Deden mudiana



Yüklə 87.48 Kb.
PDF просмотр
tarix19.08.2017
ölçüsü87.48 Kb.

B IO DIV E RSIT A S

ISSN: 1412-033X (printed edition)

Volume 11, Number 3, July 2010

ISSN: 2085-4722 (electronic)

Pages: 124-128

DOI: 10.13057/biodiv/d110304



Flower and fruit development of Syzygium pycnanthum Merr. & L.M. Perry

DEDEN MUDIANA



, ESTI ENDAH ARIYANTI

♥♥

Purwodadi Botanical Garden, Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI), Jl. Raya Surabaya-Malang, Km 65, Purwodadi, Pasuruan 67163, East Java,

Indonesia. Tel./Fax.: +62- 341-426046. email:

dmudiana@yahoo.com,





estimudiana@yahoo.com

Manuscript received: 3 June 2010. Revision accepted: 22 July 2010.

ABSTRACT

Mudiana  D,  Ariyanti  EE  (2010) Flower  and fruit development  of Syzygium  pycnanthum  Merr.  &  L.M.  Perry. Biodiversitas 12: 124-

128. Flower formation is a process of flowering plant in order to produce the next generation. Flower plays a major role in pollination

and fertilization as early stage of fruit and seed formation. Syzygium pycnanthum is a member of family Myrtaceae or known as ‘Jambu-

jambuan’  family.  The  research  aim  was  to  observe  the  development  process  of  flowering  and  fruiting  phase  of S.  pycnanthum at

Purwodadi Botanical Garden. It has been noted that this species has ten (10) stages of flowering and fruit development, namely flower

bud  initiation,  flower  bud  fully  emerge,  unfolding  calyx,  visible  corolla,  bud  starts  blooming,  early  blooming,  perfectly  blooming,

perianths and anthers fall, early fruit structure and ripe fruit. All these stages require 80-89 days.



Key words: Syzygium pycnanthum, flower and fruit development.

INTRODUCTION

Flower  is  a  vital  organ  of  flowering  plants.  This  organ

is  not  only  important  as  an  identification  instrument,  but

also  plays  a  major  role  on  reproduction.  Every  plant  has

specific 

floral  character,  both 

morphological  and

physiological  characters.  The  differences  in  shape  and

color  of  flowers  are  the  effect  of  adaptation  process  of

certain  species  to  survive.  This  is  also  related  to  the

pollinators that help the pollination of the flowers (Boulter

et  al.  2006).  Plant  responses  to  their  environment  are

correlated to the periods of their development. The science

dealt with this issue is phenology.

Basically, flower and fruit development are divided into

6 phases, i.e. (1) flower induction, (2) flower initiation, (3)

pre-anthesis,  (4)  anthesis,  (5)  pollination  and  fertilization

and  (6)  fruit  formation,  fruit  ripening  and  seed  formation

(Ratnaningrum 2004). However, these phases are different

among  the  species,  which  depend  on  the  interaction

between  internal  and  external  factors.  The  external  factors

include temperature, light intensity, humidity and minerals;

while  the  internal  factors  contain  phytohormone  and

genetic characters. The interaction between the internal and

external factors give an impact to whole flowering process,

such  as  flowering  periods,  juvenility,  dormancy,  irregular

bearing or irregular fruiting time at the same period (Ashari

2002).


Michalski  and  Durka  (2007)  clarified  that

environmental indications such as temperature, humidity or

irradiance are known to have an effect on different aspects

of  flowering  phenology.  For  an  instance,  Rahayu  et  al.

(2007)  reported  that the  initiation  flowering  process  of

Hoya  lacunosa  was  influenced  by  external  factors,  i.e.  the

average  and  the  variation  of  daily  temperature,  light

intensity and humidity.

One  of  flowering  plant  collections  at  Purwodadi

Botanical  Garden  is Syzygium  pycnanthum  Merr.  &  L.M.

Perry.  It  has  potential  as  an  ornamental  plant  based  on  its

floral  and  fruit  characters.  Moreover,  this  species  had

flowering time throughout the year as stated by Backer and

Bakhuizen van den Brink (1963); this was also the case in

Purwodadi BG.

This  research  aim  was  to  observe  the  phase  of  flower

and  fruit  development  of S. pycnanthum.  The  information

obtained  was  expected  to  be  a  basic  reference  for  further

research related to this species.



MATERIALS AND METHODS

The research was done at Purwodadi Botanical Garden

(Purwodadi  BG)  on  February-May  2009  at  bed  (location

number) XXII. It was rainy season. The climatic pattern of

Purwodadi  during  the  latest  three  years  was  shown  in

Figure  1.  Purwodadi  BG  is  located  in  Purwodadi  Village,

Purwodadi  Sub  District,  Pasuruan District,  East  Java

Province. It is sited on west direction of Gunung Baung at

300  m  asl.,  about  65  km  from  Surabaya  and  20  km  from

Malang.  It  has  type  C  climate  (based  on  Schmidt  and

Ferguson’s)  with  annual  rainfall  2,366  mm  at  average.

(Arisoesilaningsih and Soejono 2001).

This  research  was  conducted by  observation  using

instruments  such  as  writing  tools,  ruler,  label  paper  and

digital camera to help the observation and to compile data.

The  observation  of  plant  collection  was  carried  out  at  bed

XXII.F.4.  This  collection  origin  was  Mt.  Pandan  forest,

Madiun District, East Java. It was planted on 31 January

1985  therefore  it  was  about  25  year-old  at  the  time  of

observation. The height  was  6.5 m  with diameter at breast

height 22 cm and the crown width 3-4 m.


MUDIANA & ARIYANTI – Flowering phases of Syzygium pycnanthum

125


Figure 1. The climatic pattern of Purwodadi in 2008 - 2010

First  observation  was  done  to  know  the  phases  of

flower and fruit development generally, then the picture of

flower development at each phase was taken. Furthermore,

the  sketch  was  drawn  based  on  this  picture.  The next  step

was  to  determine  which  flower  to  be  observed  in  more

details. Five flowers on the same plant were chosen. Labels

were  tied  on  the  observed  objects.  The  observation  dates

were  recorded  on  the  labels.  The  observation  was  carried

out  daily  from  the buds  emerged  until  the  fruits  produced

and ripe.

RESULT AND DISCUSSION

Taxonomy of S. pycnanthum

Syzygium Gaertn.  is  a  member  of Myrtaceae  with  a

large  number  of  species;  it  can  be  found  from  Africa

eastwards  to  the  Hawaiian  Islands  and  from  India  and

southern  China  southwards  to  southeastern  Australia  and

New  Zealand. The  most  recent  study  on Syzygium’s

infrageneric  classification  was  done  by  Craven  and  Biffin

(2010).  They  distinguished  genus Syzygium  into  six  (6)

subgenera;  one  of  them  was  subgenus Syzygium  where S.



pycnanthum  belonged,  other  five  subgenera  were Acmena,

Sequestratum,

Perikion,

Anetholea  and

Wesa.  The

subgenus Syzygium  was  characterized  by  usually  open

inflorescence, rarely congested and head-like; ovules c. (3-

)8-60(-90) per locule, arranged irregularly or rarely in two

longitudinal rows (Craven and Biffin, 2010).

Morphological characters of Syzygium pycnanthum

The S.  pycnanthum’s  habit  is  small  tree  with  diameter

c.a. 20 cm and height 15-20 m. In nature, it can be found at

50-1600  m  above  sea  level  in  primary  or  secondary  forest

(Backer and Bakhuizen van den Brink 1963). Flowers were

arranged  in  terminal  or auxiliary  inflorescences.  The

inflorescence  was  set  on  a  dense  panicle.  The  flower  has

short pedicel (3-4 mm), white to reddish white corolla and

white to purplish calyx. There were at least three (3) color

variations  of S.  pycnanthum’s  calyx  at  Purwodadi  BG,  i.e.

white,  purplish  green  and  purple.  Like  other Syzygium

species  as  also  ensured  by

Belsham  and  Orlovich  (2002),

Parnell  (2003) and  Viswanathan  and  Manikandan  (2008),

the stamens of S. pycnanthum were numerous and densely

organized. The filaments were white on the tip and purplish

on  the  base.  The  fruit  type  was  berry,  globular,  diameter

2.5-3.5  cm.  The  young  fruit  was  green  and  later  becomes

purplish green to light purple when ripe.

S.  pycnanthum  has  hermaphrodite  flower  since  it  has

male and female organ on the same flower. The flower has

complete  parts  that  are  corolla,  calyx,  stamen  and  pistil;

therefore  it  is  called  a  ‘perfect’  flower  (Ashari  2002;

Tjitrosoepomo 1999).

Flower and fruit development

The  first  phase  of  flower development  is  flower

induction,  which is  microscopic and takes place inside the

cells; whereas the next five phases are macroscopic so that

these phases can be viewed easily. The first phase involves

chemical reactions inside the cells that cause meristematic-

vegetative  cells  transform  to  meristematic-reproductive

cells.  Rai  et  al.  (2006),  in  their  research  on  mangosteen’s

flower  development,  confirmed  that  the  flower  induction

phase  had  correlation  with  the  changes  of  gibberellin  and

sugar  contents. This  research  was  observing  the  last  five

phases  of  flower  development.  The  details  of  observation

results were showed in the next table (Table 1).

Based  on  recorded  data,  it  was  shown  that  the  total

period needed  to  complete  the  whole  process  of fruit

formation was 80-89 days. As comparisons, Schmidt-Adam

et al. (1999) recognized  six  stages of  flower development on

Metrosideros excelsa (Myrtaceae), it needed approximately

0

50



100

150


200

250


300

350


400

450


500

Ja

n



Fe

b

Ma



r

Ap

r



Ma

y

Ju



n

Ju

l



Au

gs

Se



p

O

ct



N

ov

D



ec

Ja

n



Fe

b

Ma



r

Ap

r



Ma

y

Ju



n

Ju

l



Au

gs

Se



p

O

ct



N

ov

D



ec

Ja

n



Fe

b

Ma



r

Ap

r



Ma

y

Ju



n

2008


2009

2010


Average tem perature

Monthly rainfall

Num ber of rainy day

Hum idity



B IO DIV E RSIT A S 11 (3): 124-128, July 2010

126


Table 1. Phases of flower and fruit development of S. pycnanthum

Phases and Period (days)

Phase I. Flower induction (microscopic); not observed

Phase II. Flower initiation

Stage 1:


Flower bud

initiation

4-5 days

Stage 2:


Flower bud fully

emerge


6-7 days

Stage 3:


Calyx begin to

unfold


6-7 days

Stage 4:


Corolla become

more visible

6 days

Phase III. Pre-anthesis

Stage 5:


Bud starts to

bloom


2-3 days

Stage 6:


Early blooming

1 day


Phase IV. Anthesis

Stage 7:


Perfectly

blooming


1-2 days

Phase V. Pollination and fertilization

Stage 8:


Perianths and

anthers fall

29-30 days

Phase VI. Fruit formation, fruit ripening and seed formation

Stage 9:


Pistil become

dry, swollen

receptacle, early

fruit structure

16-18 days

Stage 10:

Ripe fruit

9-10 days



Total period: (80-89 days)

Notes: line bars in picture represent 5 mm



MUDIANA & ARIYANTI – Flowering phases of Syzygium pycnanthum

127


20  days  from  closed  bud  to  fruit  formation.  Research  of

Jamsari et al. (2007) proved that the flower development of



Uncaria gambir consisted of 5 phases, i.e. flower initiation,

early  bud,  bud,  flower  blooming  and  fruit  formation. The

average  time  for  the  whole  process  needed  is  112  days.

Whereas  study  done  by  Rahayu  et  al. (2007)  provided

evidence  that Hoya lacunosa  needed  8-11  weeks  or  56-77

days.  Another  closer  related  species  (Myrtaceae  family),

namely Melaleuca  cajuputi,  needs  277  days  to  pass  the

whole  process  of  ripening  fruit,  starting  from  the  flower

initiation (Baskorowati et al. 2008). Alas, the study on the

flower and fruit development of other Syzygium species by

other workers has not been found yet.

S.  pycnanthum  needs  26-31  days  to  pass  the  initiation

phase  and  the  anthesis  phase;  to  be  specific;  the  anthesis

takes  place  for  1-2  days.  Generally,  the  initiation  and

anthesis  processes  of  tropical  and  subtropical  plants  take

place  in  a  very  short  time;  however,  the  needed  periods

were  varied  among  different  species  (Ashari  2002).  For

instance, Metrosideros  excelsa  (Myrtaceae)  needs  less

time, i.e. 6 days to go through the anthesis phase (Schmidt-

Adam et al. 1999). Greatly more times (roughly 8 months)

were  needed  by  avocado  (Persea  americana  Mill.)  to  go

past  anthesis  as  observed  by  Salazar-García  and  Lovatt

(2002).  Some  species  of Syzygium  at  Purwodadi  BG  were

also  observed,  they  were S.  jambos  and S.  creaghiiS.

jambos needed 54-73 days, whereas S. creaghii needed 82-

112  days  to  pass  the  flowering  and  fruiting  formation

phases. The observation of other Syzygium collections have

still being carried out continuously.

The  phase  of  flower  blooming  determines  the

pollination  process.  At  this  time,  the  flower  usually

produces  fragrant  odor  that  attract  insects  or  other

pollinators  to  help  the  pollination  process.  Beside  the

scented  smell,  some  flowers  also  produce  nectar  to  attract

the  pollinators  (Uji 1997). The  percentage  during  flower

initiation to fruit ripening was presented in Figure 2.

Figure  2.  Percentage  of  the  period  of  flower  and  fruit

development’  phases  of S.  pycnanthum. A.  Flower  initiation

(28%), B. Pre-anthesis (4%), C. Anthesis (1%), D. Pollination and

fertilization  (36%),  E.  Fruit  formation,  fruit  ripening,  and  seed

formation (31%).

Figure 2 describes the percentage of periods needed for

each phase of flower initiation and fruit development of S.

pycnanthum. It showed  that  among  the  periods  needed  for

flower to transform into fruit, the  most time  spent  was for

pollination  and  fertilization  (36%).  This  phase  was

characterized by: the fall of corolla and stamen, the stigma

dried  out  and  the  swollen  receptacle.  This  phase  is  very

important for producing fruit and seed successfully. Among

the  flowers  on  the  same  inflorescence,  only  few  of  them

can  develop  and  go  through  this  phase.  Some  of  them  fall

off  and  did  not  develop  to  form  fruits.  This  could be

assumed  that  the  pollination  and  fertilization  process  was

not working properly. Gomes da Silva and Pinheiro (2009)

stated  that  not  all  flowers  produced  fruit  during

reproductive  process  because  of  limiting  factors  occurred

during  at  each  stage  of  the  process.  However S.



pycnanthum  has  ideal  position  of  anther  and  stigma.  The

position  of  stigma  is  in  the  middle  of  the  whorl  (of

stamens),  cause  the  pollination  process  easily  happen.

Moreover,  the  same  height  of  the  anthers  and  the  stigma

caused the pollen easily fall off on the stigma. In addition,

S.  pycnanthum  had  numerous  dense  stamens;  this  made

higher  changes  of  pollination  possibly  occurred  especially

when  pollinators  perch  on  the  flowers.  The  moves  of  the

pollinators assist to stick the pollen on to the stigma.

Pollination is a process of falling pollen on the stigma,

and  fertilization  is  a  process  of  the  assembly  of  male

gamete (from pollen) and female gamete (inside the ovary).

The  later  process  is  influenced  by  internal  and  external

factors. The internal factors consist of the flower numbers,

the stigma and stamen position, the pollen maturity and the

stigma fertility. Pollen and stigma of S. pycnanthum mature

at  the  same  time.  The  external  factors  include  pollination

vectors,  weather  and  climates.  Rahman  (1997)  suggested

that  beside  those  two  factors,  there was  another  factor

namely the compatibility of pollen and stigma. This factor

related  to  the  genetic  structure  and  composition  of  pollen

and  stigma.  Pollination  and  fertilization  will  only  occur  to

the  similar  species  or  to  plants  if  they  have  compatible

genetic  structures  and  compositions.  Cross  pollination  is

also possible when some flowers mature at the same time.

When

S.  pycnanthum  blooming,  flower  releases

fragrant odor to the air so that the people around the plant

can  smell  the  fragrant.  According  to  Ashari  (2002)  the

aroma,  the color and  the  flower  shape  were  the  attractive

parts  of  flower  to  draw  the  insects  attention  to  visit  the

flower. Some insects were recorded visiting the flowers of



S.  pycnanthum  at  the  time  of  observations;  they  were

honeybees, butterflies, bumble bees, black ants and others.

This  research  was  only  observing  the  visitors  of S.

pycnanthum,  while  the  real  pollinator  needed  further

research and observation so that it can not be clearly stated

yet  which  one  was  the  real  pollinator  or  which  one  was

merely visitor.

The last phase of flower development of S. pycnanthum

was  characterized  by  the  formation  of  young  fruit;  it

emerged  from  the  developed  receptacle.  The  increase  of

fruit  size  and  the  change  of  fruit  color  (from  green  to

purplish  green,  and  finally  became  purple)  were  visible

phenomenon. The other observable fact was the decrease of



Fruit form ation, fruit

ripening and seed

form ation

31%

Pollination and

fertilization

36%

Flow er initiation

28%

Pre-anthesis

4%

Anthesis

1%

E

31%

D

36%

A

28%

B

4%

C

1%

B IO DIV E RSIT A S 11 (3): 124-128, July 2010

128


calyx  size  (that  still  remained  on  the  fruit  apex).  This  is

common  in  the Syzygium  species,  i.e.  the  calyx  trace  still

can  be  seen  on  the  fruit  apex.  The  ripe  fruit  was  globular,

purple, 2.5-3.5 cm in diameter and one to two seeded.



CONCLUSION

It  has  been  noted  that  there  were  ten  (10)  stages  of

flower  and  fruit  development  of Syzygium  pycnanthum.

These  stages  were  part  of  six  (6)  main  phases  of  common

development  of  flower  and  fruit,  apart  from  the  first  one

(was not observed), namely (1) flower induction, (2) flower

initiation, (3) pre-anthesis, (4) anthesis, (5) pollination and

fertilization and (6) fruit formation, fruit ripening and seed

formation. Syzygium pycnanthum required 80-89 days to go

through these latest five phases.



REFERENCES

Arisoesilaningsih E, Soejono (2001) Purwodadi Botanical Garden has dry

climate?  In:  Arisoesilaningsih  E,  Yanuwiadi  B,  Indriyani  S,

Yulistyarini  T,  Ariyanti  EE,  Yulia  ND,  Soejono  (eds)  Conservation

and use of biodiversity of dry lowland plants; proceeding of national

seminar  on  conservation  and  use  of  biodiversity  of  dry  lowland

plants.  Purwodadi  Botanical  Garden,  Pasuruan,  30  January  2001.

[Indonesia]

Ashari  S  (2002)  The  Introduction  of  reproduction  biology  of  plants.  PT

Rineka Cipta, Jakarta [Indonesia].

Backer  CA,  Bakhuizen  van  den  Brink  RC  (1963)  Flora  of  Java  Vol.  I.

NVP Noordhoff, Groningen.

Baskorowati  L,  Umiyati  R,  Kartikawati  N,  Rimbawanto  A,  Susanto  M

(2008). Flowering  and  Fruiting  Study  of Melaleuca  cajuputi subsp.



cajuputi Powell  at  Paliyan  Seedling  Seed  Orchard,  Gunungkidul,

Yogyakarta [Indonesia]. J Pemuliaan Tanaman Hutan 2 (2): 1-13.

Belsham  SR,  Orlovich  DA  (2002) Development  of  the  hypanthium  and

androecium  in  New  Zealand Myrtoideae  (Myrtaceae).  N  Z  J  Bot 40:

687-695.

Boulter  SL,  Kitching  RL,  Zalucki  JM,  Goodall  KL  (2006) Reproductive

biology  and  pollination  in  rainforest  trees:  techniques  for  a

community-level approach. Cooperative Research Centre for Tropical

Rainforest  Ecology  and  Management. Rainforest  CRC,  Cairns,

Australia

Craven  LA,  Biffin  E  (2010) An  infrageneric  classification  of Syzygium

(Myrtaceae). Blumea 55: 94-99

Gomes  da  Silva  AL,  Pinheiro  MCB (2009) Reproductive  success  of  four

species of Eugenia L. (Myrtaceae). Acta Bot Bras 23(2): 526-534.

Jamsari,  Yaswendri,  Kasim  M  (2007)  Phenology  of  flower  and  fruit

development  of Uncaria  gambir. Biodiversitas 8  (2):  141-146.

[Indonesia]

Michalski  SG,  Durka  W  (2007)  Synchronous  pulsed  flowering:  analysis

of  the  flowering  phenology  in Juncus  (Juncaceae).  Ann  Bot  100:

1271-1285

Parnell J (2003) Pollen of Syzygium (Myrtaceae) from SE Asia, especially

Thailand. Blumea 48: 303-317

Rahayu S, Trisnawati DE, Qoyium I (2007) Biology of Hoya lacunosa Bl.

in Bogor Botanical Garden. Biodiversitas 8 (1): 07-11. [Indonesia]

Rahman  E  (1997)  Fruit  development.  In: Sutarno  H,  Sudibyo  (eds)

Introduction  of  forest  plant

empowering.  PROSEA

Bogor.


[Indonesia].

Rai  IN,  Poerwanto  R,  Darusman  LK,  Purwoko  BS  (2006) Changes  of

gibberellin and total sugar content in flower developmental stages of

mangosteen. Hayati 13 (3):101-106. [Indonesia].

Ratnaningrum  Y  (2004)  Flowering.  In:  Summary  of  e-Learning  lectures:

Techniques 

of 

forest 


plants’ 

seedling.

http://elisa.ugm.ac.id/files/yeni_wn_ratna/kRYOOS-m3/II-kua-

litas%20dan%20prod-bunga3.doc [Indonesia].

Salazar-García  S,  Lovatt  CJ  (2002)  Flowering  of  avocado  (Persea

americana  Mill.) I.  Inflorescence  and  flower  development.  Revista

Chapingo Serie Horticultura 8 (1): 71-75

Schmidt-Adam  G,  Gould  KS,  Murray  BG  (1999)  Floral  biology  and

breeding system of pohutukawa (Metrosideros excelsa, Myrtaceae). N

Z J Bot 37: 687-702

Tjitrosoepomo  G  (1999)  Plant  morphology.  Gadjah  Mada  University

Press, Yogyakarta. [Indonesia].

Uji  T  (1997)  Flowering,  pollination, fertilization  and phenology  of  forest

trees.  In:  Sutarno  H,  Sudibyo  (eds). Introduction  of  forest  plant

empowering [Indonesia]. PROSEA Bogor. [Indonesia].

Viswanathan  MB,  Manikandan  U  (2008)  A  new  species  of Syzygium

(Myrtaceae)  from  the  Kalakkad-Mundanthurai  Tiger  Reserve  in



Peninsular India. Adansonia, sér. 3, 30 (1): 113-118.


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə