium racemosum (Bl.) DC.

Syn.:


Calyptranthus 

racemosa

Bl.,


Eugenia

brunneoramea  Merr., Eugenia  cerasiformis (Bl.) DC.,

Eugenia  evansii  Ridl., Eugenia  expansa  Duthie, Eugenia

jamboloides  Koord. & Valeton, Eugenia  robinsoniana

Ridl.,

Jambosa  cerasiformis

(Bl.)


Hassk.,

Myrtus

cerasiformis

Bl.,


Syzygium  brunneorameum

(Merr.)


Masam., Syzygium  cerasiforme (Bl.) Merr. & L.M.Perry,

Syzygium costatum Miq., Syzygium javanicum Miq.

Tree’s  height  can  reach  3-20  meters,  generally  in  the

form  of  a  small  tree  with  dense  branching. Bark  is  light

gray-brown. Ellipse-shaped  leaf  face  round  with  a  tapered

tip,  leaf  size  is  about  8-15  x  3.5-5  cm,  petiole  0.5-1.5  cm

size.  Young  leaves  are  reddish-copper. Inflorescence

terminal  or  axillary  panicles  appear  on  the  end  of  the

branch. Yellowish-white flowers, with a crown like a small

calyptras.  Fruit  is  yellowish  green,  rounded  bell-shaped

with a diameter of 2-3 cm (Figure 3.M, N, O).

Backer and Bakhuizen van den Brink (1963) stated that

this species is found growing in Java, in a mixed forest and

a  teak  forest  at  an  altitude  of  10-1200  m  asl.  In  TWA

Gunung  Baung,  it  is  often  found  growing  mainly  in  areas

with a predominance of bamboo, B. blumeana, on the local

hillsides. A  total  of  77  individuals  were  recorded  in  this

study, consisting of 20 individual seedlings, 35 individuals,

14  individuals  saplings  and  8  pole  level  individual  trees

level.


MUDIANA – Syzygium diversity in Mount Baung, Indonesia

737


Syzygium samarangense (Bl.) Merr. &L.M.Perry

Syn.: Eugenia  javanica  Lam. non Syzygium  javanicum

Miq., Eugenia  samarangensis (Bl.) O. Berg, Jambosa

javanica

(Lam.)


K.

Schum.


&

Lauterb.,



Jambosa

samarangensis (Bl.) DC., Myrtus  javanica (Lam.) Bl.,

Myrtus samarangensis Bl.

Stature of S. samarangense is a small tree with a lot of

dense  branching, height  can  reach  10  meters. Leaves are

arranged  opposite and  are  oval  or  oblong, bright  green

young leaves with leaf size of 6 to 11.5cm x 12-24cm and

petiole  length  of  3-5  mm. Inflorescence  appears  in  the

former  leaves  that  have  fallen. Yellowish-white  flowers

with  a  diameter  of  3-4  cm  (Figure  3.P,  Q,  R). The  fruit  is

bell-shaped and green  and  yellow. Its  existence  has  been

common  and  planted  by  residents  in  the  garden  and  yard

for  some uses. Only  found  in  1  individual  tree level

recorded in the observation plots. It grows in the open area,

in areas of bamboo bush.

Based  on  the  fact  that  morphological  characters  are

easily recognizable in the field, it is simple to identify. Key

for Syzygium species in TWA Gunung Baung is as follows:



Identification key

I.A. Habit of a big tree

I.A.1.

elliptic-oblong  leaf  shape;  flowers  are  small,



clustered;  perianth  white-reddish  flowers;  sweet,  small

round, red-colored or dark red fruit  .................... S. polyanthum

I.A.2. elliptical-obovate  leaf  shape;  flowers  are  small,

clustered; white-yellowish flowers; sweet, oval, purple-dark

purple fruit .................................................................. S. cumini

I.B. Habit of a small tree

I.B.1. light gray or light brown sunny bark

I.B.1.1. elliptic-ovate leaf shape, thick leaf; purplish white

flowers; round green or purplish green fruit ....S. pycnanthum

I.B.1.2. elliptical-oblong  leaf  shape,  leaf  thin  copper-

colored  young  leaves;  small  round  white  flowers

........................................... ................................ S. racemosum

I.B.2. dark gray or dark brown bark

I.B.2.1. elliptic-ovate bright green leaf; axillary inflorescence;

white flowers; bell shaped fruit .................... S. samarangense

I.B.2.2.


elliptic-ovate 

dark 


green 

leaf; 


axillary

inflorescences  on  the  top branches;  white  flowers;  round

shaped fruit ......... ................................................... S. littorale

Spesies Syzygium

Si

m

ila

rit

y

(%

)

5

4



6

2

3



1

21.55


47.70

73.85


100.00

Figure  4.  Dendogram  of Syzygium  in  Gunung  Baung  based  on

morphological character practically recognized in the field. Note:

1. S. cumini, 2. S. littorale, 3. S. polyanthum, 4. S. pycnanthum, 5.

S. racemosum, 6. S. samarangense

Based  on  the  identification  key  and  dendogram  in

Figure  4,  it  can  be  seen  that  in  general  there  are  three

groups  of Syzygium  growing on  Gunung  Baung.  The  first

group  consists  of S  cumini and S.  polyanthum,  while  the

second  group  is S.  littorale,  S. samarangense  and S.



pycnanthum,  and  the  third  group  is S.  racemosum.

Differences  among  the  three  are  primarily  on  two

morphological  characters  that  are  easily  seen  in  the  field,

namely: flower size and habit. The first group has the small

flowers  with  a  large  tree  habit.  The  second  group  has  a

large  flower  size  with  a  small  tree  habit.  While  the  third

group has a small flower size and small tree habit. S.

cumini  and S.  polyanthum  have  the  same  character  with  a

small flower size and habit of a large tree (the first group).

Despite having a small flower size, S. racemosum has a tree

with a small size habit (third group). S. littorale, S. samarang-



ense and S. pycnanthum is classified into second group.

In addition, the character of the surface of the bark can

also  be  a  distinguishing  character  between Syzygium

species  in  the  field. S.  pycnanthum  and S.  racemosum  is

very  easily  recognizable  in  the  field  because  of  the  bright

color  of  the  bark  (brown-light  gray)  with  a  relatively

smooth  surface.  Other  species  have  a  dark  color  of  bark

with a rough surface.



Potential and utilization Syzygium

Syzygium  cuminiS.  polyanthum,  and S. samarangense

are Syzygium  species  that  had  been  commonly  recognized

and utilized by the local community. It is traditionally and

mainly  used  for  fruit  consumption,  as  a  seasoning,  as

traditional medicine or timber used for household furniture

and buildings.

As  a  producer  of  fruit, S. samarangense  is one  that  is

undergoing  a  process  of  "most  advanced"  cultivation

techniques compared to other species. Today,  many cultivars

of  this  species  have  been  produced.  Even,  sometimes,  it

leads  to  new  species  as  a  result  of  human  intervention.

Widodo  (2007)  stated  that  the  activity  of  hybridization  to

produce  new  varieties  is  one  speciation  process  that

occurred  in  the  genus Syzygium.  There  are  at  least  9



Syzygium samarangense  cultivars  that  have  been  recognized

and developed by the community (Cahyono 2010).

Traditionally,  the  potential  use  of S.  cumini  includes

fruit  for  jam  making  or  as  material  consumption  of  fruit;

the wood is used as raw material for home furnishings and

building  materials,  as  well  as  leaves  and  seeds  for

traditional  medicine.  Intensive  studies  on  the  potential  of

the  active  substance  content  in  this  species  suggest  that

there  are  many  medical  benefits  provided  by  this  species.

One  is  as  a  producer  of  raw  materials  of  diabetes  mellitus

drug.  The  content  of  oleanolic  acid  in  this  plant  (the  stem

bark,  leaves,  and  especially  in  the  seeds)  is  an  efficacious

material for lowering blood glucose levels (hypoglycemic)

and  acts  as  an  anti-diabetic  (Tjitrosoepomo  1994;

Dalimartha  2003;  Mas'udah  et  al.  2010).  Lestario  (2003)

suggested  that  a S.  cumini  fruit  is  a  source  of  antioxidants

which is beneficial  to health.  These substances are needed

by  the  body  to  prevent  degenerative  diseases. In  fact,  the

leaf  extract  of S.  cumini contains  a  substance  (i.e.

methanol) that potentially developed as growth inhibitor of

bacteria or anti bacteria (Gowri and Vasantha 2010).


B IO DIVE RSIT A S 17 (2): 733-740, October 2016

738


J

K

L

G

H

I

D

E

F

A

B

C

MUDIANA – Syzygium diversity in Mount Baung, Indonesia

739


Figure 3. Flowers (A), fruit (B), and tree physique of Syzygium cumini (C); Flowers (D), flower buds and leaves (E), and tree physique

of Syzygium littorale (F); Flower (G), leaf (H), and tree physique of Syzygium polyanthum (I); Variant of young purplish red fruit (J),

green  fruit  variant  (K),  and  tree  physique  of Syzygium  pycnanthum  (L);  Flowers (M), leaf  (N), and  tree  physique  of Syzygium

racemosum (O); Flower buds (P), leaf (Q), and tree physique of Syzygium samarangense (R)

Several  studies  on  the  chemical  content  owned  by S.



polyanthum suggest that this  species  has the potential as a

producer  of  tannins,  flavonoids  and  essential  oils  (at

0.05%).  Citric  acid  and  eugenol  are  also  produced  by  this

species  (Sumarno  and  Agustin  2008).  Bay  leaves  (S.



polyanthum)  contain  chemicals  that  could  potentially  be

used as anti-diarrheal drugs as proposed by Wiryawan et al

(200).  His  research  notes  that  the  chemicals  in  the  leaves

can suppress populations of the bacterium Escherichia coli

that  cause  diarrhea  in  chickens.  Chemical  substances

contained in the leaves include: essential oils, triterpenoids,

saponins, tannins and flavonoids.

The  three  species, S.  littorale,  S.  pycnanthum  and S.



racemosum are  not  widely  known  and  neither  has  been

utilized  their  potential  for  specific  uses.  All  three  of  these

species  are  wild  and  not  cultivated.  Traditionally,  people

use  their  wood  as  firewood.  Not  many  studies  have  been

done  to  explore  the  potential  of  these  species.  One  was

done by Wahidi (2001), which suggests that S. pycnanthum

contains  15  essential  oil  components.  From  the  results  of

these studies, it can be concluded that this species could be

a  source  of  α-farnesen  and  eugenol.  Mudiana (2008)

suggested  that S.  pycnanthum  has  the  potential  to  be

developed  as  an  ornamental  out  door  plant  because  it  has

characters  of  small-boned  medium  tree,  leafy  canopy

forms,  attractive  colors  and  shapes  of  flowers  and  also

attractive fruit.

To  conclude, a  total  of  six  species  of Syzygium  are

found growing  in  the area of  TWA Gunung Baung. These

six  species  are S.  cumini,  S.  littorale,  S.  polyanthum,  S.

pycnanthum,  S.  racemosum,  and S. samarangense.  Based

on morphological characters that are easily recognizable in

the  field  in  Gunung  Baung, Syzygium  species  can  be

classified into  3  groups.  The  first  group  consists  of S.



cumini and S. polyanthum. The second group consists of S.

littorale,  S. samarangense  and S.  pycnanthum.  The  third

group is S. racemosum. Flower size, habit, and the surface

of  the  stem  are  character  identifiers  that  are  easily

recognizable  in  distinguishing  species  of Syzygium  in  Mt.

Baung. Of the six species of Syzygium, only S. polyanthum

and S. samarangense have been commonly recognized and

cultivated by people, while four other species grow wild in

nature.


P

Q

R

M

N

O

B IO DIVE RSIT A S 17 (2): 733-740, October 2016

740


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

The  author  would  like  to  thank  Prof.  Dr.  Elizabeth  A.

Widjaja,  who  has  provided  advice  and  input  in  the

utilization  of  data  and  information  on  the  preparation  of

this  manuscript.  The  authors  also  thank  to  Samantha

Tesoriero, who have helped enhance manuscript writing.



REFERENCES

Alokodra  HS. 1997.  Population  and behavior proboscis  monkey  (Nasalis



larvatus)  in  Kuala  Samboja,  East  Kalimantan.  Media  Konservasi  5

(2): 67-72.

Indonesian

Backer CA, Bakhuizen Bakhuizen van den Brink RC. 1963. Flora of Java

Vol. I. N.V.P. Noordhoff, Groningen, The Netherlands.

BBKSDA  [Center  for  Conservation  of  Natural  Resources  of  East  Java].

2008. 

Natural 


Park 

of 


Gunung 

Baung.


www.ditjenphka.go.id/kawasan_file/TWA.%20Gunung%20Baung-

a.pdf. [September 22, 2008].

Indonesian

Cahyono  B.  2010.  Raising  Successful  Jambu  Air  in  the  Courtyard  and

Plantation. Lily Publisher, Yogyakarta.

Indonesian.

Chess  IRW.  2008.  Diversity  and  Utilization  of  Bamboo  in  The  Natural

Park of Gunung Baung, Purwodadi, Pasuruan. [Final report]. Intertide

Ecological  Community-Laboratoriom  of  Ecology.  Department  of

Biology,


Institut 

Teknologi 

Sepuluh 

Nopember. 

Surabaya.

Indonesian

Coronel  RE.  1992. Syzygium  cumini  (L.)  Skeels. In:  Verheij  EWM,

Coronel RE (ed). Plant Resources of South-East Asia 2: Edible Fruits

and Nuts. Prosea, Bogor.

Craven  LA,  Biffin  E2010.  An  infrageneric  classification  of Syzygium

(Myrtaceae). Blumea 55: 94-99.

Craven  LA,  Biffin  E,  Ashton  PE.  2006. Acmena,  Acmenosperma,



Cleistocalyx,  Piliocalyx and  Waterhouse  formally transferred  to

Syzygium (Myrtaceae). Blumea 51: 131-142.

Crome  FHJ.  1985.  Two  Bob  Each  Way:  The pollination  and breading

system  of  the  Australian rain forest tree Syzygium  cormiflorum

(Myrtaceae). Biotropica 18(2): 115-125.

Dalimartha  S.  2003.  Atlas  of  Medicinal  Plants  Indonesia,  Volume  3.

Puspa Swara, Jakarta.

Indonesian.

Gowri  SS,  Vasantha  K.  2010.  Phytochemical  screening  and antibacterial

activity  of Syzygium  cumini  (L.)  (Myrtaceae) leaves extracts.  Intl  J

PharmTech Res 2 (2): 1569-1573.

Haron  NW,  Laming  PB,  Fundter  JM,  Lemmens  RHMJ.  1995. Syzygium

Gaertner. In: Lemmens, RHMJ, I. Soerianegara, and Wong WC (Eds.)

Plant  Resources  of  South-East  Asia  5  (2):  Timber  Trees:  Minor

Commercial Timbers. Prosea, Bogor.

Hasanbahri  S,  Djuwantoko,  Ngariana  IN.  1996.  Composition  of  plants

feed long tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis) in jati forest habitat.

Biota 1 (2): 1-8.

Indonesian.

Lestario  LN.  2003.  Duwet  fruit sources  of antioxidants.  Kompas,  23

October  2003.  http://kompas.com/kompas-cetak/0310/23/inspirasi/

640919.htm. [August 13, 2007].

Indonesian.

Lucas EJ, Belsham SR, NicLughadha EM, Orlovich DA, Sakuragui CM,

Chase  MW, Wilson  PG.  2005.  Phylogenetic  patterns  in  the  fleshy-

fruited  Myrtaceae-preliminary  molecular  evidence.  Plant  Syst  Evol

251: 35-51.

Mas'udah  KW,  Istiqomah,  F.  2010.  Seed  of  juwet  (Syzygium  cumini

(Linn.)  Skeels.)  as  an  alternative  medicine  for  diabetes  mellitus.

Malang State University, Malang.

Indonesian.

Mudiana D. 2008. Potential Syzygium pycnanthum Merr. & L.M. Perry as

house  plants:  Collection  of  Purwodadi  Botanical  Garden.  Warta

Kebun Raya 8 (1): 17-22.

Indonesian

Mudiana  D.  2009. Syzygium  (Myrtaceae)  along  Welang  River  Natural

Recreation Park of Gunung Baung Purwodadi. Biosfera 26 (1): 35-42.

Indonesian

Mudiana D. 2011. Some kind of Syzygium that grow on the banks of rivers

or  streams  in  the  District  of  Malang.  In:  Widyatmoko  D,

Puspitaningtyas DM, Hendrian R, Irawati, Fijridiyanto IA, Witono JR,

Rosniati  R,  Ariati  SR,  Rahayu  S,  Praptosuwiryo  TNg.  (eds.)

Proceeding  of  National  Seminar  on  Tropical  Plant  Conservation:

Current Condition  and  Future  Challenge.  Cibodas  Botanical  Garden-

LIPI, Cianjur April 7, 2011.

Indonesian

Mudiana D. 2012. Diversity, Population Structure and Distribution Pattern



Syzygium  In  Gunung  Baung.

Thesis.  Graduate  School  of  Institut

Pertanian Bogor, Bogor.

Indonesian

Mustian.  2009.  Biodiversity  of  Plants  on  Land  Concession  Area

Ultramafic at PT. INCO Tbk. Prior Mining South Sulawesi Province.

Faculty of Forestry, Institut Pertanian Bogor, Bogor.

Indonesian

Parnell  JAN,  Craven  LA,  Biffin  E.  2007.  Matters  of  scale:  Dealing  with

one of the largest genera of Angiosperms. In: Hodkinson TR, Parnell

JAN.  (eds.)  Recontructing  the  Tree  of  Life,  Taxonomy  and

Syzstematics of Species Rich Taxa. CRC Press, Boca Raton.

Panggabean  G.  1992. Syzygium  aqueum  (Burm.f)  Alston, Syzygium

malaccense  (L.)  Merr.&  Perry, Syzygium samarangense  (Blume)

Merr. & Perry. In: Verheij EWM, Coronel RE (ed.). Plant Resources

of South-East Asia 2: Edible Fruits and Nuts. Prosea, Bogor.

Partomihardo  T,  Ismail.  2008.  Diversity  flora  in  the  Nature  Reserve  of

Nusa  Barung,  Jember,  East  Java.  Berita  Biologi  9  (1):  67-80.

Indonesian

Raju  AJS,  JR  Krishna, PH  Chandra.  2014.  Reproductive  ecology  of

Syzygium  alternifolium  (Myrtaceae),  an  endemic  and  endangered

tropical tree species in the southern Eastern Ghats of India. J Threaten

Taxa 6 (9): 6153-6171.

Riswan  S,  Rachman  I,  Waluyo  EB.  2004.  The  types  of  plants  in  the

borders  and  the  River  Plate,  Ciliwung  and Cisadane.  In:  Maryanto  I,

Ubaidilah R (eds.) Management Bioregional Jabodetabek: Profile and

Strategy  Management  of  Rivers  and  Streams  Water.  Puslitbang

Biology-LIPI, Bogor.

Indonesian

Shenoy  HS,  Krishnakumar  G, Marati R.  2015.  Rediscovery  of Syzygium



kanarense  (Talbot)  Raizada  (Myrtaceae)-an  endemic  species  of  the

Western Ghats, India. J Threaten Taxa 7 (1): 6833-6835.

Sumarno A, Agustin WSD. 2008. The use of bay leaf (Eugenia polyantha

Wight) in dentistry. Majalah Kedokteran Gigi 44 (3):147-150.

Sunarti  S,  Hidayat  A,  Rugayah.  2008.  Diversity  of  plants  at  Forest

Mountains  Waworete,  District  East  Wawonii,  Wawonii  Island,

Southeast Sulawesi. Biodiversitas 9 (3): 194-198.

Indonesian

Tjitrosoepomo  G.  1994.  Taxonomy  of  Medicinal  Plants.  Yogyakarta:

Gadjah Mada University Press, Yogyakarta.

Indonesian

van  Lingen  TG.  1992. Syzygium  jambos  (L.)  Alston. In:  Verheij  EWM,

Coronel RE (ed.). Plant Resources of South-East Asia 2: Edible Fruits

and Nuts. Prosea, Bogor.

Verheij EWM, Snijders CHA. 1999. Syzygium aromaticum (L.) Merrill &

Perry. In:  de  Guzman  CC,  Siemonsma  JS (ed.). Plant  Resources  of

South-East Asia 13: Spices. Prosea, Bogor

Wahidi.  2001.  Essential  Oil  of  Bayleaf  (Syzygium  polyanthum  (Wight.)

Walp.,  Klampok  (Syzygium  pycnanthum),  and  Clove  (Syzygium

aromaticum). Department  of  Chemistry, Institut  Teknologi  Sepuluh

November, Surabaya.

Indonesian

Waryono  T.  2001.  The  role  and  functions  of  services  of  bio-eco-

hydrological  communities  along  the  river. Proceeding  of  National

Seminar on Integrated Watershed Management Java-Bali. Department

of Forestry, Jakarta, June 2001.

Indonesian

Widodo P. 2007. Review: Speciation in Syzygium (Myrtaceae): Model fast

and slow. Biodiversitas 8 (1): 79-82.

Indonesian

Wiriadinata H, Setyowati FM. 2003. Plant riparian for the Situ, Rawa and

Lake in Jabodetabek. In: Rosichon U, Maryanto I (eds.) Management

Bioregional  Jabodetabek:  Profile  and  Management  Strategy  Situ,

Swamp and Lake. Puslitbang Biologi-LIPI, Bogor.

Indonesian

Wiryawan  KG,  Luvianti  S,  Hermana  B,  Suharti  S.  2007.  Improved

performance  of broiler  chickens  with  supplementation  leaf  bay

(Syzygium  polyanthum  (Wight)  Walp)  as  antibacterial Escherichia

coli. Media Peternakan 30 (1): 55-62.

Indonesian




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə