Differential diagnosis of common tremor syndromes r bhidayasiri



Yüklə 175.64 Kb.

tarix23.02.2017
ölçüsü175.64 Kb.

REVIEW

Differential diagnosis of common tremor syndromes

R Bhidayasiri

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Postgrad Med J 2005;81:756–762. doi: 10.1136/pgmj.2005.032979

Tremor is one of the most common involuntary movement

disorders seen in clinical practice. In addition to the

detailed history, the differential diagnosis is mainly clinical

based on the distinction at rest, postural and intention,

activation condition, frequency, and topographical

distribution. The causes of tremor are heterogeneous and it

can present alone (for example, essential tremor) or as a

part of a neurological syndrome (for example, multiple

sclerosis). Essential tremor and the tremor of Parkinson’s

disease are the most common tremors encountered in

clinical practice. This article focuses on a practical

approach to these different forms of tremor and how to

distinguish them clinically. Evidence supporting various

strategies used in the differentiation is then presented,

followed by a review of formal guidelines or

recommendations when they exist.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Correspondence to:

Dr R Bhidayasiri,

Department of Neurology,

Reed Neurological

Research Institute, UCLA

Medical Center, 710

Westwood Plaza, Los

Angeles, CA 90095, USA;

rbh@ucla.edu

Submitted 24 January 2005

Accepted 16 April 2005

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

T

remor is one of the most common involun-



tary movement disorders seen in clinical

practice. It is defined as an involuntary,

approximately rhythmic, and roughly sinusoidal

movement of one or more body parts. It is

differentiated from other involuntary movement

disorders, such as chorea, athetosis, ballism, tics,

and myoclonus, by its repetitive, stereotyped

movements of a regular amplitude and fre-

quency. Tremor may be confused with rhythmic

myoclonus (incorrectly termed cortical tremor),

which is typically characterised by brief muscle

twitches, confined to one limb or to adjacent

body regions, associated with spike-wave com-

plexes on the electroencephalogram (EEG) or

spinal lesions. Clonus, unlike tremor, represents

a rhythmic movement, which is increased by

muscle stretching. Asterixis can be distinguished

from tremor on the basis of electromyographic

(EMG) findings of prolonged absence of EMG

activity during ‘‘flapping’’ or abduction of the

upper extremities. Stereotypies may have rhyth-

mic components, but nevertheless are domi-

nanted by complex movements. Lastly, epilepsia

partialis continua (EPC) can produce regular

jerks of the arm or hand, which can be difficult

to distinguish from tremor. EPC is associated

with EEG changes (which may need to be

identified with back-averaging techniques), and

MRI changes in contralateral sensorimotor cor-

tex.


The first step in evaluating any patient with

tremor is to characterise the tremor. Various

types of tremor can be distinguished clinically,

based on the activation condition, frequency, and

topographical distribution. Different classifica-

tions of tremor have been proposed although the

most useful and widely accepted classification

divides tremor according to the behaviour it

occurs, that is rest and action tremor, which is

further subdivided into postural and kinetic

tremor (table 1).

1–3


Action tremor, the most

prevalent of these types of tremor, occurs during

sustained extension of the arm and during

voluntary movements, such as writing or typing.

Resting tremor is suspected, if it occurs with the

patient sitting with his arms firmly supported

without any voluntary activities, if it increases

with mental stress (counting backwards), and if

it is suppressed by voluntary movements. The

most common cause of resting tremor is idio-

pathic Parkinson’s disease (PD). The most

common cause of postural and kinetic tremor is

essential tremor (ET). Physiological tremor is an

action tremor and is present in every healthy

person under certain conditions. Tremor can

present alone or as part of a neurological

syndrome, for example multiple sclerosis, dysto-

nia, and neuropathy. This article discusses

different types of tremor with an emphasis on

salient features and how to distinguish them

clinically. Evidence supporting various available

strategies is then presented, followed by a review

of established guidelines.

ESSENTIAL TREMOR: THE MOST

COMMON FORM OF ACTION TREMOR

Action tremor refers to any tremor that is

produced by voluntary contraction of muscles,

including postural, isometric, and kinetic tremor.

The last includes intention tremor. As there are

no validated serological, radiological, and patho-

logical markers in ET, the diagnosis is primarily

based on clinical findings (box 1).

2

Therefore, the



examination should be comprehensive. Firstly,

observe the patient sitting at rest to note whether

there is evidence of a resting tremor of the head,

hands, or legs. Then, ask the patient to stretch

out the arms and hands completely and look for

a postural tremor, followed by checking finger-

nose-finger movements looking for a kinetic

tremor. Typically, essential tremor is an action

tremor, either postural or kinetic in character,

mainly affecting the hands. It is usually bilateral

with a frequency of 4 Hz to 12 Hz and largely

symmetrical.

4

The upper limbs are affected in



about 95% of patients, followed by head (34%),

Abbreviations:

EMG, electromyography; EEG,

electroencephalography; EPC, epilepsia partialis

continua; PD, Parkinson’s disease; ET, essential tremor;

PET, positron emission tomography; DAT, dopamine

transporter; DBS, deep brain stimulation; VIM, ventral

intermedius nucleus

756

www.postgradmedj.com



lower limbs (20%), voice (12%), face and trunk (5%).

2

With



the passage of time, the frequency of the tremor decreases

and the amplitude may increase.

5

The prevalence ranges from



0.4% to 6.7% in persons over 40 years old so it is the most

common type of tremor.

6–8

Many studies have shown that ET



is much more prevalent than tremor of PD (up to 20 times

difference).

9 10

However, some experts suspected that the



condition might be overdiagnosed.

11

Although the condition



is both clinically and genetically heterogeneous, half of the

cases are considered familial with an autosomal dominant

pattern of inheritance.

9 12–14


Two different chromosomal

regions have been linked to familial ET, one on chromosome

3q13

15

and another on chromosome 2p22–25.



16

However, no

specific gene mutations have been identified to date. The

penetrance is thought to be high, suggesting that 89% of

patients at risk have signs of ET by the age of 65.

6 17


The age

of onset is typically 60–70 years, but not uncommonly before

60 years, and both sexes are equally affected. The tremor

commonly involves the head, jaw, neck, facial muscles,

tongue, and upper extremities but not the lip, which suggests

the tremor of PD in those cases.

Clinically, the differentiation between ET and tremor of PD

can be difficult (table 2). However, important features that

support the tremor to be parkinsonian in origin include

asymmetric onset and it being at rest although 40% of tremor

in PD can be of mixed type of postural and resting tremors.

Tremor that occurs during walking usually suggests an

underlying diagnosis of PD. In addition, patients with ET

typically lack prominent extrapyramidal signs, including

bradykinesia, manifesting as progressive decrement in

amplitude and speed with ‘‘re-setting’’, postural instability

or rigidity. Fifty per cent of ET patients are alcohol responsive

but only temporarily.

18

Sometimes, it can be difficult to



determine if bradykinesia is present in a patient with

pronounced postural tremor. In these circumstances, other

factors such as the presence of hypomimia and generalised

bradykinesia may need to be taken into account. A ‘‘no-no’’

or ‘‘yes-yes’’ head tremor is characteristic of ET and occurs

only rarely in PD. Handwriting is usually small and illegible

in PD but large and tremulous in ET (fig 1). If a noticeable

tremor is noted with speaking, ET is probable in most cases

with a possibility of isolated voice tremor in a minority. Most

patients with ET do not have abnormal neurological findings

except the tremor although signs of mild cerebellar dysfunc-

tion can be seen, supported by a recent study using positron

emission tomography (PET) showing increased cerebellar

activation.

19

When the presentation is atypical, functional



brain imaging with positron emission tomography and the

radiotracer 18-fluorodopa (FDOPA-PET) may permit the

diagnosis of PD in early stage, recording and quantifying

the deficiency of dopamine synthesis and storage within pre-

synaptic striatal nerve terminals. In addition, dopamine

transporter (DAT) single photon emission computed tomo-

graphy (SPECT), such as

123


I-ß-FP-CIT, can effectively

distinguish between ET and PD in an early stage of the

disease with the results being within normal limits in ET.

20 21


Apart from excluding the possibility of early PD, a careful

drug history is mandatory as many drugs are capable of

producing postural and kinetic tremors (box 2). These drugs

include b-adrenergic agonists, valproic acid, thyroxin, tricyc-

lic antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors

(SSRIs), and lithium. These drugs may cause increased

physiological tremor that may be difficult to distinguish it

from ET. Therefore, clinicians must maintain a high level of

suspicion when a tremor develops after the start of a drug

treatment. The possibility of Wilson’s disease should always

be considered in any patient with an action tremor who is

younger than 40 years of age. A low serum ceruloplasmin is

useful screening test although not diagnostic and the level of

less than 200 mg/l has 95% sensitivity for this condition. A

slit-lamp examination for Kayser-Fleischer ring should also

be considered. However, patients with Wilson’s disease

usually present with dysarthria, dystonia, and parkinsonism

and very rarely present with isolated action tremor.

22

ET is believed to be of a central nervous system origin, but



a reproducible neuropathology has not been described. A

central aetiology was partly supported by the beneficial effect

of thalamotomy, thalamic deep brain stimulation (DBS), and

drugs that act centrally. Numerous experimental physiologi-

cal and functional imaging studies have also implicated

dysfunction in brain stem structures, including the inferior

olive, locus coeruleus, red nucleus, thalamus, but cerebellum

seems to be a prime candidate for the site of dysfunction in

ET.

23–25


It is probable that ET occur as a result of an abnormal

oscillator of a CNS ‘‘pacemaker’’ in a currently unknown

exact location that can be increased or suppressed by reflex

pathways.

Table 1

Classification of tremor



Type of tremor

Definition

Rest tremor

Tremor that occurs in a body part that

is not voluntarily activated and is

completed supported against gravity.

Action tremor

Any tremor that is produced by

voluntary contraction of muscle,

including postural, isometric, and

kinetic tremor. The last includes

intention tremor.

Postural tremor

Tremor that is present while

voluntarily maintaining a position

against gravity.

Kinetic tremor

Tremor that occurs during any

voluntary movement. It may include

visually or non-visually guided

movements. Tremor during target

directed movement is called intention

tremor.

Isometric tremor



Tremor that occurs as a result of

muscle contraction against a rigid

stationary object.

Task specific tremor

Kinetic tremor that may appear or

become exacerbated during specific

activities.

Box 1 Clinical criteria for essential tremor

2

Definite essential tremor



N

Postural tremor of moderate amplitude is present in at

least one arm

N

Tremor of moderate amplitude is present in at least one



arm during at least four tasks, such as pouring water,

using a spoon to drink water drinking water, finger-to-

nose manoeuvre, and drawing a spiral.

N

Tremor must interfere with at least one activity of daily



living.

N

Medications, hypothyroidism, alcohol, and other



neurological conditions are not the cause of tremor.

Probable essential tremor

N

Tremor of moderate amplitude is present in at least one



arm during at least four tasks, or head tremor is

present.


N

Medications, hyperthyroidism, alcohol, and other

neurological conditions are not the cause of tremor.

Common tremor syndromes

757

www.postgradmedj.com



Unfortunately, pharmacological treatment of ET remains

unsatisfactory. Probably, ET is not as benign as it is often

referred as benign essential or familial tremor. About 15%–

25% of patients with ET retire prematurely and 60% of

patients choose not to apply for a job or promotion because of

the uncontrollable shaking of their hands.

4

The two most



often used drugs are non-selective b blockers (for example,

propranolol) and primidone. Because these drugs can result

in multiple side effects, especially during the titration phase,

they are not recommended for mild cases that do not cause

dysfunction or social embarrassment. Tremor of different

body parts and various tremor subtypes may also have

different pharmacological responsiveness. In general, the

start of specific pharmacological treatments is typically based

on patient age, coexistent conditions, prior exposure to drug

therapy, concurrent drug therapies, contraindications, physi-

cian and patient bias, as well as benefits and potential

adverse effects of certain agents. Drug dose is initially low,

gradually titrated upward as tolerated, and adjusted as

appropriate to identify the most efficacious dose with a

minimum of adverse effects (regulation of dose). If the drug

is of no benefit at a dose that causes adverse effects, dose

levels are gradually tapered down and treatment is eventually

stopped. If a drug is reported to be beneficial, it may be

continued at the regulated doses and the next drug may be

added to the drug regimen. If the response to a drug is

adequate and the dose well tolerated, the physician may keep

the patient at the same dose or decide to increase the dose

level (and continue to monitor tolerance). Propranolol, a

non-selective antagonist, is more effective than selective b

1

activity, with the dose of at least 120 mg/day resulting in a



significant reduction in the severity of tremor.

26 27


In a dose

response study of propranolol, 240–320 mg/day was found to

be the optimal dose range.

28

Furthermore, long acting



propranolol (propranolol LA) has been shown to be equally

effective as conventional propranolol and has better com-

pliance.

29

Propranolol is generally well tolerated. However,



relative contraindications, including asthma, heart failure,

arterioventricular block, and diabetes mellitus, have limited

its use in some patients. The mechanism of propranolol in ET

is not exactly known although central and peripheral

mechanisms have been proposed.

30 31


In general, 50%–70%

of patients obtain symptomatic relief from propranolol, but

dramatic improvement occurs in a much smaller percentage.

Similarly, primidone, an anticonvulsant in doses of up to

750 mg/day, has been shown to be effective than placebo in

reducing tremor. Although initial tolerability has limited the

use of primidone, we find that slow titration, beginning as

low as 12.5 mg/day, may lessen side effects (mainly drowsi-

ness) and increase tolerability. The mechanism of action of

primidone’s antitremor effect is also unknown. Phenobarbital

is one of primidone’s active metabolites but it has little, if

Table 2


Features differentiating tremor of PD from ET

72

Features



Parkinson’s tremor

Essential tremor

Tremor

At rest, increases with walking.



Posture holding or action

Decreases with posture holding or

action

Frequency



3–6 Hz

5–12 Hz


Distribution

Asymmetrical

Symmetrical (mostly)

Body parts

Hands and legs

Hands, head, voice

Writing

Micrographia



Tremulous

Course


Progressive

Stable or slowly progressive

Family history

Less common (1%)

Often (30%–50%)

Other neurological signs

Bradykinesia, rigidity, loss of

postural reflexes

None

Substances that improve tremor



Levodopa, anticholinergics

Alcohol, propranolol, primidone

Surgical treatment

Patients usually have other

parkinsonian features, requiring

subthalamic nucleus or internal globus

pallidus deep brain stimulation (DBS)

Thalamic VIM DBS or thalamotomy

Figure 1

Comparison of handwriting

in patients with PD (top) and ET

(bottom). Note that the handwriting in

PD is small and illegible in contrast with

ET, which is large and tremulous.

758

Bhidayasiri



www.postgradmedj.com

any, antitremor effect on its own. Common reported side

effects include nausea, vertigo, drowsiness, and unsteadiness.

Koller et al

32

showed in a placebo controlled study that



primidone

(50–1000 mg/day)

significantly

reduced


the

amplitude of hand tremor in both untreated and propranolol

treated patients. There was no correlation between therapeu-

tic response and serum concentrations. Neither drug was

conclusively shown to be superior to the other but more

patients had a preference for primidone than for propranolol

in one study.

33

In addition to the first line treatments, many other drugs



have been used as monotherapy or adjunctive treatment.

Topiramate has been shown to be effective as well as

gabapentin and alprazolam.

34 35


Theophylline, flunarizine,

olanzapine

have

been


used

with


variable

success.


Intramuscular injections of botulinum toxin type A into

intrinsic hand muscles can be considered in medically

resistant cases.

36

Lastly, DBS in the ventral intermedius



nucleus (VIM) of the thalamus in ET (Activa Tremor Control

Therapy) is effective, with over 90% of patients having a

satisfactory result. Because this rate of improvement cannot

generally be achieved with current pharmacological therapy

and several long term studies have also shown the long term

efficacy, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has

approved this device for medically intractable cases and it

has now replaced thalamotomy.

37 38

PARKINSONIAN TREMOR: THE MOST COMMON



FORM OF RESTING TREMOR

The tremor in PD typically occurs at rest and becomes less

prominent with voluntary movement. It typically occurs

initially in the distal upper extremity, and over time, moves

proximally and then to the other upper extremity, again in a

distal to proximal pattern. Seventy per cent of patients with

PD present with tremor and it usually has a better prognosis,

compared with PD patients with early postural instability and

akinesia. Action or postural tremor does occur in PD, either

alone or in combination, making the diagnosis difficult in

some cases, especially in the early stage.

1

In fact, pure rest



tremor is infrequent in PD; more common is the combination

of rest and postural kinetic tremors. Isolated postural and

kinetic tremor rarely occurs in PD. As a result of the

variability of the clinical expression of tremors in PD, the

definition is based on the general diagnosis of PD rather than

on specific features of tremors. Only the rest tremor

component is by itself, a positive diagnostic criterion for PD

but other tremors are often seen. When the diagnosis is

unclear, levodopa trial may be considered to record the

remarkable improvement in patients with PD. In contrast

with akinesia and rigidity, the response of parkinsonian

tremor to dopaminergic treatment can be so variable and it is

the overall improvement that counts and supports the

diagnosis.

39

A variety of agents have been used for tremor



in PD, including levodopa, dopamine agonists, anticholiner-

gics, budipine, and as second line treatments, clozapine,

propranolol, and clonazepam.

40

However, double blind,



randomised trials specifically assessing their efficacy in

tremor in early PD are few with different methodologies

and the results are variable.

40–42


Anticholinergics, such as

trihexylphenidyl, have been shown to be effective but rarely

used now because of its side effects, especially in the elderly

population.

43

Therefore, anticholinergics are not generally



recommended to patients with cognitive decline or elderly

patients over 65 years of age. Both dopaminergic and

anticholinergics are probably equally effective in parkinso-

nian tremor, but dopaminergic substances additionally

improve other parkinsonian signs. Dopamine agonists, such

as pramipexole and ropinirole, are probably the most effective

antitremor drugs among all dopaminergic treatments and

should be considered in all newly diagnosed tremor

predominant PD patients who have no cognitive impair-

ment.


44–46

Improvement of tremor has also been reported with

other dopamine agonists, including pergolide and bromo-

criptine.

47 48

Dopamine agonists are also useful in advanced



PD patients with tremor that is refractory to levodopa and

anticholinergics.

45

As for akinesia and rigidity, after longer



disease duration the additional use of levodopa may become

necessary for adequate control of resting tremor in many

patients.

Some patients have a predominant postural tremor in

addition to their rest tremor. This form is uncommon and has

been considered to be a combination of an ET with PD

although the relation between postural tremor that is

phenomenologically similar to ET and PD has not been well

defined. Further studies are needed to define the relation

between ET and other tremors, including PD and other task

specific tremors.

WHAT IS THE PHYSIOLOGICAL TREMOR?

Physiological tremor is seen in all normal people when

muscles are activated. The tremor is typically postural and is

thought to arise from the resonant oscillation of a limb as a

result of mechanical factors affecting it. Because the

physiological tremor has 8–12 Hz, and a rhythm in the

electroencephalogram has a similar frequency (7–13 Hz), a

common central hypothesis was raised.

49

Physiological



tremor can be barely visible to the naked eye and does not

interfere with activities of daily living. The frequency of

physiological tremor is ,6 Hz before age 9 years, increasing

to 12 Hz by the mid-teen years, and decreasing slightly above

60 years. The frequency usually decreases when large inertia

loads are applied to the limb, as shown with accelerometry

and electromyography.

50

The amplitude is typically so low as



to be virtually undetectable under normal circumstances.

Increased physiological tremor is defined by the easy visibility

of high frequency, postural tremor with no evidence of an

underlying neurological disease.

1

Furthermore, the cause is



usually reversible. Certain conditions can exacerbate physio-

logic tremor, for example stress and anxiety before public

performance. Indeed, some professional performers have

learned to avoid this response by taking a b blocker before the

event. Fatigue because of lack of sleep and consuming a large

amount of caffeine can be precipitating factors although one

study did not find physiological tremor to be significantly

increased by caffeine.

51

Relaxation sessions have been shown



Box 2 Commonly used drugs that may cause

tremor


N

b

2



adrenergic agonists

N

Valproic acid



N

Lamotrigine

N

Lithium


N

Tricyclic antidepressants

N

Antihistamines



N

Thyroxine

N

Amiodarone



N

Nifedipine

N

Neuroleptics



N

Theophylline

N

Nicotine


N

Monoamine oxidase inhibitors

N

Cyclosporin A



Common tremor syndromes

759


www.postgradmedj.com

to decrease tremor significantly.

52

In general, no drugs are



usually warranted. However, a small dose of propranolol can

be useful in some people, for example ophthalmic surgeons,

when fine coordinative movements are required.

40

Other



conditions that can augment physiological tremor include

thyrotoxicosis, pheochromocytoma, hypoglycaemia, withdra-

wal from opioids or sedatives.

Tremor is a common side effect of many drugs (box 2 lists

commonly used drugs that can cause tremor). Various drugs

and toxins can cause all types of tremor known clinically

although increased physiological tremor is most commonly

seen. Tremor is the dose limiting side effect of the b

2

adrenergic agonists, salbutamol and terbutaline, used to treat



obstructive airway diseases. Tremor is usually seen within a

month of starting valproic acid treatment and is more evident

when a dose is .750 mg/day although it can also occur when

the dose is within therapeutic range. It is the most common

tremorogenic drug among anticonvulsants, affecting up to

25% of patients.

53

Intention tremor may occur in patients on



lithium. The occurrence rate increases with increasing serum

lithium levels and manifests almost 100% in patients with

lithium toxicity.

54

Tardive tremor, a rare disorder, represents a



separate entity in which, by definition, is caused by exposure

to a dopamine receptor blocking agent (DRBA) within six

months of the onset of symptoms and persisting for at least

one month after stopping the offending drug.

55

It is usually



static in nature but can occur at rest and on intentional

movements, such as eating and writing. Tremor can also

occur as a toxic reaction to marijuana, and 3,4-methylene-

dioxymethamphetamine or ecstasy.

56

CEREBELLAR TREMOR



Classic cerebellar tremor is often termed as intention tremor.

The tremor is typically of low frequency below 5 Hz. It is

characteristically kinetic in nature and has an added

volitional component and particularly affects the head and

the upper half of the body. Postural tremor may be present,

but rest tremor is usually absent. When kinetic tremor occurs

or worsens as the target is reached, it is referred to as

terminal tremor. In rare occasions, cerebellar tremor also has

a rest component in which case it would be described as

Holmes’ tremor. In cerebellar tremor, the oscillations are of

variable amplitude and are perpendicular to the direction of

movement. It is usually best elicited during the finger-nose-

finger or heel-shin-heel tests. Furthermore, cerebellar tremor

is often associated with dysmetria, dyssynergia, and hypoto-

nia. Titubation is another tremor that is probably a result of

abonormality of the cerebellum or its afferent/efferent path-

ways and is a slow frequency oscillation depending on

postural innervation. Its rhythmicity is, at times, the only

sign distinguishing it from ataxia of the trunk. Multiple

sclerosis is a common cause of cerebellar tremor. Other

causes include Friedreich’s ataxia, spinocerebellar degenera-

tion, and cerebellar infarction. Although no clear correlations

between cerebellar lesions and tremor have been established,

lesions in the superior cerebellar peduncle and dentate

nucleus are the most common reported sites resulting in

intention tremor.

57 58

Unfortunately, there is no established pharmacological



treatment for cerebellar tremor. The results of medical

treatment are often less than satisfactory. However, as

multiple neurotransmitters as well as feedback pathways,

including brain stem, thalamus and cortical neurons, seem to

be involved, several drugs have been tried, but with variable

success, including odansetron (5-HT

3

antagonist), isoniazid,



physostigmine,

carbamazepine,

and

clonazepam.



59 60

In

refractory cases, chronic DBS of the VIM (or less commonly



nucleus ventralis oralis posterior and zona incerta) may

provide an alternative.

61 62

Although few studies used highly



standardised quantitative outcome measures, and follow up

periods were generally one year or less, the data suggested

that chronic DBS of the VIM produced improved tremor

control in multiple sclerosis.

61

However, complete cessation of



tremor is generally not achieved. There were some reported

cases in which tremor control decreased over time, and

frequent reprogramming became necessary.

PSYCHOGENIC TREMOR

The criteria suggestive of psychogenic tremor are sudden

onset but rarely a remitting course (box 3). The onset is

mostly associated with a stressful life event. According to a

modified Fahn’s criteria for psychogenic dystonia, the

diagnosis of psychogenic tremor is accepted with the

followings; (1) the major causes of symptomatic tremors

(such as medications, thyroid dysfunction, and hormonal or

metabolic dysfunction) have been excluded, (2) essential and

parkinsonian tremors are excluded on the basis of clinical

criteria, (3) no evidence for any other neurological disorders

is present, and (4) the patients had a period without tremor

of at least two weeks during the observation period.

63

The


tremor of psychogenic in origin is usually a combination of

resting and postural or intention tremors and most often

involves both arms, followed by the head and then the legs.

The tremor may be continuous or intermittent with fluctuat-

ing frequency and amplitude, but lacks the physiological

pattern. As mentioned, the onset is usually abrupt (73%)

with maximal disability (46%) at the onset that had static

course in 46% and fluctuating course in 17%.

64

Although


certain criteria are provided for the diagnosis of psychogenic

tremor, the diagnosis can be obvious in patients with

generalised shaking.

63 65


In these instances, the shaking

usually stops during the examination as they are exhausting

for patients. Differential diagnosis in this setting is limited,

but includes orthostatic tremor, essential stance tremors, or

the rare stance tremor of PD.

The examination, especially the two clinical signs, are very

useful in this situation; the entrainment of tremor frequency

Box 3 Clinical features suggestive of

psychogenic tremor

7 3


N

Abrupt onset

N

Static course



N

Spontaneous remission

N

Unclassified tremor (complex tremors)



N

Clinical inconsistencies

N

Changing tremor characteristics



N

Unresponsive to antitremor drugs

N

Tremor increases with attention, and lessens with



distractibility

N

Responsive to placebo



N

Absence of other neurological signs

N

Multiple somatisations



N

Multiple underdiagnosed conditions

N

Spontaneous remissions or cures of symptoms



N

No evidence of disease by laboratory or radiological

investigations

N

Employed in allied health professionals



N

Litigation or compensation pending

N

Presence of secondary gain



N

Presence of psychiatric disease

N

Reported functional disturbances in the past



760

Bhidayasiri

www.postgradmedj.com


and the coactivation sign.

66

Entrainment entails requiring the



patient to maintain a tapping rhythm in an uninvolved body

part (finger or foot) at a different frequency than the

suspicious tremor. A psychogenic tremor automatically

changes to the frequency that is being enforced on the

uninvolved hand or foot, because it is difficult to maintain

two different volitional movement frequencies simulta-

neously in two different body parts. During passive move-

ment of the involved limb, an increased tone can be palpated

by the examiner. Once the increased tone disappears, the

tremor also disappears (coactivation sign). Cogwheeling in

the setting of PD and ET differs from the present coactivation

sign as the first is present over the whole range of movement

of a particular joint. In contrast, coactivation in psychogenic

tremor resembles voluntary coactivation with overlying

rhythmic trembling. In addition, coactivation can produce

bizarre positioning of the hands when they are out-

stretched. The absence of finger tremor is also suggestive of

psychogenic in origin. While physiological and pathological

tremors show a decrease of tremor amplitude when postural

with and without loading is compared, psychogenic tremor

tends to show an increase of their tremor amplitudes during

loading.


Commonly,

patients


with

psychogenic

tremor

often


undergo a large number of diagnosis and therapeutic

procedures before the final diagnosis is established. A review

of medical history in these patients usually shows multiple

functional somatic or psychosomatic illnesses. Once the

diagnosis is made, most patients continue to have a

fluctuating or constant course, followed by improving and

progressive periods suggesting the prognosis is far from

benign. The therapeutic success is also variable, but the

treatment approach should include various combinations of

psychotherapy as well as drugs, such as mild anxiolytics and

antidepressants. While pharmacological treatment in organic

tremor may reduce amplitude, but does not change the

tremor frequency, the effect of treatment in psychogenic

tremor usually varies from total suppression of tremor,

especially when associated with the suggestion of a ‘‘cure’’

to no benefit.

26

Interestingly, most of successfully treated



patients were young.

63

OTHER TYPES OF TREMOR



In addition to the tremors described above, they are other

forms of tremor that are less common and some of them have

only been reported in a few case studies. Of these, dystonic

tremor is worth mentioning as many patients with dystonia

have tremor and it is sometimes difficult to distinguish

dystonic tremors from static tremors associated with dysto-

nia, which occur unspecifically in regions unaffected by

dystonia. Dystonic tremor is mainly a postural and kinetic

tremor in an extremity or body part affected by dystonia and

is not usually seen during complete rest.

1

It is now considered



as a distinct entity from ET, as it is irregular, has a broad

range of frequencies (mainly less than 7 Hz), and remains

localised. A typical example is tremulous spasmodic torticol-

lis. The tremor tends to be localised, asymmetric, and

irregular in amplitude and periodicity. Many patients with

dystonic tremor use their own tricks (geste antagoniste or

sensory tricks) to reduce the tremor amplitude. These

together with the absence of attempts at suppressing the

tremor by voluntary muscle contractions are a fairly reliable

diagnostic sign. Head tremor is common in patients with

cervical dystonia and treatment with botulinum toxin often

results in significant improvement of tremor as well as

dystonia.

Orthostatic tremor is a rare disorder of middle aged or

elderly people that is characterised by unsteadiness on

standing, secondary to 16 Hz tremor in the lower extremities.

Characteristically, the tremors remit on walking, but

disappear when sitting or lying down.

1

Patients prefer to



stand on a wide base but walk normally and only a fine

ripple of muscle activity is visible. Confirmation of the

diagnosis can be obtained by EMG showing a 16 Hz pattern

in the leg muscles with the patient standing. In terms of

treatment, the drug most commonly used is clonazepam,

followed by levodopa and then drugs used for ET. Overall,

the treatment response seems to be unsatisfactory, but

some success has been reported with gabapentin (300–

2400 mg/day) in a small placebo controlled, double blind,

crossover trial.

67

Holmes’ tremor is a term, proposed by the Ad Hoc



Scientific Committee on Movement Disorders, to refer to

previously used midbrain tremor, rubral tremor, thalamic

tremor, myorhythmia, and Benedikt’s syndrome.

1

It is a



symptomatic tremor of predominantly proximal limbs of low

frequency (,4.5 Hz) during postural in nature, worsening

during movement and goal directed tasks. Like cerebellar

tremor, Holmes’ tremor is almost always attributable to

lesions, reported in upper brain stem, thalamus, or cerebel-

lum, interrupting pathways in the midbrain tegmentum

(rubro-olivocerebellorubral loop, rubrospinal fibres, nigros-

triatal fibres), and the serotonergic brain stem telencephalic

fibres.

68

Palatal tremor, previously termed palatal myoclonus,



can be either symptomatic attributable to brain stem and/or

cerebellar lesions or essential without any identified brain

lesions. In symptomatic palatal tremor, inferior olivary

pseudohypertrophy is seen and considered as a hallmark

for the condition.

69 70


Sleep does not abolish the symptoms. In

essential cases, patients usually have characteristic ear clicks

(rhythmic movements of the tensor veli palatini muscle),

which do not present in a symptomatic variety. Botulinum

toxin injection into each tensor veli palatini has been

reported to be of some benefits.

71

Tremors, mostly postural



and kinetic, can also develop in patients with some forms of

peripheral neuropathy, particularly demyelinating neuropa-

thies (especially dysgammaglobulinaemic neuropathies). The

term ‘‘cortical tremor’’ is a misnomer as it is not a tremor but

a specific form of rhythmic myoclonus.

68

Distinguishing



rhythmic myoclonus from tremor (particularly Holmes’

tremor) can be difficult because the driving muscle contrac-

tions can be so brisk resulting in longer pauses between

individual jerks.

Tremor is a common problem seen in clinical practice.

Among all types of tremor, essential tremor is the most

common cause. In most cases of tremor, there is no

diagnostic laboratory test to confirm or exclude a particular

type of tremor and the diagnosis heavily relies on physician’s

own observation and thorough clinical examination as well

as clinical history. In persons younger than 40 years of age,

the possibility of Wilson’s disease should be excluded, as it is

a treatable and reversible condition if recognised promptly.

Differentiation between essential tremor and tremor of PD is

particularly important as the management and prognosis in

these two conditions are vastly different. Almost all drugs

used to treat tremor should be titrated slowly as side effects

and tolerability are the main issues of compliance. The

treatment should be evidence based. We recommend that the

first line treatments, if available, should be firstly attempted,

followed by second line treatments that are supported by

prospective clinical trials before finally choosing drugs from

anecdotal evidence.

Funding: Roongroj Bhidayasiri is supported by Lilian Schorr Postdoctoral

Fellowship of Parkinson’s Disease Foundation (PDF).

Conflicts of interest: none.

Common tremor syndromes

761


www.postgradmedj.com

REFERENCES

1 Deuschl G, Bain P, Brin M. Consensus statement of the Movement Disorder

Society on Tremor. Ad Hoc Scientific Committee. Mov Disord 1998;13(suppl

3):2–23.


2 Elble RJ. Diagnostic criteria for essential tremor and differential diagnosis.

Neurology 2000;54:S2–6.

3 Grimes DA. Tremor—easily seen but difficult to describe and treat.

Can J Neurol Sci 2003;30(suppl 1):S59–63.

4 Louis, ed. Clinical practice. Essential tremor. N Engl J Med

2001;345:887–91.

5 Elble RJ. Essential tremor frequency decreases with time. Neurology

2000;55:1547–51.

6 Brin MF, Koller W. Epidemiology and genetics of essential tremor. Mov Disord

1998;13(suppl 3):55–63.

7 Bharucha NE, Bharucha EP, Bharucha AE, et al. Prevalence of Parkinson’s

disease in the Parsi community of Bombay, India. Arch Neurol

1988;45:1321–3.

8 Haerer AF, Anderson DW, Schoenberg BS. Prevalence of essential tremor.

Results from the Copiah County study. Arch Neurol 1982;39:750–1.

9 Louis ED, Ford B, Frucht S, et al. Risk of tremor and impairment from tremor in

relatives of patients with essential tremor: a community-based family study.

Ann Neurol 2001;49:761–9.

10 Bain PG, Findley LJ, Thompson PD, et al. A study of hereditary essential

tremor. Brain 1994;117:805–24.

11 Schrag A, Munchau A, Bhatia KP, et al. Essential tremor: an overdiagnosed

condition? J Neurol 2000;247:955–9.

12 Louis ED, Ford B, Barnes LF. Clinical subtypes of essential tremor. Arch Neurol

2000;57:1194–8.

13 Louis ED, Barnes LF, Ford B, et al. Ethnic differences in essential tremor. Arch

Neurol 2000;57:723–7.

14 Jankovic J. Essential tremor: a heterogenous disorder. Mov Disord

2002;17:638–44.

15 Gulcher JR, Jonsson P, Kong A, et al. Mapping of a familial essential tremor

gene, FET1, to chromosome 3q13. Nat Genet 1997;17:84–7.

16 Higgins JJ, Pho LT, Nee LE. A gene (ETM) for essential tremor maps to

chromosome 2p22–p25. Mov Disord 1997;12:859–64.

17 Rautakorpi I, Takala J, Marttila RJ, et al. Essential tremor in a Finnish

population. Acta Neurol Scand 1982;66:58–67.

18 Chouinard S, Louis ED, Fahn S. Agreement among movement disorder

specialists on the clinical diagnosis of essential tremor. Mov Disord

1997;12:973–6.

19 Wills AJ, Jenkins IH, Thompson PD, et al. A positron emission tomography

study of cerebral activation associated with essential and writing tremor. Arch

Neurol 1995;52:299–305.

20 Asenbaum S, Pirker W, Angelberger P, et al. [123I]beta-CIT and SPECT in

essential tremor and Parkinson’s disease. J Neural Transm

1998;105:1213–28.

21 Benamer TS, Patterson J, Grosset DG, et al. Accurate differentiation of

parkinsonism and essential tremor using visual assessment of [123I]-FP-CIT

SPECT imaging: the [123I]-FP-CIT study group. Mov Disord 2000;15:503–10.

22 Roberts EA, Schilsky ML. A practice guideline on Wilson disease. Hepatology

2003;37:1475–92.

23 Deuschl G, Elble RJ. The pathophysiology of essential tremor. Neurology

2000;54:S14–20.

24 Deuschl G, Wenzelburger R, Loffler K, et al. Essential tremor and cerebellar

dysfunction clinical and kinematic analysis of intention tremor. Brain

2000;123:1568–80.

25 Wilms H, Sievers J, Deuschl G. Animal models of tremor. Mov Disord

1999;14:557–71.

26 Larsen TA, Calne DB. Essential tremor. Clin Neuropharmacol

1983;6:185–206.

27 Dietrichson P, Espen E. Effects of timolol and atenolol on benign essential

tremor: placebo-controlled studies based on quantitative tremor recording.

J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 1981;44:677–83.

28 Koller WC. Dose-response relationship of propranolol in the treatment of

essential tremor. Arch Neurol 1986;43:42–3.

29 Cleeves L, Findley LJ. Propranolol and propranolol-LA in essential tremor: a

double blind comparative study. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry

1988;51:379–84.

30 Young RR. Essential-familial tremor and other action tremors. Semin Neurol

1982;2:386–91.

31 Jefferson D, Jenner P, Marsden CD. beta-Adrenoreceptor antagonists in

essential tremor. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 1979;42:904–9.

32 Koller WC, Royse VL. Efficacy of primidone in essential tremor. Neurology

1986;36:121–4.

33 Gorman WP, Cooper R, Pocock P, et al. A comparison of primidone,

propranolol, and placebo in essential tremor, using quantitative analysis.

J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 1986;49:64–8.

34 Connor GS. A double-blind placebo-controlled trial of topiramate treatment

for essential tremor. Neurology 2002;59:132–4.

35 Ondo W, Hunter C, Vuong KD, et al. Gabapentin for essential tremor: a

multiple-dose, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Mov Disord

2000;15:678–82.

36 Brin MF, Lyons KE, Doucette J, et al. A randomized, double masked,

controlled trial of botulinum toxin type A in essential hand tremor. Neurology

2001;56:1523–8.

37 Koller W, Pahwa R, Busenbark K, et al. High-frequency unilateral thalamic

stimulation in the treatment of essential and parkinsonian tremor. Ann Neurol

1997;42:292–9.

38 Limousin P, Speelman JD, Gielen F, et al. Multicentre European study of

thalamic stimulation in parkinsonian and essential tremor. J Neurol Neurosurg

Psychiatry 1999;66:289–96.

39 Koller WC, Hubble JP. Levodopa therapy in Parkinson’s disease. Neurology

1990;40(suppl):40–7.

40 Wasielewski PG, Burns JM, Koller WC. Pharmacologic treatment of tremor.

Mov Disord 1998;13(suppl 3):90–100.

41 Koller WC. Pharmacologic treatment of parkinsonian tremor. Arch Neurol

1986;43:126–7.

42 Hughes AJ, Lees AJ, Stern GM. Apomorphine in the diagnosis and treatment

of parkinsonian tremor. Clin Neuropharmacol 1990;13:312–17.

43 Katzenschlager R, Sampaio C, Costa J, et al. Anticholinergics for symptomatic

management of Parkinson’s disease. Cochrane Library. Issue 2. Oxford:

Update Software, 2003.

44 Navan P, Findley LJ, Jeffs JA, et al. Double-blind, single-dose, cross-over

study of the effects of pramipexole, pergolide, and placebo on rest tremor and

UPDRS part III in Parkinson’s disease. Mov Disord 2003;18:176–80.

45 Pogarell O, Gasser T, van Hilten JJ, et al. Pramipexole in patients with

Parkinson’s disease and marked drug resistant tremor: a randomised, double

blind, placebo controlled multicentre study. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry

2002;72:713–20.

46 Schrag A, Keens J, Warner J. Ropinirole for the treatment of tremor in early

Parkinson’s disease. Eur J Neurol 2002;9:253–7.

47 Korczyn AD, Brunt ER, Larsen JP, et al. A 3-year randomized trial of ropinirole

and bromocriptine in early Parkinson’s disease. The 053 Study Group.

Neurology 1999;53:364–70.

48 van Laar T, Lledo A, Quail D, et al. An analysis of the improvement in activities

of daily living (ADL) and motor score associated with pergolide monotherapy

in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease. Eur J Neurol 1999;6:133.

49 Pizzuti GP, Byford GH, Cifaldi S, et al. Finger tremor and the central nervous

system. J Biomed Eng 1992;14:356–9.

50 Deuschl G, Raethjen J, Lindemann M, et al. The pathophysiology of tremor.

Muscle Nerve 2001;24:716–35.

51 Koller W, Cone S, Herbster G. Caffeine and tremor. Neurology

1987;37:169–72.

52 Comby B, Chevalier G, Bouchoucha M. A new method for the measurement of

tremor at rest. Arch Int Physiol Biochim Biophys 1992;100:73–8.

53 Karas BJ, Wilder BJ, Hammond EJ, et al. Valproate tremors. Neurology

1982;32:428–32.

54 Vestergaard P. Clinically important side effects of long-term lithium treatment:

a review. Acta Psychiatr Scand Suppl 1983;305:1–36.

55 Stacy M, Jankovic J. Tardive tremor. Mov Disord 1992;7:53–7.

56 Demirkiran M, Jankovic J, Dean JM. Ecstasy intoxication: an overlap between

serotonin syndrome and neuroleptic malignant syndrome. Clin

Neuropharmacol 1996;19:157–64.

57 Finsterer J, Muellbacher W, Mamoli B. Yes/yes head tremor without

appendicular tremor after bilateral cerebellar infarction. J Neurol Sci

1996;139:242–5.

58 Thach WT, Goodkin HP, Keating JG. The cerebellum and the adaptive

coordination of movement. Annu Rev Neurosci 1992;15:403–42.

59 Sandyk R. Successful treatment of cerebellar tremor with clonazepam. Clin

Pharm 1985;4:615–18.

60 Trelles L, Trelles JO, Castro C, et al. Successful treatment of two cases of

intention tremor with clonazepam. Ann Neurol 1984;16:621.

61 Wishart HA, Roberts DW, Roth RM, et al. Chronic deep brain stimulation for

the treatment of tremor in multiple sclerosis: review and case reports. J Neurol

Neurosurg Psychiatry 2003;74:1392–7.

62 Nandi D, Aziz TZ. Deep brain stimulation in the management of neuropathic

pain and multiple sclerosis tremor. J Clin Neurophysiol 2004;21:31–9.

63 Deuschl G, Koster B, Lucking CH, et al. Diagnostic and pathophysiological

aspects of psychogenic tremors. Mov Disord 1998;13:294–302.

64 Kim YJ, Pakiam AS, Lang AE. Historical and clinical features of psychogenic

tremor: a review of 70 cases. Can J Neurol Sci 1999;26:190–5.

65 Koller W, Lang A, Vetere-Overfield B, et al. Psychogenic tremors. Neurology

1989;39:1094–9.

66 Uddin MK, Rodnitzky RL. Tremor in children. Semin Pediatr Neurol

2003;10:26–34.

67 Onofrj M, Thomas A, Paci C, et al. Gabapentin in orthostatic tremor: results of

a double-blind crossover with placebo in four patients. Neurology

1998;51:880–2.

68 Samie MR, Selhorst JB, Koller WC. Post-traumatic midbrain tremors.

Neurology 1990;40:62–6.

69 Deuschl G, Toro C, Valls-Sole J, et al. Symptomatic and essential palatal

tremor. 1. Clinical, physiological and MRI analysis. Brain 1994;117:775–88.

70 Deuschl G, Toro C, Hallett M. Symptomatic and essential palatal tremor. 2.

Differences of palatal movements. Mov Disord 1994;9:676–8.

71 Cho JW, Chu K, Jeon BS. Case of essential palatal tremor: atypical features

and remarkable benefit from botulinum toxin injection. Mov Disord

2001;16:779–82.

72 Bhidayasiri R, Waters MF, Giza CC. Neurological differential

diagnosis: a prioritized approach. Oxford: Blackwell, 2005.

73 Manyam BV. Uncommon forms of tremor. In: Watts RL, Koller WC, eds.

Movement disorders: neurologic principles and practice. 2nd ed. New York:

McGraw-Hill, 2004:459–80.

762


Bhidayasiri

www.postgradmedj.com







Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə