Dieback in tropical montane forests of sri lanka



Yüklə 349.47 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə3/4
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü349.47 Kb.
1   2   3   4

Figure 5b:  Plot of Al concentration (in ppm) in the plant vs. its dieback stage  

25 


25 

Journal of Geological Society of Sri Lanka Vol. 13 (2009), 23-45 

35 


 

Manganese  

Leaf Mn concentration of Hakgala plants varies from 

4.0 to 357 ppm (Table 6). Mn contents in leaves are 

higher in dying trees of  Symplocos bractealis 



Calophyllum walkeri, and  Syzygium revolutum 

(Figure 7). However, the variation of Mn levels in 

soil and leaves of plant at different dieback stages 

show that Mn in plants does not depend on the soil 

level (Figure 8).  Mn shows a significant positive 

correlation with leaf Al content (spearman coefficient 

0.45) (Table 7). Kruskal-Wallis test recognizes 

differences between species based on leaf Mn 

concentrations (Table 8). Critical toxicity levels of 

Mn in leaves vary in a wide range due to the large 

differences in Mn tolerance. Critical leaf Mn levels of 

six crop species ranging from 160 to 7100 ppm have 

been presented by El Jaoual and Cox (1998). Excess 

available concentration of Mn can interfere with 

absorption and utilization of other elements such as 

Ca, Mg, P and Fe. However, no such significant 

deficiency in these elements in leaf matter has been 

observed in Hakgala plants by Jayasekara (1992).  

 

Chandrajith  et al. (2009) record Mn levels of 16.8 



to70.5 ppm in Calophyllum walkeri leaves, 19.6 to70 

ppm in Syzigium rotundifolium leaves  and 1.45 to 

3.31 ppm in Cinnamomun ovalifolium leaves from 

the  HPNP. No significant deficiency in Ca, Mg, and 

Fe levels in plant matter from dead and healthy trees 

in the HPNP was reported in the results of Ranawana 

et al. (2007). Mn toxicity displays initial symptoms 

such as marginal chlorosis and necrosis on leaves, 

and later, roots become brown after the shoots are 

severely injured at critical stages. However, no such 

symptoms were observed in dead or dying plants in 

the Hakgala or dieback sites in  HPNP during the 

detailed plant pathological study related to forest 

dieback (Adikaram and Mahaliyanage, 1999). Even 

though high Mn levels could impose stresses on 

certain plants, Mn toxicity cannot be recognized as 

the root cause for unhealthy forests in Sri Lanka.  

 

Lead 

Mean Pb levels in leaves of the studied plant 

species vary from 2.2 to 36.3 ppm (Table 6). Out of 

the four Eugenia mabaeoides trees studied, three of 

the leaf Pb levels exceed 20 ppm. Pb level in soil 

seems to be controlled by the available Pb 

concentration in soil (Figure 8).  Pb levels do not 

show a significant correlation with the dieback 

intensity (Table 7). Also  Kruskal-Wallis test could 

not significantly recognize the differences between 

dieback groups and species based on leaf Pb (Table 

8). However, leaf Pb increases with dieback stage in  



Calophyllum walkeri,  Cinnamomun ovalifolium  and 

Syzigium rotundifolium (Figure 8). 

 

Chandrajith  et al. (2009) recorded Pb levels of 2.06 



to 5.73 ppm in Calophyllum walkeri leaves, 1.52 to 

4.74 ppm in Syzigium rotundifolium leaves and 1.45 

to 3.31 ppm in Cinnamomun ovalifolium leaves from 

the HPNP. These values are considerably lower than 

those recorded in Hakgala for the same plants 

species; Calophyllum walkeri (2.2 to 32.1 ppm), 



Syzigium rotundifolium (4.2 to 24.9 ppm) 

Cinnamomun ovalifolium (10 to 19.8 ppm).   Bowen 

(1979) reported Pb levels between 2 to 8 ppm in land 

plants. Leaf Pb levels varying from 3 to 16 ppm have 

been reported from Bavarian and Austrian Alps, 

whereas values varying from 0.3 to18 ppm have been 

reported from cereals and vegetables grown very 

close to highways in Canada (Wedepohl, 1978). 

Heliotis and Karandinos (1988) recorded leaf Pb 

levels of 82.8 ppm in  Pseudevernia furfuracea 

grown on Mont Parnés, about 30 km outside the city 

centre of Athens, Greece.  

 

  



 

Table 8:  Kruskal-Wallis test results for plant element data. 

 

Leaf Pb 



Leaf Al 

Leaf  Mn 

Leaf   Fe 

Chi-Square 

1.74 0.23 2.75 5.56 

df 


2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 

Asymp. 


Sig. 

0.42 0.89 0.25 0.06 

Grouping Variable: Dieback intensity groups (High, Medium, Low) 

 

  



Leaf Pb 

Leaf Al 


Leaf  Mn 

Leaf   Fe 

Chi-Square 2.94 

9.71 


15.21 

4.29 


df 6 



Asymp. 


Sig. 

0.82 0.14 0.02 0.64 

Grouping Variable: Species 

 

 



 

P.N. Ranasinghe et al.  Tropical Montane Forests Dieback of Sri Lanka

 

 

36 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

Figure  6(a):  Plot of  Fe concentration (in ppm) in the plant vs. its dieback stage   

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



Fe

 (p

pm)

Fe

 (p

pm

)

Fe

 (p

pm

)

Fe

 (p

pm

)

Fe

 (p

pm)

Fe

 (p

pm)

Fe

 (p

pm

)

Fe

 (p

pm)

30 


30 

30 


30 

15 


15 

Journal of Geological Society of Sri Lanka Vol. 13 (2009), 23-45 

37 


 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

Figure  6(b):  Plot of  Fe concentration (in ppm) in the plant vs. its dieback stage   

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

Fe



 (p

pm

)

Fe

 (p

pm

)

Fe

 (p

pm

)

Fe

 (p

pm

)

Fe

 (p

pm

)

Fe

 (p

pm

)

Fe

 (p

pm

)

Fe

 (p

pm

)

 

30 



30 

P.N. Ranasinghe et al.  Tropical Montane Forests Dieback of Sri Lanka

 

 

38 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

Figure 7a:  Plot of  Mn concentration (in ppm) in the plant vs. its dieback stage  

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



Mn

 (

ppm

)

Mn

 (p

p

m

)

Mn

 (

ppm

)

Mn

 (

ppm

)

Mn

 (

ppm

)

Mn

 (

ppm

)

Mn

 (

ppm

)

Mn

 (

ppm

)

30 


30 

30 


30 

15 


15 

Journal of Geological Society of Sri Lanka Vol. 13 (2009), 23-45 

39 


 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

Mn



 (

ppm

)

Figure 7b:  Plot of  Mn concentration (in ppm) in the plant vs. its dieback stage.  Continued.. 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



Mn

 (

ppm

)

Mn

 (

ppm

)

Mn

 (

ppm

)

Mn

 (

ppm

)

Mn

 (

ppm

)

Mn

 (

ppm

)

Mn

 (

ppm

)

Mn

 (

ppm

)

30 


30 

P.N. Ranasinghe et al.  Tropical Montane Forests Dieback of Sri Lanka

 

 

40 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

Figure 8a:  Plot of  Pb concentration (in ppm) in the plant vs. its dieback stage  

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



Pb

 (p

p

m

)

Pb

 (p

p

m

)

Pb

 (p

p

m

)

Pb

 (p

p

m

)

Pb

 (p

p

m

)

Pb

 (p

p

m

)

Pb

 (p

p

m

)

Pb

 (p

p

m

)

30 


30 

30 


30 

15 


15 

Journal of Geological Society of Sri Lanka Vol. 13 (2009), 23-45 

41 


 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

Figure 8b:  Plot of Pb concentration (in ppm) in the plant vs. its dieback stage;  Continued.. 

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

Pb



 (p

p

m

)

Pb

 (p

p

m

)

Pb

 (p

p

m

)

Pb

 (p

p

m

)

Pb

 (p

p

m

)

Pb

 (p

p

m

)

Pb

 (p

p

m

)

Pb

 (p

p

m

)

30 


30 

P.N. Ranasinghe et al.  Tropical Montane Forests Dieback of Sri Lanka

 

 

42 



Chandrajith et al. (2009) suggested that air pollution 

could be contributing to the decline of forests in the 

area. Aksoy and Şahin (1999) reported values of 

180.21, 75.82, 50.56 and 16.81 ppm total leaf Pb 

levels in unwashed Elaeagnus angustifolia    from 

industrial, roadside, urban and rural locations 

respectively. Washed samples from the same sites 

recorded values of 65.2, 35.25, 28.38 and 15.4 ppm.  

Hauck  et al. (2001) have reported a mean value of 

179.02±80.6 mg/kg dry wt. from bark in the healthy 

forest and 130.9±111.9 mg/kg dry wt. from those in 

the dieback forest on the Harz Mountains in 

Germany. Haiyan and Stuanes (2003) reported mean 

total Pb contents ranging from 9.8 to 30.6 ppm dry 

wt. in cabbage and 0.01 to1.5 ppm dry wt. in rice 

grown on soils with total Pb contents of 209.7 to 

262.2 ppm in an industrial area of the Hunan 

province, China, during the period 1991-1997. 

 

Concentrations of total leaf Pb levels at three selected 



sites with different pollution levels were determined 

for comparison. Results show that Pb concentrations 

at Hakgala are almost similar to those of the 

Homagama location, which is 250 m away from the 

main traffic road and also near a large newspaper 

printing press. Total Pb level in Syzygium sp. at 

Dehiwala site, which is 50 m away from a heavy 

traffic road, varied between 3.4 to 9.8 ppm and Pb 

concentration of Ixora sp., ranged between 4.5 to 6.1 

ppm.  Concentration of total Pb levels of roots of the 

same  Syzigium  plant at the Dehiwala site was 17 

ppm. However, banning of use of leaded gasoline in 

2002 in Sri Lanka must have a significant impact on 

the leaf Pb content of the young trees tested at the 

Dehiwala road side site. But Jayasekara and 

Rossbach (1996) reported Pb levels of 0.29 to 1.1 

ppm from about 1 kg plant material each from a 

higher plant (Actinodaphne) a epiphytic orchid 

(Bulbophyllum), of an epiphyitic fern and 3.19 to 

4.26 ppm from a lichen (Usnea) and a bryophyte 

(Pogonatum). However, the dieback status of the host 

plants of these epiphytes is important because 

epiphytic lichens are exposed to lower doses of air 

pollutants in dieback affected forests than intact ones 

due to lower intercepting surfaces and direct contact 

with incident precipitation (Hauck and Raunge 2001).  

Reduction of 40-50% of Pb levels in washed samples 

from the Hakgala SNR (Jayasekara and Rossbach, 

1996) is clear evidence for contribution of 

atmospheric pollution to plant Pb levels in 1996, six 

years before banning the use of unleaded gasoline.  

 

The insignificant reduction of Pb levels in washed 



plant samples of this study, which was carried out 

four years after the banning of leaded gasoline, 

further validates the occurrences of said 

phenomenon. As such, high Pb recorded in plant 

leaves during this study (carried out 4 years after the 

banning of leaded gasoline) should have been 

absorbed from the soil and subsequently accumulated 

in leaves.   

Even though Pb levels in some plants in Hakgala are 

well above the normal Pb range of 2 to 8 ppm given 

by Bowen (1979), they are not as high as some of the 

polluted sites mentioned earlier. Pb uptake studies 

have shown that roots have an ability to take up 

significant quantities of Pb while greatly restricting 

its translocation to above ground parts. In general, the 

apparent concentration of Pb in aerial parts of the 

plants decreases as the distance from the root 

increases (Sharma and Dubey 2005). As such there 

can be a higher Pb level in the root systems of these 

plants, which were not evaluated during this study. 

Pb toxicity in plants can cause a wide variation of 

disorders such as stunted growth, inhibition of root 

growth, chlorosis, inhibition of photosynthesis and 

seed germination and upsetting the mineral nutrient 

and water balance. However, as mentioned above, 

healthy root systems were observed in dying and 

healthy trees in the HPNP by Adikaram and 

Mahaliyanage (1996). Nutrition experiments have 

demonstrated that many plants responded to 

increasing Pb availability to a very limited extent 

unless aerial Pb was a major factor (Wedepohl, 

1978). Even though no direct relationship between 

dieback intensity and leaf Pb level could be 

established, the presence of high leaf Pb levels in 

certain individuals and species, increased dieback 

intensity on slope areas.  

 

Higher extractable soil Pb content on slope areas, all 



further validate the hypothesis put forward by 

Ranasinghe et al. (2007) of the possible Pb toxicity to 

certain sensitive unique plants in montane forests of 

Sri Lanka. Considering the fact that Pb accumulation 

is highest in the root system and toxic effects and 

tolerance levels depend on individual and species 

level physiological factors, the absence of a direct 

correlation between leaf Pb level and forest dieback 

is not a valid argument to discard the possible toxic 

effects on certain plants. As discussed earlier, the 

ratio of acid leachable and total soil Pb contents in 

Horton Plains as well as the ratio between total leaf 

Pb contents in washed and unwashed samples clearly 

proves an air borne pollution related Pb deposition in 

the area prior to the banning of leaded gasoline use in 

Sri Lanka.  

 

Use of leaded petroleum as fuels until recently has 



resulted in considerable Pb pollution in stream 

sediments in Colombo and its suburbs (2 to 583 ppm) 

(Ranasinghe et al,, 2007) as well as in cities close to 

Hakgala (total Pb level of 65 to 92 ppm in stream 

sediments) (Ranasinghe et al., 2007). Therefore the 

emissions from vehicles are a likely major source of 

Pb in the montane forest areas of the country. Even 

though the literature recognizes Pb as an element 

readily deposited close to highways, ability of strong 

SW monsoonal winds blowing from the highly 

populated area of Colombo and suburbs, situated at 

about 100 km from Hakgala, to transport Pb cannot 

be excluded without further investigations. Erel et al. 


Journal of Geological Society of Sri Lanka Vol. 13 (2009), 23-45 

43 


(2002) have found that the load of foreign 

atmospheric Pb in Jerusalem, which was brought 

there by transboundary migration of atmospheric Pb 

from Egypt, Turkey, and Eastern Europe, is similar to 

the average local atmospheric Pb in the area. The 

possible impact of atmospheric Pb transport to the 

central highlands of Sri Lanka from industrialized 

south India has also to be investigated. As discussed 

by Hauck and Runge, (1999), if air pollution is the 

main source of Pb in plants, modification of Pb levels 

could be expected with the death of plant due to 

reduction of the intercepting area and exposure to 

direct precipitation, which aids removal of Pb from 

the plant surface. Leaf morphology would play a key 

role in retaining such air borne Pb, and therefore it 

may also be responsible for the irregular high and 

low Pb concentrations recorded from different 

species.  

 

Pot experiments at similar pH levels and different Pb 



and Al concentrations to recognize the tolerance and 

sensitivity of highly susceptible species to forest 

dieback would be very important to accept or exclude 

the possible contribution of these elements to the 

forest dieback in Sri Lanka.  

 

 


1   2   3   4


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə