Dieback in tropical montane forests of sri lanka



Yüklə 349.47 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə2/4
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü349.47 Kb.
1   2   3   4

Table 2: Results of the preliminary study - mean extractable element concentration in soils (first stage) 

 

Depth 


/cm 

Dieback 


stage 

Slope pH Conduc 

/us 

Moisture 



(%) 

Organic 


C(%) 

(ppm)



Na 

(ppm)


(ppm)


Ca 

(ppm)


Mg 

(ppm)


Cu 

(ppm)


Zn 

(ppm)


Mn 

(ppm) 


Fe 

(ppm) 


Ni 

(ppm)


Al 

(ppm)


Healthy 


F  4.31  152.75  20.03 

0.33 


240.8  41.7 46.8 152.0 78.9

0.7 


0.9 

11.4  285.8  0.3 

62.86 

30 Healthy F 



4.47 

43.25 18.38 0.48 125.0 

29.3 15.5

14.9 


14.4

0.6 0.6 1.0 

515.1 

0.3 


40.07 

75 Healthy F 

4.65 

24.33 17.50 0.37 42.0 



26.4 45.8

3.6 3.6 0.5 0.5 0.3 

319.8 

0.1 


36.70 

High 



F  5.70  247.50  33.83 

ND 


350.5  55.1 202.8 1586.0 288.6 0.9 

1.6 


33.2 

87.5 


0.1 

ND 


30 High F 

5.24 


50.00 

24.00 


ND 

92.4 


12.8 50.7

69.2 


69.2

ND 


ND 

ND 


ND 

ND 


ND 

High 



S  5.21  167.50  23.88 

4.34 


303.5  26.7 141.6 445.1 230.6 1.1 

1.1 


16.3  164.1  0.1 

39.46 


30 High S 

4.68 


33.00 

24.75 


0.78 

217.7 


8.9 

23.7


51.2 

15.3


0.3 

0.3 


0.7 

107.9 


0.1 

61.23 


75 High S 

4.71 


23.50 

18.13 


1.02 

142.8 


54.8 10.4

29.9 


29.9

0.2 


0.2 

0.2 


25.8 

0.1 


122.67

 

ND - Not Detected 

 

F – Flat   

S – Slope


Journal of Geological Society of Sri Lanka Vol. 13 (2009), 23-45 

29 


Table 3: Extractable soil element levels at different plant species (Second Stage) 

 

Species Dieback 



Category 

Slope 

Soil Pb/ppm 

Soil Al/ppm 

Soil Mn/ppm 

Soil Fe/ppm 

Caw H 



1.0 

152.3 

4.3 

190.1 

Caw M 



1.4 

285.4 

3.1 

173.8 

Caw L 



0.7 

72.5 

2.3 

103.1 

Caw L 



1.0 

14.8 

17.0 

220.1 

Cov H 



1.3 

94.1 

8.3 

149.7 

Cov L 



0.4 

390.8 

1.7 

113.5 

Cov L 



0.5 

84.8 

4.9 

48.1 

Cov M 



0.4 

122.6 

2.3 

223.1 

Eu H  S  1.1 

51.1 

4.0 

171.6 

Eu L  S  0.6 

33.3 

2.5 

61.5 

Eu H  F  0.7 

72.5 

2.3 

103.2 

Eu L  F  1.8 

28.1 

25.2 

98.7 

Mes H 



1.7 

23.1 

4.7 

252.6 

Mes L 



1.4 

4.4 

18.1 

141.9 

Mes H 



1.3 

4.5 

7.8 

166.0 

Mes L 



1.1 

56.0 

49.2 

172.5 

Sre H  S 

1.0 

141.6 

4.8 

144.6 

Sre M  S 

1.3 

311.0 

3.9 

133.2 

Sre H  F  1.1 

14.4 

57.2 

89.1 

Sre L  S  1.0 

17.4 

40.2 

171.2 

Sro L  F  1.2 

0.7 

21.8 

50.5 

Sro H  S 

1.4 

7.4 

6.8 

110.1 

Sro H  S 

1.5 

134.6 

4.5 

150.5 

Sro L  S  1.2 

15.3 

25.0 

372.1 

Syb H  S 

1.4 

249.2 

2.8 

102.6 

Syb L  S 

1.7 

88.1 

6.9 

102.7 

Syb L  S 

2.4 

22.5 

27.5 

121.7 

Nf L  F  0.6 

39.4 

3.5 

64.9 

Nf L  S  1.1 

5.5 

8.0 

196.4 

Nf H  F  1.0 

3.8 

4.0 

65.0 

 

Caw - Calophyllum walker                Cov - Cinnamomum ovalifolium 

Eu - Eugenia mabaeoides 

Eu - Eugenia mabaeoides                Mes - Meliosma simplicifolia 

Sre - Syzygium revolutum 

Sro - Syzygium rotundifolium 

Syb - Symplocos bractealis 

Nf - Nothapodytes foetida 

 

           H – High              M – Medium 

L – Low   

S – Slope 

F - Flat 

Table 4: Results of the Mann-Whitney test for soil element data 

 

 

Soil Pb/ppm 



Soil Al/ppm 

Soil Mn/ppm 

Soil Fe/ppm 

Mann-Whitney U 

59.5 

69 


100.5 

66 


Wilcoxon 

137.5 147 271.5 144 



Z -2.06 

-1.65 


-0.32 

-1.78 


Asymp. 

Sig. 


(2-tailed)  0.04 0.10 0.75 0.08 

Exact Sig. [2*(1-tailed Sig.)] 

0.039(a) 

0.104(a) 

0.755(a) 

0.079(a) 

a. Not corrected for ties. 

 

b. Grouping Variable: slope 



 

 


P.N. Ranasinghe et al.  Tropical Montane Forests Dieback of Sri Lanka

 

 

30 



Also when the soil is under continuously poor 

aeration, high Fe concentration may limit the 

absorption capacity of available N. Therefore, even 

though no direct relationship could be observed 

amongst extractable soil Fe level, leaf Fe level and 

dieback intensity, impact of Fe toxicity on forest 

health cannot be excluded. 

 

Manganese  

First stage sites report 11.4 - 33.2 ppm extractable 

Mn concentrations for soil depths varying from 0-75 

cm (Table 2). There is a clear decrease of Mn levels 

with depth. 

 

Sites of the Second stage report DTPA extractable 



Mn levels varying from 1.7 ppm to 57.2 ppm (Table 

3). Jayasekara (1992) reported 126.5 ppm, an average 

Mn level from the top 60 cm soil layer of the Hakgala 

SNR. Chandrajith et al. (2009) recorded 19-197 ppm 

acid extractable Mn and 0.026 – 0.45 % total MnO 

concentration from HPNP. Unlike Pb, Al and Fe, soil 

Mn level does not show a significant correlation with 

slope (Table 5). Soil acidification enhances the 

solubility of Mn   (Fernandez, 1989, Kitao et al., 

2001). Mn toxicity generally occurs at pH values less 

than 5 (Foy et al., 1978 and 1988). Toxicity threshold 

of Mn varies for different plant species. For seedlings 

of  Agathis australis, this threshold is as low as 2.5 

ppm (Peterson, 1962). 

 

Lead 

First Stage study recorded DTPA extractable Pb 

values of 1.7 - 3.2 ppm from the top soils. Sites of the 

second stage report DTPA extractable Pb 

concentrations varying between 0.6 - 2.4 ppm (Table 

3). Extractable soil Pb levels show a significant 

correlation with slope (Spearman coefficient 0.38) 

indicating high Pb contents on the slope areas (Table 

5). A similar situation was observed in the HPNP 

where higher concentrations (>1.5 ppm) of soil Pb 

were reported from the slopes of Thotupolakanda and 

Kirigalpotta ridges (Ranasinghe et al., 2007). Mann-

Whitney test shows no evidence to suggest that soil 

Pb values on slope and flat areas belong to the same 

population (Table 4). Chandrajith et al. (2009) 

reported 14-29 ppm acid extractable Fe concentration 

from HPNP. Ranawana et al. (2007) reported total Pb 

values ranging from 16.5 - 29 ppm from dieback and 

healthy forests sites in the HPNP. It was also reported 

that most of the Pb in soils were in acid leachable 

form. Hence, these authors concluded that most of 

the Pb in soils was loosely bound, and accordingly, 

an anthropogenic origin was proposed. As no specific 

rock can be considered as the source of Pb in the 

area, strong monsoonal winds are believed to have 

brought Pb from the industrialized SW area and 

deposited the same on slopes of the ridges. 

Extractable soil Pb values in several relatively 

polluted and unpolluted sites around the country 

show that high values represent polluted sites. DTPA 

extractable Pb levels in Ohio farm soils range from 

1.5 to 7.7 ppm whereas total values range from 9 to 

39 ppm (Logan and Miller, 2007). Average 

concentration values in the world vary from 2 to 200 

ppm (Baker and Chesnin, 1975). Impact of elevated 

extractable exotic Pb levels on the healthy forests 

cannot be assessed directly, as the toxicity thresholds 

for delicate endemic montane forest plant species are 

not known.  

 

Element Concentrations in Plant Matter 

Due to practical considerations, concentrations of Al, 

Pb, Fe and Mn in plants were assessed using plant 

leaves, even though certain elements tend to 

concentrate in the root. Both plant samples in 

selected trees and soil samples in the immediate 

vicinity were studied in order to study the 

relationship between element concentrations in plants 

and soil. 

 


Journal of Geological Society of Sri Lanka Vol. 13 (2009), 23-45 

31 


Aluminium 

Leaf aluminium levels in plants studied vary widely, 

ranging between 18.9 to 20047 ppm (Table 6). No 

significant relationship between soil Al level and leaf 

Al level could be observed (Figure 5a). Syzygium 

rotundifolium, Calophyllum walkeri and, 

Cinnamomum ovalifolium which 

are highly 

susceptible to dieback, show increasing concentration 

of Al has a relationship with dieback intensity.  It is 

noteworthy that regardless of the dieback extent, all 

Symplocos bractealis trees have abnormally high Al 

values exceeding 7000 ppm (Figure 5). One Eugenia 



mabaeoides tree also showed 20047 ppm on total leaf 

Al concentration. Jayasekara (1992) reported Al 

concentrations lying between 54 to 148 ppm in six 

species including Eugenia mabaeoides which had a 

mean value of 148 ppm.  

 

Reported mean Al level from the undergrowth at the 



Hakgala SNR is 12800 ppm (Jayasekara 1992). Leaf 

Al levels show a significant positive correlations with 

soil Al levels (Spearman rank coefficient 0.54). Also 

leaf Al levels shows significant positive correlation 

with leaf Fe and Mn levels (sig. <0.05). But they do 

not show a linear relationship with dieback intensity 

(Table 7). Kruskal Wallis test could not recognize a 

significant difference between dieback intensity 

groups and species with respect to leaf Al level 

(Table 8). Truman et al. (1986) specified 800 ppm for 



Pinus radiate, and for more sensitive species, 32 ppm 

value has been proposed by Steinen and Bauch 

(1988).  Álvarez et al. (2005)  found that leaf Al level 

varied greatly within the same species. They reported 

foliage Al levels higher than 800 ppm in all species 

growing on granodiorite soils indicating possible 

existence of Al stress. 

 

The most prominent symptoms of Al toxicity in 



plants are the inhibition of root growth and unhealthy 

roots which generally lead to deficiencies of nutrients 

such as P, K, Ca and Mg (Haug and Vitorello, 1996). 

Symptoms manifested in the shoots are usually 

regarded as a consequence of injuries to the root 

system (Vitorello et al., 2005). However, Adikaram 

and Mahaliyanage (1999) reported healthy root 

systems of dying trees in the HPNP, where similar 

extractable Al levels and pH levels are reported 

(Ranasinghe  et al., 2007). Jayasekara (1992) also 

reported the absence of such significant deficiency of 

nutrients in plants in the Hakgala SNR.   

 

It has been known for a long time that many plant 



species show wide variability with respect to their 

resistance to Al toxicity (Vitorello et al. 2005). As 

such, there is a strong possibility for developing a 

resistance in these plants to high Al levels having a 

geological origin, unless there is a sudden increase of 

dissolution due to soil acidification caused by acid 

rains. 

 

Iron 



Iron concentration in leaves of the studied plants 

varies between 47.5 to 800 ppm (Table 6).  Figures 

6(a) and 6(b) clearly show that Fe levels in plant 

leaves do not depend on the levels in soil.  Dying 

plants of Syzygium rotundifolium, Calophyllum 

walkeri  and Cinnamomum ovalifolium have high Fe 

contents (Figure 6).  It shows a significant correlation 

with leaf Al contents (Spearman coefficient is 0.61). 

The Spearman correlation coefficient between 

dieback intensity and leaf Fe content is 0.36 (sig. 

0.06) (Table 7). Kruskal – Wallis test does not 

recognize differences between dieback groups or 

species based on leaf Fe contents (Table 8).  

 

Jayasekara (1992) reported mean leaf Fe 



concentrations from 94 to 169 ppm on 6 different 

plant species in Hakgala. Chandrajith et al. (2009) 

recorded Fe levels of 52.9 to 157 ppm in 

Calophyllum walkeri leaves, 63 to 426 ppm in 

Syzigium rotundifolium leaves and 65 to 270 ppm in 

Cinnamomun ovalifolium leaves in HPNP. The 

toxicity threshold of Fe in plants varies widely 

depending on the species. Glyceria fluitans having 

100.5 ppm Fe in shoots does not show toxicity 

symptoms whereas affected plants have Fe levels of 

1131 ppm (Lucassen et al., 2000).  Fe uptake in 

plants is highly regulated to prevent excess 

accumulation (Kim and Guerinot 2007). Lack of 

significant correlation between soil Fe and leaf Fe 

levels can be due to the regulating of Fe uptake. As 

such, dieback caused by Fe toxicity is unlikely.  

 

 



 

 

 



 

P.N. Ranasinghe et al.  Tropical Montane Forests Dieback of Sri Lanka

 

 

32 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

Table 6: Total element concentrations in plant leaves 

 

Species Dieback 



Category 

Slope 


Leaf Pb/ppm 

Leaf Al/ppm 

Leaf  

Mn/ppm 


Leaf   

Fe/ppm


Caw H 

S  9.9  568.4 36.5 

409.5 

Caw M 


S  32.1 385.1 22.7 

588.0 


Caw L 

F  2.2  67.6 15.8 

113.1 

Caw L 


F  11.8  53.9 12.7 96.6 

Cov H 


S  19.8 452.8 

271.8 


355.4 

Cov L 


S  10.0 125.2 

357.0 


124.5 

Cov L 


F  15.3 56.0 91.9 

180.4 


Cov M 

F  16.9 745.4 

241.9 

160.3 


Eu H  S  21.7 62.3 

110.6 


380.7 

Eu L  S  22.1 

20047.6 

85.6 


800.8 

Eu H  F  7.2 115.2 

17.9 

193.9 


Eu L  F  36.3 150.7 

15.8 


78.7 

Mes H 


S  8.7  72.0 25.7 66.9 

Mes L 


S  9.6  31.3 45.7 

47.5 


Mes H 

F  12.6  55.1 32.8 

310.6 

Mes L 


F  22.1 163.4 49.6 

186.8 


Sre H  S  6.6 148.2 

115.8 


143.0 

Sre M  S  14.6 326.7 59.4 

258.2 

Sre H  F  9.7  25.8 17.1 



55.1 

Sre L  S  13.7 18.9 26.9 

49.2 

Sro L 


F  4.2  60.6 53.9 

112.1 


Sro H 

S  11.5 178.6 

57.5 

132.0 


Sro H 

S  24.9 101.6 

112.4 

201.0 


Sro L 

S  14.2 85.1 

113.0 

79.2 


Syb H 

S  10.1 7472.1 

288.9 

141.0 


Syb L 

S  8.8 18878.1 

105.7 

466.8 


Syb L 

S  28.8 


18821.3 

55.2 


129.2 

Nf L  F  15.9 57.3 

19.5 

111.5 


Nf L  S  1.1  5.5 8.0 

196.4 


Nf H  F  1.0  3.8 4.0 

65.0 


 

 

 



 

 

 



 

Caw - Calophyllum walkeri 

Cov - Cinnamomum ovalifolium 

Eu - Eugenia mabaeoides 

Eu - Eugenia mabaeoides  

Mes - Meliosma simplicifolia 

Sre - Syzygium revolutum 

Sro - Syzygium 



rotundifolium 

Syb - Symplocus bractealis 

Nf - Nothapodytes foetida 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

H - High 



M - Medium  L - Low  

S - Slope  

F - Flat 

 

 



 

Table 7: Pearson product moment correlation coefficient matrix for plant element levels. 

 

Soil Pb/ppm 



Soil 

Al/ppm 


Soil 

Mn/ppm 


Soil 

Fe/ppm 


Leaf 

Pb/ppm 


Leaf Al/ppm 

Leaf  


Mn/ppm 

Leaf   


Fe/ppm 

0.17  0.14  0.11 0.14 1.00  0.29 0.12 0.30 



0.38 0.47 0.57 0.47 n.d. 

0.13 0.55 0.12 

0.21 


0.55 

-0.33 -0.01  0.29  1.00  0.45 0.61 



0.28  0.00  0.08 0.97 0.13 

n.d. 0.02 0.00 

-0.05  0.45 -0.23 0.05 0.12  0.45 

1.00 0.35 



0.82  0.02  0.23 0.79 0.55  0.02  n.d. 0.07 

-0.04  0.54 -0.43 0.04 0.30  0.61 

0.35 1.00 

0.83  0.00  0.02 0.84 0.12  0.00 0.07  n.d. 


Journal of Geological Society of Sri Lanka Vol. 13 (2009), 23-45 

33 


 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

Figure 5 a:  Plot of Al concentration (in ppm) in the plant vs. its dieback stage   

30 


30 

30 


30 

15 


15 

P.N. Ranasinghe et al.  Tropical Montane Forests Dieback of Sri Lanka

 

 

34 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1   2   3   4


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə