Dieback in tropical montane forests of sri lanka



Yüklə 349.47 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə1/4
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü349.47 Kb.
  1   2   3   4

Journal of Geological Society of Sri Lanka Vol. 13 (2009), 23-45 

23 


DIEBACK IN TROPICAL MONTANE FORESTS OF SRI LANKA:  

ANTHROPOGENIC OR NATURAL PHENOMENON?  

 

1,2



P.N. RANASINGHE, 

3

G.W.A.R. FERNANDO

4

M.D.N.R. WIMALASENA,  

5

S.P. EKANAYAKE AND 

2

Y.P.S. SIRIWARDANA 

 



Department of Geology, Kent State University, Kent, OH,  USA,  44242 

2

Geological Survey & Mines Bureau, No 4, Galle Road, Dehiwala, Sri Lanka 

.3

Department of Physics, The Open University of Sri Lanka, PO Box 21, Nugegoda, Sri Lanka. 

 

4

Postgraduate Institute of Science, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya, Sri Lanka. 

 

5

National Environmental Forum, University Vihara, Peradeniya, Sri Lanka 

 

 

 



 

ABSTRACT 

 

Forest health of Tropical Upper Montane Rain Forests of Sri Lanka which are 



considered as “Biodiversity Hotspots” merit global attention. They are now 

rapidly diminishing due to a hitherto little understood phenomenon called forest 

dieback. This study examines the contribution of possible soil nutrient and toxic 

element factors for the health of Hakgala Tropical Upper Montane Forest. During 

the first stage, N, K, Ca, Mg, Zn, Cu , Fe, Mn and Al levels were studied in plots 

situated in  the forest at locations of different dieback stages. Al, Mn, Fe and Pb 

concentrations in 30 individuals of 08 most susceptible plant species at different 

dieback stages and of soils of the immediate vicinity were determined during the 

second stage. Collected plant leaves were analyzed for total element levels and 

soils for extractable element levels.  

 

Geographical locations and the rate at which forests are being affected since last 



three decades suggest that forest dieback in Sri Lanka is not caused by a natural 

phenomenon. Results of the first stage of the study reveal that N, K, Ca, Mg, Zn, 

Cu were not in excess nor at deficiency levels. The second stage revealed the 

presence of high DTPA extractable Pb, Mn, Fe and KCl extractable Al in soils. 

The most important observation was the presence of higher than normal 

accumulations of Pb and Al in plant leaves. The plants belonging to some 

dieback-susceptible species showed an increasing trend of both Al and Pb levels 

in their leaves.    

 

Keywords: tropical montane forest, dieback, acidic soils 

 

 



INTRODUCTION 

 

Dieback of Tropical Upper Montane Rain Forests 



(UMRF) has become a severe environmental problem 

in Sri Lanka. This phenomenon has been observed in 

UMRF  of Horton Plains National Park (HPNP)  

(Perera, 1978, Werner, 1982, Hoffman, 1988), 

Pidurutalagala ridge, Kobonilgala near Cobet’s gap in 

Knuckles range (Werner, 1988) and at summits of 

Hakgala Strict Nature Reserve (SNR) (Wijesundara, 

1991). Also, two early foresters, De Rosayro (1946) 

and Chapman (1947) have reported the unhealthy 

nature of UMRF in Sri Lanka. Adikaram and 

Mahaliyanage (1999) found that 38% of the trees in 

HPNP were either affected or dead. The authors 

observed that more than 90% of canopy trees on the 

Thotupolakanda ridge in the Horton Plains, about 

75% of the Hakgala peak and a considerable number 

of trees in Riversturn area of the Knuckles range have 

already died (Figure 1). This rapid expansion - dying 

of about 90% of forest at some locations within 3-4 

decades - casts doubts about the possibility of a 

natural phenomenon.   

 


P.N. Ranasinghe et al.  Tropical Montane Forests Dieback of Sri Lanka

 

 

24 



Even though various hypotheses such as acid rain, 

diseases, bark damage by samburs (Cerus unicolor), 

soil nutrient imbalance and soil toxicity have been 

put forward, recent studies exclude most of these 

(Adikaram and Mahaliyanage, 1999, Ranawana, 

1999, Ranasinghe and Dissanayake, 2003, 

Gunawardana, 1988).  Ranasinghe et al. (2007) 

recognized a relationship between spatial distribution 

of forest dieback in the HPNP and excess soil Pb, Al, 

Mn and Fe levels. Chandrajith et al. (2009) have 

studied the relationship between soil plant major and 

trace element levels and concluded that there is no 

direct evidence for the cause of forest dieback in 

Horton Plains National Park in Sri Lanka. These 

authors recognize it as a possible natural 

phenomenon. Also, they have not recorded excess Pb 

amounts in plants, but recorded higher accumulations 

of Mg in dead plants and lower levels of Ca in soils 

in affected areas. However, lack of sufficient studies 

covering the entire upper montane area of the country 

hinders any possible conclusions on causes of forest 

dieback. The present study was carried out in UMRF 

of the Hakgala SNR in order to comprehend the 

relationship between soil and plant elemental levels 

and forest health.   

 

 

Physiography and Climate  

Hakgala UMRF is situated in the Central Highlands 

of Sri Lanka. It covers a mountain range with three 

peaks at elevations varying from 1650 m to 2170 m 

above MSL. (Figure 2). This UMRF covering an area 

of 423 ha has been declared a Strict Nature Reserve 

(SNR). Hakgala mountain range serves as a 

catchment for Uma Oya, which is a major tributary of 

Mahaweli, the longest river in Sri Lanka. This area 

receives rainfall from both northwestern and 

southwestern monsoons, the rainfall in the southwest 

monsoon period being markedly higher than that of 

the northeast monsoon.  Mean annual rainfall of the 

area is 2400 mm (Meijer, 1980,  1981). The mean 

annual temperature is 15.5

°C, without marked 

seasonal fluctuations. Fog occurs frequently in the 

area during early afternoons and may persist 

throughout the day during rainy periods of 

southwestern monsoon. 

 

Geology and Soil  

Hakgala SNR belongs to the Highland Complex of 

Sri Lanka, which consists mainly of Precambrian 

high grade metamorphic rocks (Cooray, 1994). 

Garnet sillimanite biotite graphite gneiss, charnokites 

and marble underlie the area (Figure 3). This area is 

situated in the axial region of the Gurutalawa 

synform (GSMB Maps, 1997).  

 

Red yellow podzolic soil with a dark “A” horizon is 



the major soil group in the area (Panabokke, 1996). 

However, the dark “A” horizon was absent in most of 

the sampling locations situated on slopes. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 1:

  

A dying Upper Montane Rain Forest, Hakgala,  Sri Lanka



 

 


Journal of Geological Society of Sri Lanka Vol. 13 (2009), 23-45 

25 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 2:

  

Topography of the study area of  Hakgala



 

 

Vegetation 

 

Generally, tree heights of the Hakgala SNR forest 



vary between 6 and 10 m but decrease sharply on 

wind-exposed ridge tops where dwarf trees of height 

about 1m are dominant. Pygmy forest with stunted 

trees is a characteristic feature of the Hakgala SNR. 

At lower elevations, the forest is extremely dense 

having thick undergrowth. In these areas, tall trees 

with heights varying from 15 to 25 m are 

occasionally observed. Almost all the stems of these 

trees are covered with crustose, foliose or squawalose 

lichens. In moist areas where a dense growth of 

vegetation is observed, fruticose lichens such as 

Usnea barbata are abundant. In addition to this 

epiphytic form, many bryophytes, ferns and 

dicotyledons plants are common. Orchids are the 

only epiphytic monocots found in the Hakgala forest. 



Lauraceae, Myrtaceae, Clusiaceae, Symplocaceae 

and  Euphorbiaceae are the dominant   families   in  

the  upper  layers  while undergrowth consists of 

various species of  Strobilanthes.  

 

A study by Adikaram and Mahaliyanage (1999) 



showed that Syzigium rotundifolium, Ilex walkeri, 

Symplocos bractealis and Syzygium sclerophyllum 

were highly susceptible to dieback in the HPNP. 

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 3:

  

Geology of the study area around Hakgala



 

 

Syzigium rotundifolium, Calophyllum walkeri, 



Cinnamomum ovalifolium, Symplocos bractealis 

were identified as highly susceptible to forest dieback 

in the Hakgala SNR (Figure 4).  

 

 

METHODOLOGY 

 

First Stage 

During the first stage, available concentrations of 

major and micronutrients were measured in soil 

samples collected from three plots established in (i) 

healthy areas, (ii) dieback forest on slope areas and 

(iii) dieback forest on flat areas. Samples were 

collected from the top horizon, 30 cm and 75 cm 

depth levels at each corner of the plot.  

 

NH

4



-N and NO

3

-N of the soil were extracted by 2M 



KCl. NH

3

 and NO



3

-

 in the extract were distilled with 



MgO and Devarda’s alloy, and liberated NH

3

 was 



collected in boric acid. Borate ions in the distillate 

were titrated against 0.01 HCl solution until the green 

to pink end point. Na

+

, K



+

, Mg


2+

 and Ca


2+

 were 


extracted with NH

4

O Acetate. Available 



micronutrients Zn, Cu, Mn, Fe and Ni were 

determined by extracting the soil with DTPA-



P.N. Ranasinghe et al.  Tropical Montane Forests Dieback of Sri Lanka

 

 

26 



ammonium bicarbonate extract (Soltanpour and 

Schwab, 1977). Element concentrations in the 

extractions were measured using atomic absorption 

spectrophotometer.

 

 

 

Second Stage     

Field Sampling; In the second stage, materials were 

collected from eight plant species having different 

susceptibilities to dieback. Considering the 

susceptibility of different species to forest dieback (% 

of dieback shown in parentheses) reported by 

Adikaram and Mahaliyanage (1999) from HPNP, 

individual trees belonging to the species Symplocos 

bractealis  (33%)  ,  Syzygium rotundifolium (35%), 

Calophyllum walkeri (23%), Cinnamomum 

ovalifolium  (21%), Syzygium revolutum (15%), 

Meliosma simplicifolia (14%),  Nothapodyte foetida 

(0%),  and Eugenia mabaeoides (2%),  were selected 

for the study based on the slope/geology of the area 

and the extent of dieback of individuals (Figures 3 

and 4). Trees with a minimum girth at breast height 

(GBH) of 10 cm and a height of 1 m were selected 

for sampling. At least two plants from slopes and one 

to two plants from flat areas of each and every 

species were selected for sampling. Altogether 30 

plants were sampled. Extent of dieback was 

categorized as high (90-50%), moderate (50-20%) 

and healthy (<20%).  

 

About 500 g of plant materials were collected from 



each and every individual plant and were tightly 

packed in polythene bags. All the samples were 

quickly transferred to the laboratory for analysis. Soil 

samples were collected in relation to the selected 

plants. Three different soil samples were collected at 

each and every location at different directions and at 

about 1 m distance from the plant. Altogether 90 soil 

samples were collected at depths from 0 to 50 cm 

using an augur. The samples were collected and 

tightly packed in polythene bags to prevent changes 

in the moisture content. 

 

Chemical Analysis  

All soil samples were swiftly analyzed for moisture 

content, pH and EC (electric conductivity) at the 

laboratory. Based on the results of the pilot study as 

well as considering the results of the study by 

Ranasinghe  et al. (2007), soil plant samples were 

analyzed for available indices of micronutrients (Mn, 

Fe) and toxic elements (Pb, Al). The available Fe, 

Mn and Pb were determined by extracting the soil 

with DTPA (Diethylene Triamine Penta Acetic acid 

extract). Extractants were analyzed for the above 

elements by AAS. KCl solution was used to extract 

available Al content in soil samples. Extracted Al 

ions were spectrometrically determined by the 

developing colour with Aluminon-acetate buffer. 

 

Plant samples were digested in nitric- perchloric-



sulphuric acid solution. The acid mixture and total 

contents of  Mn, Fe, Pb and Al were determined by 

AAS. Standard solutions and replicates were 

analyzed after each batch of 10 samples to measure 

the accuracy and precision of the instrument. 

Duplicate soil extract solutions were prepared to 

quantify the precision of the method. Table 1 shows 

the accuracy of the measurements in % values and 

precision as standard deviation.  

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

        Figure 4: Dead Syzigium rotundifolium tree

 


Journal of Geological Society of Sri Lanka Vol. 13 (2009), 23-45 

27 


 

Statistical Analysis 

Pearson product moment correlation coefficient was 

used to identify correlation between dieback stage 

and soil plant element levels. Also plots of soil/plant 

element levels Vs. dieback stage for each species 

were used to extract the relationship between dieback 

stage and element concentration at species level. 

Mann Whitney U test was performed to determine 

any significant difference between extractable soil 

element levels in slopy areas and flat areas. Kruskal 

Wallis test was performed using dieback intensity 

group (High, Medium, Low) as the grouping variable 

to identify whether there is a significant difference of 

element levels in plants belonging to  different 

dieback stages.  

 

Also  Kruskal Wallis test was performed using plant 



species as the grouping variable to determine any 

significant difference of element levels between 

species. 

 

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION 

 

Field Observations 

In the Hakgala SNR, forest dieback is intense (>75%) 

on slopes (>40

0

) where the forest is exposed to strong 



winds. In most of the slope areas the forest has been 

completely removed leaving a few decomposing 

stems and allowing Strobilanthes spp. to spread over. 

A similar situation can also be observed on the 

Thotupola Kanda ridge in the HPNP. However, it 

was noted that dieback had not affected the plant 

species in the pygmy forests such as Osbekia spp

Symplocos elegans, Rhodomyrtus tomentosa and 

Vaccinium leschenaiult. In flat areas, the dieback 

intensity is generally low (<25%) except in some 

specific localities where moderate intensities (25-

75%) can be observed. Because of strong winds, tree 

height decreases towards higher altitudes and pygmy 

forest formations occur in the vicinity of the peaks. 

Strong winds prevail during the SW monsoonal 

period shedding a high amount of leaves from the 

tree canopies in the flat terrain and leaving a thick 

leaf matter layer on the forest ground. Losing a 

considerable amount of leaf matter could impose a 

stress on trees of the area. 

 

 

 

 

 

Element Concentrations in Soils  

Major and Trace Nutrients  

Wjesundara (1991), attributed a possible deficiency 

in available major- and micro- nutrients as the cause 

for forest dieback. Chandrajith et al., (2009) also 

recorded higher total and acid extractable Ca levels in 

healthy forest than in dieback sites.  However, results 

of the first stage and the soil studies in the Hakgala 

SNR by Jayasekara (1992), no significant depletion 

or excess (except Fe and Mn) in available 

concentrations of nutrients, except for low P values 

reported by Jayasekara (1992). According to first 

stage results, there is no significant difference 

between extractable  nutrient levels in the unhealthy 

and the healthy forests (Table 2). The same 

phenomenon was observed in the tropical montane 

forests in the HPNP as well (Ranasinghe and 

Dissanayake, 2003). 

 

Soil Toxicity 

High levels of of  DTPA extractable Pb Mn, Fe, and 

KCl extractable Al were observed in Hakgala forest 

during the first stage of the study. Similar 

concentrations were reported in relation to dieback 

distribution in the tropical montane forests of the 

HPNP (Ranasinghe et al., 2007).  Chandrajith et al

(2009) reported high Fe, Mn levels in soils of HPNP. 

Therefore, DTPA extractable levels of Fe, Mn, Al 

and Pb were measured in the soil around each 

selected tree.  

 

Aluminium 

Extractable aluminium levels in the uppermost 75cm 

of soils of the first stage sites vary from 36.7 to 122.7 

ppm (Table 2). The downward increment of Al levels 

may indicate underground lithology as the source of 

Al. 


 

Extractable Al values in second stage sites vary 

between 0.7 and 390.8 ppm (Table 3). Mann - 

Whitney test recognizes soil Al in slope and in flat 

areas at a significant level of 0.1 (Table 4). 

Extractable soil Al of the area has a positive 

correlation with slope of the location (Spearman 

Coefficient 0.31, Sig. = 0.1) (Table 5).  Extractable 

soil Al concentration has a weak positive Spearman 

correlation with dieback intensity (r = 0.23, Sig. = 

0.22) (Table 5). Generally, montane forests of Sri 

Lanka contain high Al contents (Werner 1982, 

Werner and Balasubramanium, 1992).  

Table 1: Quality control results of soil and plant chemical analysis of soils and plants 

 Soil 


Plant 

Element 


Accuracy 

Precision (Stdev) 

Accuracy 

Precision (Stdev) 

 % 

Instrument 



Method %  Instrument Method 

Al 5 


.01 

0.01 


0.02 4.76  0.02 

Fe 3 


0.32 

2.79 


2  0.47  0.05 

Mn 2 


0.02 

0.07 


5.9  0.02  0.08 

Pb 7.7 


0.07 

0.03 1.6  0.05  0.02 



P.N. Ranasinghe et al.  Tropical Montane Forests Dieback of Sri Lanka

 

 

28 



 

World’s End area and the Thotupolakanda ridge of 

the HPNP have 1180 ppm and 1014 ppm of total Al 

concentrations respectively. Jayasekara (1992) 

reported an average value of 1581.5 ppm (double 

acid extractable) from the top 60cm of soil section of 

the Hakgala SNR. Ranasinghe et al. (2007) reported 

extractable Al levels of 11 to 116 ppm from the top 

soils of the tropical montane forests of the HPNP. 

However, the highest concentrations have been 

recorded at deeper levels.  

 

Weathering- susceptible, feldspar-rich garnet 



sillimanite biotite graphite gneiss (Khondalite) should 

be the main source of Al in soils of the area. Al 

toxicity, which is the most widespread form of metal 

toxicity in plants occurs at soil pH values below 5.5 

(Vitorello  et al., 2005). It has been found that 

extractable Al concentrations of 15 to 20 ppm in soil 

can also be toxic to certain plants (Balakrishnan and 

Muller Dombois, 1984). However, lvarez et al. 

(2005) have found that the Al concentration in 

solution at which symptoms of toxicity appear in 

forest species varies from 1.3 to 80 ppm.  

 

Studies show that Al



3+

 and mononuclear hydroxides 

of Al, Al (OH)

2+

 and Al(OH)



2

+

 are generally 



considered to be the most toxic, whereas  soluble 

organo-Al complexes and Al-F and Al-SO

4

 

complexes are less phototoxic (Alva et al., 1986a, b, 



Adams and Moore, 1983, Feng, 2000, Kinirade, 

1991). Al toxicity decreases with increasing Ca 

concentrations in solution. Therefore the limits of Al 

toxicity vary greatly among different species and 

environmental conditions, making it difficult to 

establish a reference Al level for evaluating the 

toxicity. Alva et al., (1986 a and b) have observed 

that the appearance of symptoms of Al toxicity in 

plants is not well correlated with the Al content of 

either the solid or the soil solution. This indicates that 

following factors are playing an important role in 

modifying the response of plants to Al; (i) pH (ii) 

formation of insoluble precipitates (iii) protection 

exerted by certain ions (iv) ionic strength of the 

growth medium (v) presence of organic chelating  

 

agents and (iv) genotype of the plant playing an 



important role in modifying the response of plants to 

Al.   However, since in most toxic species Al

+3

 is the 


commonest species of Al in KCl extracts (Drabek et 

al., 2005), which was used to determine the 

exchangeable Al content of soil in this study. There 

was no significant relationship between dieback 

intensity and soil Al contents. Possible stresses 

imposed by potential Al toxicity due to high Al

3+

 



contents at low pH levels cannot be ruled out. 

 

Iron  

The first stage studies show a mean DTPA 

extractable iron concentration of 186.8 ppm in the top 

75 cm depth interval (Table 2). Second stage sites 

recorded DTPA extractable Fe contents in soils lying 

between 48.1 and 372.1 ppm (Table 3). Average 

extractable soil Fe content is higher in slope areas 

than in flat areas. Results of the Mann-Whitney test 

indicates that Fe concentration on slope area is 

significantly different from that of the flat areas 

(Table 4). Garnet is a major source of Fe in the garnet 

sillimanite biotite graphite gneiss (khondalite) terrain. 

Soil and leaf iron contents do not show a significant 

relationship as shown in Table 5 or of dieback extent.  

Jayasekara (1992) reported mean extractable (double 

acid extractable) iron concentrations of 155 ppm in 

the top soil layer (60 cm) of the Hakgala SNR.  

 

Chandrajith  et al. (2009) recorded 0.5-2.5% acid 



extractable Fe and 7.14-14.7% total Fe

2

O



concentration from HPNP.  Fe toxicity has been 

recorded for certain plants at a level of 30 ppm 

(Clement and Putman, 1971, Matin, 1968). It has 

been found that 12 ppm Fe level is toxic to seedling 

of some plant species such as Agathis australis 

(Peterson, 1962). At low pH and water logging 

conditions, toxicity of Fe is thought to be more 

pronounced. 

 

 



 

 

  1   2   3   4


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə