Derwent Valley t his plant species list is a sample of



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Plant 

Species

 List 


Derwent Valley

T

his plant species list is a sample of  



species that occur in your municipality 

and are relatively easy to grow or to 

purchase from a native plant nursery.

Some of  the more common plants are 

listed, as well as uncommon species that 

have a limited distribution and only 

occur in your area. 

However, many more species could be 

included on the list. Observing your 

local bush is a good way to get an idea 

of  what else may be grown in your 

area and is suited to your property. To 

help choose your plants, each species 

is scored against soil type, vegetation 

community and uses.

An extensive listing of  suitable species 

can be found on the NRM South and 

Understorey Network websites.

Acacia derwentiana

 (derwent wa

ttle) 

Understorey



Network

Coastal 

Vegeta


tion

Rainforest

W

et Eucalypt F



orest

Dr

y Eucalypt F



orest and 

W

oodland



Grassy 

Vegeta


tion

Hea


th

Sedgeland and 

W

etland


Riparian

Montane 


Vegeta

tion


W

ell drained soil

Poorly drained soil

Sand


y soil

Loamy soil

Clay soil

Poor soil

Fertile soil

Lo

w flammablity



Erosion control

Shelter belts

Bush tucker

W

ater 



Wise

Salinity control

Easy to propa

ga

te from seed



Easy to propa

ga

te from cuttings



Easy to propa

ga

te by division



Standard 

Name

Common 


Name

Endemic


Vegetation Community

Soil Type

Uses

Grow


from

Trees


Acacia melanoxylon

blackwood











Atherosperma 

moschatum

sassafras





Banksia marginata

silver banksia









Eucalyptus globulus

tasmanian blue gum







Eucalyptus obliqua



stringybark







Eucalyptus viminalis

white gum









Eucryphia lucida

leatherwood







Nematolepis squamea

satinwood





Nothofagus cunninghamii

myrtle beech





Pomaderris apetala



dogwood







Shrubs



Acacia derwentiana

derwent wattle









Acacia mucronata

catepillar wattle











Allocasuarina monilifera

necklace sheoak







Allocasuarina zephyrea



western sheoak





Bauera rubioides



wiry bauera





Bossiaea obcordata

spiny bossia





Callistemon pallidus

lemon bottlebrush







Correa lawrenceana var. 



lawrenceana

mountain correa







Dillwynia glaberrima

smooth parrotpea





Grevillea australis



southern grevillea







Hakea lissosperma



mountain needlebush





Leptospermum lanigerum woolly teatree











Leptospermum nitidum

shiny teatree









Lomatia polymorpha

mountain guitarplant







Melaleuca squamea

swamp honeymyrtle









Melaleuca squarrosa

scented paperbark







Derwent Valley

Olearia myrsinoides

silky daisybush





Oxylobium arborescens



tall shaggypea





Ozothamnus ericifolius

heath everlastingbush







Rhagodia candolleana

coastal saltbush







Tasmannia lanceolata



mountain pepper







Westringia rigida

stiff westringia



Herbs and Groundcovers



Acaena novae-zelandiae

common buzzy









Carpobrotus rossii



native pigface









Chrysocephalum 

apiculatum

common everlasting









Hibbertia procumbens

spreading guineaflower







Pratia pedunculata

matted pratia







Viola hederacea

ivy-leaf violet











Grasses, Lillies, Sedges

Calorophus erostris

black roperush







Carex appressa

tall sedge





Dianella tasmanica

forest flaxlily









Diplarrena latifolia

western flag-iris





Lomandra longifolia

sagg








Patersonia fragilis



short purpleflag







Poa labillardierei

tussock grass











Rytidosperma dimidiatum



variable wallabygrass







Climbers


Billardiera mutabilis

apple-berry







Clematis aristata



southern clematis





Note: However well intended, planting threatened species is potentially problematic.  Due to risks of genetic contamination, limited availability of 



provenance plants and to discourage collection from native occurrences without a permit, threatened species were deliberately not included in 

these plant lists.

Coastal 

Vegeta


tion

Rainforest

W

et Eucalypt F



orest

Dr

y Eucalypt F



orest and 

W

oodland



Grassy 

Vegeta


tion

Hea


th

Sedgeland and 

W

etland


Riparian

Montane 


Vegeta

tion


W

ell drained soil

Poorly drained soil

Sand


y soil

Loamy soil

Clay soil

Poor soil

Fertile soil

Lo

w flammablity



Erosion control

Shelter belts

Bush tucker

W

ater 



Wise

Salinity control

Easy to propa

ga

te from seed



Easy to propa

ga

te from cuttings



Easy to propa

ga

te by division



Standard 

Name

Common 


Name

Endemic


Vegetation Community

Soil Type

Uses

Grow


from

P

lant


 

Sp

ecies

 L

is



For more information contact:

NRM South

03 6208 6111

www.nrmsouth.org.au

or 


The Understorey Network

03 6234 4286

www.understorey-network.org.au

TASMANIA


LOCAL GOVERNMENT AREAS

King Island

Circular Head

Waratah-Wynyard

Burnie 

Central

Coast

Kentish

West Coast

Meander Valley

Central Highlands

   

Southern Midlands

Derwent Valley

Huon Valley

Kingborough

Sorell

Tasman

Brighton

G

len

orch



Clarence 

Hobart

Glamorgan-

Spring Bay

Northern Midlands

Break O‘Day

Dorset

Launceston 

George Town

Latrobe

Devonport 

Flinders

West Tamar

LAUNCESTON

SMITHTON

Cygnet


WYNYARD

BURNIE


Penguin

ZEEHAN


Queenstown

ULVERSTONE

Deloraine

NEW NORFOLK

ST HELENS

TRIABUNNA

HAMILTON

Bothwell


Scamander

Bicheno


Orford

Kempton


OATLANDS

Strahan


Rosebery

Ross


Fingal

Ouse


Maydena

KINGSTON


HUONVILLE

Geeveston

Dover

Bridport


Nubeena

Swansea


WHITEMARK

Grassy


CURRIE

Dunalley


Campbell Town

LONGFORD


WESTBURY

    


EXETER

Stanley


SHEFFIELD

Poatina


Alonnah

SCOTTSDALE

There are many good reasons 

for planting local native plant 

species:

Native plants occurring naturally in an 

area are adapted to survive and thrive in 

local environmental conditions, so you are 

more likely to have a successful planting 

site by choosing local species. By planting 

locally sourced species, you are helping 

to preserve any natural variability within 

that species. Planting local species also 

assists with providing habitat for birds, 

insects and mammals in your area.

Plants can be obtained from a native plant 

nursery or you may like to collect your 

own seed and to grow them yourself. The 

Understorey Network can assist you with 

advice on how to propagate native seeds. 

It’s cheap (no hothouses or shadehouses 

are required) and surprisingly easy! 

Illustrations: Janet Fenton  Graphic Design: Julia Dineen  Printed on 100% recycled paper. 

Data sources: DPIW (2007). Native Vascular Plant Records for Tasmania. Unpublished data provided on CD 

by Natural Values Atlas 30/03/2007. 

Understorey Network online plant database: http://www.understorey-network.org.au/plant-database.html



Understorey

Network


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